Sample records for region china sector

  1. Scenario development in China's electricity sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenhof, P.A.; Fulton, W. [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography & Environmental Studies

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuing growth of China's electricity sector will affect global environmental and economic sustainability due to its impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and global resource depletion. In 2005, the generation of electricity in China resulted in the emissions of 2290 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide (approximately 53% of the nation's total) and required 779 million metric tonnes of coal (approximately 50% of China's total coal consumption). These figures are expected to increase with China's economic growth. In order to gauge the range in which fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions could grow a scenario-based conceptual model has been developed by the authors (published in this journal). The application and analysis of this shows that under a business as usual (BAU) scenario, electricity generation could contribute upwards of 56% of China's energy related greenhouse gas emissions by 2020. Meanwhile, consumption of coal will also increase, growing to nearly 60% of total national demand by 2020. However, variations in a number of key drivers could produce significant deviation from the BAU scenario. With accelerated economic output, even with greater technological advances and greater potential to bring natural gas on stream, carbon dioxide emissions would rise 10% above the BAU. Alternatively, in a scenario where China's economy grows at a tempered pace, less investment would be available for advanced technologies, developing natural gas infrastructure, or nuclear energy. In this scenario, reduced economic growth and electricity demand would thereby be countered by reduced efficiency and a higher contribution of coal.

  2. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns of energy consumption, trends in saturation andand how the energy consumption trend could be changed in athe sectoral energy consumption trends in China in detail,

  3. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  4. Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

  5. The domestic travel sector in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Jeff, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is already the largest domestic tourism market in the world. Chinese citizens made as many as 800 million overnight domestic trips in 2005. While travel is not a new concept in China, the disposable income they wield, ...

  6. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policies; this will generate significantly benefits given the fast- growing urbanization process and the number of buildings that will be constructed in the next 20 years in Chinese cities. ENERGY USE HISTORY AND OUTLOOK IN CHINA China...://www.energy.gov/ EIA. International Energy Outlook.2006. DOE, Washington. 2006. ERI. 2003. China’s Sustainable Energy Future. European Commission Directorate General for Energy and Transport. 2001. Information and Communication. Fisher-Vanden et al...

  7. Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China Claire Gavard, Niven Winchester and Sergey established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy analysis need to be related to the economic, technological, and political forces that drive emissions

  8. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  9. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclear Historical Primary Energy Consumption by sector Energy Use by Sector (EJ Services Transportation Agriculture

  10. autonomous region china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetism of the Neogene Kuitun He section (northwest China of Geology and Mineral Resources of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Urumqi, China g Department East Beijing Road,...

  11. Regional Power Sector Integration: Lessons from Global Case Studies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integration: Lessons from Global Case Studies and a Literature Review Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Regional Power Sector Integration: Lessons from...

  12. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11 Calibration of the Energy Consumption Data forSectoral energy consumption data are available in publishedof the sectoral energy consumption data in the statistics

  13. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77 million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

  14. Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China Sylvie Démurger, Jeffrey D. Sachs and Regional Development in China Sylvie Démurger Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Centre d Woo Economics Department University of California, Davis wtwoo@ucdavis.edu Shuming Bao China Data

  15. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fall in China's coal use and energy intensity after 1995 wasLPG is a major energy source, while coal and electricity arewas the dominance of coal in the energy structure. From 51%

  16. Regional Income Inequality in Post-1978 China: A Kaldorian Spatial Econometric Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Yongbok

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003), “Analyzing Regional Inequality in Post-Mao China in a1996), “Regional Income Inequality and Economic Growth inpermission Regional Income Inequality in Post-1978 China : A

  17. Radiative forcing due to major aerosol emitting sectors in China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emissions in key sectors of China and India using the GISS-E2 chemistry-climate model. Diesel trucks aerosol sources is essential for making effective emission control decisions to mitigate climate change, annual average forcings due mainly to the direct and indirect effects of BC. Emissions from these two

  18. A Sectoral Prospective Analysis of CO2 Emissions in China, USA and France, 2010-2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A Sectoral Prospective Analysis of CO2 Emissions in China, USA and France, 2010-2050 Pascal da mitigation targets for CO2 emissions, which reflect their own specific situations. In this article, scenarios for CO2 emissions up to 2050 are set up for three representative countries: the United States of America

  19. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency) Scenario: Ref Region: All Regions Boiler GasEfficiencies End Use Technology District Heating Boiler GasCogen Boiler Stove Heat Pump Figure 48 Example of Efficiency

  20. Scenarios of Building Energy Demand for China with a Detailed Regional Representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Zhou, Yuyu; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Building energy consumption currently accounts for 28% of China’s total energy use and is expected to continue to grow induced by floorspace expansion, income growth, and population change. Fuel sources and building services are also evolving over time as well as across regions and building types. To understand sectoral and regional difference in building energy use and how socioeconomic, physical, and technological development influence the evolution of the Chinese building sector, this study developed a building energy use model for China downscaled into four climate regions under an integrated assessment framework. Three building types (rural residential, urban residential, and commercial) were modeled specifically in each climate region. Our study finds that the Cold and Hot Summer Cold Winter regions lead in total building energy use. The impact of climate change on heating energy use is more significant than that of cooling energy use in most climate regions. Both rural and urban households will experience fuel switch from fossil fuel to cleaner fuels. Commercial buildings will experience rapid growth in electrification and energy intensity. Improved understanding of Chinese buildings with climate change highlighted in this study will help policy makers develop targeted policies and prioritize building energy efficiency measures.

  1. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ci ty Heat NG Fuel Oil Heavy oil Electri city Heat Coal CokeElectr icity H eat Coal Heavy oil NG Electr icity H eat NGRef Region: All Regions Heavy Oil Electricity Heat Variable:

  2. Reference: Delgoulet, C., Gaudart, C. & Chassaing. K (2009). Job entry and on-the-job skills acquisition in the construction sector, Proceedings of The XVIIth Trienal congress of IEA, Beijing (China), the 9-14th of August.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acquisition in the construction sector, Proceedings of The XVIIth Trienal congress of IEA, Beijing (China

  3. Informal electronic waste recycling: A sector review with special focus on China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi Xinwen, E-mail: x.chi@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Streicher-Porte, Martin [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Technology and Society Laboratory, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Wang, Mark Y.L. [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Reuter, Markus A. [Outotec Pty Ltd., Melbourne, 12 Kitchen Road, Dandenong, VIC 3175 (Australia)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Informal recycling is a new and expanding low cost recycling practice in managing Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE or e-waste). It occurs in many developing countries, including China, where current gaps in environmental management, high demand for second-hand electronic appliances and the norm of selling e-waste to individual collectors encourage the growth of a strong informal recycling sector. This paper gathers information on informal e-waste management, takes a look at its particular manifestations in China and identifies some of the main difficulties of the current Chinese approach. Informal e-waste recycling is not only associated with serious environmental and health impacts, but also the supply deficiency of formal recyclers and the safety problems of remanufactured electronic products. Experiences already show that simply prohibiting or competing with the informal collectors and informal recyclers is not an effective solution. New formal e-waste recycling systems should take existing informal sectors into account, and more policies need to be made to improve recycling rates, working conditions and the efficiency of involved informal players. A key issue for China's e-waste management is how to set up incentives for informal recyclers so as to reduce improper recycling activities and to divert more e-waste flow into the formal recycling sector.

  4. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    report on China’s Electricity Sector Statistics (2007).Overview on China’s Electricity Sector Development in 2010.report on China’s Electricity Sector Statistics (2011).

  5. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DER Technologies Cost Data in China (USD) Technologies Fixedin Northern China make the CHP system not cost-effective.for China -- a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs

  6. China Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric SurveyChelanVermont:ChicotConsultants Place:China Export

  7. Energy use and conservation in China`s residential and commercial sectors: Patterns, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the determinants of residential and commercial energy demand, profiles the patterns and problems of energy consumption, and evaluates popular energy conservation measures of the People`s Republic of China. It also discusses technological and institutional opportunities for realizing greater energy conservation. General characteristics related to energy use include: population growth, economic growth, residential and commercial energy, and improved standards of living. Specific end-use areas that are examined in detail are space heating, cooking and water heating, and lighting and appliances.

  8. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and costs in China's electricity sector,” Energy Policy 38 (62 5.1 Electricity SectorSector Analysis 5.1 Electricity Sector Introduction China’s

  9. Costa Rica-Regional Programme for LAC: Preparation of Sectoral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of regional and global partners." Program Focus The program will focus on reducing poverty and inequality, strengthening democratic governance, increasing disaster preparedness...

  10. Analyzing the Regional Impact of a Fossil Energy Cap in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    economic growth is crucial to China's sustainable development. In addition to energy and carbon intensityAnalyzing the Regional Impact of a Fossil Energy Cap in China Da Zhang, Valerie Karplus, Sebastian Rausch and Xiliang Zhang Report No. 237 January 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT #12

  11. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy demand. The energy consumption mix i n China'sstructure and product mix in energy-intensive industries;Table 4). The sector's mix of energy sources that year was

  12. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance and cost parameters in China are similar tofor China - a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs andNorthern China uses district heating systems, as the cost of

  13. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reform in China’s electricity sector. Pacific Affairs 77,Statistics for the Electricity Sector [????? 2009 ??????????of reform in China’s electricity sector. Pacific Affairs 77,

  14. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to transform China’s electricity sector Ryan Landon Swansonto transform China’s electricity sector Ryan Landon SwansonAgency (IEA), China‘s electricity sector in 2007 accounted

  15. 10. China's Emergence, Real Exchange Rates, and Implications for East Asian Regional Trade and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    10. China's Emergence, Real Exchange Rates, and Implications for East Asian Regional Trade with China's opening has also drawn new attention to East and Southeast Asian trade blocs. Many of the more for multilateral trade relations, calling into question the central tenets of regionalism. For these reasons, East

  16. Significant reduction of surface solar irradiance induced by aerosols in a suburban region in northeastern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Significant reduction of surface solar irradiance induced by aerosols in a suburban region in northeastern China Xiangao Xia,1 Hongbin Chen,1 Zhanqing Li,1,2 Pucai Wang,1 and Jiankai Wang1 Received 25 May region in northeastern China. Aerosol properties derived from Sun photometer measurements and aerosol

  17. Sectoral approaches to improve regional carbon budgets Pete Smith & Gert-Jan Nabuurs & Ivan A. Janssens &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Sectoral approaches to improve regional carbon budgets Pete Smith & Gert-Jan Nabuurs & Ivan A Science + Business Media B.V. 2007 Abstract Humans utilise about 40% of the earth's net primary production. Smith (*) School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, UK e-mail: pete.smith

  18. WHAT TO EXPECT FROM SECTORAL TRADING: A US-CHINA EXAMPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and increases electricity generation. Keywords: Climate; sectoral agreements; emissions trading; carbon leakage an Emissions Trading Scheme, international negotiations aim to foster wider agreements, particularly

  19. Quantifying regional economic impacts of intensity targets in China*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with kind permission from Elsevier B.V. Reprint 2013-24 TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project #12 of Technology, Cambridge, U.S. c Center for Economic Research at ETH (CER-ETH), Department of Management China's 30 prov- inces and includes energy system detail, and apply it to assess the impact

  20. China’s Defense Technology and Industrial Base in a Regional Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitzinger, Richard A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is aindustries, in terms of technology innovation these regionalregion, in terms of technology innovation, continues to run

  1. A study of mobile trough genesis over the Yellow Sea - East China Sea region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Keith Nickolas

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the formation of mobile troughs over a prolific source region in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Two mobile troughs which intensified significantly after formation were...

  2. Integrated impact analysis of yellow-dust storms : a regional case study in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ai, Ning, 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust storm is a meteorological event that is caused by strong winds and proceeds from arid and semi-arid regions, transporting a thick cloud of fine sediments. In China, the sediments of dust storms mainly come from ...

  3. A study of mobile trough genesis over the Yellow Sea - East China Sea region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Keith Nickolas

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the formation of mobile troughs over a prolific source region in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Two mobile troughs which intensified significantly after formation were...

  4. What to Expect from Sectoral Trading: A U.S.–China Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavard, Claire

    In recent United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations, sectoral mechanisms were proposed as a way to encourage early action and spur investment in low carbon technologies in developing ...

  5. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  6. Analytical input-output and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yu, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I design an input-output model to investigate the energy supply chain of coal-coke-steel in China. To study the demand, supply, and energy-intensity issues for coal and coke from a macroeconomic perspective, I apply the ...

  7. Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid income change Article Type and changing demographics. We estimate income and price elasticities for these energy types using a two effects into account, we find that total energy is price-inelastic for all income groups. For individual

  8. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

  9. China's fuel gas sector: History, current status, and future prospects Chi-Jen Yang a,c,*, Yipei Zhou b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    in cylinders and can- isters in rural areas. Natural gas consumption is increasing throughout China, particularly as a cooking fuel. Expanding the production and supply of natural gas in China faces many challenges. In particular, China's controls on natural gas prices have deterred investment in exploration

  10. China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

  11. State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector goal of comprehensive carbon pricing along with various other policies (LCFS) · Into this setting drops rate" and the role of renewable energy and energy efficiency in the rate targets and in compliance

  12. Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

  13. Regional seismic discrimination in central Asia with emphasis on western China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartse, H.E.; Taylor, S.R.; Phillips, W.S.; Randall, G.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of an anticipated Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, the authors have started to evaluate regional seismic event discrimination capabilities for central Asia, emphasizing western China. The authors have measured noise and seismic phase amplitudes of over 250 earthquakes and 18 underground nuclear explosions recorded at the broadband, digital station WMQ in western China and over 100 earthquakes and 5 nuclear explosions at station AAK in Kyrgyzstan. The explosions are from the Kazakh Test Site (KTS) and Lop Nor, China. The earthquakes are mostly from northwest China. They have also evaluated a single suspected chemical explosion. Event magnitudes (m{sub b}) range between 2.5 and 6.5 and maximum event-station distance is about 1,700 km. Using these measurements the authors formed phase, spectral, cross-spectral, short-period/long-period, and long-period ratios to test many possible event discriminants. All ratios were corrected for distance effects before forming ratio-versus-magnitude discrimination plots. The authors found that all five classes of these discriminants are useful for separating earthquakes from explosions in central Asia, provided the right combinations of frequency bands and phases are selected. Results are described.

  14. China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation, Adaptation, and Espionage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvenon, James; Luce, Matthew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation,of the Chinese defense electronics sector can be attributedAdvanced defense electronics components and systems play a

  15. The Impact of Regional and Sectoral Productivity Changes on the U.S. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    Costinot, Dave Donaldson, Jonathan Eaton, Gene Grossman, Tom Holmes, Miklos Koren, Samuel Kortum, Peter...c to a sector and a location: a large corporate bankruptcy or bailout. The heterogeneity of these potential

  16. Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

  17. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s 2008 Thermal Electricity Sector CO 2 Emissions byheat. Share of thermal electricity sector’s CO 2 emissionsheat. Share of thermal electricity sector’s CO 2 emissions

  18. Muslim Women at a Crossroads: Gender and Development in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Cindy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8    Yr 2000  Yr 2008  Kyrgyzstan  Uzbekistan  Pakistan China, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan, the

  19. China’s Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In line with its aim to meet growing energy demand while shifting away from coal, China has set an ambitious goal of doubling its use of natural gas from 2011 levels by 2015. Prospects are good for significant new supplies – both domestic and imported, conventional and unconventional – to come online in the medium term, but notable challenges remain, particularly concerning gas pricing and the institutional and regulatory landscape. While China’s circumstances are, in many respects unique, some current issues are similar to those a number of IEA countries have faced. This report highlights some key challenges China faces in its transition to greater reliance on natural gas, then explores in detail relevant IEA experience, particularly in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the European Union, and the United States. Preliminary suggestions about how lessons learned in other countries could be applied to China’s situation are offered as well. The aim is to provide stakeholders in China with a useful reference as they consider decisions about the evolution of the gas sector in their country. PARTNER COUNTRY SERIES

  20. Analyzing the Regional Impact of a Fossil Energy Cap in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, D.

    Decoupling fossil energy demand from economic growth is crucial to China’s sustainable development. In addition to energy and carbon intensity targets enacted under the Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011–2015), a coal or fossil ...

  1. Understanding the Regional Variability of Eddy Diffusivity in the Pacific Sector of the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuckburgh, Emily

    A diagnostic framework is presented, based on the Nakamura effective diffusivity, to investigate the regional variation in eddy diffusivity. Comparison of three different diffusivity calculations enables the effects of ...

