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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Interactions of Endoglucanases with Amorphous Cellulose Films Resolved by Neutron Reflectometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the interaction of four endoglucanases with amorphous cellulose films by neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) is reported. The endoglucanases include a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens), a processive endoglucanase from a marine bacterium (Cel5H from S. degradans), and two from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima). The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. The endoglucanases displayed highly diverse behavior. Cel45A and Cel5H, which possess carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), penetrated and digested within the bulk of the films to a far greater extent than Cel9A and Cel5A, which lack CBMs. While both Cel45A and Cel5H were active within the bulk of the films, striking differences were observed. With Cel45A, substantial film expansion and interfacial broadening were observed, whereas for Cel5H the film thickness decreased with little interfacial broadening. These results are consistent with Cel45A digesting within the interior of cellulose chains as a classic endoglucanase, and Cel5H digesting predominantly at chain ends consistent with its designation as a processive endoglucanase.

Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Liu, Zelin [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Kent, Michael S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Michael, Jablin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Jaclyn, Murton K [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Datta, Supratim [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Chao, Wang [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Brown, Page [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulase Enzymes with Films of Amorphous Cellulose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) of the interaction of a commercial fungal enzyme extract (T. viride), two purified endoglucanses from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima), and a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens) with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nm resolution, while QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. At 20 oC and 0.3 mg/ml, the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, beginning from the surface followed by activity throughout the bulk of the film. For similar conditions, Cel9A and Cel5A were active for only a short period of time and only at the surface of the film, with Cel9A releasing 40 from the ~ 700 film and Cel5A resulting in only a slight roughening/swelling effect at the surface. Subsequent elevation of the temperature to the Topt in each case resulted in a very limited increase in activity, corresponding to the loss of an additional 60 from the film for Cel9A and 20 from the film for Cel5A, and very weak penetration into and digestion within the bulk of the film, before the activity again ceased. The results for Cel9A and Cel5A contrast sharply with results for Cel45A where very rapid and extensive penetration and digestion within the bulk of the film was observed at 20 C. We speculate that the large differences are due to the use of the thermophilic enzymes far below their optimal temperatures and also the presence of a cellulose binding module (CBM) on Cel45A while the thermophilic enzymes lack a CBM.

Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Kent, Michael S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jaclyn, Murton K [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Browning, Jim [ORNL; Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Liu, Zelin [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Supratim, Datta [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Michael, Jablin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bulent, Akgun [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Alan, Esker [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Interaction effects between cellulose and water in nanocrystalline and amorphous regions: a novel approach using molecular modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of cellulose is based on its structural anisotropy. Cellulose chains are arranged in a parallel manner and are organized in sheets stabilized by interchain OH-O hydrogen bonds, whereas the stacking of sheets is stabilized ...

Ali Chami Khazraji, Sylvain Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, B.M.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

SUSTAINABLE COMPOSITES: CELLULOSE NANOFIBERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE COMPOSITES: CELLULOSE NANOFIBERS. Iulia Sacui and Jeffrey Gilman. Our main focus is on using cellulose ...

6

Cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Conversion of cellulose materials into nanostructured ceramics by biomineralization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis of hierarchically ordered silica materials having ordered wood cellular structures has been demonstrated through in-situ mineralization of wood by means of surfactant-directed mineralization in solutions of different pH. At low pH, silicic acid penetrates the buried interfaces of the wood cellular structure without clogging the pores to subsequently molecularly paint the interfaces thereby forming a positive replica following calcinations. At high pH, the hydrolyzed silica rapidly condenses to fill the open cells and pits within the structure resulting in a negative replica of the structure. Surfactant-templated mineralization in acid solutions leads to the formation of micelles that hexagonally pack at the wood interfaces preserving structural integrity while integrating hexagonally ordered nanoporosity into the structure of the cell walls following thermal treatment in air. The carbothermal reduction of mineralized wood with silica at high temperature produces biomorphic silicon carbide (SiC) materials, which are typical aggregations of ?-SiC nanoparticles. To understand the roles of each component (lignin, crystalline cellulose, amorphous cellulose) comprising the natural biotemplates in the transformation to SiC rods, three different cellulose precursors including unbleached and bleached pulp, and cellulose nanocrystals have been utilized. Lignin in unbleached pulp blocked homogeneous penetration of silica into the pores between cellulose fibers resulting in non-uniform SiC fibers containing thick silica layers. Bleached pulp produced uniform SiC rods with camelback structures (80nm in diameter; ~50?m in length), indicating that more silica infiltrates into the amorphous constituent of cellulose to form chunky rather than straight rod structures. The cellulose nanocrystal (CNXL) material produced clean and uniform SiC nanowires (70nm in diameter; >100?m in length) without the camelback structure.

Shin, Yongsoon; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method of saccharifying cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reduced shedding regenerator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the regenerator thereby alleviating a source of potential damage and malfunction of a thermal regenerative machine using the regenerator.

Qiu, Songgang (Richland, WA); Augenblick, John E. (Richland, WA); Erbeznik, Raymond M. (Kennewick, WA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Active magnetic regenerator  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Available Technologies: Cellulose Degradation Using ...  

... enzymes. When combined with heat and acid pretreatments for cellulose, they can speed the degradation process, saving time and energy, ...

13

Theory of amorphous ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use large-deviation theory to study nonequilibrium transitions between amorphous solids and liquid in an atomistic model of supercooled water. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between the two amorphous solids, a finding that is consistent with experiment. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where the two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. While the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly-aging glasses, their melting leads quickly to the formation of ice. This irreversible behavior is demonstrated in our theoretical treatment and compared with experiment.

David T Limmer; David Chandler

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

Desulfurization sorbent regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Culture-led regeneration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???Culture-led regeneration policy has become a global trend in many major cities worldwide (UNCHS, 2004; Miles and Paddison, 2005). While overseas governments such as the (more)

???.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Retrofit regenerator package  

SciTech Connect

Potential fuel savings by retrofitting gas turbines with regeneration units are discussed. Thomassen U.S. is making the retrofit available.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

871; 871; NO. OF PAGES 5 Please cite this article in press as: Wilson DB. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis, Curr Opin Microbiol (2011), doi:10.1016/j.mib.2011.04.004 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis David B Wilson Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still

18

Why Sequence Cellulose Degrading Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? One of the major DOE missions is the production of renewable fuels to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and also to take the place of petroleum-based fuels as these resources dwindle. Biologically produced ethanol is one possible replacement for fossil fuels. Currently, ethanol is produced from corn starch, but there is much research into using lignocellulosic materials (those containing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) as the raw material for ethanol production. Ethanol production from cellulose requires several steps: pretreatment with steam, acid, or ammonia; digestion of cellulose to sugars; and fermentation of sugars to ethanol. The slowest and most expensive step is the breakdown of cellulose, chemically accomplished by cellulases. The second and third

19

Thin-film Nanofibrous Composite Membranes Containing Cellulose or Chitin Barrier Layers Fabricated by Ionic Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The barrier layer of high-flux ultrafiltration (UF) thin-film nanofibrous composite (TFNC) membranes for purification of wastewater (e.g., bilge water) have been prepared by using cellulose, chitin, and a cellulose-chitin blend, regenerated from an ionic liquid. The structures and properties of regenerated cellulose, chitin, and a cellulose-chitin blend were analyzed with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The surface morphology, pore size and pore size distribution of TFNC membranes were determined by SEM images and molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) methods. An oil/water emulsion, a model of bilge water, was used as the feed solution, and the permeation flux and rejection ratio of the membranes were investigated. TFNC membranes based on the cellulose-chitin blend exhibited 10 times higher permeation flux when compared with a commercial UF membrane (PAN10, Sepro) with a similar rejection ratio after filtration over a time period of up to 100 h, implying the practical feasibility of such membranes for UF applications.

H Ma; B Hsiao; B Chu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Regeneration of starfish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of starfish Regeneration of starfish Name: komogo3 Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: My science book states that a cut up starfish can regrow into more starfish. I want more information. Can an arm regenerate a whole new starfish? I have trouble believing this. Replies: Starfish, also known as sea stars, (they are not fish) are capable of regenerating even one arm into a whole new body. This is only possible if the arm includes part of the central disc. If you cut off only the tip of an arm, that tip will not regenerate, but the animal will grow another arm. I have seen a single arm nearly 8 inches long with small 1/2 inch arms growing off of it, it will eventually become a whole new sea star. If you cut a sea star in quarters, right down the center, each piece will grow into a whole new sea star. I do not know how many pieces one can cut any one starfish into and still have each regenerate. As long as a piece has part of the central disk, it should regenerate into a whole organism. But if you cut a starfish in half, and then let it grow into an whole one before cutting it in half again, one should be able to do that indefinitely.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol ...  

Background Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass ...

22

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol ...  

Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass include ...

23

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Regeneration of Polyborzaylene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Polyborzaylene Regeneration of Polyborzaylene Regeneration of Polyborzaylene Method of producing ammonia borane, comprising providing polyborazylene; digesting the polyborazylene with a dithiol-containing agent to produce a boro-sulfide compound and a byproduct; converting the byproduct to the boro-sulfide product of step (b) by reaction with a first alkyl-tin hydride; and, converting the boro-sulfide compound produced in steps (b) and (c) to ammonia borane by reaction with a second alkyl-tin hydride. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Regeneration of Polyborzaylene Method of producing ammonia borane, comprising providing polyborazylene; digesting the polyborazylene with a dithiol-containing agent to produce a boro-sulfide compound and a byproduct; converting the byproduct to the

26

Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

Amorphous semiconductor solar cell  

SciTech Connect

A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Regenerator seal design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

Eckart, Francis H. (Bargersville, IN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods ...  

Technology Marketing Summary This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Description Cellulosic fiber composites currently use ...

32

Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cellulosic ethanol Cellulosic ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Cellethanol.jpg Cellulosic ethanol is identical to first generation bio ethanol except that it can be derived from agricultural residues, other lignocellulosic raw materials or energy crops. These lignocellulosic raw materials are more widely available than the standard material used for ethanol. They are also considered to be more sustainable, however they need to be broken down (hydrolysed) into simple sugars prior to distillation, a much more complex process than the first generation bioethanol. It first must go through pretreatment,hydrolysis then a conversion. Research since the 1970s and large investments are being made in the US and Europe to speed up development of this route to bioethanol. Biomass refineries like Inbicon in Denmark are producing

33

Structural and Thermal Stability Properties of Cellulose ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, nanocomposite based on cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) and polyactic ... The optical transparency properties were studied by Fourier Transform...

34

Amorphous Binary Alloy Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hope Ishii, Sean Brennan and Arthur Bienenstock SSRL/SLAC Hope Ishii, Sean Brennan and Arthur Bienenstock SSRL/SLAC Figure 1: Partial Pair Distribution Functions extracted from the scattering patterns obtained at four different photon energies near the Ge and Mo K-absorption edges. Attempting to determine and describe the atomic arrangements in an amorphous material is a daunting prospect. A considerable advance has been made in the anomalous X-ray scattering approach to determining these arrangements in materials containing two atomic species. Up until the advent of X-ray synchrotron radiation, the X-ray radial distribution function (RDF) method was the most widely used approach for structure analysis of amorphous materials. The RDF is the probability of finding two electrons in a sample separated by a distance r, but with all

35

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain: DistributedBiomassProcessingfor SustainableBiofuelsandAnimalFeeds Supplying adequate cellulosic biomass to biorefineries is emerging as a crucial issue in biofuel systems. We addresss this problem by pretreating cellulosic biomass using the ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) process

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

38

Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

Lupica, S.B.

1975-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009 bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State

40

Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

2000-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RANDOMIZED HEURISTICS FOR THE REGENERATOR ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and loses power as it gets farther from the source, mainly due to attenuation. Therefore, to ..... their regenerator to an alternative node. The procedure then...

42

Regenerable solid imine sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Morphogenesis as an amorphous computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a programming language viewpoint for morphogenesis, the process of shape formation during embryological development. Specifically, we model morphogenesis as a self-organizing, self-repairing amorphous computation and describe ... Keywords: amorphous computing, emergent order, morphogenesis

Arnab Bhattacharyya

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell  

SciTech Connect

An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

Devaud, Genevieve (629 S. Humphrey Ave., Oak Park, IL 60304)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Preparation and Characterization on Cellulose Nanofiber Film  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, cellulose nanofibers from wood were obtained using ... Employment of PS Template in the Surface Modification and Performance Improvement of...

48

Supercomputer Provides Molecular Insight into Cellulose (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cellulose, which is a fundamental step in biomass conversion technolo- gies for biofuels production. NREL used the new high-performance supercomputer Red Mesa to conduct...

49

ANNEALING BEHAVIOR OF HIGH PERMEABILITY AMORPHOUS ALLOYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal stability for power transformer applications. Alloysinduction amorphous alloys in power transformers results in

Rabenberg, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October...

51

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Vaccine for ...  

Background Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass ...

52

Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose...

53

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel suggests that infrastructure development was not a major limitation. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

55

Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Tunable Magnetic Regenerator/Refrigerant  

Magnetic regenerators utilize the magnetocaloric effect--the ability of a magnetic field to reduce the magnetic part of a solid materials entropy, generating heat, and then removing the magnetic field, permitting the reduction of temperature with the ...

57

Amorphous metal alloy and composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain  

SciTech Connect

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Definition: Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Cellulosic ethanol An advanced type of biofuel that is produced by breaking down and using the cellulose compound found in trees and grasses.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, or the inedible parts of plants. It is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Miscanthus grass species, wood chips and the byproducts of lawn and tree maintenance are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Production of ethanol from lignocellulose has the advantage of abundant and

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption Fuel consisting of cellulosic biofuel or a blend of gasoline and cellulosic

64

Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reaction Mechanisms in Reaction Mechanisms in Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review. - - pacific N o r t h ~ ~ ~ , baboratwies I - - bCL-T-,,;, .,- , . . . I ' I . - " 1- jl,! # . .' , . - --h 1 , i b - . "I 1.- . . ., .. ' N O T - I C E , , If PACIF tC NORTHWLST U B O R A T ~ R Y .4peiild by B h m E far c h t ,EP4ERGY RESEARCH AN0 PEVELOPMEM ADMtNlSTRAnQN U m h Contract Z Y - ~ ~ - C ~ & I # D w n : m a , m & l 3 Q j l m OIdrfrn m y - !*? 1SI71Y9 1 - m-u3 2s-m .**-2?3 ,Sbca lcPa w m *a0 Iffy &a It- w-% w w @.a SlO.0 m u 6 REACTION MECHANISMS IN CELLULOSE PYROLYSIS A LITERATURE REVIEW by Peter M. Molton T.F. Demmitt Chemical Technology Department BATTELLE Pacific Northwest Laboratories Richland, Washington 99352 CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L I S T OF F I G U R E S iii L I S T O F T A B L E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i v . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . INTRODUCTION 1

65

Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Renewable materials for tissue repair/biocompatibility of cellulose nanocrystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface of cellulose displays hydroxyl groups can be reacted to a broad range of molecules adding unique properties to cellulose surfaces. This opens for possible applications for cellulose nanoparticles in biomedicine, specifically in areas that ... Keywords: atomic force microscope, biocompatibility, cellulose nanoparticles

E.-M. Ulrika Egertsdotter; Cyrus K. Aidun

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

REgeneration Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REgeneration Finance REgeneration Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name REgeneration Finance Place Harrison, New York Zip 10528 Sector Solar Product New York State-based distributed solar generation project financier and developer. Coordinates 35.10917°, -85.143009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.10917,"lon":-85.143009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Self-regenerating column chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternation ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multifunction column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multifunction ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins. Applications are to separation of nitrogen and sulfur isotopes.

Park, Woo K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Regenerator cross arm seal assembly  

SciTech Connect

A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

Jackman, Anthony V. (Indianapolis, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Amorphous-diamond electron emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Amorphous Metal Transformer: Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous-metal transformers were developed through EPRI in the early 1980's. Over the next 15 years, US electric utilities bought and installed over 500,000 units and had satisfactory field experience. The demand for this product disappeared in North America late in the 1990's as deregulation set-in. Globally, this product has been in use, and its acceptance has been increasing. This paper describes the current state of amorphous transformer activities globally. An analysis using US Department of Energy...

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Essays concerning the cellulosic biofuel industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite market-based incentives and mandated production, the U.S. cellulosic biofuel industry has been slow to develop. This dissertation explores the economic factors that have limited (more)

Rosburg, Alicia Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cermet layer for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transparent high work function metal cermet forms a Schottky barrier in a Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell and adheres well to the P+ layer in a PIN amorphous silicon solar cell.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Bioactive Polymeric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Glass ionomers/resin modified Release of fluoride ions from ionomers/ compomers fluoride-containing filler Amorphous calcium phosphate Release ...

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene under Tensile Loading Atomistic Predictions of Age Hardening in Al-Cu Alloys.