  2. Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's building sector--A review of energy and climate models forecast,China's building sector--A review of energy and climate models forecast,

  3. A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. Gao. 2011. China Renewable Energy Industry DevelopmentGolden CO: National Renewable Energy Resource LaboratoryDOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy. 2012. Buildings

  4. Muslim Women at a Crossroads: Gender and Development in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Cindy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in post-Soviet Kazakhstan. ” In The Transformation ofXinjiang (est. )  China  Kazakhstan  Russia  Uyghurs havekidnapping in post-Soviet Kazakhstan. In my understanding,

  5. Probe into Gaseous Pollution and Assessment of Air Quality Benefit under Sector Dependent Emission Control Strategies over Megacities in Yangtze River Delta, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xinyi; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, G.; Zhou, Ying

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 29th 2012, China published its new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (CH-NAAQS) aiming at revising the standards and measurements for both gaseous pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), and also particle pollutants including PM10 and PM2.5. In order to understand the air pollution status regarding this new standard, the integrated MM5/CMAQ modeling system was applied over Yangtze River Delta (YRD) within this study to examine the criteria gaseous pollutants listed in the new CH-NAAQS. Sensitivity simulations were also conducted to assess the responses of gaseous pollutants under 8 different sector-dependent emission reduction scenarios in order to evaluate the potential control strategies. 2006 was selected as the simulation year in order to review the air quality condition at the beginning of China’s 11th Five-Year-Plan (FYP, from 2006 to 2010), and also compared with air quality status in 2010 as the end of 11th FYP to probe into the effectiveness of the national emission control efforts. Base case simulation showed distinct seasonal variation for gaseous pollutants: SO2, and NO2 were found to have higher surface concentrations in winter while O3 was found to have higher concentrations in spring and summer than other seasons. According to the analyses focused on 3 megacities within YRD, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Hangzhou, we found different air quality conditions among the cities: NO2 was the primary pollutant that having the largest number of days exceeding the CH-NAAQS daily standard (80 ?g/m3) in Shanghai (59 days) and Nanjing (27 days); SO2 was the primary pollutant with maximum number of days exceeding daily air quality standard (150 ?g/m3) in Hangzhou (28 days), while O3 exceeding the daily maximum 8-hour standard (160 ?g/m3) for relatively fewer days in all the three cities (9 days in Shanghai, 14 days in Nanjing, and 11 days in Hangzhou). Simulation results from predefined potential applicable emission control scenarios suggested significant air quality improvements from emission reduction: 90% of SO2 emission removed from power plant in YRD would be able to reduce more than 85% of SO2 pollution, 85% NOx emission reduction from power plant would reduce more than 60% of NO2 pollution, in terms of reducing the number of days exceeding daily air quality standard. NOx emission reduction from transportation and industry were also found to effectively reduce NO2 pollution but less efficient than emission control from power plants. We also found that multi-pollutants emission control including both NOx and VOC would be a better strategy than independent NOx control over YRD which is China’s 12th Five-Year-Plan (from 2011 to 2015), because O3 pollution would be increased as a side effect of NOx control and counteract NO2 pollution reduction benefit.

  6. Final Report on Hierarchical Coupled Modeling and Prediction of Regional Climate Change in the Atlantic Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A& M University

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: a) Carried out studies of climate changes in the past using a hierarchy of intermediate coupled models (Chang et al., 2008; Wan et al 2009; Wen et al., 2010a,b) b) Completed the development of a Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM; Patricola et al., 2011a,b) c) Carried out studies testing hypotheses testing the origin of systematic errors in the CRCM (Patricola et al., 2011a,b) d) Carried out studies of the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, in the context of barrier layer interactions (Balaguru et al)

  7. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Sector in Russia: Regional Aspects " In Economics EducationElectricity Sector in Russia: Regional Aspects " in Economics Education

  8. China Energy Primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on extensive analysis of the 'China Energy Databook Version 7' (October 2008) this Primer for China's Energy Industry draws a broad picture of China's energy industry with the two goals of helping users read and interpret the data presented in the 'China Energy Databook' and understand the historical evolution of China's energy inustry. Primer provides comprehensive historical reviews of China's energy industry including its supply and demand, exports and imports, investments, environment, and most importantly, its complicated pricing system, a key element in the analysis of China's energy sector.

  9. Incorporating global warming risks in power sector planning: A case study of the New England region. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, F.; Busch, J.; Koomey, J.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing international concern over the threat of global climate change has led to proposals to buy insurance against this threat by reducing emissions of carbon (short for carbon dioxide) and other greenhouse gases below current levels. Concern over these and other, non-climatic environmental effects of electricity generation has led a number of states to adopt or explore new mechanisms for incorporating environmental externalities in utility resource planning. For example, the New York and Massachusetts utility commissions have adopted monetized surcharges (or adders) to induce emission reductions of federally regulated air pollutants (notably, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates) beyond federally mandated levels. These regulations also include preliminary estimates of the cost of reducing carbon emissions, for which no federal regulations exist at this time. Within New England, regulators and utilities have also held several workshops and meetings to discuss alternative methods of incorporating externalities as well as the feasibility of regional approaches. This study examines the potential for reduced carbon emissions in the New England power sector as well as the cost and rate impacts of two policy approaches: environmental externality surcharges and a target- based approach. We analyze the following questions: Does New England have sufficient low-carbon resources to achieve significant reductions (10% to 20% below current levels) in fossil carbon emissions in its utility sector? What reductions could be achieved at a maximum? What is the expected cost of carbon reductions as a function of the reduction goal? How would carbon reduction strategies affect electricity rates? How effective are environmental externality cost surcharges as an instrument in bringing about carbon reductions? To what extent could the minimization of total electricity costs alone result in carbon reductions relative to conventional resource plans?

  10. China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heater Residential CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) 2020 ResidentialEnergy Industrial Sector CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) IndustrialFigure 5. Power Sector CO2 Emissions by Scenario E3 Max Tech

  11. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GOV) and energy consumption grew at annual rates of 12% and 5.6% respectively, and the average energy intensity of China's

  12. The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bai [ORNL; Liu, Yu [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China; Sun, Jiaren [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Guangzhou, China

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

  13. Engaging Regions in Globalization: The Rise of the Economic Relationship between the San Francisco Bay Area and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volberding, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar companies, Isoftstone, a Chinese IT company, and Chinawith China. “Mayor Newsom Welcomes Leading Solar Firm,China. ” Robson, “Suntech America. ” Riddell, “Trina Solar

  14. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    because Northern China uses district heating system.of current coal-fired district heating is relatively cheapprice of coal- fired district heating in Northern China make

  15. Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

  16. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and rural sectors. Second, since electricity access is basically universal in China, electrification

  17. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Ministry of Metallurgy. (6) Coal gas recovery fromby the Ministry of Metallurgy. China's most energy-efficientNo. 1,1991. Ministry of Metallurgy (MOM), Zhongguo Gangti

  18. Impacts of emission reduction policies in a multi-regional multi-sectoral small open economy with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    to an increasingly constraining environmental policy driving up the ratio price of permits to price of energy is higher. Given an environmental policy that increases the price of energy (through an energy tax policy in the energy intensive sector. We show that such a property does not necessarily hold

  19. Regional Income Inequality in Post-1978 China: A Kaldorian Spatial Econometric Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Yongbok

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Panel Data Approach”, Econometric Reviews, 22, pp.59-77Matter? A Spatial Econometric View of Kaldor’s Laws,”convergence: A spatial econometric perspective”, Regional

  20. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  1. Sources and Pathways of Nutrients in the Semi-Arid Region of Beijing-Tianjin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    to eutrophication, which causes immense ecological and economic problems. One region that is in transition eutrophication and even more rapidly than was previously observed in Europe. INTRODUCTION Eutrophication. In the western world, research on the mitigation of eutrophication conducted from the 1970 to the 1990s

  2. Marine air intrusion into the Adelie Land sector of East Antarctica: A study using the regional climate model (MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallée, Hubert

    , and often, precipitation in the coastal regions. Extratropical cyclones also advect cloud cover ahead of them as they track eastward. The presence of clouds greatly effects the reflected radiation of the atmosphere. In summer their main impact is to decrease the short wave radiation coming to Earth, while

  3. Wei, J., Zhao, J., and Chen, Q. 2010, "Optimal design for a dual-airflow window for different climate regions in China," Energy and Buildings, 16(6), 785-798.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    climate regions in China," Energy and Buildings, 16(6), 785-798. Optimal design for a dual-airflow window The dual-airflow window could be used to conserve energy and improve indoor air quality in buildings method 1 Introduction In China, energy demand for buildings accounts for nearly 27.5% of the total

  4. SCOPE CHINA SCOPE CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    SCOPE CHINA SCOPE CHINA 92030006 86-351-7010700 86-351-7010700 E-mail: scope #12;SCOPE-ZHONGYU ENvirONmENtal FOrUm 2012 October 11-14, 2012 Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, China Chair of Environmental Development Dr. Shu Sun, Academician, President of SCOPE CAST China Former Vice President

  5. A Multi-Model Analysis of the Regional and Sectoral Roles of Bioenergy in Near- and Long-Term CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; McCollum, David; Tavoni, Massimo; van der Zwaan, Bob; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the near term and the longer term the contribution of bioenergy in different LIMITS scenarios as modeled by the participating models in the LIMITS project. With These scenarios have proven useful for exploring a range of outcomes for bioenergy use in response to both regionally diverse near term policies and the transition to a longer-term global mitigation policy and target. The use of several models has provided a source of heterogeneity in terms of incorporating uncertain assumptions about future socioeconomics and technology, as well as different paradigms for how the world may respond to policies. The results have also highlighted the heterogeneity and versatility of bioenergy itself, with different types of resources and applications in several energy sectors. In large part due to this versatility, the contribution of bioenergy to climate mitigation is a robust response across all models, despite their differences.

  6. Industrial sector energy conservation programs in the People`s Republic of China during the seventh five-year plan (1986--1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Zhiping [State Planning Commission, Beijing (China). Energy Research Inst.; Sinton, J.E.; Yang Fuqiang; Levine, M.D.; Ting, M.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impetus at the national level to invest in energy conservation is quite strong and has long been reflected not only in official pronouncements, but also in the investments and organizational activities of the Chinese government. In the early 1980s the central government began a program of direct investments in industrial energy conservation that continues to the present. In addition, concurrently established governmental and quasi-governmental agencies have pursued conservation through administrative and educational measures. In Section 2 of this paper the authors outline the policies and institutions that supported China`s program of energy conservation investments in the Sixth and Seventh Five-Year Plans (FYPs) (1981--1985 and 1986--1990). In Section 3 they describe examples of the types of conservation projects pursued in four industrial subsectors: ferrous metals manufacturing; non-ferrous metals mining and manufacturing; chemicals manufacturing; and building materials manufacturing. Section 4 presents a simple methodology for comparing the costs of energy conservation to those of energy supply. Further discussion points out the applicability and limitations of this methodology to State Planning Commission published statistical material on the overall results of energy conservation investments. Though problematic, such analysis indicates that energy conservation investments were probably substantially cheaper than investments in equivalent energy supply would have been. They end with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered in carrying out the conservation investment programs.

  7. Inter-provincial Permanent and Temporary Migration in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mingjie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the role of migration in China's regional development and9: 485-502. Zhu, Yu. 2007. "China's floating population andThe settlement intention of China’s floating population in

  8. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  9. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions are allocated to that sector accordingly. Biogas.The majority of biogas consumed in China is from rural

  10. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    update for 2004. Energy input tables for China are compiled every year for major energy consuming sectors

  11. Engaging Regions in Globalization: The Rise of the Economic Relationship between the San Francisco Bay Area and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volberding, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Firm, Yingli Green Energy Americas to San Francisco. ”and Cleantech. US-China Green Energy Council Seminar. Palo85 In July 2009, Yingli Green Energy Americas announced its

  12. EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry in Gabon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry: .....................................................................................................................................................2 Part I: The EU, China and the external environmental dimension....................................................................3 1.1 China as a competitor normative power in the environmental sector

  13. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption:10. China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy: Sectoral16 Table 11. China's 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy:

  14. The mixed economy in China: through rhetorical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Yuchun

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed economies gradually emerge in many countries. China is no exception. China's traditional planned economy system is limited to state-owned enterprises, which are undergoing reform. In the private sector, the market system has begun to play a...

  15. Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Price, Lynn; Lu, Hongyou

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    China has set an ambitious goal of reducing its energy use per unit of GDP by 20% between 2006 and 2010. Since the industrial sector consumes about two-thirds of China's primary energy, many of the country's efforts are focused on improving the energy efficiency of this sector. Industrial energy audits have become an important part of China's efforts to improve its energy intensity. In China, industrial energy audits have been employed to help enterprises indentify energy-efficiency improvement opportunities for achieving the energy-saving targets. These audits also serve as a mean to collect critical energy-consuming information necessary for governments at different levels to supervise enterprises energy use and evaluate their energy performance. To better understand how energy audits are carried out in China as well as their impacts on achieving China's energy-saving target, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducted an in-depth study that combines a review of China's national policies and guidelines on energy auditing and a series of discussions with a variety of Chinese institutions involved in energy audits. This report consists of four parts. First, it provides a historical overview of energy auditing in China over the past decades, describing how and why energy audits have been conducted during various periods. Next, the report reviews current energy auditing practices at both the national and regional levels. It then discusses some of the key issues related to energy audits conducted in China, which underscore the need for improvement. The report concludes with policy recommendations for China that draw upon international best practices and aim to remove barriers to maximizing the potential of energy audits.

  16. Effect of mesoscale topography over the Tibetan Plateau on summer precipitation in China: A regional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Effect of mesoscale topography over the Tibetan Plateau on summer precipitation in China 2008; accepted 27 August 2008; published 8 October 2008. [1] The effect of mesoscale topography over and topography. In the sensitivity simulation, the mesoscale feature in topography over the TP was smoothed out

  17. Coal in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minchener, A.J. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article gives an overview of the production and use of coal in China, for power generation and in other sectors. Coal use for power generation was 850 million tonnes in 2003 and 800 million tonnes in the non-power sector. The majority of power will continue to be produced from coal, with a trend towards new larger pulverised coal fired units and introduction of circulating fluidised bed combustors. Stricter regulations are forcing introduction of improved pollution control technologies. It seems likely that China will need international finance to supplement private and state investment to carry out a programme to develop and apply clean coal technologies. The author concludes that there is evidence of a market economy being established but there is a need to resolve inconsistencies with the planned aspects of the economy and that additional policies are needed in certain sectors to achieve sustainable development. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

  19. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Fridley, D.G.; Levine, M.D. [eds.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response to the first edition of the China Energy Databook was overwhelmingly positive, and has encouraged us to issue this revised, updated, and expanded edition. It has been a natural counterpart to the Energy Analysis Program`s continuing program of collaborative research with the Energy Research Institute. No other current reference volume dedicated to China`s energy system contains a similar variety and quality of material. We have revised some of the categories and data that appeared in the old volume. The adjustment for energy consumption in the transportation sector, for instance, has been slightly changed to include some fuel use in the commercial sector, which was previously left out. As another example, natural gas consumption statistics in the first edition greatly overstated electric utility use; we have rectified that error. Some tables have changed as statistical collection and reporting practices change in China. Figures on gross output value by sector stop with 1992, and economic output in subsequent years is covered by various measures of value-added, such as national income and gross domestic product.

  20. Accessing Future Flashpoints in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KAPLAN, Brad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. MacDonald, “U.S. -China Relations: Policy Is- sues,”Bilateral consultations with China which stress both U.S.other regional actors, including China. Increased access to

  1. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gases emission. Energy consumption in buildings could be reduced by 100-300 million tons of oil equivalent (mtoe) in 2030 compared to the business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, which means that 600-700 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions...

  2. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cold climate zone) buildings use least energy compared to other cold regions, mainly because of its high altitude and ample solar

  3. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  4. "Market Watch 2010" The Timber Sector in Malaysia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sectors are palm oil & palm oil-based products, crude petroleum, liquefied natural gas and timber Major export countries for Malaysian goods are Singapore, Japan, China, India, Korea as well, the Republic of Singapore, the European Union, the People's Republic of China and Japan. Malaysian FDI reached

  5. Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the People’s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

  6. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Korea Other Crude Oil Production by Region (1985-2010)North West Chinese Crude Oil Production by Regional SharesHenan Other Total Crude Oil Production: 209 Mt China's Crude

  7. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Korea Other Crude Oil Production by Region (1985-2010)West Chinese Crude Oil Production by Regional Shares EastHenan Other Total Crude Oil Production: 209 Mt China's Crude

  8. Natural Gas and China’s Environment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greater utilization of natural gas could dramatically improve environmental conditions in China. Results show that China could cut particulate, sulfur dioxide, and carbon emissions by 1, 3, and 70 million tons, respectively, each year if it boosts gas utilization to 10 percent of total energy demand by 2020. But the government first needs to establish a broad new array of market reforms to make this happen. Developing the natural gas sector makes sense economically, independent of carbon control efforts, but an international agreement to credit reductions in carbon emissions could stimulate significant new foreign investment for gas projects in China.

  9. Engaging Regions in Globalization: The Rise of the Economic Relationship between the San Francisco Bay Area and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volberding, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vitality. Globalization and the Region The world economy,Bay Area economy has achieved a high level of globalizationglobalization, notes that the expansion and specialization of the global economy

  10. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi [eds.] [Energy Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China`s State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industrics morc energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of cncrgy supply and demand in the People`s Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Preparing this volume confronted us with a number of difficult issues. The most frustrating usually involved the different approaches to sectoral divisions taken in China and the US. For instance, fuel used by motor vehicles belonging to industrial enterprises is counted as industrial consumption in China; only fuel use by vehicles belonging to enterprises engaged primarily in transportation is countcd as transportation use. The estimated adjustment to count all fuel use by vehicles as transportation energy use is quite large, since a large fraction of motor vehicles belong to industrial enterprises. Similarly, Chinese industrial investment figures are skewed compared to those collected in the US because a large portion of enterprises` investment funds is directed towards providing housing and social services for workers and their families.

  11. A portfolio approach to energy governance : state management of China's coal and electric power supply industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Edward A., IV (Edward Albert)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses the extent to which China's central state devolved ownership and investment levels in its energy sector to other actors during the modern reform period (1978- 2008). The project focused on China's coal ...

  12. Preliminary -November 30, 2010 INNOVATE SYMPOSIUM: Globalization and Technology in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Preliminary - November 30, 2010 INNOVATE SYMPOSIUM: Globalization and Technology in China examination of economic and technological development and innovation between China and their own home study of factors affecting their respective technology sectors. The INNOVATE itinerary

  13. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi (eds.) (Energy Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China's State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industrics morc energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of cncrgy supply and demand in the People's Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Preparing this volume confronted us with a number of difficult issues. The most frustrating usually involved the different approaches to sectoral divisions taken in China and the US. For instance, fuel used by motor vehicles belonging to industrial enterprises is counted as industrial consumption in China; only fuel use by vehicles belonging to enterprises engaged primarily in transportation is countcd as transportation use. The estimated adjustment to count all fuel use by vehicles as transportation energy use is quite large, since a large fraction of motor vehicles belong to industrial enterprises. Similarly, Chinese industrial investment figures are skewed compared to those collected in the US because a large portion of enterprises' investment funds is directed towards providing housing and social services for workers and their families.

  14. Household operational energy consumption in urban China : a multilevel analysis on Jinan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dong, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With decades of economic growth and socio-economic transformation, China's residential sector has seen rapid expansion in energy consumption, and is now the second largest energy consuming sector in the country. Faced with ...

  15. 8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector, Rennes, France, 2-4 October 2012 Life Cycle Assessment at the regional scale: innovative insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in groundwater irrigated areas worldwide are manifold and the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is very relevant and decision making is carried out, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be applied at regional scale, which Life Cycle Assessment at the regional scale: innovative insights based on the Systems Approach used

  16. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Technology Shares and Efficiencies, 2005- Figure 54 China CIS Total and Power Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions,coal capacity 100-200 MW power sector carbon dioxide emissionsemissions. Table 41 Comparison of CCS Assumptions in Different Studies % of Coal Power

  17. Investigation of contemporary problems and practices in post-hurricane reconstruction in the commercial sector of the southeast region of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharjee, Suchayita S.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis addresses the problems faced by contractors during the recovery and rebuilding process after hurricanes that struck the southeast region of the United States in 2004-2005 hurricane seasons. It also deals with the practices they normally...

  18. In China's Mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barros de Castro, Antônio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of California, Berkeley In China’s Mirror * Antônio Barrosthe article “No Espelho da China,” which originally appearedThomas, “Produtos Baratos da China Facilitam a Vida de

  19. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

  20. Nationalities of China Province of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang

    Outline Nationalities of China Province of China Language of China #12;Nationalities of China 56 of China A province is an administrative division of China. 33 province level divisions. 22 Provinces 4-level cities in China direct- controlled by the central government Beijing Tianjin Shanghai Chongqing #12

  1. The Organization and Dynamics of Clustering and Innovation in the ocean technology sector in Newfoundland and Labrador and the St. John's city-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    outwardly organized, that is, toward other firms/organizations outside the region in terms of buyer/supplier') is occurring within the cluster. · Memorial University (MUN) plays a substantial role in buyer/supplier networks and within collaboration networks within the cluster. · The network of buyer/supplier

  2. Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis Policies deployment programs Climate Energy Land Agriculture Biomass Buildings Economic Development Energy Efficiency Forestry Geothermal Greenhouse Gas Hydrogen...

  3. Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation toPowerPrincetonProgram Organization Country

  4. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008) 5 Figure 1-6 China’s SolarFigure 1-6). Figure 1-6 China’s Solar Resources 3,200hs andin rural areas. China has abundant solar resources that can

  5. Contemporary China Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einmahl, Uwe

    Contemporary China Studies Postgraduate #12;Programme: Contemporary China Studies Postgraduate1 Chinese - Level 2 5 2 · Basic vocabulary & grammar Dealing with China: 3 1 Intercultural management · China's political constellation and its impact on business life · Human resources issues for China

  6. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and India’s iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

  7. Sector 30 - useful links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Useful Links Sector 30 Printing from your laptop at the beamline Data retrival onsite from ftp:ftp.xray.aps.anl.govpubsector30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header...

  8. Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more efficient buildings/low energy buildings such as LEED-low carbon indicator value by indexing and weighting end-use indicators Residential includes buildings energylow carbon indicator for China’s commercial buildings sector is defined as commercial buildings final energy/

  9. Illegal Logging and Illegal Activites in the Forestry Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illegal Logging and Illegal Activites in the Forestry Sector : Overview and Possible Issues, China #12;Quebec Wood Export Bureau Why Illegal logging and illegal activities ? ­ Threats for our export members companies ? · Unfair competition ? · New trade barriers ? Literature review ­ Data

  10. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

  11. China's Dream Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILLER, Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCC PROJECTleaders/21577070-vision-chinas- new-president-should-serve-In Case You Missed It: China Dream. ” The China Beat, April

  12. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

  13. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Energy Agency (IEA), China’s Worldwide QuestSecurity, (Paris: OCED/IEA, 2000), 74. Thomas Woodrow, “TheInternational Energy Agency (IEA), China’s Worldwide Quest

  14. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-1). In addition to attaining oil resources, China’s energyWith limited domestic oil resources, China’s major oilgrowth, limited crude oil resources and the late development

  15. China's Dream Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILLER, Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in China Study of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCCOffice. SITC Study of Innovation and Technology in ChinaStudy of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCC PROJECT

  16. China Business Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einmahl, Uwe

    China Business Development Postgraduate Programme #12;Programme: China Business Development with China: Intercultural Management 3 1 Daily life and business behaviour explained from a cultural perspective Chinese strategic thinking China's political constellation and its impact on business life Human

  17. Outsourcing CO2 within China.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sectors, and 1 electricity sector. The regressions forsectors 6–21), and 1 electricity sector (sector 22). For gas

  18. Outsourcing CO2 within China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sectors, and 1 electricity sector. The regressions forsectors 6–21), and 1 electricity sector (sector 22). For gas

  19. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    refer to IEA (2007), World Energy Outlook 2007: China andIEA (2007), World Energy Outlook 2007: China and India

  20. China's Civil-Military Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAFFERTY, Brian; SHRABERG, Aaron; CLEMENS, Morgan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s civil-military integration, and China’s high tech2013 China’s Civil-Military Integration Brian LAFFERTY Aarons pursuit of civil-military integration (CMI) intensified in

  1. Hythane project by Hydrogen China Ltd and China Railway Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Hydrogen China Ltd and China Railway Construction Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hythane project by Hydrogen China Ltd and China Railway Construction Corporation...

  2. China's emergence in East Asia under alternative trading arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    China's emergence in East Asia under alternative trading arrangements Hiro Leea,* , David Roland China's accelerated global emergence has changed trade patterns in the Asia-Pacific region and exerted to China, Japan, and the United States using a dynamic global computable general equilibrium (CGE) model

  3. area northeast china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potassic basalts are characterized by significant 230 Th Zou, Haibo 3 Market power and electricity market reform in Northeast China MIT - DSpace Summary: The Northeast region of...

  4. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to raise pumped storage hydropower capacity. ? Industrialto raise pumped storage hydropower capacity,? Industrialin regions of China without hydropower resources, coal-fired

  5. New Roads to Capitalism: China and Global Value Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dallas, Mark Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China (largely Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, Gansu and Qinghaiprices in Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and Qinghai provinces (pastoral regions of Inner Mongolia, upwards of 80-90% of the

  6. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s inconsistent electricity sector development policies.Figure 3-14). The electricity sector, as categorized as anof this increase came from electricity sector emissions. The

  7. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its remaining potential as a renewable energy source and itsrenewable energy source and with abundant solar resources in China, particularly in the western regions, solar power generation has very high growth potential

  8. Will Economic Restructuring in China Reduce Trade-Embodied CO2 Emissions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Tianyu

    We calculate CO2 emissions embodied in China’s net exports using a multi-regional input-output database. We find that the majority of China’s export-embodied CO2 is associated with production of machinery and equipment ...

  9. The Informal Sector and Economic Development in Latin America: A Brief Study of the Chilean Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jordan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A major hindrance to the achievement of steady economic growth is widespread informal employment, also known as the informal sector. The informal sector is a complex phenomenon which is pervasive in developing regions of the world such as sub...

  10. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (NDRC), China, http://zhangguobao.ndrc.gov.cn/of Land and Resources, China, January 19, 2009, http://NewsShow.asp? NewsID=10650. 6 China Energy Group (October

  11. Japan's China Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAKAHASHI, Sugio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11, JANUARY 2012 Japan’s China Strategy Sugio TAKAHASHIAsia with the ascendancy of China as a world economic power.War policy of “shaping” China into a model country while “

  12. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China made an Iranian oil investment valued at $70 billion.across Iran, China’s oil investment may exceed $100 billionthese involving investment in oil and gas, really undermine

  13. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    unfettered access to oil resources including the possibleChina’s search for oil resources around the world. However,a survey of China’s oil resources, while others focus

  14. Regulatory and technical barriers to wind energy integration in northeast China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Michael (Michael Roy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China leads the world in installed wind capacity, which forms an integral part of its long-term goals to reduce the environmental impacts of the electricity sector. This primarily centrally-managed wind policy has concentrated ...

  15. FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    government gives priority to the development of China's shale gas sector to help fight air pollution and reduce reliance on natural gas imports; and The U.S. government supports...

  16. Implications of the market and regulatory environment in China on multinational water companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Wen Zheng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amidst China's rapid industrialization and urbanization following market-oriented reforms in its economy, the shortcomings of the state-controlled municipal water sector was brought to the fore. The Chinese government ...

  17. China's Political Uses of Seapower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YOSHIHARA, Toshi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BRIEF 2013-6, APRIL 2013 China’s Political Uses of Seapowerassertiveness in the South China Seas is a harbinger ofdividends that advance China’s larger aims at sea. The Study

  18. China's Civil-Military Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAFFERTY, Brian; SHRABERG, Aaron; CLEMENS, Morgan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial development plans, China hopes that civilianin primary source research on China’s defense-related S&Tresearch interests in- clude China’s defense-related S&T

  19. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief 2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry Aftera significant impact on the future of China’s nuclear power.the importance of safety as China builds more nuclear power

  20. Trip to China

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to China By row boat or by plane... 16 hours later Linda Field Patent Counsel Department of Energy Destination: Wuhan, China Purpose: Innovation Promotion in CERC - IP Clarity &...

  1. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Energy Administration .30same time, the National Energy Administration has agreed toRegulation China’s energy administration has operated in a

  2. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Will Start Its State Oil Reserve, JOGMEC, February 4, 2005.s Proved Oil Reserves (2008) . 215 Table 2-3 China’s Current Strategic Oil Reserve

  3. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Regulation ..power reactor (AP-1000) 2. Energy Regulation China’s energys Renewable Energy Law and Regulations, Center for Renewable

  4. Challenges and opportunities in the Tunisian private equity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gharbi, Moez, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the studies and research analyzing the private equity ("PE") sector in the Middle East North Africa ("MENA") region tend to focus more on the Middle East and less on North Africa. The case of Tunisia is probably ...

  5. U.S.-China Trade Relations, 1983: Six Essays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bays, Daniel H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and political areas of China.18 In addition, foreign engineering, technology and equip ment will be major components in the development of other high priority sectors like hydropower, coal, port and railway construc tion and light industry.19 A final... are the machinery industry and consumer goods. In April 1982 a People's Daily editorial singled out the automotive vehicle industry as well as seamless steel pipe, mining equipment and other sectors as suffering from the effects of "blind imports."25 Shanghai...

  6. Evaluation of the PV technology for rural electrification improvement : China market focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Kyoung Suk

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy use, especially electricity, in China is rapidly growing, but China faced two challenges in developing new energy supply: global climate changes and unbalanced economic development between urban and rural regions. ...

  7. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China; 2 Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China; 3 School of Material Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute

  8. ESCO Industry in China

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the development, achievements, and functions of the China Energy Conservation project and ESCO.

  9. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Density-functional-theory formulation of classical and quantum Hooke's law. Sci China Tech Sci, 2014, 57- sider an equilibrium lattice without strain (=0), but elec- #12;Hu H, et al. Sci China Tech Sci April

  10. . RESEARCH PAPER . SCIENCE CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . RESEARCH PAPER . SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences January 2013, Vol. 56 012104:1­012104:10 doi: 10.1007/s11432-012-4616-5 c Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012 info, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; 2Beijing Aerospace Control Center, Beijing 100094, China; 3

  11. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lighting and other electric application will increase their share to 18% (Figure 13). In comparison,

  12. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of primary energy excluding biomass fuels. Figure 10 showsof primary energy without counting biomass fuels which areFinal Energy Consumption by Fuel (with Biomass) Coal

  13. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, coke, other Coal,oil and oil product, crude oil, otherCoal,oil and oil product, crude oil, other Diesel, GasolinePipelin e Crude oil, oil products, NG, other Gas electricity

  14. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12, August, pp. 1499-1507 IEA, 1997. Indicators of Energyand Human Activity , Paris, IEA/OECD. Institute of EnergyInternational Energy Agency (IEA), 2001, Energy Statistics

  15. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31% of the world’s energy consumption increase from 2003 totrends in energy consumption in the world’s largest country.s energy consumption has a growing impact on world energy

  16. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    share). Coal Oil Gas Hydropower Biomass Figure 5 ResidentialRenewables Oil Nuclear Gas Hydropower Figure 6 ResidentialCoal Oil Nuclear Gas Hydropower Figure 10 Commercial Primary

  17. Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavard, Claire

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), new market mechanisms are proposed to involve Non-Annex I countries in the carbon markets developed by Annex I countries, beyond ...

  18. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from agriculture, and analyze how these efforts would in turn impact agricultural productivity and trade. In order to realize this goal, we have the following specific...

  19. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan which has short-hauls and small trucks turns out to beFor example trucks and locomotives used to haul freight can

  20. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Walsh, M. , 2005. “Oil consumption and CO 2 emissions inadjustment. Fuel oil. Fuel oil consumption figures includeonly 26% of total oil consumption. On an adjusted basis,

  1. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump airsmall cogen stove district heating heat pump Central AC Roomrespectively, followed by district heating of 22%, while in

  2. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel Oil Natural Gas Electricity Total Transportation FuelHeavy Oil Natural Gas Electricity Heat Total Transportation

  3. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Heat Pump Central AC by NG electric water heaterwater heating Technologies Electric heater gas boiler boiler small cogen stove district heating heat pump

  4. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCity ofClarkEnergy -Project Phase

  5. Where is the North ChinaSouth China block boundary in eastern China?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Where is the North China­South China block boundary in eastern China? Michel Faure, Wei Lin of the North China and South China blocks. The eastern extension of the belt (the Sulu area) consists and the lack of ocean-basin rock shows that the boundary between the North China block and South China block

  6. Hepp and Speer Sectors within Modern Strategies of Sector Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Smirnov; V. A. Smirnov

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepp and Speer sectors were successfully used in the sixties and seventies for proving mathematical theorems on analytically or/and dimensionally regularized and renormalized Feynman integrals at Euclidean external momenta. We describe them within recently developed strategies of introducing iterative sector decompositions. We show that Speer sectors are reproduced within one of the existing strategies.