77

Numerical simulation of the active magnetic regenerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent one-dimensional model of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) that takes into account most of the physical and practical design problems for the AMR is developed as a highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations. The adequateness ... Keywords: Active magnetic regenerator, Magnetic refrigerator, Modeling and numerical scheme, Numerical simulation, Passive regenerator

B. M. Siddikov; B. A. Wade; D. H. Schultz

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A qualified investor may receive a tax credit of up to 40% of an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A tax credit is available for investments in a qualified small business

82

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing The Kansas Development Finance Authority may issue revenue bonds to cover

83

Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of Making Same  

This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Cellulosic fiber composites currently use petroleum-derived binders ...

84

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the long- established corn processing infrastructure. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has a target of 21Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Infrastructure of biofuel sustainability. #12;

85

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis...

86

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel The rapid limitation. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires almost

87

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel leveraged the long-established corn processing infrastructure. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has is being integrated into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Point of Contact: Michael R

88

Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose Malin Bergenstråhle a , Jakob Wohlert a, , Michael E. Himmel b , John W. Brady a, * a Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 4 February 2010 Received in revised form 5 June 2010 Accepted 25 June 2010 Available online 6 July 2010 Keywords: Cellulase Cellobiohydrolase I Cellulose Computer modeling Molecular dynamics a b s t r a c t Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potentials of mean force for separating short cellooligomers in aqueous solution as a means of estimating the contributions of hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonding to the insolubility of crystalline cellulose. A series of four potential of mean force (pmf) calculations

89

Process design and optimization of cellulose hydrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary concern of this work is the economic optimization of a process for the hydrolysis of waste cellulosic material to fermentable sugars. Hydrolysis is performed enzymatically, utilizing the cellulase enzyme complex produced by Trichoderma viride. Using corn stover as a substrate, a system was designed to provide 14% hydrolyzate sugars (70% fermentable) at an estimated cost of 6.84 cents/pound of sugar, a 43% cost reduction over previous designs. Optimal residence time for hydrolysis was found to be 62 hours, resulting in a 34% conversion of raw material to sugars. Total fixed capital investment for the process is estimated to be $17.13 x 10/sup 6/. The kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis were modeled through the use of a modified Michaelis--Menten equation, making computer simulation of batch hydrolyses possible. Additional studies on the accessibility of cellulose were performed, and the feasibility of a counter-current processing scheme was investigated.

Lindsey, R.R.; Wilke, C.R.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Why sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? Amanita thiersii is a white, sticky mushroom that obtains its carbon by decomposing grasses, playing a role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The fungus is commonly found in grasslands throughout the central United States and grows in grassy areas away from trees, often seen on lawns after the rain. By sequencing A. thiersii's genome, researchers hope increase the list of fungi that might provide enzymes that can be used to commercialize the production of cellulosic biofuel, which falls in with the U.S. Department of Energy's mission to develop clean energy, by potentially offering a more cost-effective method of breaking down lignocellulose in plant cell walls. Because the fungus is found in regions where the biomass is high in

91

Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure highlights NREL's recent advances in cellulosic ethanol production. Research at NREL addresses both biochemical and thermochemical processes.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy Corn for Cellulosic Ethanol - National Renewable Energy ...  

edenspace. Edenspace: A Track Record of Success Improved crop feedstocks for cellulosic ethanol Superb development team includes NREL,

93

Environmental Cycling of Cellulosic Thermal Insulation and Its ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cellulosic insulation industry, lengthy conditioning cycles and testing -8- ... energy using a flux profile generated during test ... and Technology, Vol. ...

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Vaccine for ...  

and ethanol, along with other inhibitors found in cellulosic hydrolysate. Advantages Hardier organisms with increased growth and production potential

95

Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties. The estimated Youngs modulus of cellulose microfibrils by experimental and theoretical approaches is up to 220 GPa [3, 4]. Cellulose has deeply integrated with our society in applications such as paper, cotton, lubricants, fillers, adhesives... and visualisation [15, 16]. The chapter 7 of this thesis explores the effect of various additives on the bacterial cellulose microstructure. Work has been directed towards developing a rationale to modify cellulose microstructure. In situ modification has also...

Khandelwal, Mudrika

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

97

Book ReViews Comprehensive Cellulose Chemistry. Volume 1. Fundamentals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book ReViews Comprehensive Cellulose Chemistry. Volume 1. Fundamentals and Analytical Methods. By D is a valuable and much-needed reference book for both the novice and the practitioner of cellulose chemistry does this significantly reduce the clarity of the book. The section on cellulose structure is extensive

Dantus, Marcos

98

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

Woodward, J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Magnetic Alignment of Cellulose Nanowhiskers in an All-Cellulose Composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite paper was fabricated from cellulose nanowhiskers and wood pulp under an externally-applied magnetic field. A 1.2 Tesla magnetic field was applied in order to align the nanowhiskers in the pulp as it was being formed into a sheet of paper. The magnetic alignment was driven by the characteristic negative diamagnetic anisotropy of the cellulose nanowhiskers. ESEM micrographs demonstrated unidirectional alignment of the nanowhiskers in the all-cellulose composite paper. Comparing with control paper sheets made from wood pulp only, the storage modulus in the all-cellulose nanocomposites increased dramatically. The storage modulus along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field was much stronger than that parallel to the magnetic field. This new nanocomposite, which contains preferentially-oriented microstructures and has improved mechanical properties, demonstrates the possibility of expanding the functionality of paper products and constitutes a promising alternative to hydrocarbon based materials and fibers.

Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Zuyan; Al-Haik, Marwan; Tehrani, Mehran; Murray, Frank; Tennenbaum, Rina; Garmestani, Hamid

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Method of producing amorphous thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention dicloses a method for sintering particulate material (such as silica) with a laser beam to produce amorphous optical thin films on substrates.

Brusasco, R.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

SANS Study of Cellulose Extracted from Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

AbstractLignocellulosic biomass, an abundant renewable natural resource, has the potential to play a major role in generation of renewable biofuels through its conversion to bio-ethanol. Unfortunately, it is a complex biological composite material that shows significant recalcitrance making it a cost-ineffective feedstock for bioethanol production. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to probe the multi-scale structure of cellulosic materials. Cellulose was extracted from milled native switchgrass and switchgrass that had undergone the dilute acid pretreatment method to disrupt the lignocellulose structure. The high-Q structural feature (Q > 0.07 -1) can be assigned to cellulose fibrils based on comparison with the switchgrass purified by solvent extraction of native and dilute acid pretreated and a commercial preparation of microcrystalline cellulose. Dilute acid pretreatment results in an increase in the smallest structural size, a decrease in the interconnectivity of the fibrils; and no change in the smooth domain boundaries at length scales larger than 1000 .

Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; McGaughey, Joseph [ORNL; O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

Weil, Raoul B. (Haifa, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Amorphous and nanocrystalline Mg2Si thin-film electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Amorphous and nanocrystalline Mg2Si thin-film electrodes Title Amorphous and nanocrystalline Mg2Si thin-film electrodes...

105

Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

Devaud, G.

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Electrospinning of Cellulose and Carbon Nanotube-Cellulose Fibers for Smart Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulose is one of the Earths most abundant natural polymers and is used as a raw material in various applications. Recently, cellulose based electro-active paper (EAPap) has been investigated for its potential as a smart material. The electrospinning method of fiber production is not a new way of fabrication; however, it has attracted a great deal of attention as a means of producing non-woven membranes of nanofibers due to its simple methodology and the advent of nano applications. Electrospinning occurs when the electrical force on a polymer droplet overcomes its surface tension, and a charged jet is ejected. As the liquid jet is continuously elongated and the solvent is evaporated, the fibers of sub-micron size or nano size are formed, depending on the conditions. In a previous study, a cellulose mat was electro-spun and tested for piezoelectric characteristics. This aligned, electrospun cellulose mat showed a possibility as a promising smart material. Additionally, carbon nanotubes have been considered for the versatile nano-applications due to their superior material properties such as low density and high aspect ratio. Parametric studies were conducted to find optimum conditions for electrospinning. Various ways of reducing surface tension of solutions were investigated including radiative and convective heating of the solution. Pre-examination of solution is very important in consistent, uniform fiber formation. In this study, cellulose and CNT-cellulose composite fibers were prepared via electrospinning. The optimal experimental conditions for fiber generation were found so that the mechanical strength of both the composite and the pure cellulose fibers could be compared in future tests. Eventually, this fiber will be interwoven into the CNT-cellulose mat and be used as an electro-active paper sensor and actuator. The CNT-cellulose electrospun mat will be widely applicable to the fields of sensors, filters and reinforcements in composites because of its intrinsic properties of porosity, light weight, flexibility, and large surface area. To be used in the aforementioned applications, piezoelectric properties of this composite will also be tested in the next step.

Pankonien, Alexander

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulosic Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment Lee Lynd 1,2 and Mark Laser 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2.1 Our Place in History The two most profound societal transformations in history have been spawned by radical shifts in human- kind's use of natural resources. The agricultural revolution, which spanned about two millennia beginning around 4000 BC, saw hunter-gatherer societies subsisting on wild plants and animals being largely dis- placed by those cultivating the land to produce crops and domesticated livestock. The industrial revolution followed, beginning around 1700 and lasting roughly two hundred years, during which time preindustrial agricultural societies gave way to those harnessing precious metals and fossil energy to develop sophisti- cated economies centered

108

Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

Tobias I. Baskin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Regenerator for gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotary disc-type counterflow regenerator for a gas turbine engine includes a disc-shaped ceramic core surrounded by a metal rim which carries a coaxial annular ring gear. Bonding of the metal rim to the ceramic core is accomplished by constructing the metal rim in three integral portions: a driving portion disposed adjacent the ceramic core which carries the ring gear, a bonding portion disposed further away from the ceramic core and which is bonded thereto by elastomeric pads, and a connecting portion connecting the bonding portion to the driving portion. The elastomeric pads are bonded to radially flexible mounts formed as part of the metal rim by circumferential slots in the transition portion and lateral slots extending from one end of the circumferential slots across the bonding portion of the rim.

Lewakowski, John J. (Warren, MI)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

RTF glovebox stripper regeneration development  

SciTech Connect

Currently, the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) glovebox stripper system consists of a catalytic oxidation front end where trace tritium which may escape from the primary tritium process into the glovebox nitrogen system is oxidized to tritiated water. The tritiated water, along with normal water which may leak into the glovebox from the surrounding atmosphere, is then captured on a zeolite bed. Eventually, the zeolite bed becomes saturated with water and must be regenerated to remain effective as a stripper. This is accomplished by heating the zeolite and evolving the trapped water which is then passed over an elevated temperature uranium bed. A waste minimization program was instituted to address this issue. The program has two parallel paths. One path investigates replacing the entire glovebox stripper system with a system of getters to scavenge trace tritium. This report concentrates on the second path, retaining the catalytic oxidation front end but replacing the uranium bed water cracking with alternative technologies.

Birchenall, A.K.

1992-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Organization of American States (OAS) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.sepa-americas.net/p Program Start 2008 Program End 2009 Country Belize UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References OAS Project Database[1] "The main objective of the Project is to assess the market potential for cellulosic ethanol in Belize through sustainable implementation of cellulosic ethanol technology utilizing agricultural and forest residues as primary biomass feedstock. A supplementary objective will be to help prepare for potential future cellulosic ethanol projects in other Caribbean

113

Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking  

SciTech Connect

Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidised bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C{sub 2}-C{sub 7}) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that 'waste' FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity.

Salmiaton, A., E-mail: mie@eng.upm.edu.my [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Garforth, A.A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Synthesis of Cellulose Hydrogels with High Strength and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high strength of cellulose fibers and the ability to synthesize gels with high optical ... Ab Initio Study of Thermodynamic, Structural, and Elastic Properties of...

115

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

116

Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic ...  

Potential to be produced in-house: The enzyme could potentially be produced in house by biorefineries, reducing one of the cost impediments to cellulosic biofuels.

117

Cellulosic biofuels begin to flow but in lower volumes than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technology scale-up difficulties at startup companies; ... many companies are developing technologies to produce intermediate chemicals from cellulosic biomass as ...

118

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated...

119

New Saccharification Process of Cellulosic Biomass by Microwave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, As renewable energy, the research to produce biofuels from cellulosic resources which does not compete with foods has been actively doing ...

120

Cellulose Simulations Demystify High-Temperature Behavior (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easier to break down, which could lead to more efficient processing of cellulose into biofuel. Using molecular dynamics simulation, scientists at the National Renewable Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cellulosic biofuels begin to flow but in lower volumes than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Several companies combined to produce about 20,000 gallons of fuels using cellulosic biomass (e.g., wood waste, sugarcane bagasse) from commercial-scale facilities in ...

122

Culture-led regeneration: an opportunity for sustainable urban regeneration in Hong Kong?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???Culture-led regeneration policy has become a global trend in many major cities worldwide (UNCHS, 2004; Miles and Paddison, 2005). While overseas governments such as the (more)

Lee, Cheuk-hei.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

Preston, Jr., John L. (Hebron, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Regenerated Plate Type SCR Catalyst Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology has become the technology of choice for meeting stringent nitrogen oxides (NOX) emission limits for many coal fired electric generating plants. With the aging of the domestic SCR fleet, the average age of catalysts currently in use has increased; and many facilities are now considering replacement or regeneration of the catalyst materials. Facilities planning to integrate SCR catalyst regeneration into their operations need to understand the overall performa...

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

Lee, S.H.D.

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

Lee, S.H.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

MHD seed recovery/regeneration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1 calls for the design, procurement, construction, and installation of the Seed Regeneration Proof-of-Concept Facility (SRPF) (Figure 1) that will produce tonnage quantities of recyclable potassium formate seed at a design rate of 250 lb/hr for testing in the channel at the CDIF while collecting data that will be used to upgrade the design of a 300 MW{sub t} system. Approximately 12 tons of KCOOH (dry basis) as 70--75 wt% solution have been produced. The front end of the plant (potassium sulfate reaction and solids separation/washing units) was operated for five days in March. Most of the operations were conducted at a spent seed feed rate of 250 pounds/hour. A total of {approximately}8,500 gallons of dilute KCOOH solution was generated containing approximately 2.6 tons of potassium formate (dry basis). The average KCOOH content of this solution was -7 wt%. The design KCOOH solution concentration for the front end of the plant is 8.5 wt%. The evaporation unit was operated or a total six days during March. Approximately 2.5 tons of potassium formate (dry basis) were processed through the evaporator and concentrated to >70 wt%.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

References Brown, R. C. 2003. Bio renewable Resources:RIVERSIDE Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic BiomassTHE THESIS Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the lowest cost feedstock sources for cellulosic ethanolfeedstock costs along with achieving high yields of ethanol can result in significant improvements in the economics of cellulosic

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins  

SciTech Connect

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cellulose synthesizing Complexes in Vascular Plants andProcaryotes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuing the work initiated under DE-FG03-94ER20145, the following major accomplishments were achieved under DE-FG02-03ER15396 from 2003-2007: (a) we purified the acsD gene product of the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon as well as transferred the CesA cellulose gene from Gossypium into E. coli in an attempt to crystallize this protein for x-ray diffraction structural analysis; however, crystallization attempts proved unsuccessful; (b) the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon was successfully incorporated into Synechococcus, a cyanobacterium2; (c) this operon in Synechococcus was functionally expressed; (d) we successfully immunolabeled Vigna cellulose and callose synthase components and mapped their distribution before and after wounding; (e) we developed a novel method to produce replicas of cellulose synthases in tobacco BY-2 cells, and we demonstrated the cytoplasmic domain of the rosette TC; (f) from the moss Physcomitrella, we isolated two full-length cDNA sequences of cellulose synthase (PpCesA1 and PpCesA2) and attempted to obtain full genomic DNA sequences; (g) we examined the detailed molecular structure of a new form of non-crystalline cellulose known as nematic ordered cellulose (=NOC)3.

Brown, Richard M, Jr; Saxena, Inder Mohan

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic 704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi SUMMARY ThIs EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a propsal, (Fulton Project) that consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated acid hydrolysis process. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire

137

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October 6, 2007 - 4:21pm Addthis SOPERTON, GA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today attended a groundbreaking ceremony for Range Fuels' biorefinery - one of the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol biorefineries - and made the following statement. "Together, the Department of Energy and private sector pioneers, such as Range Fuels, are blending science and technology to advance the President's goal of reducing our dependence on foreign oil," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The production of cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol is a significant part of America's energy future. This new

138

DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Place Itasca, Illinois Zip 60143 Product DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol is a joint venture to develop technologies for cellulosic ethanol. Coordinates 32.1666°, -97.154369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.1666,"lon":-97.154369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie, E-mail: aguilbert@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector  

SciTech Connect

Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies developed here could be used to develop X-ray and neutron monitors that could be used in the future for security checks at the airports and other critical facilities. The project would lead to devices that could significantly enhance the performance of multi-billion dollar neutron source facilities in the US and bring our nation to the forefront of neutron beam sciences and technologies which have enormous impact to materials, life science and military research and applications.