  7. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum, 1995. China's biomass, solar, wind, tidal, anda focus of China's rural power development, with solar waterPassive solar design has been incor- II-6 China Energy

  8. China's Space Robotic Arms Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SITC Study of Innovation and Technology in ChinaStudy of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCC PROJECTand-security/innovation-and-technology-in-china/sitc-

  9. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advertising Co. China Automotive Industry Corporation andQiche Gongye Nianjian (China Automotive Industry Yearbook).Board of the China Automotive Industry Yearbook. Editorial

  10. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  11. Industrial energy efficiency policy in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

  12. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry After FukushimaMarch 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had a significanton the future of China’s nuclear power. First, it highlights

  13. China’s Space Industry in 2009: A Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollpeter, Kevin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of historic challenges. As China’s leading space industryprob- lems associated with China’s economic reforms. Inhas un- Kevin POLLPETER is China program manager at Defense

  14. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; T. Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After rapid growth in economic development and energy demand over the last three decades, China has undertaken energy efficiency improvement efforts to reduce its energy intensity under the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP). Since becoming the world's largest annual CO{sub 2} emitter in 2007, China has set reduction targets for energy and carbon intensities and committed to meeting 15% of its total 2020 energy demand with non-fossil fuel. Despite having achieved important savings in 11th FYP efficiency programs, rising per capita income and the continued economic importance of trade will drive demand for transport activity and fuel use. At the same time, an increasingly 'electrified' economy will drive rapid power demand growth. Greater analysis is therefore needed to understand the underlying drivers, possible trajectories and mitigation potential in the growing industrial, transport and power sectors. This study uses scenario analysis to understand the likely trajectory of China's energy and carbon emissions to 2030 in light of the current and planned portfolio of programs, policies and technology development and ongoing urbanization and demographic trends. It evaluates the potential impacts of alternative transportation and power sector development using two key scenarios, Continued Improvement Scenario (CIS) and Accelerated Improvement Scenario (AIS). CIS represents the most likely path of growth based on continuation of current policies and meeting announced targets and goals, including meeting planned appliance efficiency standard revisions, fuel economy standards, and industrial targets and moderate phase-out of subcritical coal-fired generation with additional non-fossil generation. AIS represents a more aggressive trajectory of accelerated improvement in energy intensity and decarbonized power and transport sectors. A range of sensitivity analysis and power technology scenarios are tested to evaluate the impact of additional actions such as carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and integrated mine-mouth generation. The CIS and AIS results are also contextualized and compared to model scenarios in other published studies. The results of this study show that China's energy and CO{sub 2} emissions will not likely peak before 2030, although growth is expected to slow after 2020. Moreover, China will be able to meet its 2020 carbon intensity reduction target of 40 to 45% under both CIS and AIS, but only meet its 15% non-fossil fuel target by 2020 under AIS. Under both scenarios, efficiency remains a key resource and has the same, if not greater, mitigation potential as new technologies in transport and power sectors. In the transport sector, electrification will be closely linked the degree of decarbonization in the power sector and EV deployment has little or no impact on China's crude oil import demand. Rather, power generation improvements have the largest sector potential for overall emission mitigation while mine-mouth power generation and CCS have limited mitigation potential compared to fuel switching and efficiency improvements. Comparisons of this study's results with other published studies reveal that CIS and AIS are within the range of other national energy projections but alternative studies rely much more heavily on CCS for carbon reduction. The McKinsey study, in particular, has more optimistic assumptions for reductions in crude oil imports and coal demand in its abatement scenario and has much higher gasoline reduction potential for the same level of EV deployment. Despite these differences, this study's scenario analysis of both transport and power sectors illustrate the necessity for continued efficiency improvements and aggressive power sector decarbonization in flattening China's CO{sub 2} emissions.

  15. Characterization of submicron aerosols at a rural site in Pearl River Delta of China using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in South China is one of the most economically developed regions in China, but it is also noted for its severe air pollution due to industrial/metropolitan emissions. In order to continuously ...

  16. Multi-Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS Dept ofActing Chiefof Inks andmulti-sector

  17. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13% - 22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement.

  18. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

  19. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

  20. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chun (2008), China’s Wind-Power Generation Policy and Market67 Figure 2-29 Wind Power Generation Capacity by Province (By 2010, on-grid wind power generation capacity will reach 5

  1. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    firms to co-develop oilfields. ” China Daily (27 Augustof a Chinese-controlled oilfield may indicate this to be thefirms to co-develop oilfields,” China Daily, 27 August 2005,

  2. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentthis point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supply inand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

  3. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    42 Figure 2-11 Crude Oil Production by Oilfield (1980-Stabilize the increase in crude oil production and implementSinopec CNOOC China’s crude oil production increased from

  4. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 Table 1-3 China’s Exploitable HydropowerGW of technically exploitable hydropower reserves capable ofTable 1-3). The major hydropower resources are in Southwest

  5. Shakespeare Studies in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Hui

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , the characteristic of Shakespeare studies in China is closely associated with the political and cultural situation of the time. This thesis chronicles and analyzes noteworthy scholarship of Shakespeare studies in China, especially since the 1990s, in terms...

  6. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

  7. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    42 Figure 2-11 Crude Oil Production by Oilfield (1980-for 44.8% of China’s total oil production in 2006, a drop ofgas, a by-product of oil production, has been used primarily

  8. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic Research Center of Oil and Gas Resources, Ministryand Myanmar Signed on Construction of Oil and Gas PipelineAgreements”, China Oil and Gas Weekly News, China5E

  9. REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES ANALYSIS SYSTEM Kaimeng Sun Institute of Agricultural Information, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing,P. R. China 100081 Abstract: In this paper, a system for analyzing the strategic adjustment of regional agricultural

  10. the uva meets china the uva meets china6 7 The UvA meets China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    the uva meets china the uva meets china6 7 The UvA meets China Amsterdam University Press 9789089646156 The UvA meets China Collaboration with China has been designated a key strategic target contributions by various authors from both China and the Netherlands, particularly Amsterdam, on a wide range

  11. Jordan ships oil shale to China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jordan and China have signed an agreement to develop oil shale processing technology that could lead to a 200 ton/day oil shale plant in Jordan. China will process 1200 tons of Jordanian oil shale at its Fu Shun refinery. If tests are successful, China could build the demonstration plant in Jordan's Lajjun region, where the oil shale resource is estimated at 1.3 billion tons. China plans to send a team to Jordan to conduct a plant design study. A Lajjun oil shale complex could produce as much as 50,000 b/d of shale oil. An earlier 500 ton shipment of shale is said to have yielded promising results.

  12. China reala Assinado protocolo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Cavaco na China realça papel de emigrantes em Macau Assinado protocolo para promover trocas entre portugueses "é factor essencial para a valorização das relações" com a China. "Podemos teste- munhar o sucesso China. Para o Presidente, cada emigrante por- tuguês é "um verdadeiro embai- xador de Portugal, um

  13. Cumulative environmental impacts and integrated coastal management: the case of Xiamen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    Cumulative environmental impacts and integrated coastal management: the case of Xiamen, China, Environmental Science Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China b Management Science and the implementation of integrated coastal management within the harbour of Xiamen, China, an urban region in which

  14. ASEAN AND CHINA: EXPORT RIVALS OR PARTNERS? 1255 Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    ASEAN AND CHINA: EXPORT RIVALS OR PARTNERS? 1255 © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2004 © Blackwell 1255 ASEAN and China: Export Rivals or Partners in Regional Growth? David Roland Holst1 and John Weiss2 Asian Development Bank Institute and University of Bradford, UK 1. INTRODUCTION CHINA'S initial opening

  15. Response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to drought events in a poplar plantation in Northern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to drought events in a poplar plantation in Northern China Jie, Beijing 100083, PR China b Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center, USDA Forest Service plantations are widely used for timber production and ecological restoration in northern China, a region

  16. Agricultural Sciences in China 2005, 4(1): 101-105

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Situation of Soil Organic Carbon Storage in Croplands in Northeast of China QIU Jian-jun1, WANG Li organic carbon (SOC) storage in North east of China, identify its balance situation and changing trends for the accumulation of SOC in these regions. Key words: Northeast of China, Soil, Soil organic carbon, Simulation

  17. Made in China, Mined in Australia: Interdependency and Business-Cycle Transmission between Chinese and Australian Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mineral resources is to development in China. Mineral resources such as iron ore are inputs of international trade fluctuations. Both the boom period leading up to the Global Financial Crisis and its industry to China and its resource-intensive manufacturing sector. By conducting this analysis, this study

  18. Energy efficiency opportunities in China. Industrial equipment and small cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick glance at comparative statistics on energy consumption per unit of industrial output reveals that China is one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. Energy waste not only impedes economic growth, but also creates pollution that threatens human health, regional ecosystems, and the global climate. China`s decision to pursue economic reform and encourage technology transfer from developed countries has created a window of opportunity for significant advances in energy efficiency. Policy changes, technical training, public education, and financing can help China realize its energy conservation potential.

  19. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

  20. Staking claims to China's borderland : oil, ores and statebuilding in Xinjiang Province, 1893-1964

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinzley, Judd Creighton; Kinzley, Judd Creighton

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    helping fix regions like Mongolia, Tibet, and Xinjiang asChinese grasslands of Inner Mongolia (Stanford, CA: Stanfordbut also Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, North China, Tibet, and

  1. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  2. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    years, we exclude electricity sector investment in steam andyears, we exclude electricity sector investment in steam andand Construction. Electricity sector capacity figures before

  3. Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

  4. The Lepton Sector of a Fourth Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Burdman; Leandro Da Rold; Ricardo D. Matheus

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  5. By Sector, 2010 Nonprofit /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    of the Asia-Pacific region including Latin America. IR/PS graduates have successful careers in the public · National Renewable Energy Lab · Korean Communications Commission · Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs #12;

  6. Coal use in the People`s Republic of China. Volume 1: Environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, N.; Tompkins, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.; Carlson, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.]|[Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States); Simbeck, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.]|[SFA Pacific, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The People`s Republic of China (hereafter referred to as China) is the largest producer and consumer of coal in the world. Coal makes up 76% and 74% of China`s primary energy consumption and production, respectively. This heavy dependence on coal has come at a high price for China, accounting for a large share of its environmental problems. This report examines the dominance of coal in China`s energy balance, its impact on the environment, and the need for technical and financial assistance, specifically for two distinct aspects: the effect of coal use on the environment and the importance of coal to China`s economy. The results of the analysis are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 focuses on full fuel cycle coal emissions and the environmental effects of coal consumption. Volume 2 provides a detailed analysis by sector of China`s economy and examines the economic impact of constraints on coal use. 51 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Prospects for the power sector in nine developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S.; Goldman, N.; Martin, N.; Friedmann, R.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on information drawn primarily from official planning documents issued by national governments and/or utilities, the authors examined the outlook for the power sector in the year 2000 in nine countries: China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, Argentina and Mexico. They found that the implicit rates of average annual growth of installed electric power capacity between 1991 and 2001 range from a low of 3.3% per year in Argentina to a high of 13.2% per year in Indonesia. In absolute terms, China and India account for the vast majority of the growth. The plans call for a shift in the generating mix towards coal in six of the countries, and continued strong reliance on coal in China and India. The use of natural gas is expected to increase substantially in a number of the countries. The historic movement away from oil continues, although some countries are maintaining dual-fuel capabilities. Plans call for considerable growth of nuclear power in South Korea and China and modest increases in India and Taiwan. The feasibility of the official plans varies among the countries. Lack of public capital is leading towards greater reliance on private sector participation in power projects in many of the countries. Environmental issues are becoming a more significant constraint than in the past, particularly in the case of large-scale hydropower projects. The financial and environmental constraints are leading to a rising interest in methods of improving the efficiency of electricity supply and end use. The scale of such activities is growing in most of the study countries.

  8. Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaohu

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Interprovincial migration flows involve substantial relocation of people and productive activity, with implications for regional energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. In China, these flows are not explicitly considered ...

  9. Market power and electricity market reform in Northeast China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaochun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast region of China has been used as a testing ground for creation of a functioning wholesale electric power market. We describe the ownership structure of the generation assets for those plants participating in ...

  10. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary Energy Consumption (Shares) Coal Crude Oil Naturalconsumption doubled from 5.1 to 10.53 Mtce , while both crude oilfuel consumption in 2006. The sector’s use of crude oil

  11. Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willy Fischler; Jimmy Lorshbough; Dustin Lorshbough

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

  12. From upstream to downstream: Megatrends and latest developments in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kang; Pezeshki, S.; McMahon, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector has been characterized by reorganization, revitalization, regional cooperation, environmental awakening, and steady expansion. The pattern of these changes, which appear to be the megatrends of the region`s hydrocarbons sector development, will continue during the rest of the 1990s. To further study the current situation and future prospects of Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector, we critically summarize in this short article the key issues in the region`s oil and gas development. These megatrends in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector development will impact not only the future energy demand and supply in the region, but also global oil flows in the North American market and across the Pacific Ocean. Each country is individually discussed; pipelines to be constructed are discussed also.

  13. Surveying China’s Science and Technology Human Talents Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YANG, Fan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is ain Science and Technology Innovation—was es- tablished in

  14. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Resources of China. Washington D.C. , U.S.U.S. Department of Energy. A-4 China Energy Databook EnergyImproved Biomass Stoves in China: How Was It Done? E W C / E

  15. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial Energy Consumption China TX-12 India Japan USAEnergy Consumption by Source, 1992 I.Mtce Country China India Japan USAEnergy Consumption by Source, 1992 I.Mtce Country Coal Liquid Gas China India* Japan USA

  16. China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

  17. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of China's Total Primary Energy Production (TPE) byFuel (Mtce) Primary Energy Production (Mtce) AAGR Coal Rawof China's Total Primary Energy Production (Mtce) AAGR Total

  18. China's Space Robotic Arms Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013 China’s Space Robotic Arm Programs Kevin POLLPETERdebris observation and space robotic arm technologies. Thelikely equipped with a robotic arm, grappling the target

  19. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    includes natural crude and shale oil. Source: China Energyincludes natural crude and shale oil. U Converted based onincludes natural crude and shale oil. Source: China Energy

  20. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

  1. Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by...

  2. China power - thermal coal and clean coal technology export. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binsheng Li

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    China is the world`s fourth largest electric power producer, and is expected to surpass Japan within the next two years to become the third largest power producer. During the past 15 years, China`s total electricity generation more than tripled, increasing from about 300 TWh to about 1,000 TWh. Total installed generating capacity grew at an average of 8.2 percent per year, increasing from 66 to 214 GW. The share of China`s installed capacity in Asia increased from 21 to 31 percent. The Chinese government plans to continue China`s rapid growth rate in the power sector. Total installed capacity is planned to reach 300 GW by 2000, which will generate 1,400 TWh of electricity per year. China`s long-term power sector development is subject to great uncertainty. Under the middle scenario, total capacity is expected to reach 700 GW by 2015, with annual generation of 3,330 TWh. Under the low and high scenarios, total capacity will reach 527-1,005 GW by 2015. The high scenario representing possible demand. To achieve this ambitious scenario, dramatic policy changes in favor of power development are required; however, there is no evidence that such policy changes will occur at this stage. Even under the high scenario, China`s per capita annual electricity consumption would be only 3,000 kWh by 2015, less than half of the present per capita consumption for OECD countries. Under the low scenario, electricity shortages will seriously curb economic growth.

  3. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy in China’s overall energy mix, in February 2005 thehalf of the nation’s energy mix (Figure 2-3). Figure 2-3energy conversion has only slightly increased since 1980 with an increase of only 2.6 Mt, after overall fuel mix

  4. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg HU HongChang, TIAN FuQiang* & HU HePing Department of Hydraulic Engineering, State Key Laboratory as a key soil physical parameter and has been widely used to predict soil hydraulic and other related

  5. China Refrigerator Information Label

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-246E China Refrigerator Information Label: Specification Development and Potential Impact Jianhong Cheng China National Institute of Standardization Tomoyuki Sakamoto The Institute of Energy by the United States Gov- ernment. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither

  6. China's Approaches to Financing Sustainable Development: Policies, Practices, and Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composition of China’s green energy investment portfolio.financing mechanisms for green energy development in China.Composition of China’s green energy investment portfolio •

  7. Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater Thanversion, “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater2012. “Modeling Future Vehicle Sales and Stock in China,”

  8. Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector BUILDING FOR ECOLOGICALLY RESPONSIVE Industries" SMX Convention Center, Pasay City CHRISTOPHER CRUZ DE LA CRUZ Philippine Green Building Council 8 the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" #12;· "The fastest growing regional green building

  9. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  10. Taking the China Challenge: China and the Future of Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    Taking the China Challenge: China and the Future of Latin American Economic Development Kevin P-author of the new book, The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization, Stanford University Press. The author would like to thank Elen Shrethsa for research as- sistance #12;Taking the China

  11. China's Pathways to Energy Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Steven; Caruana, Craig; Coats, Charles; Haguewood, Robert; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Morgan, Broderick; Murray, Joshua; Riedell, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese Bilateral Investment/Projects Involved Countries Projects Year China-Kazakhstan Oil pipeline (Atasu-Alashankou ) Gas pipeline China offers $10 bln loan Will complete in 2011 Completed in 2009 For future oil supply China-Turkmenistan Gas pipeline... that China can directly import energy from, bypassing Russia Chinese ventures in Cen. Asia: Kazakh-China oil pipeline (finished Dec. 2009) (Garrison 47) Could increase Chinese imports from this country from their current 1% of total imports to around 15...

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 Figure 3. Map of China's Solar Resourceand Wang Sicheng, 2007, “China Solar PV Report. ” Beijing:tower. Figure 3. Map of China's Solar Resource Distribution

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under33. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under31. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Runqing Hu, 2005, “Solar thermal in China: Overview andperspectives of the Chinese solar thermal market. ” RefocusProspectives for China’s solar thermal power technology

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    32 Table 13. Total Resource Requirements for Hydropower23 Figure 12. China's Hydropower Installed Capacity, 1980-and costs of China’s hydropower: Development or slowdown? ”

  16. Technology detail in a multi-sector CGE model : transport under climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, Andreas.

    A set of three analytical models is used to study the imbedding of specific transport technologies within a multi-sector, multi-region evaluation of constraints on greenhouse emissions. Key parameters of a computable general ...

  17. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

  18. Can China’s Political System Sustain Its Peaceful Rise?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIRK, Susan L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is Ho Miu Lam Professor of China and Pacific Relations at2013-4, APRIL 2013 Can China’s Political System Sustain ItsIt also would seem that China’s growing economic ties with

  19. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction Other Oil Consumption by Sector (1980-2009) Mtto "Other". Final Oil Consumption by Sectoral SharesOil Natural Gas Note: Data based on total final consumption

  20. Housing policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Lu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last three decades, the People's Republic of China (PRC) has managed to replace its welfare-based urban housing system with a market-based housing provision scheme. With such significant housing policy changes, the ...

  1. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    anthracite, and lignite and brown coal make up the remainingCoal Anthracite Lignite and Brown Coal Source: China Energyof Coal in 2006 Lignite and Brown Coal Anthracite Bituminous

  2. Plague From China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Those of you who have been paying attention to Postcards these past three years are already aware that China takes credit for many of the world's firsts, including pasta, gunpowder and golf. Well, ...

  3. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Worldwide Quest for Energy Security, (Paris: OCED/IEA,s Worldwide Quest for Energy Security, (Paris: OCED/IEA,China’s Quest for Energy Security, (Washington: RAND Project

  4. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assumption of four distinct motivations in pursuing international oilassumption that China has a unified strategy for international oiloil demand as staying consistent into the future, but this is perhaps an unreasonable assumption;

  5. Lepton sector of a fourth generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdman, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Da Rold, L. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Bariloche (Argentina); Matheus, R. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation, one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by choosing the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth-generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  6. China’s Rise as a Global S&T Power and China–EU Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bräuner, Oliver

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a researcher in the China and Global Security Program ofChinese foreign and security policy, primarily on China–EUrelations and China’s international science and technology

  7. Regional Study to Guide Policy Interventions for Enhancing the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Asia and the Pacific Region AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency,...

  8. Sector 1 Frequently Asked Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sector 1 Safety Plan (pdf) Useful X-Ray Related Numbers Si a0 5.4308 Angstrom CeO2 a05.411 Angstrom Cd-109 gamma 88.036 keV X-ray energywavelength conversion...

  9. THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    205 CHAPTER 11 THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA C. Cindy Fan and lack of economic opportunities on their own. Agriculture faces an uncertain future, so do peasant work in urban industries and services, the sectors of the Chinese economy characterized by poorly paid

  10. Electroweak Baryogenesis with a Supersymmetric Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Huo

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a model with an exotic new sector strongly coupled to the Higgs boson, in which supersymmetry is introduced to protect the quartic coupling from a large running and avoid potential vacuum stability problem. The fermionic components present vector like mass terms, through which the Higgs diphoton decay branching ratio can be tuned. The bosonic components trigger a strongly first order electroweak phase transition. We find a large parameter region of effective Yukawa coupling $y\\gtrsim2$ and mass parameters $m_f\\sim m_s$ of a few hundred GeV, that can simultaneously accommodate the diphoton excess and electroweak baryogenesis, without vacuum stability and electroweak precision measurement problems.

  11. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits and costs of China’s hydropower: Development orpower in China: A case study of nonrenewable energy cost andCost of rapeseed-based biodiesel as alternative energy in China. ”

  12. Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development i n China The scarcity of local investment capital offers for- eign investors opportunitied i n China's energy

  13. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s Energy Security,’ European Management Journal 22(2): 150-164. Figure 16: Historical and Forecast

  14. The emerging multi-polar world and China's grand game

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Rajan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk outlines a scenario describing an emerging multipolar world that is aligned with geographical regions. The stability and security of this multipolar world is examined with respect to demographics, trade (economics), resource constraints, and development. In particular I focus on Asia which has two large countries, China and India, competing for resources and markets and examine the emerging regional relations, opportunities and threats. These relationships must overcome many hurdles - the Subcontinent is in a weak position politically and strategically and faces many threats, and China's growing power could help stabilize it or create new threats. Since the fate of 1.5 billion (2.4 billion by 2050) people depends on how the Subcontinent evolves, this talk is meant to initiates a discussion of what China and India can do to help the region develop and stabilize.

  15. Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

  16. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  17. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences © 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS Springer Sci China Ser D, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China; 2 China Meteorological Administration Training Centre, Beijing 100081, China; 3 Heilongjiang Meteorological Observatory, Harbin 150030, China Using correlation

  18. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  19. China's policy towards US adversaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swartz, Peter Goodings

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the Chinese government is trying to reassure the US that China's rise is not threatening, why does China diplomatically support adversaries of the US such as Iran, Sudan, Libya, and Syria? This thesis shows that soft ...

  20. China Marches West: Jacket cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, Peter C.

    The China we know today is the product of vast frontier conquests of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by the expanding Qing empire. China Marches West tells the story of this unprecedented expansion and explores ...

  1. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    239 Mt World's Oil Consumption (2010) US China Japan IndiaKorea Canada Other Total World Oil Consumption: 4,028 MtTotal China Oil Consumption: 445 Mt Natural Gas Production

  2. China's Space Robotic Arms Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blog, “Gen. Chilton on a Space Weapons Treaty,” October 30,archive/2076/general-chilton-on-a-space-weapons-treaty. 31on the military use of space, see Kevin Pollpeter, “China’s

  3. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi (eds.) (Energy Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first becamc involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China's State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industries more energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of energy supply and demand in the People's Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. We are hopeful that this volume will not only help us in our work, but help build a broader community of Chinese energy policy studies within the US.

  4. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including the west of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region,Xinjiang, and Inner Mongolia regions. In 2008, Chinain Ordos Basin in the Inner Mongolia Region. It is estimated

  5. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scrap metal processors. On the other hand, China still uses considerably more energy than the steel industries

  6. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China Oil Use Refinery Loss/Self Use Residential Power Generation/Heat Commerce, Const. , Agriculture, Gov.

  7. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China Oil Use Refinery Loss/Self Use Residential Power Generation/Heat Commerce, Const. , Agriculture, Gov.

  8. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameterin Building Sector Electricity Consumption Appendix 1. WorldElectricity in Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii

  9. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private Participation in the Electricity Sector World BankTelecommunications and Electricity Sectors." Governance 19,41 with journalist covering electricity sector, Vladivostok,

  10. Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes of enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes online xxxx Keywords: Iodine Groundwater Spatial patterns Hydrogeochemistry North China Plain The North/L) and low-iodine (b10 g/L) groundwater regions that frequently result in iodine excess or deficien- cy

  11. Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . . . . . .and Rural-Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . 1.

  12. China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbon emissions (Summary)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy use. China’s Sustainable Energy Future Summary next31 -ii- China’s Sustainable Energy Future Executive Summarystudy, entitled China’s Sustainable Energy Future: Scenarios

  13. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. China's Space Robotic Arms Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    innovation-and-technology-in-china/sitc-publications/. 34Andrea Shalal-Esa, “U.S. Sees China Launch as Test of Anti-arti- cle/2013/05/15/us-china-launch-idUSBRE94E07D20130515.

  15. SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guangyu

    SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin.1007/s11433-012-4970-8 Carbon-based spintronics CHEN Peng & ZHANG GuangYu* Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China

  16. Submitted to *Xidian University, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THESIS Submitted to *Xidian University, China *Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Rouen, France To obtain China-France Joint PhD in Discipline: PHYSICS Speciality: Energy by WANG Jiajie Shaped.09.2011 Members of the jury: Reviewers: Bai Jintao Professor, Northwest University, Xi'an, China Liu Weidong

  17. to China: A Bridge Between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    From Yale to China: A Bridge Between Cultures Students often invoke the metaphor of a journey in China," she said. "Yale oered a vast array of resources to help me improve my language compe- tency program and myriad exchanges with China. The summer before her sophomore year at Yale, Jenna received

  18. Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave INFORME para la Sostenibilidad Energética y Ambiental, FUNSEAM. #12;Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave eléctrica y los diferentes sectores que forman la smart grid. 6 Figura 2. Evolución y previsión de

  19. Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector: Up by the Stairs and Down by the Parachute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Pinto, Brian; Sushko, Vladyslav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 2012 Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector:to reclassifying financial sector ups and downs as turning

  20. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. • Fundamentals of the US Electric Sector Business Model • Today’s Challenges Faced by U.S. Electric Sector • The Math Does Not Lie: A Look into the Sector’s Future • Disruption to Today...

  1. Energy and water sector policy strategies for drought mitigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelic, Andjelka; Vugrin, Eric D.; Loose, Verne W.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tensions between the energy and water sectors occur when demand for electric power is high and water supply levels are low. There are several regions of the country, such as the western and southwestern states, where the confluence of energy and water is always strained due to population growth. However, for much of the country, this tension occurs at particular times of year (e.g., summer) or when a region is suffering from drought conditions. This report discusses prior work on the interdependencies between energy and water. It identifies the types of power plants that are most likely to be susceptible to water shortages, the regions of the country where this is most likely to occur, and policy options that can be applied in both the energy and water sectors to address the issue. The policy options are designed to be applied in the near term, applicable to all areas of the country, and to ease the tension between the energy and water sectors by addressing peak power demand or decreased water supply.

  2. Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .grahn@fy.chalmers.se #12;No biomass in the transportation sector #12;No biomass in the transportation sector At least,000 USD/yr to 50,000 USD/yr · Developing regions to Western Europe level #12;Energy demand · Heat/yr · Developing regions to Western Europe level · Passenger transportation increases ten fold #12;Energy demand

  3. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of EnergyCross-Sector Sign In About |

  4. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oliver, H.H. et. al. 2009. “China’s Fuel Economy Standardset. al. , 2009. Figure 30 China's Fuel Economy Standards forGermany. Bradsher, K. 2009. “China Vies to be World’s Leader

  5. Evolution and System Characteristics of China’s Science, Technology, and Innovation Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WANG, Yuan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA POLICY BRIEF STIThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is aof China’s Science, Technology, and Innovation Policies WANG

  6. China’s Space Industry in 2009: A Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollpeter, Kevin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    challenges. As China’s leading space industry organization,particular, Pollpeter focuses on the Chinese space program.10 September 2010 China’s Space Industry in 2009: A Year in

  7. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 2B.9. China's Crude Oil Production by Oilfield, 1950-Indicators of Crude Oil Production, 1970-2006 Table 2B.11.2006 Figure 2B.5. Crude Oil Production by Region, 1950-2006

  8. On the Road: Access to Transportation Infrastructure and Economic Growth in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Abhijit

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates the effect of access to transportation networks on regional economic outcomes in China over a twenty-period of rapid income growth. It addresses the problem of the endogenous placement of networks by ...

  9. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2B.9. China's Crude Oil Production by Oilfield, 1950-2006Indicators of Crude Oil Production, 1970-2006 Table 2B.11.2006 Figure 2B.5. Crude Oil Production by Region, 1950-2006

  10. Macroscopic theory of dark sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris E. Meierovich

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple Lagrangian with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term turned out an adequate tool for macroscopic description of the dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Massive fields {\\phi}_{I} with {\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0 describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like ({\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0) massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the universe. In particular, the singular big bang turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with the accelerate expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions in the absence of vector fields. The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows to display the main properties of the dark sector analytically and avoid unnecessary model assumptions.

  11. Experts in Defense: How China’s Academicians Contribute to Its Defense Science and Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILSON, Jordan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is a

  12. Specialist Communities: People and Cultures in China’s Defense Science and Technology System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KROLIKOWSKI, Alanna

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is a

  13. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 mitigation potential and costs in China's electricityCO2 mitigation potential and costs in China's electricity

  14. Expanding Natural Gas Use in China Primary Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many individuals and groups deserve out thanks for making this study possible. Paul Schwengels from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency deserves special recognition for conceptualizing the project and working with colleagues in China to make it a reality. Kong Chiu, also from the U.S. EPA, managed many of the daily issues associated with the study. Xu Dingming and Zhang Yuqing of the State Development Planning Commission directed the work for the Chinese. Our thanks also go out to the dozens of Chinese and non-Chinese natural gas experts in the public and private sector who offered guidance and suggestions in writing this report. More than once, Chris Adams of the U.S. Foreign Commercial Service in Beijing brought together participants from the U.S.-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum to discuss natural gas issues in China. While this study is not associated with the Forum, it benefited from the expertise and guidance of Forum participants. Laura Hudson and Ann Weeks played important roles in catalyzing discussion on how China could boost the use of natural gas. Scott Roberts, Chen Changhong, Owen Ward, and Reggie Zhan volunteered generous support in researching and writing some of the case study examples found in the report. We also thank the following Chinese experts who helped us with our research. Luo Weidong and

  15. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jinnan

    Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences © 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS Springer Sci China Ser D.springerlink.com Anachronistic facies in the Lower Triassic of South China and their implications to the ecosystems during and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China; 2 Yichang Institute of Geology

  17. Understanding the China energy market: trends and opportunities 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara Drazga

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is broken up into 4 Sections: Section I - Overview of China Energy Market (historical background, market value, consumption, production, reserves, export and import, market segmentation, market forecast); Section II - Market Analysis (PEST analysis, Porter's five forces analysis, socio-economic trends, consumption trends); Section III - Market Segments (electricity, oil, natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquid petroleum gas, nuclear power, coal, renewables, photovoltaics, wind power, hydroelectric power. Each market segment details current and planned projects, and lists participants in that sector); and Section IV - Breaking Into the Market (regulatory framework, methods of market entry, foreign investment, challenges, government agencies).

  18. Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

  19. Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) administers the Illinois Energy Now programs, including the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program. The program will...

  20. Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia (Presentation) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal...

  1. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  2. Draft Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Letters of IntentAgreements The electric power sector participates in the Climate VISION program through the Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) and its Power...

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Business Roundtable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results Every Sector, One RESOLVE: A Progress Report on Business Roundtable's Climate RESOLVE Program, September 2004 (PDF 1.8 MB) Download Acrobat Reader...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million...

  6. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon...

  7. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on rice production in Mainland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    agricultural simulation model to simulate regional nuclear war impacts on rice yield in 24 provinces in China to avoid nuclear war impacts on agriculture is to avoid nuclear war, and this can only be guaranteed regional nuclear war could significantly influence agricultural productivity in regions far from

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and subsidies initiated in the last few years, China’s solarChina has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar,

  9. China's Approaches to Financing Sustainable Development: Policies, Practices, and Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOEs have also dominated China’s solar power project market44 It also provided China’s major solar panel manufacturersmany years China lacked incentives to foster domestic solar

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  11. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China will continue to pursue nuclear expansion as part of an energy strategy that aims to increase clean and renewable energies (solar,

  12. Outsourcing CO2 within China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6. Lo AY (2012) Carbon emissions trading in China. Nat Climof interprovincial emissions trading (6–9). Additionally,the central coast. The emissions trading scheme being tested

  13. Outsourcing CO2 within China.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6. Lo AY (2012) Carbon emissions trading in China. Nat Climof interprovincial emissions trading (6–9). Additionally,the central coast. The emissions trading scheme being tested

  14. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Institute, 1994; LDC Energy Database, Internationalof China 1994; India — LDC Energy Database, InternationalNational Laboratory (1995). LDC Energy Database. JIA

  15. Looking for Law in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubman, Stanley

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environment of Corporate Governance in China and Its Policyas institutions for corporate governance by a shareholder’sGerman model. Rules on corporate governance were adopted in

  16. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from geothermal and wind generators is negligible in thebeen so designated. Wind generators have also been used toand total capacity of all wind generator systems in China is

  17. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the China National Petrochemical Corporation, or Sinopec)for fertilizers and petrochemical products, feedstock usesrapid con- struction of petrochemical processing facilities

  18. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating Supply Coal Washing Coking Petroleum Refineries GasHeating Supply Coal Washing Coking Petroleum Refineries GasRefueling in China Coal Washing Coking Petroleum Refineries

  19. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the previous year. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY AND FUEL CYCLES China’third-generation nuclear technology and reactor design, withs own third-generation nuclear technology. Westing- house,

  20. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China Experimen- tal Fast Reactor, or CEFR) and highpressurized water reactor—fast reactors—fusion reactor,”experimental fast breeder reactors, and heavy water

  1. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of China's Total Primary Energy Production by Source (1950-AAGR EJ Primary Energy Production (Mtce) Coal Oil NaturalRenewables Total Primary Energy Production by Source Shares*

  2. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    containing monthly energy production statistics] ChinaReserves Chapter IL Energy Production Chapter III. EnergyCountries CHAPTER II. ENERGY PRODUCTION 1. Primary Energy

  3. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xinjiang Liaoning Inner Mongolia Gansu Hebei Beijing Qinghaiin China (2010) Inner Mongolia Shanxi Shaanxi Henan GuizhouIndonesia Australia Vietnam Mongolia Russia South Africa

  4. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GOV 80% _t 160%-J A .E V) Transport P7| Construction f~] Commerce |f | Industry Agriculture X-J6 I960 China

  5. NAWS-China Lake Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the NAWS-China Lake Project at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  6. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Pumps Room AC Residential AC (Cooling) Residential HP (Cooling + Heating)Residential space heating included both electric heat pumpsheating (residential sector only), we make the following regional assumptions: Northern Region: 20% of heat pump

  7. army cold regions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kinds of air-conditioning systems energy conservation measures, and according to the climate of the hot-summer and cold-winter region in China, this paper puts forward an...