Xu, Liwei

2004-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method for Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents for Use in CO 2 Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Regenerable Sorbent Technique for Capturing CO 2 Using Immobilized Amine Sorbents." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Carbon sequestration entails a multi-step process in which anthropogenic CO 2 emissions are captured from CO 2 -laden process gas streams and perma- nently stored. Carbon capture is a critical step in the process and accounts for a considerable portion of the overall cost. Newly developed, high-capacity amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technology

142

Heat engine regenerators: Research status and needs  

SciTech Connect

The rapidly oscillating, variable density flows of regenerative heat engines provide a class of poorly understood unsteady flow and heat transfer problems. These problems are not currently amenable to direct experimental resolution. Experiences in engine development and test programs and efforts to develop analysis tools point to the regenerator as a key area of insufficient understanding. Focusing on flow and heat transfer in regenerators, this report discusses similarity parameters for the flows and reviews the experimental data currently available for Stirling analysis. Then a number of experimental results are presented from recent fundamental fluid mechanical and thermal investigations that shed additional light on the functioning of heat engine regenerators. Suggestions are made for approaches for further measurement and analysis efforts.

Hutchinson, R.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bioethanol production has become more competitive by combining cellulose saccharification and fermentation (

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

Bramhall, Naomi F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Carbohydrate derivedpseudolignin can retard cellulose biological conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar, 1,2,3 Fan Hu, 3,4 Poulomi Sannigrahi, 3,4 Seokwon Jung, 3,4 Arthur J. Ragauskas, 3,4 Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: 951-781-5668; fax: 951-781-5790; e-mail: rajeev.dartmouth@gmail.com 2 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, 446 Winston Chung Hall, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92507 3 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6422 4 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT: Dilute acid as well as water only (hydrother- mal) pretreatments often lead to a significant

147

Author Proof A ARTICLE Cellulose Hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: II: Numerical Results and Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Zhiqian Hao, 3 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 16 December 2008; revision received 13 March 2009; accepted 27 April 2009 Published online 12 May 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22388 ABSTRACT: Numerical simulation results are presented for a cellulose hydrolysis model which incorporates both the enzymatic glucan chain fragmentation kinetics and the hydrolytic

148

Author Proof A ARTICLE Cellulose Hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I: I: A General Modeling Formalism Wen Zhou, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler, 3 Zhiqian Hao, 3 Ying Xu 1,2 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennassee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 16 December 2008; revision received 13 March 2009; accepted 27 April 2009 Published online 8 May 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22389 ABSTRACT: We develop a general framework for a realistic rate equation modeling of cellulose hydrolysis using non- complexed cellulase. Our proposed formalism, for the first time, takes

149

The Role of Cellulosic Ethanol in Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum provides essentially all of the energy used today in the transportation sector. To reduce this dependence on fossil energy, other fuels are beginning to be used, notably ethanol and biodiesel. Almost all fuel ethanol is produced by the conversion of corn grain to starch with subsequent fermentation to ethanol. In 2006, almost 5 billion gallons of fuel ethanol were produced, which used 17% of domestic corn production. The DOE has a goal to displace 30% of motor gasoline demand or 60 billion gallons per year by 2030. To achieve this goal, production of ethanol from lignocellulosic sources (e.g., agricultural residues, forest residues, and dedicated energy crops) is needed. This paper will describe the production of cellulosic ethanol as well as the issues and benefits associated with its production.

Robert M. Neilson, Jr.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Understanding Cellulose Through Molecular Simulation and Electron Tomography  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution cellulose crystal structures have been determined from diffraction experiments using large diameter microfibrils as the sample material. However, cellulose microfibrils in plants are much smaller in diameter, and are more difficult to directly examine experimentally. Molecular dynamics simulation combined with quantum chemical calculations can help to elucidate the structure and dynamics of small diameter cellulose microfibrils. These simulation techniques also aid in the interpretation of electron tomography volumetric structural data from maize cell walls, where pretreatment with dilute acid or ammonia reveals microfibril geometry.

Matthews, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Production Methods for Amorphous Alloy for Transformer Cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmission and distribution system transformers made of ferromagnetic amorphous metals have far lower core losses than conventional transformers. A pilot plant demonstrated production of these amorphous alloys; a large-scale plant has since been constructed for commercial production.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Private Life of Electrons in Amorphous Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Private Life of Electrons in Amorphous Insulators. Since the twenties, it has been known that the stationary electron ...

155

Amorphous Materials: Common Issues within Science and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Amorphous Materials: Common Issues within Science and Technology.

156

Off-site regeneration of gas-plant molecular sieves  

SciTech Connect

The use of regenerated molecular sieve, significantly reduces the operating costs associated with adsorption, dehydration, and processing gas-treating equipment. Laboratory analysis have proven an effective tool in predicting the regenerability of sieve and the expected effectiveness of the regeneration. 2 figures, 1 table.

Moses, J.R. (Catalyst Recovery Canada, Ltd., Calgary, Alberta); Auger, L.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

158

Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Husson, Scott M. (Anderson, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal ... Keywords: Bone, biodegradable polymers, biomaterials, cell therapy, fracture repair, orthopaedics, tissue engineering

Glenn Dickson; Fraser Buchanan; David Marsh; Eileen Harkin-Jones; Uel Little; Mervyn McCaigue

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

164

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

165

Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 a gallon in 2010. References: Cellulose, Volume 16, No. 4, August 2009, Special issue: Corn Stover Conversion to Biofuels, Ed. Michael E. Himmel. M.M. Yung, K. A. Magrini-Bair,...

166

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

First look at cellulose's early production could hold keys to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cellulose's early production could hold keys to bacteria-free medical devices, better biofuel By Jared Sagoff * May 14, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Produced by plants as well as algae...

168

Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

Haward, Simon J.

169

The structure and mechanics of nanofibrillar cellulose foams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crystalline nanofibrillar cellulose has remarkable mechanical properties: a Young's modulus of about 130 GPa and a tensile strength in the range of 7501000 MPa. Recently, there has been increasing interest in exploiting ...

Ali, Zubaidah Mohammed

170

Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Phase diagram of amorphous solid water: Low-density, high-density, and very-high-density amorphous ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the understanding of the transformation between the different amorphous ices and the two hypothesized phasesPhase diagram of amorphous solid water: Low-density, high-density, and very-high-density amorphous ices Nicolas Giovambattista,1,2 H. Eugene Stanley,2 and Francesco Sciortino3 1 Department of Chemical

Sciortino, Francesco

172

Structure and dynamics of a complex of cellulose with EDA: insights into the action of amines on cellulose  

SciTech Connect

The neutron structure of a complex of EDA with cellulose has been determined to reveal the location of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. EDA disrupts the hydrogen bonding pattern of naturally occurring cellulose by accepting a strong hydrogen bond from the O6 hydroxymethyl group as the conformation of this group is rotated from tg to gt. The O3-H O5 intrachain hydrogen bond commonly found in cellulose allomorphs is observed to be disordered in the neutron structure, and quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations show that O3 prefers to donate to EDA. The hydrogen bonding arrangement is highly dynamic with bonds continually being formed and broken thus explaining the difficulty in locating all of the hydrogen atoms in the neutron scattering density maps. Comparison with other polysaccharide-amine complexes supports a common underlying mechanism for amine disruption of cellulose.

Sawada, Daisuke [ORNL; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS); Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Parthasarathi, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University; Wada, Masahisa [University of Tokyo, Japan; Langan, Paul [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Inhomogeneity of fluid flow in Stirling engine regenerators  

SciTech Connect

The literature relating to inhomogeneity of flow regenerators is briefly reviewed. It is noted that, in contrast to other applications of regenerators, relatively little attention has been paid to the consequences of flow inhomogeneity for thermal regeneration in Stirling cycle machines. The construction of regenerator capsules for a large stationary Stirling engine is described. A test rig is developed to measure the gas velocity profile across the face of the packed regenerator capsules under steady flow conditions. Measured flow profiles for a number of different matrix materials and construction techniques are presented, and it is noted that stacked-mesh regenerator matrices tend to display marked inhomogeneities of flow. The consequences of flow inhomogeneity for flow friction and regenerator effectiveness are analyzed theoretically, and approximate formulae deduced. One method for reducing flow inhomogeneity in stacked-screen matrice

Jones, J.D. (School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser Univ. Burnaby, British Columbia (CA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

Kuester, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

Cuzens, J.E.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

Comparison of Cellulose Ib Simulations with Three Carbohydrate Force Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose have recently become more prevalent due to increased interest in renewable energy applications, and many atomistic and coarse-grained force fields exist that can be applied to cellulose. However, to date no systematic comparison between carbohydrate force fields has been conducted for this important system. To that end, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrated, 36-chain cellulose I{beta} microfibrils at room temperature with three carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM35, GLYCAM06, and Gromos 45a4) up to the near-microsecond time scale. Our results indicate that each of these simulated microfibrils diverge from the cellulose I{beta} crystal structure to varying degrees under the conditions tested. The CHARMM35 and GLYCAM06 force fields eventually result in structures similar to those observed at 500 K with the same force fields, which are consistent with the experimentally observed high-temperature behavior of cellulose I. The third force field, Gromos 45a4, produces behavior significantly different from experiment, from the other two force fields, and from previously reported simulations with this force field using shorter simulation times and constrained periodic boundary conditions. For the GLYCAM06 force field, initial hydrogen-bond conformations and choice of electrostatic scaling factors significantly affect the rate of structural divergence. Our results suggest dramatically different time scales for convergence of properties of interest, which is important in the design of computational studies and comparisons to experimental data. This study highlights that further experimental and theoretical work is required to understand the structure of small diameter cellulose microfibrils typical of plant cellulose.

Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Bergenstrahle, M.; Brady, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

178

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

179

Carbon Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents sorbent material. Additionally, the design of the system incorporates a cross- flow moving-bed reactor where the gas flows horizontally through a "panel" of solid sorbent that is slowly moving down-wards under gravity flow. With the expanded use of fossil fuels expected throughout the world, the increase in CO 2 emissions may prove to contribute even more significantly to global climate change. To address this problem, carbon sequestration scientists and engineers have proposed a number of methods to remove CO 2 from gas streams, such as chemical absorption with a solvent, membrane separation, and cryogenic fractionation. However, all of these methods are expensive and possibly cost-prohibitive for a specific application.

180

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

182

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

183

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, Robert C. (Clinton, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, R.C.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, Robert C. (Clinton, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Photovoltaic-electrodialysis regeneration method for liquid desiccant cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid desiccant cooling system (LDCS) is an (a novel) air-conditioning system with good energy saving potential. Regenerator is the power centre for LDCS. Currently, the regeneration process is always fuelled by thermal energy. Nevertheless, this regeneration pattern has some disadvantages in that its performance will become poor when the surrounding atmosphere is of high humidity, and the heat provided for regeneration will be unfavourable to the following dehumidification process. To ameliorate that, a new regeneration method is proposed in this paper: a membrane regenerator is employed to regenerate the liquid desiccant in an electrodialysis way; while solar photovoltaic generator is adopted to supply electric power for this process. Analysis has been made about this new regeneration method and the result reveals: this new manner achieves good stability with the immunity against the adverse impact from the outside high humidity; its performance is much higher than that of the thermal regeneration manner while putting aside the low efficiency of the photovoltaic system. Besides, purified water can be obtained in company with the regeneration process. (author)

Li, Xiu-Wei [College of Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhang, Xiao-Song [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Regeneration of Carbon Aerogel Exhausted in Water Purification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon has been used electrochemically in various forms for water treatment and the carbon aerogel is one of them. Carbon Aerogels (CA) are used as electrodes due to their high surface capacity and high electrical conductivity. They are also known as Carbon Nanofoams (CNF). CA electrodes attract oppositely charged ions that are nearby. This concept is known as Capacitive De-Ionization (CDI). The use of CA in CDI for water purification is well documented, but not much work has been done on regeneration of CA electrodes. Once saturated, these electrodes lose their ability to adsorb additional ions and it must be restored by regeneration. If they cannot be regenerated, they would need to be replaced, which would greatly increase the cost of the treatment they are expensive. The goal of this study is to obtain data to define optimal regeneration conditions and to develop predictive capability by examining desorption behavior of adsorbed ions on CA electrodes. This study focuses on desorption of adsorbed ions and regeneration of CA. Various experiments were conducted to explore the effects on regeneration of CA of shorting of electrodes, change of polarity of electrodes, flow speed of water over CA electrodes, and temperature of regeneration water. The optimal combination of experimental variables was identified and was used for remaining experiments that tested the effect of size, charge and mass of adsorbed ions on regeneration of CA. Also, the effect of thickness of CA and its pore size on regeneration of CA was studied. Results indicated that application of reverse potential for the first few minutes of the total regeneration time provided the greatest regeneration. Longer application of reverse potential did not result in higher regeneration. The regeneration behavior when no potential applied with and without shorting was as expected. Application of reverse potential with variable temperature or variable flow speed of water over CA surfaces provided results that were different from the ones that were obtained with no potential being applied with or without shorting of electrodes.

Tewari, Sanjay

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable material for many The talk will cover the use of cellulose as a sustainable and renewable source for use in composites

Mumby, Peter J.

190

Cellulose Simulations Demystify High-Temperature Behavior (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molecular simulations that model cellulose microfibrils at high temperature indicate regions that may be easier to break down, which could lead to more efficient processing of cellulose into biofuel.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

J33. CSSC Cellulosic H2 2009 (High Resolution $$$).pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reprint Reprint © Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Supported by  WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Table of Contents X. Ye, Y. Wang, R. C. Hopkins, M. W. W. Adams, B. R. Evans, J. R. Mielenz, Y.-H. P. Zhang* 149 - 152 Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails Cocktail reception: Biohydrogen is pro- duced in high yield from cellulosic ma- terials and water in a one-pot process catalyzed by up to 14 enzymes and one coenzyme. This assembly of enzymes re- sults in non-natural catabolic pathways. These spontaneous reactions are con- ducted under modest reaction condi- tions (32 8C and atmospheric pressure). DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900017 Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails Xinhao Ye, [a] Yiran Wang, [a] Robert

192

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Breaking down cellulose without blasting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2011 4, 2011 Breaking down cellulose without blasting lignin: "Dry rot" genome offers lessons for biofuel pretreatment WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-Feared by realtors and homeowners alike, dry rot due to the fungus Serpula lacrymans causes millions of dollars worth of damage to homes and buildings around the world. This brown rot fungus' capacity to break down the cellulose in wood led to its selection for sequencing by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) in 2007, with the goal of identifying the enzymes involved in the degradation process and using the information to improve cellulosic biofuels production. Photo: A variant of Serpula lacrymans causes dry rot. (Dave Brown via Flickr/Creative Commons Attribution 2.0) As reported online July 14 in Science Express, an international team of

193

New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Received: Received: 7 September 2012 Accepted: 13 September 2012 Published online in Wiley Online Library: (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI 10.1002/jctb.3959 New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, a† Anthe George b,c and Y-H Percival Zhang a,d,e∗ Abstract Non-food lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable bioresource as a collectable, transportable, and storable chemical energy that is far from fully utilized. The goal of biomass pretreatment is to improve the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. Many substrate factors, such as substrate accessibility, lignin content, particle size and so on, contribute to its recalcitrance. Cellulose accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes is believed to be the most important substrate characteristic limiting enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulose

194

MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicom

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Amorphous silicon/polycrystalline thin film solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved photovoltaic solar cell is described including a p-type amorphous silicon layer, intrinsic amorphous silicon, and an n-type polycrystalline semiconductor such as cadmium sulfide, cadmium zinc sulfide, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide, and gallium nitride. The polycrystalline semiconductor has an energy bandgap greater than that of the amorphous silicon. The solar cell can be provided as a single-junction device or a multijunction device.

Ullal, H.S.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cellulose solventbased biomass pretreatment breaks highly ordered hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers of switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent-Based Solvent-Based Biomass Pretreatment Breaks Highly Ordered Hydrogen Bonds in Cellulose Fibers of Switchgrass Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Sungsool Wi, 3 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,4 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 540-231-7414, fax: 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 Chemistry Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 4 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 25 June 2010; revision received 23 August 2010; accepted 4 October 2010 Published online 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com).

197

NETL: Efficient Regeneration of Physical and Chemical Solvents...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the solvent regeneration process. Membrane types that will be investigated in this study. Figure 1: Membrane types that will be investigated in this study. Related Papers and...

198

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen ...  

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group

199

Continuous cryopump with a device for regenerating the cryosurface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high throughput continuous cryopump is provided. The cryopump incorporates an improved method for regenerating the cryopumping surface while the pump is in continuous operation. The regeneration of the cryopumping surface does not thermally cycle the pump, and to this end a small chamber connected to a secondary pumping source serves to contain and exhaust frost removed from the cryopumping surface during such regeneration. The frost is exhausted at a rate substantially independent of the speed of the cryopump which enhances the capability of the pump to achieve a high compression ratio and allow the pump to operate continuously while the cryopumping surface is being regenerated. 8 figs.

Foster, C.A.