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. Solar PV Cell Production and Installed Capacity, 2000-23 Figure 12. China's Hydropower Installed Capacity, 1980-4 Table 2. China Installed Capacity for Alternative Energy

  9. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factors for China’s coal generation results largely from therelative share of coal generation decreases significantlycompetitive with coal-fired generation (Wang, 2010).

  10. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) (Zhou et al. , Anothernuclear companies as China’s NNSA lacks independence andAs mentioned previously, the NNSA has limited staffing

  11. China's Defense Electronics and Information Technology Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAGLAND, LeighAnn; MCREYNOLDS, Joe; GEARY, Debra

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013 China’s Defense Electronics and Information Technologythe Chinese defense electronics and information technology (is moving the defense electronics and IT industry toward

  12. National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) project was to address cyber security issues for the electric sector, particularly in the near and mid-term. The following table identifies the strategies from the DOE Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity published in September 2011 that are applicable to the NESCOR project.

  13. Institute of Public Sector Accounting Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE STATE" New Public Sector Seminar, Edinburgh, 6-7th November 2014 Co-Chairs: Liisa Kurunmaki, Irvine and consultants depend on in the management of public service organisations, and what is the statusInstitute of Public Sector Accounting Research I·P·S·A·R In Government, Public Services

  14. Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    action. Our study seeks to inform the decisions of both government managers and private entrepreneursApril 2000 Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage 00-787 Managing Technical Risk Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage Technology

  15. The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors ­ including five energy to communicate research results and improve public understanding of global environment and energy challenges-intensive sectors ­ to analyze global energy demand, CO2 emissions, and economic activity. The C-GEM model supplies

  16. 202-328-5000 www.rff.orgSector Effects of the Shale Gas Revolution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper reviews the impact of the shale gas revolution on the sectors of electricity generation, transportation, and manufacturing in the United States. Natural gas is being substituted for other fuels, particularly coal, in electricity generation, resulting in lower greenhouse gas emissions from this sector. The use of natural gas in the transportation sector is currently negligible but is projected to increase with investments in refueling infrastructure and natural gas vehicle technologies. Petrochemical and other manufacturing industries have responded to lower natural gas prices by investing in domestically located manufacturing projects. This paper also speculates on the impact of a possible shale gas boom in China. Key Words: shale gas, electricity, transportation, and manufacturing JEL Classification Numbers: L71, L9, Q4 © 2013 Resources for the Future. All rights reserved. No portion of this paper may be reproduced without permission of the authors. Discussion papers are research materials circulated by their authors for purposes of information and discussion.

  17. Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. and Yuan, L.Y. (2007), “China’s Solar Energy Industry:the examples of China and Taiwan that Solar PV saw a largetariffs Figure 7: China’s annual solar PV installation and

  18. Transforming Federal sector procurement of performance based energy services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahle, D.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal agencies are mandated to reduce their energy use by 30% by 2005. The investment in energy projects required to achieve this reduction is estimated at $4 billion to $6 billion. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has developed streamlined procurement vehicles to allow Federal agencies to acquire private-sector-financed, performance-based energy services for all Federal buildings. These procurement vehicles, called Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) will be in place covering all regions of the US by summer 1998. The six regional DOE ESPC contracts will provide agencies the ability to contract for up to $4.5 billion in private sector financed energy services. This represents an estimated potential of $3 billion in private sector investments in Federal buildings for energy efficiency, renewable energy and water conservation projects. DOE has developed guidelines and unique project development tools that will allow Federal agencies to contract for ESPC services in months rather than in the years it used to take to develop and implement site specific ESPC projects. The Federal government's buying power has transformed the energy services and utilities industries by stimulating the formation of new cross-industry teams and partnerships to meet the breadth of capability and ability to respond to the needs of Federal facilities in large geographic regions. This paper presents results to date and describes the linkages between the Super ESPC Program and the US Climate Change Proposal. A key US strategy that calls for Federal leadership, and in particular for DOE to spearhead a comprehensive effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Federal sources.

  19. CHINA KYRGYZSTAN UZBEKISTAN TURKMENISTAN TURKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorf, Martin E.

    CHINA · KYRGYZSTAN · UZBEKISTAN TURKMENISTAN · TURKEY The Ultimate Silk Road Journey: From Xian through the mountains and deserts of Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, and on through vibrant and continue along the fabled route to Western China, mountainous Kyrgyzstan, the blue-tiled Silk Road oases

  20. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Crude Oil Imports: 239 Mt World's Oil Consumption (consumption - Urban Statistical Difference Appendix 3: Energy Balance/China 2010 (cont’d) Mtce Crude Oilconsumption - Urban Other Statistical Difference Appendix 3: Energy Balance/China 2010 (cont’d) Physical Quantity Crude Oil

  1. China is the New Baseball

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Baseball is called bang qiu here in China. And, if a recent exploration trip taken by New York Yankee bigwigs is any indication, it looks as if China might be the next major outsource for major league outfielders. Not right...

  2. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

  3. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power Generation The electricity sector accounts for a large2005 - 2050 Electricity Commercial sector’s emerging role asuse of coal and electricity in demand sectors, and the

  4. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  5. A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Aden, Nathaniel; Chunxia, Zhang; Xiuping, Li; Fangqin, Shangguan

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steel produced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order to develop a common framework for comparing steel industry energy use. This study uses a bottom-up, physical-based method to compare the energy intensity of China and U.S. crude steel production in 2006. This year was chosen in order to maximize the availability of comparable steel-sector data. However, data published in China and the U.S. are not always consistent in terms of analytical scope, conversion factors, and information on adoption of energy-saving technologies. This study is primarily based on published annual data from the China Iron & Steel Association and National Bureau of Statistics in China and the Energy Information Agency in the U.S. This report found that the energy intensity of steel production is lower in the United States than China primarily due to structural differences in the steel industry in these two countries. In order to understand the differences in energy intensity of steel production in both countries, this report identified key determinants of sector energy use in both countries. Five determinants analyzed in this report include: share of electric arc furnaces in total steel production, sector penetration of energy-efficiency technologies, scale of production equipment, fuel shares in the iron and steel industry, and final steel product mix in both countries. The share of lower energy intensity electric arc furnace production in each country was a key determinant of total steel sector energy efficiency. Overall steel sector structure, in terms of average plant vintage and production capacity, is also an important variable though data were not available to quantify this in a scenario. The methodology developed in this report, along with the accompanying quantitative and qualitative analyses, provides a foundation for comparative international assessment of steel sector energy intensity.

  6. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  7. Science in China Series B: Chemistry 2009 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianbo

    Science in China Series B: Chemistry © 2009 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS Springer Sci China Ser B Sciences, Beijing 100871, China In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic-009-0224-7 Corresponding author (email: wangjb@pku.edu.cn) Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China

  8. Study China Programme Live and learn in China for three weeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Study China Programme Live and learn in China for three weeks Study China is a unique learning, arts and business. About Study China Finance is provided by the UK government and managed Universities. Study China is in it's fourth year and has enabled over 1000 students to explore this fascinating

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. China Today IAS 2123.001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    China Today IAS 2123.001 Kevin Carrico Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:30 am -11:45 am Approved for Non-Western culture credit Everyone knows that China today is a "rising superpower," but the real story of China's modern history is considerably more complex. This course looks beyond the headlines to rediscover China

  11. China Initiatives at Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China Initiatives at Michigan State University Office of China Programs The Office of International Studies and Programs at Michigan State University established the Office of China Programs in July 2005 to help implement President Lou Anna K. Simon's "China Initiative," part of the university's long

  12. The University of Nottingham Ningbo China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Gail

    The University of Nottingham Ningbo China International Student Prospectus 2013 www China (UNNC) is a unique, world-class, international institution. Situated on China's prosperous east in the UK, China and Malaysia, and students from more than 150 countries, we can offer you access

  13. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992 12. End Use Electricity Consumption by Sector, 1992 13.Sources) Per Capita Electricity Consumption, 1990 EnergyUrban Rural 2. Electricity Consumption Shares Year Urban TWh

  14. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cities, December 1994 6. Ex-Refinery Oil Products Prices,and residential sectors. Includes refinery gas, LPG, variousOil Field Petroleum Refinery Output Natural Gas Production

  15. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    55 Industrial Sector Oil Consumption, 1990 IV-56 Industrialdominant at 40% of total oil consumption, but the share issumption climbs. Fuel oil consumption continues to increase,

  16. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  17. Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

    2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

  18. China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

  19. Electricity sector restructuring and competition : lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We now have over a decade of experience with the privatization, restructuring, regulatory reform, and wholesale and retail competition in electricity sectors around the world. The objectives and design attributes of these ...

  20. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, John

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ...

  1. Private Sector Rates (FY 2015) Instrument Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Source Laser $150 $175 Nanophoton Raman 11 Raman Spectroscopy $150 $175 Newport Solar Simulator Solar Rates for the Material Research Laboratory Facilities Rates for Private Sector companies and researchers

  2. Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Presentation-given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  3. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private Participation in the Electricity Sector World BankTelecommunications and Electricity Sectors." Governance 19,Power Struggle: Reforming the Electricity Industry." In The

  4. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and market assessment Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size2008. “The Size of the U.S. Energy Efficiency Market. Reportmarket spending Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size

  5. EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables...

  6. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameter logisticin Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii iv Sectoralsome water with electricity consumption, it is not possible

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Transportation energy use grows slowly in comparison with historical trend figure data Transportation sector energy consumption grows at an...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

  9. Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate...

  10. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sector - New SEE Action Publication March 24, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector provides...

  11. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference...

  12. The Economics of Public Sector Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Rufus

    result in incentives for over-investment in quality and capacity improvements because, by over-investing, the PSIH stimulates demand and obtains a larger subsidy. In terms of responsiveness an organization operating a more ‘commercial’ pricing policy (e... area (building especially), or keeping up to date with the decisions of their elected representatives. While much data is supplied from outside the public sector, compared to many other areas of the economy, the public sector plays an unusually...

  13. Visiting entertainment venues and sexual health in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of market vendors in eastern China. Sexually Transmittedcommercial sex workers in China. Journal of Acquired Immunefemale entertainment workers in China. AIDS Education and

  14. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  15. China Solar Photovoltaic Group CNPV aka Dongying Photovoltaic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Solar Photovoltaic Group CNPV aka Dongying Photovoltaic Power Co Ltd or China Solar PV Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Solar Photovoltaic Group (CNPV, aka Dongying...

  16. China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    problems; the China Sustainable Energy Program (funded byFoundation's China Sustainable Energy Program commissionedFoundation (China Sustainable Energy Program) became major

  17. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yichong. ?The Politics of Nuclear Energy in China. ? Guestauthor of The Politics of Nuclear Energy in China, nuclearYichong, ?The Politics of Nuclear Energy in China,? (guest

  18. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    html. Study of Innovation and Technology in ChinaOffice. Study of Innovation and Technology in China SITCRevolution. ” Study of Innovation and Technology in China

  19. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  20. China's china : Jingdezhen porcelain and the production of art in the Nineteenth Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ellen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worked in Traditional China. New York: Columbia University1935. Chen Jian. Mao’s China and the Cold War. Chapel Hill,Trans. , John C. Ferguson. China Journal 11 (5) 1929: 218-

  1. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China CIS Electricity Generation Capacity, 2000-2030 Installed Capacity (GW) SolarRenew Solar Coal Total 2030 2010-2030 AAGR Table 30: ChinaChina AIS Power Generation Capacity, 2000-2030 Installed Capacity (GW) Solar

  2. Red, But More Expert: The Evolution of China’s “Two Chiefs” Program Manager System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC).STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is a

  3. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report (CEACER). Beijing:Oil consumption and CO2 emissions in China’s road transport:Growth, Oil Demand and CO2 Emissions through 2050. Report

  4. Issue Specific Explanations of China-ASEAN Relationship: Applying the Realist and Constructivist Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei-hsieh

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    for 1 See China-ASEAN summit to focus on regional trade, political trust 2006. 3 other Asian countries as well as the U.S. Indeed, it is difficult for China to play a reconciliation role in Asia without antagonizing the U.S. or destabilizing... takes place between realists and constructivists (Acharya & Stubbs 2006; Peou 2002), while neoliberal 4 institutionalism is considered a theory with less explanatory power after 1997 Asian financial crisis (Acharya 1999). In the early 1990s, many...

  5. Demand-side Management Strategies and the Residential Sector: Lessons from International Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Aoife Brophy; Jamasb, Tooraj; Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

    technological progress are needed (see also Steinbucks, 2011 for more analysis). 21 Products targeted by standards in the residential sector include appliances, ICT, lighting, heating and cooling equipments... characteristics of the political, economic, energy system make EE investments difficult Differences in degree of liberalisation of the electricity market (Blumstein et al., 2005); differences in economic level across regions; lack of technical skills...

  6. Renewable energy sector development in the Caribbean: Current trends and lessons from history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Report for Latin America and the Caribbean 2007 (CARICOM, 2007) that regional development agencies haveRenewable energy sector development in the Caribbean: Current trends and lessons from history in the Caribbean. c We conduct a cost benefit analysis of four Caribbean renewable energy projects. c Results show

  7. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Efficiency for Heavy Industry in China, 1996-and energy efficiency for heavy industry (defined as ferrousand Energy Efficiency for Heavy Industry in China, 1996-2007

  8. Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tower plant in China. ” Renewable and Sustainable Energyby plant in Guangxi. ” Renewable and Sustainable EnergyChina’s Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of

  9. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    di- rection. Military representative reform could raise2011 China’s Military Representatives: Striving Towardreforms is the Military Representative Office (MRO) system

  10. Building China's Information Technology Industry: Tariff Policy and China's Accession to the WTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrus, Michael; Cohen, Stephen

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Industry: Tariff Policy and China's Accession toand thereby eliminate China's tariffs on semiconductors,make further substantial tariff reductions. A major issue

  11. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Council. 2010. “Smart Grid Snapshot: China Topswww.zpryme.com/reports/smart_grid_snapshot_global_and_china%Figure 48 2010 Federal Stimulus Investments in Smart Grid by

  12. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India i Japan Electricity Q i USA G a s China EnergyIndia Japan USA FSUf 3S4.8 Liquid Gas Electricity Heat fiIndia Japan USA FSU World f H Hydro- electricity Uranium §

  13. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    continued growth of its coal- dominated energy system, Chinasectoral end use from coal China Energy Databook IX-3 (TableAND EXPORTS Net Energy Exports Coal Imports and Exports by

  14. China Energy Databook. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J. E.; Fridley, D. G.; Levine, M. D.; Yang, F.; Zhenping, J.; Xing, Z.; Kejun, J.; Xiaofeng, L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Analysis Program at LBL first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and energy demand held in Nanjing Nov. 1988. EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute of China`s State Planning Commission. It was decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Primary interest was to use the data to help understand the historical evolution and likely future of the Chinese energy system; thus the primary criterion was to relate the data to the structure of energy supply and demand in the past and to indicate probable developments (eg, as indicated by patterns of investment). Caveats are included in forewords to both the 1992 and 1996 editions. A chapter on energy prices is included in the 1996 edition. 1993 energy consumption data are not included since there was a major disruption in energy statistical collection in China that year.

  15. Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Barter Island sector of the Western Beaufort Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffman, Jeffrey Dale

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) is currently motivating additional studies along the coastal region (Magoon and Bird, in press). The presence of the AN(JR along the coastal plain of the Barter Island sector has stopped the development of onshore drilling in the region. The geology of ANWR... Over the recent past, the interpretation of seismic data was strongly influenced by the publication of Payton (1977). The application of seismic stratigraphy with respect to sea level changes is not universally accepted and continues to be debated...