1988-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ionic-Liquid Induced Changes in Cellulose Structure Associated with Enhanced Biomass Hydrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of varying ionic liquid pretreatment parameters on various sources of lignocellulosic biomass have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fiber diffraction, and compositional analysis. Comparative enzymatic hydrolysis and sugar analysis were used to relate the observed changes in cellulose structure to biomass digestibility. In this study, the factor most clearly associated with enhanced biomass hydrolysis is the conversion of cellulose fibers from the cellulose I to the cellulose II crystal phase.

Samayam, Indira P.; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul; Schall, Constance A. (Toledo)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the processing of the cellulosic feedstock to ethanol wascellulosic ethanol scenarios, use of poplar as a feedstock

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fabrication of Amorphous Alloy Surface Composites by High ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2007 ... Fabrication of Amorphous Alloy Surface Composites by High-Energy Electron- Beam Irradiation by K. Lee, S. Lee, and N.J. Kim...

203

Residual Stress Measurement in Amorphous Materials by the Micro ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... minimal human guidance in its operation. We demonstrate the influence of particular sources of errors on RS estimates in homogeneous amorphous materials...

204

NMR Studies of Molecular Hydrogen in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using NMR, the concentrations of molecular hydrogen have been measured directly in hydrogenated amorphous silicon made by the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique.

Su, T.; Chen, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Crandall, R. S.; Mahan, A. H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Localized Phase Transformation in Amorphous Fe-Si-B Ribbons ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Fe-based amorphous alloys are used in modern transformers to reduce the core losses as they exhibit excellent permeability and increased...

206

Spark Plasma Sintering of Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we will discuss the results of deposition of amorphous coatings on metallic substrates using spark plasma sintering method. The influence of...

207

New Atomization Technology for Fine Amorphous Alloy Powder ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, the present conventional powder-making processes (gas and water atomization) seem difficult to reduce the price of amorphous alloy powders.

208

AMORPHOUS THIN FILMS CONSISTING OF TERNARY MgZnCa ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... AMORPHOUS THIN FILMS CONSISTING OF TERNARY MgZnCa-ALLOYS by K. Schlter, C. Zamponi, U. Schrmann, N. Hort, L. Kienle, K.U....

209

Improved Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells - Energy Innovation Portal  

Alex Zettl, Jeffrey Grossman and Lucas Wagner of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells with 30% improved ...

210

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

216

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF STRUCTURAL AMORPHOUS METAL  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of a yttrium-containing amorphous metal, SAM1651. SAM1651 has a glass transition temperature of {approx}584 C, a recrystallization temperature of {approx}653 C, and a melting point of {approx}1121 C. The measured critical cooling rate for SAM1651 is {le} 80 K per second, respectively. The yttrium addition to SAM1651 enhances glass formation, as reported by Guo and Poon [2003]. The corrosion behavior of SAM1651 was compared with nickel-based Alloy 22 in electrochemical polarization measurements performed in several highly concentrated chloride solutions.

Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

218

Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA)

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Genetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bats, tool handles, furniture, and firewood. However, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) develop an efficient regeneration and genetic transformation system for green ash, (2) regenerateGenetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The future of amorphous silicon photovoltaic technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon modules are commercially available. They are the first truly commercial thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Well-defined production processes over very large areas (>1 m{sup 2}) have been implemented. There are few environmental issues during manufacturing, deployment in the field, or with the eventual disposal of the modules. Manufacturing safety issues are well characterized and controllable. The highest measured initial efficiency to date is 13.7% for a small triple-stacked cell and the highest stabilized module efficiency is 10%. There is a consensus among researchers, that in order to achieve a 15% stabilized efficiency, a triple-junction amorphous silicon structure is required. Fundamental improvements in alloys are needed for higher efficiencies. This is being pursued through the DOE/NREL Thin-Film Partnership Program. Cost reductions through improved manufacturing processes are being pursued under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory/US Department of Energy (NREL/DOE)-sponsored research in manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Much of the work in designing a-Si devices is a result of trying to compensate for the Staebler-Wronski effect. Some new deposition techniques hold promise because they have produced materials with lower stabilized defect densities. However, none has yet produced a high efficiency device and shown it to be more stable than those from standard glow discharge deposited material.

Crandall, R.; Luft, W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the effects of the germanium fraction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys on various parameters, especially those that are indicators of film quality, and the impact of deposition methods, feedgas mixtures, and other deposition parameters on a SiGe:H and a-SiGe:H:F film characteristics and quality. Literature data show the relationship between germanium content, hydrogen content, deposition method (various glow discharges and CVD), feedgas lmixture, and other parameters and properties, such as optical band gap, dark and photoconductivities, photosensitivity, activation energy, Urbach parameter, and spin density. Some of these are convenient quality indicators; another is the absence of microstructure. Examining RF glow discharge with both a diode and triode geometry, DC proximity glow discharge, microwave glow discharge, and photo-CVD, using gas mixtures such as hydrogen-diluted and undiluted mixtures of silane/germane, disilane/germane, silane/germaniumtetrafluoride, and others, it was observed that hydrogen dilution (or inert gas dilution) is essential in achieving high photosensitivity in silicon-germanium alloys (in contradistinction to amorphous hydrogenated silicon). Hydrogen dilution results in a higher photosensitivity than do undiluted gas mixtures. 81 refs., 42 figs., 7 tabs.

Luft, W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Active magnetic regenerator method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an active magnetic regenerator apparatus having a regenerator bed of material exhibiting the magnetocaloric effect, flow of heat transfer fluid through the bed is unbalanced, so that more fluid flows through the bed from the hot side of the bed to the cold side than from the cold side to the hot side. The excess heat transfer fluid is diverted back to the hot side of the bed. The diverted fluid may be passed through a heat exchanger to draw heat from a fluid to be cooled. The apparatus may be operated at cryogenic temperatures, and the heat transfer fluid may be helium gas and the fluid to be cooled may be hydrogen gas, which is liquified by the device. The apparatus can be formed in multiple stages to allow a greater span of cooling temperatures than a single stage, and each stage may be comprised of two bed parts. Where two bed parts are employed in each stage, a portion of the fluid passing from the hot side to the cold side of a first bed part which does not have a magnetic field applied thereto is diverted back to the cold side of the other bed part in the stage, where it is passed through to the hot side. The remainder of the fluid from the cold side of the bed part of the first stage is passed to the hot side of the bed part of the second stage.

DeGregoria, Anthony J. (Madison, WI); Zimm, Carl B. (Madison, WI); Janda, Dennis J. (McFarland, WI); Lubasz, Richard A. (Deerfield, WI); Jastrab, Alexander G. (Oconomowoc, WI); Johnson, Joseph W. (Madison, WI); Ludeman, Evan M. (Austin, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

Anstine, Larry D. (San Jose, CA); James, Dean B. (Saratoga, CA); Melaika, Edward A. (Berkeley, CA); Peterson, Jr., John P. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Carbohydrate Polymers j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / c a r b p o l Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures R.S. Atalla a , M.F. Crowley b , M.E. Himmel b , R.H. Atalla a,c,∗ a Cellulose Sciences International, Madison, WI, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, United States c University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 August 2012 Received in revised form 4 June 2013 Accepted 7 June 2013 Available online 15 June 2013 Keywords: Transformation Irreversible Celluloses Elevated Temperatures Native Accessibility Aggregation a b s t r a c t Current research, basic and applied, assumes that observed recalcitrance of celluloses is an inherent

227

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Supercomputer Provides Molecular Insight into Cellulose (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Groundbreaking research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has used supercomputing simulations to calculate the work that enzymes must do to deconstruct cellulose, which is a fundamental step in biomass conversion technologies for biofuels production. NREL used the new high-performance supercomputer Red Mesa to conduct several million central processing unit (CPU) hours of simulation.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

What is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Received in revised form 8 November 2011 Accepted 9 December 2011 Available online xxx Keywords: Bioethanol release and sugar conversion were measured. Up to 26% difference in sugar release between cultivars to cellulose can impede the sugar conversion rate, and convertibility of each botanical fraction might be more

California at Riverside, University of

230

Selective regenerated particle swarm optimization for multimodal function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article proposes an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) with suggested parameter setting "Selective Particle Regeneration". To evaluate its reliability and efficiency, this approach is applied to multimodal function optimizing tasks. 12 benchmark ... Keywords: multimodal functions, particle swarm optimization, selective particle regeneration

Chi-Yang Tsai; I-Wei Kao

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

CORROSION STUDY OF AMORPHOUS METAL RIBBONS  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of iron-based melt-spun amorphous metal ribbons. Melt-Spun ribbon is made by rapid solidification--a stream of molten metal is dropped onto a spinning copper wheel, a process that enables the manufacture of amorphous metals which are unable to be manufactured by conventional cold or hot rolling techniques. The study of melt-spun ribbon allows quick evaluation of amorphous metals corrosion resistance. The melt-spun ribbons included in this study are DAR40, SAM7, and SAM8, SAM1X series, and SAM2X series. The SAM1X series ribbons have Ni additions in increments of 1, 3, 5, and 7 atom percent, to DAR40. For example, 1X7 means a composition of 7-atom% Ni added to 93-atom% of DAR40. Similarly, The SAM1X series ribbons have Mo additions in increments of 1, 3, 5, and 7 atom percent, to DAR40. For example, 2X3 means a composition of 3-atom% Mo added to 97-atom% of DAR40. SAM7 ribbon is a Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B metal glass, commonly called Alloy1651. SAM8 is SAM7 with an additional 3-atom% W. The nominal compositions of DAR40 and SAM7 are listed in Table 1. SAM7 ribbon is extremely brittle and hard to manufactured by melt-spinning, only limited number of SAM7 ribbons were tested.

Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

Arya, Rajeewa R. (Doylestown, PA)

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide semiconductor thin film transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported on the performance and electrical properties of co-sputtering-processed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (?-HfIZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). Co-sputtering-processed ?-HfIZO thin films have shown an amorphous phase in nature. ...

Sheng-Po Chang; San-Syong Shih

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Harvesting of resinous stumpwood and natural regeneration in kirov province  

SciTech Connect

Natural regeneration was studied on various site types after stump removal by blasting, or mechanically with bulldozers or a ML-27 stump grubber. Regeneration was strongly influenced by the degree of surface mineralization which was much greater with the 2-3 passes needed for mechanical removal than with the single pass needed with blasting. Stump removal adversely affects regeneration on Polytrichum type sites by enabling establishment of broadleaves and producing waterlogged stump holes. On sites of the Calluna/Cladonia and Calamagrostis types with advance growth, only mechanical removal maintained adequate numbers for regeneration with 1-2 years, whereas after blasting, adequate numbers were reached only after 9 years or more. On sites with dry valleys, mechanical removal with bulldozers enhanced natural regeneration. 8 references.

Barantsev, A.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feedstock on earth for biofuel production [1]. However, the economic feasibility and sustainability of cellulosic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Simulating Cellulose Structure, Properties, Thermodynamics, Synthesis, and Deconstruction with Atomistic and Coarse-Grain Models  

SciTech Connect

Cellulose is still a mysterious polymer in many ways: structure of microfibrils, thermodynamics of synthesis and degradation, and interactions with other plant cell wall components. Our aim is to uncover the details and mechanisms of cellulose digestion and synthesis. We report the details of the structure of cellulose 1-beta under several temperature conditions and report here the results of these studies and connections to experimental measurements and the measurement in-silico the free energy of decrystallization of several morphologies of cellulose. In spatially large modeling, we show the most recent work of mapping atomistic and coarse-grain models into tomographic images of cellulose and extreme coarse-grain modeling of interactions of large cellulase complexes with microfibrils. We discuss the difficulties of modeling cellulose and suggest future work both experimental and theoretical to increase our understanding of cellulose and our ability to use it as a raw material for fuels and materials.

Crowley, M. F.; Matthews, J.; Beckham, G.; Bomble, Y.; Hynninen, A. P.; Ciesielski, P. F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We review the progress made by amorphous silicon solar cells, including the emerging technology of solar cells of microcrystalline silicon. The long-term trend in the efficiency of stabilized laboratory cells based on a-Si:H has been a rise of {approx}0.6 % per year. The recent trend in the a-Si,Ge:H cell efficiency alone, measured in the spectral window assigned to the bottom device in a triple-junction cell, has been an increase of {approx}0.16% per year. These improvements have brought within reach the target of 15% efficiency identified by EPRI and DOE for widespread application. Our review leads to an identification of areas of promising research, with emphasis on the fundamental science required to reach the 15% target, and then to move to the next-level efficiency goal.

Wagner, S. (Princeton University); Carlson, D. E. (Solarex); Branz, H. M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thermal regeneration of an electrochemical concentration cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are described for thermally regenerating an electrochemical concentration cell having first and second aluminum electrodes respectively positioned in contact with first and second electrolytes separated by an ion exchange member, the first and second electrolytes being composed of different concentrations of an ionic solvent and a salt, preferably an aluminum halide. The ionic solvent may be either organic or inorganic with a relatively low melting point, the ionic solvent and the salt form a complex wherein the free energy of formation of said complex is less than about -5 kcal/mole. A distillation column using solar heat or low grade industrial waste heat receives the first and second electrolytes and thermally decomposes the salt-solvent complex to provide feed material for the two half cells.

Krumpelt, M.; Bates, J.K.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

MHD seed recovery/regeneration, Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task I calls for the design, procurement, construction, and installation of the Seed Regeneration Proof-of-Concept Facility (SRPF) that will produce tonnage quantities of recyclable potassium formate seed at a design rate of 250 lb/hr for testing in the channel at the CDIF while collecting data that will be used to upgrade the design of a 300 MW[sub t] system. Approximately 12 tons of KCOOH (dry basis) as 70--75 wt % solution have been produced. The long-term plant securing operations which were started in May were completed during this reporting period. Securing operations included both the front end of the plant (potassium sulfate reaction and solids separation/washing units) and the evaporator/crystallizer. In addition, weekly preventative maintenance was performed. TRW is awaiting word from the CDIF in Montana that it is alright to ship the 41 drums of concentrated potassium formate final product to Montana.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Regeneration characteristics of adsorbent in the integrated desiccant/collector  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a solar desiccant system using an adsorbent in an integrated desiccant/solar collector that uses direct solar energy as a heat source for efficient regeneration of the adsorbent. The objective of this study is to investigate an integrated desiccant/collector in which the adsorbent absorbs solar radiation fully and is heated for regeneration. Another objective is to obtain the regeneration characteristics in the equipment proposed by both experiments and simulations. Throughout this study, silica gel is used as the adsorbent.

Saito, Y. (Osaka Inst. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Regeneration of lime from sulfates for fluidized-bed combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized-bed combustor the evolving sulfur oxides are reacted with CaO to form calcium sulfate which is then decomposed in the presence of carbonaceous material, such as the fly ash recovered from the combustion, at temperatures of about 900.degree. to 1000.degree. C., to regenerate lime. The regenerated lime is then recycled to the fluidized bed combustor to further react with the evolving sulfur oxides. The lime regenerated in this manner is quite effective in removing the sulfur oxides.

Yang, Ralph T. (Middle Island, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Approaches for regeneration of amine-carboxylic acid extracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction processes based on reversible chemical complexation can be useful for separation of polar organics from dilute solution. Tertiary amines are effective extractants for the recovery of carboxylic acids from aqueous solution. The regeneration of aminecarboxylic acid extracts is an important step which strongly influences the economic viability of the separation process. Several regeneration methods are critically reviewed, and the factors that affect swing regeneration processes, including temperature-swing, diluent composition-swing and pH-swing with a volatile base are discussed. Interest in this area comes from interest in treatment of waste streams, particularly in petrochemical and fermentation manufacture.

Dai, Y.; King, C.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

Ling Li; Giulio Manico; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello; Gianfranco Vidali

2007-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35[degrees]C to about 40[degrees]C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35{degrees}C to about 40{degrees}C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluating possible cap and trade legislation on cellulosic feedstock availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated, socioeconomic biogeophysical model is used to analyze the interactions of cap-and-trade legislation and the Renewable Fuels Standard. Five alternative policy scenarios were considered with the purpose of identifying policies that act in a synergistic manner to reduce carbon emissions, increase economic returns to agriculture, and adequately meet ethanol mandates. We conclude that climate and energy policies can best be implemented together by offering carbon offset payments to conservation tillage, herbaceous grasses for biomass, and by constraining crop residue removal for ethanol feedstocks to carbon neutral level. When comparing this scenario to the Baseline scenario, the agricultural sector realizes an economic benefit of US$156 billion by 2030 and emissions are reduced by 135 Tg C-equivalent (Eq) yr 1. Results also indicate that geographic location of cellulosic feedstocks could shift significantly depending on the final policies implemented in cap and trade legislation. Placement of cellulosic ethanol facilities should consider these possible shifts when determining site location.

Hellwinckel, Chad [Agricultural Policy Analysis Center, University of Tennessee; de la Torre Ugarte, Daniel [University of Tennessee; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; West, T. O. [University of Maryland

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

Somerville, Chris (Director, Energy Biosciences Institute)

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon by heating a portion of the glow discharge produced amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 365.degree. C. higher than the deposition temperature prior to etching. The etch rate of the exposed amorphous silicon is less than the unheated amorphous silicon.

Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Zanzucchi, Peter J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An Environmental and Policy Evaluation of Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the global demand for energy rises, there are significant efforts to find alternative energy sources. In the United States (US), these efforts are primarily motivated by a desire to increase energy security and reduce the potential impacts on climate change caused by carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Biofuels are considered a potential partial solution, which are being encouraged through public policy. Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel that is required in increasing amounts over time as part of the Renewable Fuel Standards. Thus, researchers are exploring the environmental impacts of using this biofuel on a large scale. This dissertation research performed an environmental evaluation using the Life Cycle Assessment technique on Bioenergy Sorghum, a crop which was specifically produced as an energy crop, used in a conversion process (MixAlco version 1) that can produce cellulosic ethanol. Results indicate that the conversion process is highly optimized with minimal environmental concerns. Analysis of the crop production, however, demonstrate that further investigation is warranted regarding the depletion of natural resources and emissions from the fertilizers and pesticides/herbicides, due to large scale production of energy crops. A new policy is proposed to support the sustainable, environmentally responsible development of cellulosic ethanol in the US.

Hurtado, Lisa Diane

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Biomass Facility Facility Martinez Sulfuric Acid Regeneration Plt Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

UDel: named entity recognition and reference regeneration from surface text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results of a system developed for the GREC Named Entity Recognition and GREC Named Entity Regeneration Challenges 2010. We explain our process of automatically annotating surface text, as well as how we use this ...

Nicole L. Sparks; Charles F. Greenbacker; Kathleen F. McCoy; Che-Yu Kuo

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Carbon DioxiDe Capture from flue Gas usinG Dry reGenerable sorbents Background Currently...

254

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International 1 is heading a research team to develop an innovative process for CO 2 capture that employs a dry, regenerable sorbent. The process is cyclic in that the sorbent...

255

Corrosion protection of reforming equipment during regeneration of the catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors discuss the important process of catalytic reforming to produce the basic components of high-octane gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum chemistry. Wide use is made of two-stage oxidative regeneration--coke burning and oxychlorination. This increases the activity of the catalysts. The authors developed a two-stage industrial method of corrosion protection for the low-temperature equipment of catalytic reforming plants during catalyst regeneration. The system is washed, before catalyst regeneration, with an aqueous solution of KLOE-15 in order to remove corrosion products already present. During catalyst regeneration, KLOE-15 and a neutralizing additive are fed in. The method is technically simple and economically effective, and has been introduced in a number of petroleum refineries.

Altsybeeva, A.I.; Andreeva, G.A.; Prasolova, O.N.; Ratner, E.M.; Reshetnikov, S.M.; Teslya, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared by glow discharge of disilane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an investigation of the properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and the efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells deposited from disilane at rates of 1.5 nanometers/second or greater. The study was divided into two parts, investigation of basic materials properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the fabrication of glass-P-I-N-metal solar cells. The thin film materials properties investigated included the dark conductivity, photoconductivity, dihydride/monohydride concentration ratio, activation energy, and mobility-lifetime product. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells were fabricated with an intrinsic layer which was deposited at 1.5 nanometers/second. The absolute and reverse bias quantum yields were measured and solar cell efficiencies of 5% were achieved. Attempts to increase the efficiency by reverse bias annealing are also reported. 7 refs., 27 figs.

Wiesmann, H.J. (UHT Corp., Dobbs Ferry, NY (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Properties of vacuum arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous hard carbon films formed by vacuum arc deposition are hydrogen-free, dense, and very hard. The properties of amorphous hard carbon films depend strongly on the energy of the incident ions. A technique which is called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation can be applied to vacuum arc deposition of amorphous hard carbon films to influence the ion energy. The authors have studied the influence of the ion energy on the elastic modulus determined by an ultrasonic method, and have measured the optical gap for films with the highest sp{sup 3} content they have obtained so far with this deposition technique. The results show an elastic modulus close to that of diamond, and an optical gap of 2.1 eV which is much greater than for amorphous hard carbon films deposited by other techniques.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Raoux, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply airstream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium.

Wilson, Kirk A. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Brown, David B. (Brighton, MI)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

Nguyen, Quang A

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spin--wave spectrum of an amorphous ferromagnet  

SciTech Connect

The spin-wave spectruin of an amorphous Heisenberg ferromagnet is calculated by a diagrammatic expansion making use of a transformation due to Taylor and Wu Phys. Rev., B2: 1752 (1970). The upper limit of the spectrum is found to occur at frequencies below that of the corresponding crystalline system, while the low-frequency part of the spectrum is enhanced. Internal van Hove singularities are absent in the spin-wave spectrum of the amorphous ferromagnet. (auth)

Gubernatis, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silano (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700.degree.-2300.degree. C., and preferably in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-8 to 10.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseous mixture onto a substrate outside said source of thermal decomposition to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Ghosh, Arup K. (Rocky Point, NY); Wiesmann, Harold J. (Wantagh, NY); Rock, Edward B. (Oxford, GB); Lutz, III, Harry A. (Midlothian, VA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Enriching and characterizing an aerotolerant mixed microbial community capable of cellulose hydrolysis and ethanol production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cellulosic ethanol produced via consolidated bioprocessing may one day be a viable alternative to fossil fuels However, efforts must focus on streamlining and simplifying its (more)

Ronan, Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Spinning Carbon Fiber Precursors from 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Cellulose Solutions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cellulose is an abundant natural renewable polymer that is used in the production of many materials. However, limited processibility and reduced solubility have restricted its (more)

Gelderloos-Sammons, Rhea J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology was extended to prepare similar adsorption gels from cellulosic wastes like spent paper and spent cotton. These adsorption gels were tested for...

267

Catalyst regeneration apparatus with radial flow distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for regenerating spent hydrocarbon conversion catalyst. Catalyst particles in a vertically-elongated movable tapered bed are contacted with a hot oxygen-containing gas stream in order to remove, by means of combustion, coke which accumulated on the catalyst particles while they were used in a hydrocarbon conversion zone. Catalyst moves downward under the influence of gravity. The catalyst bed is tapered such that the thickness of the bed, in a dimension which is transverse to the direction of catalyst movement, varies from a minimum at the top of the tapered bed to a maximum at the bottom of the tapered bed. Gas passes through the tapered bed in a direction which is substantially transverse to the direction of catalyst movement. Substantially, all of the catalyst in the bed is in contact with the flowing gas. The variation in bed thickness causes a varying gas flow rate through the bed, from a maximum flow rate at the top of the tapered bed to a minimum flow rate at the bottom of the tapered bed and reduces the time that catalyst is exposed to high temperature gases. This flow pattern results in the delivery of oxygen in a manner which more closely matches the oxygen requirement for combustion at each point in the tapered bed. Advantages of the invention include increased coke burning capacity and longer catalyst life. Catalytic reforming is an example of a hydrocarbon conversion process in which the invention may be advantageously employed. 9 figs.

Sechrist, P.A.; Koves, W.J.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H{sub 2} can be readily released in contrast to the loss of H{sub 2} from C{sub 2}H{sub 6} which is substantially endothermic. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any chemical H{sub 2} storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, but reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. Our group is currently engaged in trying to find and fully demonstrate an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps. Although spent fuel composition depends on the dehydrogenation method, we have focused our efforts on the spent fuel resulting from metal-based catalysis, which has thus far shown the most promise. Metal-based catalysts have produced the fastest rates for a single equivalent of H{sub 2} released from AB and up to 2.5 equiv. of H{sub 2} can be produced within 2 hours. While ongoing work is being carried out to tailor the composition of spent AB fuel, a method has been developed for regenerating the predominant product, polyborazylene (PB) which can be obtained readily from the decomposition of borazine or from nickel carbene catalyst dehydrogenation. In this cycle, the PB is digested with benzenedithiol to yield two products which can both be converted to AB using Bu{sub 3}SnH and BU{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} as reductants. However, in a real world situation the process becomes more complicated for several reasons. Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} is thermally unstable and therefore not viable in a process scale operation. This has led to the development of Bu{sub 3}SnH as the sole reductant although this requires an additional amine exchange step in order to facilitate the reduction to an amine-borane which can then be converted to AB. The tin by-products also need to be recycled in order to maximize the overall energy efficiency and therefore minimize the overall cost of the process. In addition, on an industrial scale, the mass of the tin reductant generates significant cost due to the manipulation of the relatively large quantities involved so reducing the mass at this stage would be of vast significance. We will discuss further developments made to the tin recycle component of the cycle (including methods to minimize tin usage) and investigate new methods of reduction of the digested products, primarily focusing on lighter reductants, including lighter analogs of Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} and Bu{sub 3}SnH. These advances will have a significant impact on the cost of production and therefore the viability of AB as a fuel. Minimization of tin reagents and their recycle will contribute to reduction of the overall cost of AB regeneration and all stages of AB regeneration have been demonstrated.

Sutton, Andrew David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Benjamin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Phase Diagram of Amorphous Solid Water: Low-Density, High-Density, and Very-High-Density Amorphous Ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the phase diagram of amorphous solid water by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations follow different paths in the phase diagram: isothermal compression/decompression, isochoric cooling/heating and isobaric cooling/heating. We are able to identify low-density amorphous (LDA), high-density amorphous (HDA), and very-high density amorphous (VHDA) ices. The density $\\rho$ of these glasses at different pressure $P$ and temperature $T$ agree well with experimental values. We also study the radial distribution functions of glassy water. We obtain VHDA by isobaric heating of HDA, as in experiment. We also find that ``other forms'' of glassy water can be obtained upon isobaric heating of LDA, as well as amorphous ices formed during the transformation of LDA to HDA. We argue that these other forms of amorphous ices, as well as VHDA, are not altogether new glasses but rather are the result of aging induced by heating. Samples of HDA and VHDA with different densities are recovered at normal $P$, showing that there is a continuum of glasses. Furthermore, the two ranges of densities of recovered HDA and recovered VHDA overlap at ambient $P$. Our simulations are consistent with the possibility of HDA$\\to$LDA and VHDA$\\to$LDA transformations, reproducing the experimental findings. We do not observe a VHDA$\\to$HDA transformation.

Nicolas Giovambattista; H. Eugene Stanley; Francesco Sciortino

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

CYANATE ION IN COMPACT AMORPHOUS WATER ICE  

SciTech Connect

The 4.62 {mu}m infrared (2164.5 cm{sup -1}) absorption band, observed in ice mantels toward many young stellar objects, has been mostly attributed to the {nu}{sub 3} (CN stretch) band of OCN{sup -} ions. We present in this work a spectroscopic study of OCN{sup -} ions embedded in compact amorphous ice in a range of concentrations and temperatures relevant to astronomical observations together with quantum mechanical calculations of the {nu}{sub 3} band of OCN{sup -} in various H{sub 2}O environments. The ice samples containing the ions are prepared through hyperquenching of liquid droplets of K{sup +}OCN{sup -} solutions on a substrate at 14 K. The {nu}{sub 3} OCN{sup -} band appears as a broad feature peaking at 4.64 {mu}m with a secondary maximum at 4.54 {mu}m and is much weaker than the corresponding peak in the liquid solution or in the solid salt. A similar weakening is observed for other OCN{sup -} absorption peaks at 7.66 {mu}m (2{nu}{sub 2}) and 8.20 {mu}m ({nu}{sub 1}). The theoretical calculations for the {nu}{sub 3} vibration lead to a range of frequencies spanning the experimentally observed width. This frequency spread could help explain the pronounced drop in the band intensity in the ice. The OCN{sup -} {nu}{sub 3} band in the present compact ices is also broader and much weaker than that reported in the literature for OCN{sup -} ions obtained by variously processing porous ice samples containing suitable neutral precursors. The results of this study indicate that the astronomical detection of OCN{sup -} in ice mantels could be significantly impaired if the ion is embedded in a compact water network.

Mate, Belen; Herrero, Victor J.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Moreno, Miguel A.; Escribano, Rafael [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Torre, Delia [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28050 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Pedro C. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica I, Universidad Complutense, Unidad Asociada UCM-CSIC, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Optimization of direct bioconversion of cellulose into biofuels: medium improvement, scale-up and use of alternative nutrients.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite the long-term economic and environmental benefits of cellulosic biofuel production, low rates of cellulose utilization and products syntheses are major techno-economical barriers to the (more)

Islam, Rumana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of A Microwave Assisted Particulate Filter Regeneration System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need for active regeneration of diesel particulate filters and the advantages of microwave assisted regeneration are discussed. The current study has multiple objectives, which include developing a microwave assisted particulate filter regeneration system for future generation light-duty diesel applications, including PNGV type applications. A variable power 2.0 kW microwave system and a tuned waveguide were employed. Cavity geometry is being optimized with the aid of computational modeling and temperature measurements during microwave heating. A wall-flow ceramic-fiber filter with superior thermal shock resistance, high filtration efficiency, and high soot capacity was used. The microwave assisted particulate filter regeneration system has operated for more than 100 hours in an engine test-cell with a 5.9-liter diesel engine with automated split exhaust flow and by-pass flow capabilities. Filter regeneration was demonstrated using soot loads up to 10 g/liter and engine exhaust at idling flow rates as the oxygen source. A parametric study to determine the optimal combination of soot loading, oxidant flow rate, microwave power and heating time is underway. Preliminary experimental results are reported.

Popuri, Sriram

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With Other Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been driving down the cost of cellulosic ethanol and overcoming the technical challenges that surround it-major milestones toward the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence performance if used as EDLC electrode material. Carbon aerogels were synthesized by crosslinking cellulose atmosphere (1000°C, nitrogen atmosphere). Subsequently, the surface chemistry of the carbon aerogels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Construction and characterization of chimeric cellulases with enhanced catalytic activity towards insoluble cellulosic substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulose in high affinity through fusion of an effective CBM, the enzyme concentration on the insol- uble., 2008; Cordomi et al., 2008; Yoon et al., 2008). Initial coordinates for the protein atoms were taken- ciently hydrolyzed the soluble cellulosic substrates as well as insol- uble ones (Table 1). The catalytic

Lee, Keun Woo

277

Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 3550% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented for the first time and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained earlier for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H$_{2}$ formation within a temperature range which is relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds. The results also indicate that the hydrogen molecules are thermalized with the surface and desorb with low kinetic energy. Thus, they are unlikely to occupy highly excited states.

Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; Gianfranco Vidali; Ling Li; Sol Swords; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Giulio Manico; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mechanisms of Cell Regeneration, Development, and Propagation within a Two-Dimensional Multicell Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, mechanisms of cell regeneration, development, and propagation within a two-dimensional multicell storm are investigated using a numerical cloud model. The cell regeneration is explained by the advection mechanism. The following ...

Yuh-Lang Lin; Roy L. Deal; Mark S. Kulie

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A wound-induced Wnt expression program controls planarian regeneration polarity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regeneration requires specification of the identity of new tissues to be made. Whether this process relies only on intrinsic regulative properties of regenerating tissues or whether wound signaling provides input into ...

Petersen, Christian P.

286

Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

Madan, A.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Amorphous Metallic Glass as New High Power and Energy Density Anodes For Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the use of aluminum based amorphous metallic glass as the anode in lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Amorphous metallic glasses have no long-range ordered microstructure; the atoms are less closely ...

Meng, Shirley Y.

288

Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data supplied by a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). The thermochemical system analysis revealed that most of the system inefficiency is associated with the gasification process and subsequent tar reforming step. For the biochemical process, the steam generation from residue combustion, providing the requisite heating for the conventional pretreatment and alcohol distillation processes, was shown to dominate the exergy loss. An overall energy balance with different potential distillation energy requirements shows that as much as 30% of the biomass energy content may be available in the future as a feedstock for thermochemical production of liquid fuels.

Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration methods and systems for hybrid vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling regeneration of a particulate filter for a hybrid vehicle is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration. An engine control module controls operation of an engine of the hybrid vehicle based on the control of the current to the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Low cost catalysts for regeneration of diesel particulate filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A range of perovskites including the substituted and promoted perovskite type catalytic materials have been designed and synthesized using various techniques. In this work we have studied the catalytic activities of a praseodymium substituted La0.8Pr0.2MnO3 ... Keywords: catalytic regeneration of DPF, perovskite, praseodymium substituted lanthanum-magnates perovskite

Manju Dhakad; S. S. Rayalu; Rakesh Kumar; D. Fino; N. Russo; Nitin Labhsetwar

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Power Density Analysis for a Regenerated Closed Brayton Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the power density, defined as the ratio of power output to the maximum specific volume in the cycle, is set as the objective for performance analysis of an irreversible, regenerated and closed Brayton cycle coupled to constant-temperature ...

Lingen Chen; Junlin Zheng; Fengrui Sun; Chih Wu

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

Chiotti, P.

1964-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cellulose hydrolysis in evolving substrate morphologies III: Timescale analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis Hydrolysis in Evolving Substrate Morphologies III: Time-Scale Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Computational Systems Biology Lab, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 11 December 2009; revision received 4 May 2010; accepted 10 May 2010 Published online 1 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22814 ABSTRACT: We present a time-scale analysis for the enzy- matic hydrolysis of solid cellulosic substrates,

294

Cellulosic Ethanol: Securing the Planet Future Energy Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Bioenergy is fairly recognized as not only a necessity, but an inevitable path to secure the planet future energy needs. There is however a global consensus that the overall feasibility of bioenergy will require an integrated approach based on diversified feedstocks and conversion processes. As illustrated in the Brazilian experience, the thrust of any bioenergy program should be centered on the principles and criteria of sustainable production. In general the trends are towards exploiting low value cellulosic materials to obtain high-end value energy products. To this end, it is expected that scientific or technical innovation will come to play a critical role on the future prospects and potential of any bioenergy initiative.

Clifford Louime; Hannah Uckelmann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Conversion of cellulosic and waste polymer material to gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present status and future plans for a project to convert cellulosic (biomass) and waste synthetic polymer materials to quality liquid fuels is presented. A thermal gasification approach is utilized followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis steps. Potential products include a medium quality substitute for natural gas or liquid fuel equivalents of diesel fuel, kerosene or high octane gasoline. The process appears very flexible with regard to ability to handle different sources of feedstock. Results to date indicate quality products can be produced. Product yields need to be improved with the main thrust centered on improvement of pyrolysis gas composition. This will be a major effort in the new contract period. Other items to be addressed are study of alternate economic feedstocks, waste stream characterization, and liquid fuels synthesis and tailoring with particular attention on the effects of alternate feedstocks. A description of a proposed 10 ton/day pilot plant is presented with flow sheet, material balance and cost estimates.

Kuester, J.L.

1979-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Structure-driven optimizations for amorphous data-parallel programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irregular algorithms are organized around pointer-based data structures such as graphs and trees, and they are ubiquitous in applications. Recent work by the Galois project has provided a systematic approach for parallelizing irregular applications based ... Keywords: amorphous data-parallelism, cautious operator implementations, irregular programs, iteration coalescing, one-shot optimization, optimistic parallelization, synchronization overheads

Mario Mndez-Lojo; Donald Nguyen; Dimitrios Prountzos; Xin Sui; M. Amber Hassaan; Milind Kulkarni; Martin Burtscher; Keshav Pingali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Method of depositing wide bandgap amorphous semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing wide bandgap p type amorphous semiconductor materials on a substrate without photosensitization by the decomposition of one or more higher order gaseous silanes in the presence of a p-type catalytic dopant at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. and a pressure in the range from about 1-50 Torr.

Ellis, Jr., Frank B. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Delahoy, Alan E. (Rocky Hill, NJ)

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic systems, 1985--1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the performance of commercial amorphous silicon modules used in photovoltaic power systems from 1985 through 1989. Topics discussed include initial degradation, reliability, durability, and effects of temperature and solar irradiance on peak power and energy production. 6 refs., 18 figs.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary  

SciTech Connect

At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Amorphous-silicon thin-film heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The investigation of amorphous silicon materials at MTSEC has had two major thrusts: (1) to improve the amorphous material, i.e., obtain a low state density in the gap, improve the carrier collection depth and diminish non-radiative recombinations; and (2) to attempt to understand and improve on the limitations of the junction devices while evaluating the amorphous silicon materials. In the first of these efforts, the investigation has continued to examine the modifications to the a-Si(H) network by alloying silicon with other group IVA elements, either in binary or ternary compositions, and/or by replacing the hydrogenation for defect compensation with a combination of hydrogenation and alkylation or hydrogenation and halogenation. The doped junction layers are being examined in an attempt to determine the limiting characteristics of the junctions in solar cell devices of these amorphous materials. Amorphous alloys of Si-Ge, Si-C, Si-Sn were prepared as well as ternary compositions of Si-Ge-C and Si-Sn-C. In addition, Na vapor was added to the gas feed to deposit a-Si(Na, H) films, and to prepare Si-Sn, fluoride was added along with the tin by vapor additions of SnF/sub 4/ to the gas feed. The optical properties of these materials were measured, and structural and compositional information was obtained from the IR vibrational spectra using the scanning electron microscope and from analyses using scanning Auger microscopy. Electrical measurements have included the dark conductivity and the photo conductivity under room fluorescent light and at AM1 conditions. With alloys that displayed promising photoconductive properties n-i-p devices were prepared to assess the solar cell properties. Details are presented. (WHK)

Cretella, M. C.; Gregory, J. A.; Sandstrom, D. B.; Paul, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Efficiency of a liquid desiccant dehumidification system regenerated by using solar collectors/regenerators with photovoltaic fans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid solar dehumidification air-conditioning system was used to study the absorption of water vapor from moist air by contacting the air with aqueous solutions that contained from 90 to 94% triethylene glycol (TEG). For the packings of 2-inch polypropylene Jaeger Tri-Packs, which have a surface-to-volume ratio of 157 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3} (48 ft{sup 2}/ft{sup 3}), the efficiency of dehumidification can reach 93.3%. The environmental air was introduced into the dehumidifier cocurrently flowing with the liquid desiccant, and the liquid desiccant was sprayed on the top of the packing material. The air-to-liquid mass flow ratio was controlled in a range of 0.46 to 1.36. As the moisture was absorbed from air by the TEG solution, the solution was diluted. The regeneration of the solution was carried out in 20-piece (38.8 m{sup 2}) basin-type solar collectors/regenerators whose regeneration coefficients of performance are above 0.2. Air generated by photovoltaic fans was blown into the solar collectors/regenerators and carried away the water vapor from the evaporation of the aqueous desiccant solution. On the basis of the experimental results, the system performance is acceptable for most applications.

Tsair-Wang Chung; Wei-Yih Wu; Wen-Jih Yan; Ching-Lin Huang [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan (China)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

NREL: Continuum Magazine - At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive Issue 5 Print Version Share this resource At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive DOE challenge met-research advances cut costs to produce fuel from non-food plant sources. A photo showing a silhouette of a man wearing glass in a dark room lit only by a band of light consisting or red, blue, and white dots (26186). Enlarge image In NREL's new Energy Systems Integration Facility, the Insight Collaboration Laboratory shows a 3D model of cellulose microfibrils. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL Imagine a near perfect transportation fuel-it's clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable. Now imagine that it's also affordable. Bringing this vision closer to reality was the challenge the U.S.

304

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cellulosic biomass: an update. Curr.Opin.Biotechnol.16:Stokes, and D. C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as a feedstock for a2002. Energy production from biomass (part 1): overview of

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an exzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation.

Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263+-0.02 g cellulose L{sup -1} for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci [Chemical Engineering Department of Istanbul Technical University, Ayazaga, Maslak, Istanbul, 34469 (Turkey)

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

Somerville, Chris R. (Portola Valley, CA); Scheible, Wolf (Golm, DE)

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of Exothermic Reactions from Bulk-Vitrification Melter Feeds Containing Cellulose  

SciTech Connect

PNNL has demonstrated that cellulose effectively reduces the amount of molten ionic salt during Bulk Vitrification of simulated Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW). To address concerns about the potential reactivity of cellulose-LLW, PNNL used thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, and accelerating rate calorimetry to determine in these preliminary studies that these mixtures will support a self-sustaining reaction if heated to 110C at adiabatic conditions. Additional testing is recommended.

Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Bos, Stanley J.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Berry, Pam

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters which promote bonding between particles and b) to determine by what mechanisms the plasticity is enhanced in bulk amorphous metal matrix composites consolidated by ECAE. To accomplish the objectives BAM and AMMCs were produced via ECAE consolidation of Vitreloy 106a (Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3-wt%), ARLloy #1 (Hf71.3Cu16.2Ni7.6Ti2.2Al2.6 -wt%), and both of these amorphous alloys blended with crystalline phases of W, Cu and Ni. Novel instrumented extrusions and a host of postprocessing material characterizations were used to evaluate processing conditions and material properties. The results show that ECAE consolidation at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region gives near fully dense (>99%) and well bonded millimeter scale BAM and AMMCs. The mechanical properties of the ECAE processed BMG are comparable to cast material: Ï?f = 1640 MPa, ?µf = 2.3%, E = 80 GPa for consolidated Vitreloy 106a as compared to Ï?f = 1800 MPa, ?µf = 2.5%, E = 85 GPa for cast Vitreloy 106, and Ï?f = 1660 MPa, ?µf = 2.0%, E = 97 GPa for ARLloy #1 as compared to Ï?f = 2150 MPa, ?µf oxides and crystalline phase morphology and chemistry. It is demonstrated that the addition of a dispersed crystalline phase to an amorphous matrix by ECAE powder consolidation increases the plasticity of the amorphous matrix by providing locations for generation and/or arrest of adiabatic shear bands. The ability of ECAE to consolidated BAM and AMMCs with improved plasticity opens the possibility of overcoming the size and plasticity limitations of the monolithic bulk metallic glasses.

Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

High pressure HC1 conversion of cellulose to glucose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of ethanol from glucose by means of fermentation represents a potential long-range alternative to oil for use as a transportation fuel. Today's rising oil prices and the dwindling world supply of oil have made other fuels, such as ethanol, attractive alternatives. It has been shown that automobiles can operate, with minor alterations, on a 10% ethanol-gasoline mixture popularly known as gasohol. Wood has long been known as a potential source of glucose. Glucose may be obtained from wood following acid hydrolysis. In this research, it was found that saturating wood particles with HCl gas under pressure was an effective pretreatment before subjecting the wood to dilute acid hydrolysis. The pretreatment is necessary because of the tight lattice structure of cellulose, which inhibits dilute acid hydrolysis. HCl gas makes the cellulose more susceptible to hydrolysis and the glucose yield is doubled when dilute acid hydrolysis is preceded by HCl saturation at high pressure. The saturation was most effectively performed in a fluidized bed reactor, with pure HCl gas fluidizing equal volumes of ground wood and inert particles. The fluidized bed effectively dissipated the large amount of heat released upon HCl absorption into the wood. Batch reaction times of one hour at 314.7 p.s.i.a. gave glucose yields of 80% and xylose yields of 95% after dilute acid hydrolysis. A non-catalytic gas-solid reaction model, with gas diffusing through the solid limiting the reaction rate, was found to describe the HCl-wood reaction in the fluidized bed. HCl was found to form a stable adduct with the lignin residue in the wood, in a ratio of 3.33 moles per mole of lignin monomer. This resulted in a loss of 0.1453 lb. of HCl per pound of wood. The adduct was broken upon the addition of water. A process design and economic evaluation for a plant to produce 214 tons per day of glucose from air-dried ground Populus tristi gave an estimated glucose cost of 15.14 cents per pound. This would correspond to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol if the glucose were fermented. Key factors contributing to the cost of glucose production were unrecovered HCl, which contributed 5.70 cents per pound of glucose, and the cost of wood, which at $25 per ton contribute 4.17 cents per pound.

Antonoplis, Robert Alexander; Blanch, Harvey W.; Wilke, Charles R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electric Field Alignment of Cellulose Based-Polymer Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulose whiskers (CWs) obtained from naturally occuring cellulose are nano-inclusions which show a lot of promise as mechanical reinforcements in polymers. Typically, a relatively high content is added to realize improvement in effective mechanical behavior. This enhancement in modulus is usually followed by a modest increase in strength but generally the ductility and toughness decrease. Our approach is to use small concentrations of CWs so as not to detrimentally affect processability, toughness and ductility. By aligning the small concentrations, we target the same kind of improvement in modulus and strength as reported in the literature, but at much smaller volume contents. In this work, we investigate the effect of AC electric field on the alignment of dispersed nanoscale CW in a polymer. Polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) is used as the model polymer because of the good interaction between CWs and PVAc. A low concentration of 0.4wt% was used for the study. Two dispersion methods, namely basic and modified, were developed. The basic method led to micron scale dispersion. Using the modified method, CWs were individually dispersed in PVAc with average lengths and diameters of 260 nm and 8 nm respectively yielding an aspect ratio of approximately 30. The behavior of CWs (alignment and chain formation) under an applied electric field was found to be a function of applied electric field magnitude, frequency and duration. Following alignment, the CW/PVAc nanocomposites are thermally dried in the presence of electric field to maintain the aligned microstructure. Improvements in dielectric constant and mechanical properties were observed for the aligned cases as compared to random case and pure PVAc. The optimal electric field magnitude, frequency and duration for the alignment and chain formation were found to be 200Vpp/mm, 50 KHz for duration of 20 minutes for the microcomposite and 250Vpp/mm, 10KHz for a duration of 1hr for the nanocomposite. At 0.4wt% concentration, 21% increase in dielectric constant for the optimal nanocomposite case. Above Tg, a 680% improvement in elastic modulus at 0.4wt% concentration for the optimal nanocomposite case. The reason for the significant reinforcement is attributed to alignment (rotation and chain formation) and chain-chain interaction (3D network formation and hydrogen bonding).

Kalidindi, Sanjay Varma

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov December 2012 This patent-pending technology, "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process," provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Patent Details U.S. Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/159,553; titled "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid

313

Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

Moens, L.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Transgenic Plants Lower the Costs of Cellulosic Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion. Expression of a single gene derived from bacteria in plants has resulted in transgenic plants that are easier and cheaper to convert into biofuels. Part of the high production cost of cellulosic biofuels is the relatively poor accessibility of substrates to enzymes due to the strong associations between plant cell wall components. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have created transgenic maize expressing an active glycosyl hydrolase enzyme, E1 endoglucanase, originally isolated from a thermophilic bacterium, Acidothermus cellulolyticus. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced severity pretreatments and post-pretreatment enzymatic hydrolysis. This reduction in recalcitrance was manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion of wild-type biomass. The improvements observed are significant enough to positively affect the economics of the conversion process through decreased capital construction costs and decreased degradation products and inhibitor formation.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH).sub.2 is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH).sub.2 is added in an excess amount needed.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Amorphization and precipitation within the amorphous layer induced by dry sliding wear of an Al-Si/SiCp composite material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphization and precipitation have been observed within a surface mixed layer which was formed by unlubricated reciprocal sliding wear on the surface of Al-Si/SiCp composite. By using transmission electron microscopy, the characterizations of the amorphous phase and the crystal precipitates have been carried out. It has been identified that the precipitates possess tetragonal symmetry, and the lattice parameters of the precipitates have been determined. Internal twinning was also observed in the precipitate particles. EDS analysis indicates that the chemical composition of the precipitates was different from the amorphous phase. The results show that the precipitates might be produced in conjunction with the formation of the amorphous phase during the sliding wear. The formation mechanisms of the amorphous phase and the precipitates have been discussed in detail in terms of defects (i.e., dislocations and substructures) and thermodynamic changes induced by the unlubricated wear.

Li, X.Y.; Tandon, K.N. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Clostridium Thermocellum CbhA- Amino acid sequence modified for enhanced catalytic activity in the saccharification of cellulose  

sugars from biomass cellulose is an important step in making biomass-derived products economically viable. Despite efforts to engineer cellulases with ...

322

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Method for reducing sulfate formation during regeneration of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The regeneration of sulfur sorbents having sulfate forming tendencies and used for desulfurizing hot product gas streams such as provided by coal gasification is provided by employing a two-stage regeneration method. Air containing a sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen is used in the first stage for substantially fully regenerating the sorbent without sulfate formation and then regeneration of the resulting partially regenerated sorbent is completed in the second stage with air containing a quantity of oxygen slightly greater than the stoichiometric amount adequate to essentially fully regenerate the sorbent. Sulfate formation occurs in only the second stage with the extent of sulfate formation being limited only to the portion of the sulfur species contained by the sorbent after substantially all of the sulfur species have been removed therefrom in the first stage.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV); Rockey, John M. (Westover, WV)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

New amorphous forms of solid CO2 from ab initio molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By employing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at constant pressure, we investigated behavior of amorphous carbon dioxide between 0-100 GPa and 200-500 K and found several new amorphous forms. We focused on evolution of the high-pressure tetrahedral amorphous form known as a-carbonia on its way down to zero pressure, where it eventually converts into a molecular amorphous solid. During decompression, two nonmolecular amorphous forms with different proportion of three and four-coordinated carbons and two mixed molecular-nonmolecular forms were observed. Transformation from a-carbonia to the molecular state appears to proceed discontinuously via several intermediate stages. This suggests that solid CO2 might belong to the group of materials exhibiting polyamorphism. We also studied relations of the amorphous forms to their crystalline counterparts. The predominantly four-coordinated a-carbonia is related to phase V according to their structural properties, while existence of the mixed forms may reflect h...