  16. Sustainable energy in china: the closing window of opportunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei Feng; Roland Priddle; Leiping Wang; Noureddine Berrah

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    China's remarkable economic growth has been supported by a generally adequate and relatively low-cost supply of energy, creating the world's largest coal industry, its second-largest oil market, and an eclectic power business that is adding capacity at an unprecedented rate. If energy requirements continue to double every decade, China will not be able to meet the energy demands of the present without seriously compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own energy needs. This title uses historical data from 1980 and alternative scenarios through 2020 to assess China's future energy requirements and the resources to meet them. It calls for a high-level commitment to develop and implement an integrated, coordinated, and comprehensive energy policy. The authors recommend eight building blocks to reduce energy consumption growth well below the targeted rate of economic growth, to use national resources on an economically and environmentally sound basis, and to establish a robust energy system that can better ensure the security of a diverse supply of competitively priced energy forms. Sustainability calls for persistence of effort, greater reliance on advanced energy technologies, and better standards enforcement. Achieving these goals will require policy initiatives that restrict demand and create a 'resources-conscious society', reconcile energy needs with environmental imperatives, rationalize pricing, and tackle supply security. While the challenges are daunting, China has a unique opportunity to position itself as a world leader in the application of cutting-edge energy developments to create a sustainable energy sector effectively supporting a flourishing economy and society.

  17. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  18. amazon region state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A; Pomorski, K; Sobiczewski, A 1981-01-01 125 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan...

  19. araruama region state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A; Pomorski, K; Sobiczewski, A 1981-01-01 56 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan...

  20. agreste region state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A; Pomorski, K; Sobiczewski, A 1981-01-01 56 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan...

  1. Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG emissions: Supplementary Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    % Figure S2. Relationship between regional and U.S. average electricity sector delivered natural gas prices1 Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX Griffin, H Scott Matthews Table S1. Base case fuel prices and marginal prices of electricity production

  2. China energy databook. 1992 Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi [eds.] [Energy Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first becamc involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China`s State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industries more energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of energy supply and demand in the People`s Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. We are hopeful that this volume will not only help us in our work, but help build a broader community of Chinese energy policy studies within the US.

  3. Spatial Relationships of Sector-Specific Fossil-fuel CO2 Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of sector-specific fossil fuel CO2 emissions provides strategic information to public and private decision-makers on climate change mitigation options and can provide critical constraints to carbon budget studies being performed at the national to urban scales. This study analyzes the spatial distribution and spatial drivers of total and sectoral fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the state and county levels in the United States. The spatial patterns of absolute versus per capita fossil fuel CO2 emissions differ substantially and these differences are sector-specific. Area-based sources such as those in the residential and commercial sectors are driven by a combination of population and surface temperature with per capita emissions largest in the northern latitudes and continental interior. Emission sources associated with large individual manufacturing or electricity producing facilities are heterogeneously distributed in both absolute and per capita metrics. The relationship between surface temperature and sectoral emissions suggests that the increased electricity consumption due to space cooling requirements under a warmer climate may outweigh the savings generated by lessened space heating. Spatial cluster analysis of fossil fuel CO2 emissions confirms that counties with high (low) CO2 emissions tend to be clustered close to other counties with high (low) CO2 emissions and some of the spatial clustering extends to multi-state spatial domains. This is particularly true for the residential and transportation sectors, suggesting that emissions mitigation policy might best be approached from the regional or multi-state perspective. Our findings underscore the potential for geographically focused, sector-specific emissions mitigation strategies and the importance of accurate spatial distribution of emitting sources when combined with atmospheric monitoring via aircraft, satellite and in situ measurements. Keywords: Fossil-fuel; Carbon dioxide emissions; Sectoral; Spatial cluster; Emissions mitigation policy

  4. China-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd:InformationInformationLow Carbon

  5. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update."

  6. Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential and commercial sector installations, for a total of 9 GW. Clearly, commercial DG with CHP

  7. China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    full end-use model of China’s energy economy for 2020.Assessed ways for China to meet its goal of reducing energyCenter (BSDC) Beijing University China Academy of Building

  8. International Flooring Conference 26 March 2009, Changzhou, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Flooring Conference 26 March 2009, Changzhou, China Global Trade of Wood Products;International Flooring Conference 26 March 2009, Changzhou, China Subjects I. Overview of developments II 26 March 2009, Changzhou, China Acknowledgements · China National Forest Products Industry

  9. Climatic effects of different aerosol types in China simulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. GU

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vignola (2000), China’s dust affects solar resource in theof Earth’s surface solar radiation in China during 30 recentthe dust from China affects the solar radiation resource in

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examine the application of additive manufacturing in China’sBulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  11. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies for Renewable Energy-the example of China‘s windframework,? Energy Policy 32 (2004): ?PR China,? Global WindWind Power in China: Policy and development challenges,? Energy Policy

  12. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China‘s Potent Wind Potential. ? Technology Review,Fairley, ?China‘s Potent Wind Potential,? Technology Review,s Grid-Limited Wind Energy Potential. ? Carbon-Nation. 15

  13. Global Imbalances: Is Germany the new China? A Skeptical View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Sengupta, Rajeswari

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    led growth of China and reducing the cost of funding therepression in China imply that the costs of sterilization in

  14. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    produced. Primary energy associated with coal products wasUse EJ China Residential Energy Use Gas Coal Oil Biomass GasUse EJ China Residential Energy Use Gas Coal Oil Gas Biomass

  15. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power by constructing thirty 100 MW wind farms and fourGW class wind farms in the Inner Mongolia region, Hebei,benchmark prices for on-grid wind farm-generated electricity

  16. "Embrace China" show in Houston will celebrate 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Embrace China" show in Houston will celebrate 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China "Embrace China," a multi-arts show of the People's Republic of China. The Sino Professionals Association will host

  17. The Sector Collector of the CMS DT Trigger system: Installation and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travaglini, R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drift Tubes chambers are used for muon detection in the central region of the CMS experiment at LHC. Custom electronics is used for reconstructing muon track segments and for triggering the CMS readout. The trigger Sector Collector modules collect muon segments identified by the on-chamber devices, synchronize the data received from different chambers and convert from LVDS to Optical for transmission to the off-detector electronics. Installation and integration tests were developed for tuning both firmware and hardware of the Sector Collector system: results are reviewed. The system performance during CMS data taking with cosmic rays is discussed.

  18. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  19. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, Ed., David; Aden, Ed., Nathaniel; Lu, Ed., Hongyou; Zheng, Ed., Nina

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2001, China's energy consumption has grown more quickly than expected by Chinese or international observers. This edition of the China Energy Databook traces the growth of the energy system through 2006. As with version six, the Databook covers a wide range of energy-related information, including resources and reserves, production, consumption, investment, equipment, prices, trade, environment, economy, and demographic data. These data provide an extensive quantitative foundation for understanding China's growing energy system. In addition to providing updated data through 2006, version seven includes revised energy and GDP data back to the 1990s. In the 2005 China Energy Statistical Yearbook, China's National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) published revised energy production, consumption, and usage data covering the years 1998 to 2003. Most of these revisions related to coal production and consumption, though natural gas data were also adjusted. In order to accommodate underestimated service sector growth, the NBS also released revised GDP data in 2005. Beyond the inclusion of historical revisions in the seventh edition, no attempt has been made to rectify known or suspected issues in the official data. The purpose of this volume is to provide a common basis for understanding China's energy system. In order to broaden understanding of China's energy system, the Databook includes information from industry yearbooks, periodicals, and government websites in addition to data published by NBS. Rather than discarding discontinued data series, information that is no longer possible to update has been placed in C section tables and figures in each chapter. As with previous versions, the data are presented in digital database and tabular formats. The compilation of updated data is the result of tireless work by Lu Hongyou and Nina Zheng.

  20. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric Vehicle Penetration Rail Electrification Power Sector Thermal Efficiency Improvements Renewable Generation

  1. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  2. IU China Office Manager IU International Consulting and ResearchChina, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    IU China Office Manager IU International Consulting and Research­China, LLC PRELIMINARY POSITION DESCRIPTION The IU China Office Manager will work in consultation with an Indiana University (IU) Academic Manager will be located at the IU China Office in Beijing and will be responsible for the following

  3. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Ganqing

    Formation, South China The Ediacaran Period is characterized by unusually negative carbon isotope anomaliesScience in China Series D: Earth Sciences © 2008 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS Springer www Doushantuo basin in South China JIANG GanQing1 , ZHANG ShiHong2,3 , SHI XiaoYing2,3 & WANG XinQiang1,2 1

  4. Science in China Series C: Life Sciences 2007 Science in China Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Science in China Series C: Life Sciences © 2007 Science in China Press Springer-Verlag www.scichina.com www.springerlink.com Sci China Ser C-Life Sci | 2007 | vol. 50 | no. 2 | 277-284 Changes in biodiversity and ecosystem function during the restoration of a tropical forest in south China REN Hai1 , LI

  5. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 2009 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences © 2009 SCIENCE IN CHINA PRESS Springer www.scichina.com earth.scichina.com www.springerlink.com Forecasting the summer rainfall in North China using the year, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China; 2 Graduate University

  6. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 2007 Science in China Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences © 2007 Science in China Press Springer of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China; 2 Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China Monthly data of Self-Calibrated Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) from 1951 to 2000

  7. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential of different solar PV technologies, including both2007, p. 28. Status of Solar PV Technology China has been anResearch, 2010. Solar PV technology applications in China

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been revised over time and small hydro currently is definedChina. Prior to 1990, small hydro in China was defined hydroand does not include small hydro, which are often not grid-

  9. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy in China. ” Renewable Energy 36 (5): 1374-1378. Chen,GoC/World Bank/GEF China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programwind power systems. ” Renewable Energy 35: 218-225. Lechon

  10. The dynamics of the China logistics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cen, Xuepin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the WTO accession, China is opening its logistics industry to international logistics companies. What are these companies' strategies in the China market, and how are Chinese domestic logistics companies ...

  11. U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Second U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum, held May 5-6, 2011 in the U.S. at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, highlighted U.S.-China cooperation on energy...

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China. Prior to 1990, small hydro in China was defined hydrorevised over time and small hydro currently is defined asand does not include small hydro, which are often not grid-

  13. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance and cost,” Energy Policy 37: 915-924. Chinaand costs The average efficiency of thermal electricity generation is comparatively low in ChinaChina lowers the coal recovery rate and increases extraction costs

  14. CAPITAL REGION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6 (2-91)A (04-86)SnapshotCAOmemo.pdf t

  15. Software Copyright and Piracy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jia

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    business community has been China?s failure to deal adequately with intellectual property violations. Since the mid-1990s, western countries, led by the United States, have criticized China?s continued infringement of intellectual property 5... the application across the system. On the other hand, the term "piracy", though being used in various ways depending on the country and context, generally refers to infringements of copyright or related rights. The World Trade Organization (n.d.) defined...

  16. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of biomass co-firing in Europe. ” Biomass andprimarily in Europe. China have also developed small biomass

  17. Conceptualising Inventory Prepositioning in the Humanitarian Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Conceptualising Inventory Prepositioning in the Humanitarian Sector Delia Richardson, Sander de chain to reduce delivery time of relief inventory improves responsiveness. This is the essence of inventory pre-positioning (IPP). IPP is yet to be clearly defined; and the main factors affecting IPP

  18. WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

  19. NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

  20. Cough REVIEW Open Access Epidemiology of cough in relation to China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kefang Lai; Jiayu Pan; Ruchong Chen; Baojuan Liu; Wei Luo; Nanshan Zhong

    Cough is one of the most common complaints for which patients seek medical attention. Misdiagnosis and mistreatment of cough exist commonly in China. The prevalence of acute cough caused by upper airway infection fluctuates between 9 % and 64 % in the community, for chronic cough, the prevalence>10 % in most surveys, ranging from 7.2%-33%. The common causes of chronic cough are upper airway cough syndrome (previously called as post nasal drip syndrome [PNDS]), cough variant asthma (CVA), gastroesophageal reflux related cough (GERD) and eosinophilic bronchitis (EB). There is a regional discrepancy regarding the prevalence of common causes of cough and distribution of gender among China, UK, USA, the most common cause of chronic cough in China are CVA, followed by UACS, EB and atopic cough (AC), the male is almost equal to female in numbers in China. The risk factors for cough includes cold air, smoking, environmental pollutants, noxious substances and allergens, and unreasonable diet habits.

  1. Evaluating China's pilot lowcarbon city initiative: nationa goals and local plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Nina

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTEAPREGTOPENVIRONMENT/Resources/China_Cost_of_Pollution.pBank, 2007. Cost of pollution in China. Beijing, China.

  2. Review of China's Low-Carbon City Initiative and Developments in the Coal Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more recent forecasts by China’s Energy and CO 2 Emissionsforecasts for China in the 2011 International Energy

  3. Is China on Track to Comply with Its 2020 Copenhagen Carbon Intensity Commitment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Junjie; Wang, Can

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Energy Outlook (IEO) 2013 forecasts China’s COto forecast energy consumption directly. The China Energy

  4. Yangtze Patrol: American Naval Forces in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangtze Patrol: American Naval Forces in China A Selected, Partially-Annotated Bibliography literature of the United States Navy in China. mvh #12;"Like Chimneys in Summer" The thousands of men who served on the China Station before World War II have been all but forgotten, except in the mythology

  5. Gain International Work Experience in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Gain International Work Experience in China www.StudyCLI.org "The CLI internship gave me a huge boost both personally and professionally. At 21 years old, I've lived in China and can speak basic city of Guilin, China. CLIinternsengageinadynamicrangeofprojects: Y Establishnewrelationshipswith

  6. 211 / 985 China Universities Never Stand Still

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    and Law Reference: Ministry of Education of People's Republic of China Website [http://www.moe.gov211 / 985 China Universities Never Stand Still NAME OF UNIVERSITY CHINESE NAME 211 985 Anhui of Posts and Telecommunications Beijing University of Technology Central China Normal University Central

  7. Producing China's Innovative Entrepreneurship: Nationalism, Cultural Practices, and Subject-Making of Transnational Chinese Professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Social Networks within China's Floating Population.A. 2008. Privatizing China: Socialism from Afar. CornellOverseas and Returnee Scholars to China. The China Quarterly

  8. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    House, Beijing. CCA (China Cement Association), 2009.China Cement Almanac 2008. Jiangsu People'sHouse, Nanjing. CCA (China Cement Association), 2010. China

  9. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation of T&D Costs in China [????? ????????]. Moderninstance 23 — in China investment costs for advanced coalassesses the benefits and costs of China’s proposed energy

  10. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial inventories calculated global emissions by large geographic areas (Vfkhelyi, 1985), with very little spatial to compile regional to global inventories of anthropogenic emissions. This discussion is by no means

  11. Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutgers Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy Growth Challenges James W. Hughes Dean Edward J July 2006 #12;advanced new-economy peers--New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts--have been experi- encing employment declines in the post­2000 period in a number of important "new economy" sectors

  12. Filamentary current structures in the postnoon sector: Observations from UARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bythrow, P.F.; Anderson, B.J.; Potemra, T.A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)] [and others] [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States); and others

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During an intense geomagnetic storm (Kp 7+) that began at {approximately} 1830 UT on October 1, 1991, the UARS satellite encountered the dayside postnoon auroral oval. On two consecutive crossings of the northern hemisphere between 2040 and 2240 UT, the vector magnetometer detected region 1 and 2 Birkeland and ionospheric currents in the postnoon sector. Low-energy electron events were observed near 1400 MLT within a narrow portion of the region 1 current system. Simultaneous magnetic field measurements revealed the presence of intense ({approximately} 20 {mu}A/m{sup 2}) bipolar filament current structures embedded in the auroral oval. The upward-directed currents were associated with the more concentrated region of precipitating electrons. Ions associated with the more intense flux of low-energy electrons exhibited a dispersion signature typical of an ion velocity filter. The dispersion, aligned along the orbit, exhibited higher-energy ions at lower latitudes and earlier local times. The colocation of filament currents and ion dispersion signatures at such late postnoon local times is not consistent with typical E x B {open_quotes}cusp{close_quotes} dispersions. These features more likely result from dayside boundary wave phenomena. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  13. A review of China`s energy policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Duan, N. [Environment Management Institute, Beijing (China); Zhijie, H. [Energy Research Institute, Beijing (China)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992 China`s primary energy production reached 1075 million tons of coal equivalent by far the largest in the developing world. Because coal is the primary commercial fuel, rapid growth of carbon dioxide emissions is certain. Thus the attitude of the Chinese government toward energy and environmental issues becomes increasingly important to those involved in the study and analysis of global climate change and energy issues. This report is intended to provide a basic understanding of the development of China`s energy policymaking over the past four decades. The paper first reviews institutional development and policymaking and then describes the transition to the market-oriented system. While energy has consistently received a great deal of attention from the central government, the institutional basis for setting and implementing policies has shifted often. Reforms during the past 15 years have been incremental, piecemeal, and occasionally contradictory, but overall have freed a large portion of the energy industry from the strictures of a planned economy and laid the basis for broad price liberalization. Responsibility for energy planning is now dispersed among a number of organizations, rendering coordination of energy development difficult. Economic reform has rendered obsolete most of the policy-implementation means of the planning era. Although the new tools of central control are not fully effective, the trend toward decentralized decisionmaking has been strengthened. The report ends with a summary of energy forecasts used by Chinese policymakers, highlighting current policy goals and the issues that will shape future policy.

  14. The Greening of the Middle Kingdom: The Story of Energy Efficiency in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark D.; Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominant image of China's energy system is of billowing smokestacks from the combustion of coal. More heavily dependent on coal than any other major country, China uses it for about 70 percent of its energy (NBS, 2008). Furthermore, until recently, China had very few environmental controls on emissions from coal combustion; recent efforts to control sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions appear to be meeting with some success (Economy, 2007, 2009). Figure 1 shows the dominant use of coal in China's energy system from 1950 to 1980 (NBS, various years). However, this is just one side of China's energy story. Figure 2 illustrates the second part, and what may be the most important part of the story - China's energy system since 1980, shortly after Deng Xiaoping assumed full leadership. This figure compares the trends in energy consumption and gross domestic product (GDP) by indexing both values to 100 in 1980. The upper line shows what energy consumption in China would have been if it had grown at the same rate as GDP, since energy consumption usually increases in lockstep with GDP in an industrializing, developing country, at least until it reaches a high economic level. The lower line in Figure 2 shows China's actual energy consumption, also indexed to 1980. The striking difference between the lines shows that GDP in China grew much faster than energy demand from 1980 to 2002. As a result, by 2002 energy and energy-related carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions were more than 40% percent of what they would have been if energy and GDP had grown in tandem. In the next chapter of China's energy history, from 2002 to 2005, the increase in energy demand outstripped a very rapidly growing economy, and because of the large size of the Chinese economy, the increase had substantial impacts. The construction of power plants increased to 100 gigawatts per year; over the three-year period newly constructed plants had a capacity of more than 30 percent of total electricity-generation capacity in the United States. At the same time, energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in China increased dramatically. In the latest stage, another abrupt change, this time for the better in terms of energy efficiency, began late in 2005. As senior officials in the government turned their attention to the problem of growing energy demand, the government set a mandatory goal for 2010 of a 20 percent reduction in energy intensity (defined as energy use per unit of GDP) from 2005 levels. To meet this goal, China undertook significant legislative, regulatory, and organizational reforms at the national, provincial, and municipal levels to ensure that measures to reduce energy intensity would be implemented in all sectors and activities in China. At the time of this writing, it appears that China is on its way to meeting the 20 percent goal, thus reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.5 billion tones, as compared with consumption at 2005 energy-intensity levels. In this paper, we describe and assess these three significant periods in China's energy story and provide a context by briefly reviewing the three decades prior to 1980.

  15. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Pierrot, Andre

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years China's energy consumption has increased rapidly. The problem of high energy consumption intensity and low energy utilization efficiency is serious, and the contradiction between economic development and energy and environmental resources has become increasingly acute, making energy conservation and consumption reduction an important society-wide concern. At the same time, global climate change has and will continue to have profound impacts on human survival and development, and is another major challenge to all countries. In order to accelerate China's energy conservation and emission reduction work, the National Leading Group to Address Climate Change, Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction was founded with Premier Wen Jiabao as the head, and the 'Comprehensive Work Program of Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction' and 'China's National Program of Addressing Climate Change' were issued, under which China's energy conservation and emission reduction work has been fully deployed. Efforts to promote energy efficiency have been further strengthened in all levels of government, and various policies and measures have progressively been issued and implemented. In addition, based on China's experience with implementing energy-saving priority strategies over the past 20+ years, our government established a goal of a 20% decrease in energy consumption per unit GDP in the 'Eleventh Five-year Development Plan'. Furthermore, in November 2009, in order to support global greenhouse gas emission reduction activities and promote China's low carbon economic development, the government established a further 40-50% reduction in energy consumption per unit GDP by 2020 compared to the year 2005. Improving energy utilization efficiency by scientific and technological progress will undoubtedly play an important role in achieving the above stated objectives. The improvement of energy efficiency of energy consuming products has always been an important component of all countries energy strategies. As we all know, a very large amount of total energy consumption is due to energy consuming products and equipment, which account for about 50% of China's total energy consumption. However, the current average energy utilization efficiency of this sector is only about 60%, 10 percent lower than the international advanced level. Therefore, China's energy consuming products and equipment sector holds great energy-saving potential. On the other hand, the energy supplied to these products is mainly from fossil fuel combustion, a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Therefore, improving the energy efficiency and augmenting the market share of market-dominant energy consuming products is of significant importance to achieving China's energy saving and emission reduction target and is an effective means to deal with energy and environmental constraints and climate change issues. Main energy consuming products generally include widely-used home appliances, industrial equipment, office equipment, transportation vehicles, etc. China is one of the major manufacturers and exporters of energy end-using products such as air-conditioners, refrigerators, televisions, etc. Their overall energy efficiency is comparatively low and the products are poorly designed, leading to great energy-saving potential. For example, electricity consumption of air conditioners accounts for about 20% of China's total electricity consumption and 40% of the summer electricity peak load in large and medium cities. However, less than 5% of units sold in the domestic market in 2009 reached the standard's highly efficient level of grade 2 above. The electricity consumption of electric motors and their related drive systems accounts for about 60% of China's total electricity consumption; however, less than 2% of the domestic market share consists of energy-efficient electric motor products. Promoting the energy efficiency and market shares of main energy-consuming products has become an important determinant of achieving energy conservation and emission reduc

  16. Evidence of Reactive Aromatics As a Major Source of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate over China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yuhang; Gu, Dasa; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Shao, Min; Zhu, T.; Zeng, Limin; Liu, Shaw C.; Chang, Chih-Chung; Amoroso, Antonio; Costabile, Francesa

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the observations of near-surface peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and its precursors in Beijing, China in August of 2007. The levels of PAN are remarkably high (up to 14 ppbv), surpassing those measured over other urban regions in recent years. Analyses employing a 1-D version of a chemical transport model (Regional chEmical and trAnsport Model, REAM) indicate that aromatic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are the dominant (55-75%) PAN source. The major oxidation product of aromatics that produces acetyl peroxy radicals is methylglyoxal (MGLY). PAN and O3 in the observations are correlated at daytime; aromatic NMHCs appear to play an important role in O3 photochemistry. Previous NMHC measurements indicate the presence of reactive aromatics at high levels over broad polluted regions of China. Aromatics are often ignored in global and (to a lesser degree) regional 3D photochemical transport models; their emissions over China as well as photochemistry are quite uncertain.Our findings suggest that critical assessments of aromatics emissions and chemistry (such as the yields of MGLY) are necessary to understand and assess ozone photochemistry and regional pollution export in China.

  17. Cogeneration development and market potential in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Xin, D. [State Planning Commission of China, Beijing, BJ (China). Energy Research Inst.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

  18. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal power stations 8.5 MWe Small-scale hydropower stations 14.41 G W Source: China Energytidal power have already been exploited on a small scale, but the capital- intensive nature of technologies for harnessing renew- able energy

  19. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David G.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanization has re-shaped China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2007 China added 290 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 45%. This population adjustment spurred energy demand for construction of new buildings and infrastructure, as well as additional residential use as rural biomass was replaced with urban commercial energy services. Primary energy demand grew at an average annual rate of 10% between 2000 and 2007. Urbanization's effect on energy demand was compounded by the boom in domestic infrastructure investment, and in the export trade following World Trade Organization (WTO) accession in 2001. Industry energy consumption was most directly affected by this acceleration. Whereas industry comprised 32% of 2007 U.S. energy use, it accounted for 75% of China's 2007 energy consumption. Five sub-sectors accounted for 78% of China's industry energy use in 2007: iron and steel, energy extraction and processing, chemicals, cement, and non-ferrous metals. Ferrous metals alone accounted for 25% of industry and 18% of total primary energy use. The rapid growth of heavy industry has led China to become by far the world's largest producer of steel, cement, aluminum, and other energy-intensive commodities. However, the energy efficiency of heavy industrial production continues to lag world best practice levels. This study uses scenario analysis to quantify the impact of urbanization and trade on industrial and residential energy consumption from 2000 to 2025. The BAU scenario assumed 67% urbanization, frozen export amounts of heavy industrial products, and achievement of world best practices by 2025. The China Lightens Up (CLU) scenario assumed 55% urbanization, zero net exports of heavy industrial products, and more aggressive efficiency improvements by 2025. The five dominant industry sub-sectors were modeled in both scenarios using a LEAP energy end-use accounting model. The results of this study show that a CLU-style development path would avoid 430 million tonnes coal-equivalent energy use by 2025. More than 60% of these energy savings would come from reduced activity and production levels. In carbon terms, this would amount to more than a billion-tonne reduction of energy-related carbon emissions compared with the BAU scenario in 2025, though the absolute level of emissions rises in both scenarios. Aside from the energy and carbon savings related to CLU scenario development, this study showed impending saturation effects in commercial construction, urban appliance ownership, and fertilizer application. The implication of these findings is that urbanization will have a direct impact on future energy use and emissions - policies to guide urban growth can play a central role in China's efforts to mitigate emissions growth.

  20. Air quality during the 2008 Beijing Olympics: secondary pollutants and regional impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air pollutant emissions of coal-fired power plants in China:2 from control of emissions in coal- fired power plants, COin coal-fired power plants. The increased regional emission

  1. Laser experiments explore the hidden sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  2. Constraining Dark Sectors with Monojets and Dijets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chala, Mikael; McCullough, Matthew; Nardini, Germano; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider dark sector particles (DSPs) that obtain sizeable interactions with Standard Model fermions from a new mediator. While these particles can avoid observation in direct detection experiments, they are strongly constrained by LHC measurements. We demonstrate that there is an important complementarity between searches for DSP production and searches for the mediator itself, in particular bounds on (broad) dijet resonances. This observation is crucial not only in the case where the DSP is all of the dark matter but whenever - precisely due to its sizeable interactions with the visible sector - the DSP annihilates away so efficiently that it only forms a dark matter subcomponent. To highlight the different roles of DSP direct detection and LHC monojet and dijet searches, as well as perturbativity constraints, we first analyse the exemplary case of an axial-vector mediator and then generalise our results. We find important implications for the interpretation of LHC dark matter searches in terms of simpli...

  3. Advanced metering techniques in the federal sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.; Halverson, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of utility metering in the federal sector has hampered introduction of direct billing of individual activities at most military installations. Direct billing will produce accountability for the amount of energy used and is a positive step toward self-directed energy conservation. For many installations, automatic meter reading (AMR) is a cost-effective way to increase the number of meters while reducing labor requirements and providing energy conservation analysis capabilities. The communications technology used by some of the AMR systems provides other demand-side management (DSM) capabilities. This paper summarizes the characteristics and relative merits of several AMR/DSM technologies that may be appropriate for the federal sector. A case study of an AMR system being installed at Fort Irwin, California, describes a cost-effective two-way radio communication system used for meter reading and load control.

  4. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... Electricity Business Model • Observations on the Future and Conclusions Presentation overview 2 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights...

  5. Viable textures for the fermion sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Cárcamo Hernández; I. de Medeiros Varzielas

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a modification of the Fukuyama-Nishiura texture and compare it to the precision quark flavour data, finding that it fits the data very well but at the cost of accidental cancelations between parameters. We then propose different viable textures for quarks, where only the Cabibbo mixing arises from the down sector, and extend to the charged leptons while constructing a complementary neutrino structure that leads to viable lepton masses and mixing.

  6. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource...

  7. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communication...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Federal Communications Commission's Communications, Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communications...

  8. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the capabilities of a jurisdiction to protect itself from, mitigate, respond to, and recover from a potential incident. On the basis of this metric, an interactive tool - the ESSCI Dashboard - can identify scenarios for enhancement that can be implemented, and it can identify the repercussions of these scenarios on the jurisdiction. It can assess the capabilities of law enforcement, fire fighting, search and rescue, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, dispatch/911, and emergency management services in a given jurisdiction and it can help guide those who need to prioritize what limited resources should be used to improve these capabilities. Furthermore, this tool can be used to compare the level of capabilities of various jurisdictions that have similar socioeconomic characteristics. It can thus help DHS define how it can support risk reduction and community preparedness at a national level. This tool aligns directly with Presidential Policy Directive 8 by giving a jurisdiction a metric of its ESS's capabilities and by promoting an interactive approach for defining options to improve preparedness and to effectively respond to a disruptive event. It can be used in combination with other CI performance metrics developed at Argonne National Laboratory, such as the vulnerability index and the resilience index for assessing regional resilience.

  9. Improving the Usability of Integrated Assessment for Adaptation Practice: Insights from the U.S. Southeast Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Preston, Benjamin; Rice, Jennie S.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy systems comprise a key sector of the U.S. economy, and one that has been identified as potentially vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. However, understanding of adaptation processes in energy companies and private entities more broadly is limited. It is unclear, for example, the extent to which energy companies are well-served by existing knowledge and tools emerging from the impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (IAV) and integrated assessment modeling (IAM) communities and/or what experiments, analyses, and model results have practical utility for informing adaptation in the energy sector. As part of a regional IAM development project, we investigated available evidence of adaptation processes in the energy sector, with a particular emphasis on the U.S. Southeast and Gulf Coast region. A mixed methods approach of literature review and semi-structured interviews with key informants from energy utilities was used to compare existing knowledge from the IAV community with that of regional stakeholders. That comparison revealed that much of the IAV literature on the energy sector is climate-centric and therefore disconnected from the more integrated decision-making processes and institutional perspectives of energy utilities. Increasing the relevance of research and assessment for the energy sector will necessitate a greater investment in integrated assessment and modeling efforts that respond to practical decision-making needs as well as greater collaboration between energy utilities and researchers in the design, execution, and communication of those efforts.

  10. Energy efficiency in building sector in India through Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    electricity consumption in India (2012) #12;Growth in electricity consumption by building sector At a conservative 9 % growth rate electricity consumption of building sector by 2020 will be more than 2 times ( Source: DB Research) #12;Electricity Consumption Pattern in Residential Sector (Source: BEE, Figure taken

  11. WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

  12. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

  13. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector: Urgent Need for¼rcan, 2007, Electricity and natural gas sectors in Korea: aand commercial sub-sectors, electricity use is distributed

  14. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies in the Electricity Sector. Discussion Paper 99-51,emissions from the electricity sector. Several states have2020 emissions from the electricity sector by 18%. Extending

  15. Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates from the electricity sector to assumed values inrates from the electricity sector to assumed values intend to underestimate electricity sector emissions, and it

  16. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Scenario (non-residential sector only) – AssumesIndia: Industry and Non Residential Sectors Jayant Sathaye,and support. The Non Residential sector analysis benefited

  17. Country Review of Energy-Efficiency Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Stephane de la Rue du

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector Stephane deFinancial Incentives in the Residential Sector Stephane desavings achieved in the residential sector. In contrast,

  18. China in the World Trade Organization: Antidumping and Safeguards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    China in the World Trade Organization: Antidumping and Safeguards Patrick A. Messerlin China finds of antidumping measures, but (so far) one of the smallest users of such measures. China's World Trade China's recent antidumping enforcement; how China could minimize its exposure to foreign antidumping

  19. Beijing, China, December 1-4 General Chairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    Beijing, China, December 1-4 General Chairs Hai Jin, China Yun Liu, China Program Chairs Martin Gilje Jaatun, Norway Gansen Zhao, China Program Vice Chairs Franck Cappello (Chair) Hai Jin, China Frode Eika Sandnes, Norway Advisory Committee Mark Musen, USA

  20. Impacts of urban transportation mode split on CO{sub 2} emissions in Jinan, China.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, D.; Meng, F.; Wang, M.; He, K. (Energy Systems); (Energy Foundation); (Tsinghua Univ.)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the world's largest developing country, China currently is undergoing rapid urbanization and motorization, which will result in far-reaching impacts on energy and the environment. According to estimates, energy use and carbon emissions in the transportation sector will comprise roughly 30% of total emissions by 2030. Since the late 1990s, transportation-related issues such as energy, consumption, and carbon emissions have become a policy focus in China. To date, most research and policies have centered on vehicle technologies that promote vehicle efficiency and reduced emissions. Limited research exists on the control of greenhouse gases through mode shifts in urban transportation - in particular, through the promotion of public transit. The purpose of this study is to establish a methodology to analyze carbon emissions from the urban transportation sector at the Chinese city level. By using Jinan, the capital of China's Shandong Province, as an example, we have developed an analytical model to simulate energy consumption and carbon emissions based on the number of trips, the transportation mode split, and the trip distance. This model has enabled us to assess the impacts of the transportation mode split on energy consumption and carbon emissions. Furthermore, this paper reviews a set of methods for data collection, estimation, and processing for situations where statistical data are scarce in China. This paper also describes the simulation of three transportation system development scenarios. The results of this study illustrate that if no policy intervention is implemented for the transportation mode split (the business-as-usual (BAU) case), then emissions from Chinese urban transportation systems will quadruple by 2030. However, a dense, mixed land-use pattern, as well as transportation policies that encourage public transportation, would result in the elimination of 1.93 million tons of carbon emissions - approximately 50% of the BAU scenario emissions.