Plaienka, Duan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Long-Term Tracking of Regenerated Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of regenerated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst has become quite commonplace in the utility industry over the past several years. As a result, a clear understanding of the long-term performance of regenerated catalysts is needed so that informed purchasing decisions can be made and accurate catalyst management plans can be developed. EPRI and others have evaluated the initial performance of regenerated catalysts in numerous studies, but long-term performance has not been studied in ad...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

2011 Long-Term Tracking of Regenerated Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of regenerated SCR catalyst has become quite commonplace in the utility industry over the past several years. As a result, a clear understanding of the long-term performance of regenerated catalysts is needed so that informed purchasing decisions can be made and accurate catalyst management plans can be developed. EPRI and others have evaluated the initial performance of regenerated catalysts in numerous studies, but long-term performance has not been studied in adequate detail. The current proje...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

2012 Long-Term Tracking of Regenerated Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of regenerated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst has become quite commonplace in the utility industry over the past several years. As a result, a clear understanding of the long-term performance of regenerated catalysts is needed so that informed purchasing decisions can be made and accurate catalyst management plans can be developed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and others have evaluated the initial performance of regenerated catalysts in numerous studies, but ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

APPLICATION OF NOVEL REGENERATOR MATERIAL WITHIN A COAXIAL TWO-STAGE PULSE TUBE REFRIGERATOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a lead-based regenerator material which is suitable for working temperatures below 20 K. This material can be used as a substitute for the state of the art non-magnetic materials used today within very low-temperature regenerators. This high efficient regenerator matrix combines technological advantages with the possibility to vary the thermodynamic and flow characteristics over a wide range

T. Koettig; F. Richter; R. Nawrodt; A. Zimmer; C. Schwarz; D. Heinert; M. Thrk; P. Seidel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Regenerable Sorbent Technique for Capturing CO2 Using Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

This technology allows foroptimal CO2 removal capacity for a given absorption and regeneration reactor size. Management of water loading in this ...

331

Methylome reorganization during in vitro dedifferentiation and regeneration of Populus trichocarpa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the in vitro-regenerated oil palm Elaeis guineensis. AnnJL: Somaclonal variation in oil palm (Elaeis guineensischaracterisation of two oil palm markers showing somaclonal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Moderate and High Temperatur...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,314,847 entitled "Regenerable sorbents for CO 2 capture from moderate and...

333

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO 2 Capture Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is...

334

SP58: Hydrogels for Stem Cell-Based Heart Muscle Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MI leads to chronic heart failure due to insufficient cardiomyocyte regeneration. The goal of this project is to design injectable, pH- and temperature-sensitive...

335

Characterization of cellulosic wastes and gasification products from chicken farms  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gas chromatography indicated the variable quality of the producer gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The char had appreciable NPK values, and can be used as a fertiliser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bio-oil produced was of poor quality, having high moisture content and low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mass and energy balances showed inadequate level energy recovery from the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future work includes changing the operating parameters of the gasification unit. - Abstract: The current article focuses on gasification as a primary disposal solution for cellulosic wastes derived from chicken farms, and the possibility to recover energy from this process. Wood shavings and chicken litter were characterized with a view to establishing their thermal parameters, compositional natures and calorific values. The main products obtained from the gasification of chicken litter, namely, producer gas, bio-oil and char, were also analysed in order to establish their potential as energy sources. The experimental protocol included bomb calorimetry, pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), thermo-gravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), mineral content analyses and gas chromatography. The mass and energy balances of the gasification unit were also estimated. The results obtained confirmed that gasification is a viable method of chicken litter disposal. In addition to this, it is also possible to recover some energy from the process. However, energy content in the gas-phase was relatively low. This might be due to the low energy efficiency (19.6%) of the gasification unit, which could be improved by changing the operation parameters.

Joseph, Paul, E-mail: p.joseph@ulster.ac.uk [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Tretsiakova-McNally, Svetlana; McKenna, Siobhan [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used to simulate the range of biomass available by county and district. The probability that a district could support a 25, 50, 75, or 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plant is estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation results. Biomass in Texas is concentrated in the Northern and Eastern areas of the state. The areas of South and West Texas have little to no biomass available to use for cellulosic ethanol. The North East, South East, and Upper Coast districts include forestry waste that increase the amount of available biomass. With 100 percent certainty the North East and South East districts can support four 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plants each. The research found that there is more than enough biomass to support numerous cellulosic ethanol plants in Texas, and decision makers can use the results of this study to identify regions of low and high risk for available biomass from agricultural and forestry waste.

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Field-Annealed FeCo-Based Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Alloys ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The saturation magnetic flux density for the optimum field annealed amorphous ... Current Status of Permanent Magnet Research and Market in China.

339

Synthesis of Amorphous Al-Co-Ce Alloys via Atomization and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternatively, complete amorphization of the Al9Co2 and Al11Ce3 compounds was achieved by mechanical milling the atomized powder. The effect of initial...

340

Characterization for the Onset of Crystallization of Amorphous to Microcrystalline Silicon by Optical Spectroscopies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the amorphous to microcrystalline silicon films made at three laboratories by using Raman, photoluminescence- and optical-abosrption spectroscopies.

Yue, G.; Han, D.; Ganguly, G.; Wang, Q.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

Zielke, Clyde W. (McMurray, PA); Rosenhoover, William A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Erbium-based magnetic refrigerant (regenerator) for passive cryocooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler having a low temperature stage for reaching approximately 10K, wherein the low temperature stage includes a passive magnetic heat regenerator selected from the group consisting of Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Pb, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 (Sn.sub.0.75 Ga.sub.0.25), and Er.sub.9 Ni.sub.3 Sn comprising a mixture of Er.sub.3 Ni and Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn in the microstructure.

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

Progress in amorphous silicon PV technology: An update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reach the 15% stabilized efficiency goal for amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules by the year 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established four research teams. The teams -- with members from industry, universities, and NREL -- have been in operation for 2.5 years now. Consensus has been reached that a triple-junction a-Si structure is needed to reach the efficiency goal. Performance parameter goals for the overall structure and the three component cells have been formulated. All four teams have generated their own development plans. Individual team progress relative to the plans is reported.

Luft, W.; Branz, H.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Dalal, V.L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Hegedus, S.S. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion; Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Neutron spectroscopy of high-density amorphous ice.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vibrational spectra of high-density amorphous ice (hda-ice) for H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O samples were measured by inelastic neutron scattering. The measured spectra of hda-ice are closer to those for high-pressure phase ice-VI, but not for low-density ice-Ih. This result suggests that similar to ice-VI the structure of hda-ice should consist of two interpenetrating hydrogen-bonded networks having no hydrogen bonds between themselves.

Kolesnikov, A. I.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

1979-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

Riley, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Heat Transfer between Graphene and Amorphous SiO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the heat transfer between graphene and amorphous SiO2. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and between the surfaces in the non-contact region. We consider the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies, and the heat transfer by the gas in the non-contact region. We find that the dominant contribution to the heat transfer result from the area of real contact, and the calculated value of the heat transfer coefficient is in good agreement with the value deduced from experimental data.

B. N. J. Persson; H. Ueba

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes has been studied for fabricating amorphous hydrogenated silicon thin-film solar cells. Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited in a reduced-pressure, tubular-flow reactor, using disilane feed-gas. Conditions for depositing intrinsic films at growth rates up to 10 A/s were identified. Electrical and optical properties, including dark conductivity, photoconductivity, activation energy, optical absorption, band-gap and sub-band-gap absorption properties of CVD intrinsic material were characterized. Parameter space for depositing intrinsic and doped films, suitable for device analysis, was identified.

Rocheleau, R.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NREL: News - NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

114 114 NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme CelA digests cellulose faster than enzymes from commercial preparations January 2, 2014 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the market. If the enzyme continues to perform well in larger tests, it could help drive down the price of making lignocellulosic fuels, from ethanol to other biofuels that can be dropped into existing infrastructure. A paper reporting this finding, "Revealing Nature's Cellulase Diversity: The

352

Direct analysis of cellulose in poplar stem by matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis analysis of cellulose in poplar stem by matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry Seokwon Jung 1,3 , Yanfeng Chen 3 , M. Cameron Sullards 1,3 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 * 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10 th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10 th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Received 10 July 2010; Revised 9 August 2010; Accepted 23 August 2010 Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) was applied to the analysis of the spatial distribution of cellulose on a cross-section of juvenile poplar (Populus deltoids) stems. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was used to optimize matrix (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic

353

Ultrastable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulosebinding moduletagged thermophilic enzyme on lowcost highcapacity cellulosic adsorbent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-stable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulose- Ultra-stable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulose- binding module-tagged thermophilic enzyme on low-cost high-capacity cellulosic adsorbent Suwan Myung 1,2 , Xiao-Zhou Zhang 1 , Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3* Running title: One-step protein purification and immobilization 1 Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA *Corresponding author. Tel: 540-231-7414; Fax: 540-231-7414; Email: ypzhang@vt.edu Biocatalysts and Bioreactor Design

354

The environmental benefits of cellulosic energy crops at a landscape scale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to present a broad overview of the potential environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops--particularly the cellulosic energy crops current under development. For this discussion, the term energy crop refers to a crop grown primarily to create feedstock for either making biofuels such as ethanol or burning in a heat or electricity generation facility. Cellulosic energy crops are designed to be used in cellulose-based ethanol conversion processes (as opposed to starch or sugar-based ethanol conversion processes). As more cellulose can be produced per hectare of land than can sugar or starch, the cellulose-based ethanol conversion process is a more efficient sue of land for ethanol production. Assessing the environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops is complex because the environmental impact of using biomass for energy must be considered in the context of alternative energy options while the environmental impact of producing biomass from energy crops must be considered in the context of alternative land-uses. Using biomass-derived energy can reduce greenhouse gas emissions or increase them; growing biomass energy crops can enhance soil fertility or degrade it. Without knowing the context of the biomass energy, one can say little about its specific environmental impacts. The primary focus of this paper is an evaluation of the environmental impacts of growing cellulosic energy crops especially at the landscape or regional scale. However, to set the stage for this discussion, the authors begin by comparing the environmental advantages and disadvantages of biomass-derived energy relative to other energy alternatives such as coal, hydropower, nuclear power, oil/gasoline, natural gas and photovoltaics.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, B.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. of Agriculture

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

NEUTRON AND SYNCHROTRON X-RAY FIBER DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF CELLULOSE POLYMORPHS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the crystalline nature of cellulose has been one of most studied structural problems in polymer science there remain many open questions. Cellulose is a polymer formed by (1-4)-linked {beta}-D-glucosyl residues that are alternately rotated by 180o along the polymer axis to form flat ribbon-like chains. Each glucosyl unit bears three hydroxyl groups, one an hydroxymethyl group. It has been long recognized that these hydroxyl groups and their ability to bond via hydrogen bonding not only play a major role in directing how the crystal structure of cellulose forms but also in governing important physical properties of cellulose materials. Through the development of new techniques we have been able to prepare fiber samples of cellulose with exceptionally high order. The quality of these samples is allowing us to exploit the unique properties of synchrotron X-ray and neutron sources in order to collect diffraction data to near atomic resolution. Synchrotron X-rays are used to provide accurate crystallographic parameters for C and O atoms. However, because of the relatively weak scattering power of H atoms for X-rays, neutrons are used to determine H atom parameters. We have developed methods for replacing labile H atoms with D, without any loss in crystalline perfection. Deuterated fibers can diffract neutrons with intensities that are substantially different from the intensities diffracted from hydrogenated fibers. These differences, along with the phases calculated from the C and O positions determined in our X-ray studies, are used to calculate Fourier difference syntheses in which density associated with labile hydrogen atoms is imaged. The unprecedented high resolution of these data is revealing new information on cellulose structure and hydrogen bonding.

Los Alamos National Laboratory

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Chapter 18: Understanding the Developing Cellulosic Biofuels Industry through Dynamic Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss a system dynamics model called the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the burgeoning cellulosic biofuels industry in the United States. The model has also recently been expanded to include advanced conversion technologies and biofuels (i.e., conversion pathways that yield biomass-based gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and butanol), but we focus on cellulosic ethanol conversion pathways here. The BSM uses a system dynamics modeling approach (Bush et al., 2008) built on the STELLA software platform.

Newes, E.; Inman, D.; Bush, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Convergence of Agriculture and Energy: II. Producing Cellulosic Biomass for Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35-50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on geographical factors such as biomass species, yield, location, climate, local economy, as well as the types of systems used for harvesting, collection, preprocessing, and transportation. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that influence the selection of pioneer biorefinery locations, and these same factors will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Due to geographic variability and complex distributed supply system dynamics, estimating feedstock costs and supplies has been a major source of uncertainty.

Steven L. Fales; Wallace W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

363

Cellulose and cellobiose: adventures of a wandering organic chemist in theoretical chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The energies arising from the rotation of free hydroxyl groups in the central glucose residue of a cellulose crystalline assembly, calculated using RHF, DFT, and FMO2/MP2 methods, will be presented. In addition, interactions of this central glucose residue with some of the surrounding residues (selected on the basis of the interaction strengths) are analyzed. The mechanism of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellobiose, which is the repeating unit of cellulose. Energies corresponding to the different steps of this mechanism calculated using RHF and DFT are compared with those previously reported using molecular dynamics calculations and with experimental data.

Baluyut, John

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2004 and March 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. RTI has produced laboratory scale batches (approximately 300 grams) of supported sorbents (composed of 20 to 40% sodium carbonate) with high surface area and acceptable activity. Initial rates of weight gain of the supported sorbents when exposed to a simulated flue gas exceeded that of 100% calcined sodium bicarbonate. One of these sorbents was tested through six cycles of carbonation/calcination by thermogravimetric analysis and found to have consistent carbonation activity. Kinetic modeling of the regeneration cycle on the basis of diffusion resistance at the particle surface is impractical, because the evolving gases have an identical composition to those assumed for the bulk fluidization gas. A kinetic model of the reaction has been developed on the basis of bulk motion of water and carbon dioxide at the particle surface (as opposed to control by gas diffusion). The model will be used to define the operating conditions in future laboratory- and pilot-scale testing.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

DIRECT PLANTLET REGENERATION FROM SEGMENTS OF ROOT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shoot organogenesis and plant establishment has been achieved for Balanites aegyptiaca (L.) Del. from excised root explants. Young root explants obtained from 4 weeks old aseptic seedlings were used for the induction of direct shoot regeneration by incorporating various cytokinins either singly or in combination with auxins in Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium. Root explants cultured on MS medium enriched with 5.0 M Benzyladenine (BA) produced organogenic nodular meristemoids which developed into shoots at the cut ends as well as at the middle surface of the explant without formation of callus within 2 weeks of incubation. The highest frequency (68%) of shoot regeneration and maximum number (7.20 0.15) of shoots per explant was obtained on MS medium containing a combination of 5 M BA and 1.0 M ?-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). The microshoots were rooted best on half strength MS medium supplemented with 1.0 M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Plantlets derived via shoot organogenesis from root explants were successfully hardened and acclimatized under greenhouse and fared well with 75 % survival rate in field conditions. The protocol could be harvested in obtaining biodiesel from the plants and genetic transformation for the benefit of mankind.

Ankita Varshney; Mohammad Anis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates or intermediate salts through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that high calcination temperatures decrease the activity of sodium bicarbonate Grade 1 (SBC No.1) during subsequent carbonation cycles, but there is little or no progressive decrease in activity in successive cycles. SBC No.1 appears to be more active than SBC No.3. As expected, the presence of SO{sub 2} in simulated flue gas results in a progressive loss of sorbent capacity with increasing cycles. This is most likely due to an irreversible reaction to produce Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. This compound appears to be stable at calcination temperatures as high as 200 C. Tests of 40% supported potassium carbonate sorbent and plain support material suggest that some of the activity observed in tests of the supported sorbent may be due to adsorption by the support material rather than to carbonation of the sorbent.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P.Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P. Jr.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

Photoluminescence in silicon implanted with silicon ions at amorphizing doses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescent and structural properties of n-FZ-Si and n-Cz-Si implanted with Si ions at amorphizing doses and annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C in a chlorine-containing atmosphere have been studied. An analysis of proton Rutherford backscattering spectra of implanted samples demonstrated that an amorphous layer is formed, and its position and thickness depend on the implantation dose. An X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that defects of the interstitial type are formed in the samples upon annealing. Photoluminescence spectra measured at 78 K and low excitation levels are dominated by the dislocation-related line D1, which is also observed at 300 K. The peak position of this line, its full width at half-maximum, and intensity depend on the conduction type of Si and implantation dose. As the luminescence excitation power is raised, a continuous band appears in the spectrum. A model is suggested that explains the fundamental aspects of the behavior of the photoluminescence spectra in relation to the experimental conditions.

Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Kalyadin, A. E.; Kyutt, R. N.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T.; Shek, E. I.; Afrosimov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Tetel'baum, D. I. [Lobachevsky State University, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Increasing cellulose accessibility is more important than removing lignin: A comparison of cellulose solventbased lignocellulose fractionation and soaking in aqueous ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing Increasing Cellulose Accessibility Is More Important Than Removing Lignin: A Comparison of Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation and Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia Joseph A. Rollin, 1 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 1-540-231-7414; fax: þ1- 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 18 May 2010; revision received 11 August 2010; accepted 17 August 2010 Published online 1 September 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22919

372

Energy Saving Technology of Thermal Regenerative Compressed Air Dryer by Regenerates Adsorbent with Residual Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the characteristic of the compressed air dryer located at the same place with the air compressor, for the large capacity thermal regenerative compressed air dryer that the absorbent is regenerated by an electric heater, this thesis puts ... Keywords: Compressed air dryer, Regeneration, Heater, Residual heat, Energy saving

Zhang Mingzhu; Zhou Zhili; Li Hongtao; Zhang Yongbo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Regeneration Effect of Fluoride-rich Granular Activated Alumina on Desorption Regent NaOH Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an effective adsorbent, granular activated alumina (GAA) has been widely used in defluoridation. In order to reduce cost and operate environment-friendly, the adsorbent should be regenerated. In this paper, column experiment was done to characterize ... Keywords: adsorption, regeneration, defluoridation, granular activated alumina

Baijie Niu; Wenming Ding; Dan Dang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Regenerable process for the selective removal of sulfur dioxide from effluent gases  

SciTech Connect

A regenerable process is claimed for scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from effluent gases using an aqueous alkanolamine and the corresponding sulfite as the solvent, such amine having a boiling point below about 250/sup 0/ C. At one atmosphere pressure and wherein the alkanolamine solutions containing heat stable salts (Hss) is regenerated by alkali addition, crystallization and vacuum distillation of the amine.

Atwood, G.R.; Kosseim, A.J.; Sokolik, J.E.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Sputtered pin amorphous silicon semi-conductor device and method therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semi-conductor device is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers of amorphous silicon and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. A method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced physical integrity and facilitates ease of construction in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Friedman, Robert A. (Milford, NJ)

1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

The evaporation rate, free energy, and entropy of amorphous water Robin J. Speedy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evaporation rate, free energy, and entropy of amorphous water at 150 K Robin J. Speedy can be interpreted as giving a measure of their free energy difference, i a G 150 K 1100 100 J of amorphous water (a) and ice (i) near 150 K and suppose that their ratio gives a measure of their free energy

380

Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated H NMR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15 N, 13 C, and 1 H Received 14 February 2003; published 5 November 2003 The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa

Reilly, Anne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13 C nuclear magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance bonding of hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films was examined using solid-state 13 on Si 001 substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests reveal a recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa

Reilly, Anne

382

Effect of the annealing temperature on magnetic property for transformer with amorphous core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of annealing elevated, magnetic properties and their application with amorphous SA1 Cores. The phenomenon of two exothermic peaks correlated with the crystallization behavior was examined ... Keywords: amorphous materials, annealing, core loss, curies temperature, exciting power, transformer

Chang-Hung Hsu; Yeong-Hwa Chang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Dry Regenerable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Regenerable Sorbents Dry Regenerable Sorbents Project No.: FC26-07NT43089 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Schematic of RTI’s Dry Carbonate Process Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International completed two projects, NT43089 and NT40923, to investigate the use of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3 or soda ash) as an inexpensive, dry, and regenerable sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in the Dry Carbonate Process. In this process, Na2CO3 reacts with CO2 and water to form sodium bicarbonate at the temperature of the flue gas exhaust; the sorbent is then regenerated at modest temperatures (~120°C) to yield a concentrated stream of CO2 for sequestration or other use. The regenerated sorbent is recycled to the absorption step for subsequent CO2 capture. See schematic of RTI's Dry Carbonate Process.

384

Transformation of Sulfur Species during Steam/Air Regeneration on a Ni Biomass Conditioning Catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur K-edge XANES identified transformation of sulfides to sulfates during combined steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. This catalyst was tested over multiple reaction/regeneration/reduction cycles. Postreaction catalysts showed the presence of sulfides on H2S-poisoned sites. Although H2S was observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst, and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. Following the oxidative regeneration, the subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides, indicating the difficulty and sensitivity in achieving complete sulfur removal during regeneration for biomass-conditioning catalysts.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Kuhn, J. N.

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Amorphization of Ge and Si nanocrystals embedded in amorphous SiO{sub 2} by ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Finite-size effects become significant in nanoscale materials. When a nanocrystal is surrounded by a host matrix of a different nature, the perfection of the crystal structure is distorted by the interface formed between the nanocrystal and the matrix. The larger the surface-to-volume ratio of the nanocrystal, the higher the influence of the interface defect states on its properties. The presence of defect states in the interface can also explain the different responses of the nanocrystals (NCs) on external influences. By the combination of molecular-dynamics simulations and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements, we show that the amorphization of Si and Ge nanocrystals is reached at doses roughly one order of magnitude lower than those for the bulk crystals. Examining nanocrystals in the size range from 2.4 to 9 nm, we also show that the susceptibility to the amorphization decreases with increasing nanocrystal size. The finite-size effect remains significant also for the largest nanocrystals of 9 nm.

Backman, M.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Nordlund, K. [Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Djurabekova, F. [Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Arifov Institute of Electronics, Durmon yuli 33, 100125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Araujo, L. L.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

BIOTECHNOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ENZYMES AND PROTEINS Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Fusion of a family 9 cellulose-binding module improves catalytic potential of Clostridium thermocellum cellodextrin phosphorylase on insoluble cellulose Xinhao Ye & Zhiguang Zhu & Chenming Zhang & Y.-H. Percival Zhang Received: 31 March 2011 / Revised: 2 May 2011 / Accepted: 3 May 2011 # Springer-Verlag (outside the USA) 2011 Abstract Clostridium thermocellum cellodextrin phosphor- ylase (CtCDP), a single-module protein without an apparent carbohydrate-binding module, has reported activities on soluble cellodextrin with a degree of polymerization (DP) from two to five. In this study, CtCDP was first discovered to have weak activities on weakly water-soluble cellohep- taose and insoluble regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC). To enhance its activity on solid cellulosic materials, four cellulose binding modules, e.g., CBM3 (type A) from C. thermocellum

387

Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

Miller, David A [Cornell University; Suen, Garret [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Fox, Brian G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Angert, Esther R. [Cornell University; Currie, Cameron [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Woodward, J.

1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Design of Superhydrophobic Paper/Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Enhanced Etching and Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agents have been added to pulp slur- ries to yield hydrophobic paper surfaces [3]. In recent decades to the paper forming process. Commercial copy paper substrates, "Premium white copy paper", were obtained fromDesign of Superhydrophobic Paper/Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Enhanced Etching and Deposition

Breedveld, Victor

390

Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

Relation between the High Density Phase and the Very-High Density Phase of Amorphous Solid Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relation between the High Density Phase and the Very-High Density Phase of Amorphous Solid Water; published 18 March 2005) It has been suggested that high-density amorphous (HDA) ice is a structurally arrested form of high- density liquid (HDL) water, while low-density amorphous ice is a structurally

Sciortino, Francesco

392

Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines manufacturing monolithic amorphous silicon modules on a continuous polymer substrate. Module production costs can be reduced by increasing module performance, expanding production, and improving and modifying production processes. Material costs can be reduced by developing processes that use a 1-mil polyimide substrate and multilayers of low-cost material for the front encapsulant. Research to speed up a-Si and ZnO deposition rates is needed to improve throughputs. To keep throughput rates compatible with depositions, multibeam fiber optic delivery systems for laser scribing can be used. However, mechanical scribing systems promise even higher throughputs. Tandem cells and production experience can increase device efficiency and stability. Two alternative manufacturing processes are described: (1) wet etching and sheet handling and (2) wet etching and roll-to-roll fabrication.

Grimmer, D.P. (Iowa Thin Film Technologies, Inc., Ames, IA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research on semiconductor and non-semiconductor materials to enhance the performance of multi-band-gap, multijunction panel with an area greater than 900 cm[sup 2] by 1992. Double-junction and triple-junction cells are mode on a Ag/ZnO back reflector deposited on stainless steel substrates. An a-SiGe alloy is used for the i-layer in the bottom and the middle cells; the top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy. After the evaporation of an antireflection coating, silver grids and bus bars are put on the top surface and the panel is encapsulated in an ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/Tefzel structure to make a 1-ft[sup 2] monolithic module.

Guha, S. (United Solar Systems Corp., Troy, MI (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from disilane  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited at growth rates of 1 to 30 A/s by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane source gas at 24 torr total pressure in a tubular reactor. The effects of substrate temperature and gas holding time (flow rate) on film growth rate and effluent gas composition were measured at temperatures ranging from 360{sup 0} to 485{sup 0}C and gas holding times from 3 to 62s. Effluent gases determined by gas chromatography included silane, disilane and other higher order silanes. A chemical reaction engineering model, based on a silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion gas phase reaction network and film growth from both SiH/sub 2/ and high molecular weight silicon species, Si/sub n/H/sub 2n/, was developed. The model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally determined growth rates and effluent gas compositions.

Bogaert, R.J.; Russell, T.W.F.; Klein, M.T. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rocheleau, R.E.; Baron, B.N. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Inst. of Energy Conversion)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology titled "Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Carbon sequestration entails a multi-step process in which CO 2 is first separated / captured from gas streams followed by permanent storage. Carbon capture represents a critical step in the process and accounts for a considerable portion of the overall cost. Newly developed, high capacity amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technology including increased CO

400

Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Direct-energy-regenerated particulate trap technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this CRADA between Lockheed Martin and Cummins Engine Company was to develop fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC) composite materials for use as diesel engine particulate traps. Chemical vapor deposition techniques were used to partially densify and rigidize a thin fibrous substrate and produce the porous SiC- based filter. Microwave energy was used to directly couple to the deposited SiC to uniformly heat the filter and oxidize the collected carbon particulates. For commercial usage particulate traps must: (1) filter carbon particulates from a high temperature diesel exhaust at an acceptably low backpressure, (2) survive thousands of thermal transients due to regeneration or cleaning of the filter by oxidizing the collected carbon, (3) be durable and reliable over the expected life of the filter (300,000 miles or 10,000 hours), and (4) provide a low overall operating cost which is competitive with other filtering techniques. The development efforts performed as part of this CRADA have resulted in a very promising new technology for Cummins Engine Company. Ceramic fiber based filter papers were developed at Fleetguard, Inc., (a Cummins Subsidiary) and used to produce the spiral wound, corrugated filter cartridges. Optimized SiC coatings were developed at Lockheed Martin which couple with 2.45 GHz microwaves. Prototype particulate filter cartridges fabricated at Fleetguard and rigidized at Lockheed Martin performed well in single cylinder engine tests at Cummins. These prototype filters obtained filtering efficiencies greater than 80% at acceptably low backpressures and could be successfully headed and regenerated using a conventional in-home microwave oven.

Stinton, D.P.; Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yonushonis, T.M.; McDonald, A.C.; Wiczynski, P.D. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Haberkamp, W.C. [Fleetguard, Inc. (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Efficient regeneration of partially spent ammonia borane fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical hydrogen storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}B-NH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of hydrogen (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H2 can be readily released. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. Even though the viability of any chemical hydrogen storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. For example, the DOE recently decided to no longer pursue the use of NaBH{sub 4} as a H{sub 2} storage material, in part because of inefficient regeneration. We thus endeavored to find an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps.

Davis, Benjamin Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stephens, Frances [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dixon, David A [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Matus, Myrna H [UNIV OF ALABAMA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Regenerable Sorbent Development for Sulfur, Chloride and Ammonia Removal from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of components in coal form corrosive and toxic compounds during coal gasification processes. DOEs NETL aims to reduce contaminants to parts per billion in order to utilize gasification gas streams in fuel cell applications. Even more stringent requirements are expected if the fuel is to be utilized in chemical production applications. Regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal sorbents have been developed at NETL. These sorbents can remove the hydrogen sulfide to ppb range at 316 C and at 20 atmospheres. The sorbent can be regenerated with oxygen. Reactivity and physical durability of the sorbent did not change during the multi-cycle tests. The sorbent development work has been extended to include the removal of other major impurities, such as HCl and NH3. The sorbents for HCl removal that are available today are not regenerable. Regenerable HCl removal sorbents have been developed at NETL. These sorbents can remove HCl to ppb range at 300 C to 500 C. The sorbent can be regenerated with oxygen. Results of TGA and bench-scale flow reactor tests with both regenerable and non-regenerable HCl removal sorbents will be discussed in the paper. Bench-scale reactor tests were also conducted with NH3 removal sorbents. The results indicated that the sorbents have a high removal capacity and good regenerability during the multi-cycle tests. Future emphasis of the NETL coal gasification/cleanup program is to develop multi-functional sorbents to remove multiple impurities in order to minimize the steps involved in the cleanup systems. To accomplish this goal, a regenerable sorbent capable of removing both HCl and H2S was developed. The results of the TGA conducted with the sorbent to evaluate the feasibility of both H2S and HCl sorption will be discussed in this paper.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Webster, T.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Amorphous and nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Si thin film electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mg{sub 2}Si films, prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), were amorphous, as prepared, and nanocrystalline following annealing. Their micro-structure and electrochemical characteristics were studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electrochemical cycling against lithium. HRTEM analysis revealed that some excess Si was present in the films. The more amorphous thinner film exhibited excellent cyclability. However, when the film becomes crystalline, the irreversible capacity loss was more significant during the initial cycling and after *50 cycles. Interpretations of the superior stability of the amorphous films are examined.

Song, Seung-Wan; Striebel, Kathryn A.; Song, Xiangyun; Cairns, Elton J.

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effect of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from corncob on the tensile, thermal and barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals fromcorncob (CNC) on the tensile, thermal, and barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposites was evaluated. The CNC were prepared by sulfuric acid hydrolysis at 45C for 60 minutes, ...

Hudson Alves Silvrio, Wilson Pires Flauzino Neto, Daniel Pasquini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessing the Environmental Impacts of Cellulosic Bioethanol Production: An Ongoing Case Study of Switchgrass Production around Vonore, TN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Vonore area, we will relate these changes in water quality to changes in economic criteria (e.g., target of Tennessee Biofuels Initiative. Managed by Genera Energy LLC and operated by DuPont Danisco Cellulosic

412

EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for a cellulosic ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida. This EA is on hold.

413

Flash High-Pressure Condensate to Regenerate Low-Pressure Steam  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on regenerating low-pressure steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Proteomic comparison of biomaterial implants for regeneration of peripheral nerve tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue regenerates resulting from the healing of transected peripheral nerve differ in morphological and electrophysiological properties based on the biomaterial implant used to bridge the interneural wound gap. At gap ...

Miu, Kathy K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Analysis of a Flat-Plate, Liquid-Desiccant, Dehumidifier and Regenerator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A numerical model for isothermal and non-isothermal flat-plate liquid-desiccant dehumidifiers and regenerators was developed and implemented. The two-dimensional model takes into account the desiccant, water (more)

Mesquita, Lucio Cesar De Souza

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Passive regeneration : long-term effects on ash characteristics and diesel particulate filter performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread growth as an effective means for meeting increasingly rigorous particle emissions regulations. There is growing interest to exploit passive regeneration of DPFs to ...

Bahr, Michael J., Nav. E. (Michael James). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Removal and Transformation of Sulfur Species During Regeneration of Poisoned Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur K-edge XANES was used to monitor sulfur species transforming from sulfides to sulfates during steam + air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. The catalyst was tested for multiple reaction/regeneration cycles. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H{sub 2}S-poisoned nickel catalyst. Although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H{sub 2} reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Potential commercialization of a collagen-GAG scaffold for liver regeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential for commercializing a scaffold made of collagen and glycosaminoglycan to help regenerate cirrhotic liver was analyzed and a business plan and model were created. Using a lypholization technique, a bulk-sized ...

Southworth, Adam R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Regeneration of Sulfur Deactivated Ni-based Biomass Syngas Cleaning Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nickel-based catalysts have been widely tested in decomposing tar and methane in hot biomass syngas cleanup researches. However these catalysts can be easily deactivated by the sulfur compounds in syngas due to the strong sulfur adsorption effect on the Ni surface. Here we report on a new regeneration process, which can effectively and efficiently regenerate the sulfur-poisoned Ni reforming catalysts. This process consists of four sequential treatments: 1) controlled oxidation at 750oC in 1% O2, 2) decomposition at 900oC in Ar, 3) reduction at 900oC in 2% H2, and 4) reaction at 900oC under reforming condition. The duration of this 4-step regeneration process is only about 8 hours, which is shorter than that of the conventional steaming regeneration treatment.

Li, Liyu; Howard, Christopher J.; King, David L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Dagle, Robert A.; Stevens, Don J.

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

NETL: A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0000469 TDA Research (TDA) is testing and validating the technical and economic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effects of Aerosol Solubility and Regeneration on Mixed-Phase Orographic Clouds and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed bin aerosol-microphysics scheme has been implemented into the Weather Research and Forecast Model to investigate the effects of aerosol solubility and regeneration on mixed-phase orographic clouds and precipitation. Two-dimensional ...

Lulin Xue; Amit Teller; Roy Rasmussen; Istvan Geresdi; Zaitao Pan; Xiaodong Liu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Physical analysis of collagen-GAG composite scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue regeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study biomaterial scaffolds for regeneration of nucleus pulposus were developed by freeze drying slurries with different proportions of collagen II (CII), chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS), and hyaluronic acid (HA). The ...

Simson, Jacob A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, five cycle thermogravimetric tests were conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) with sodium bicarbonate Grade 3 (SBC{number_sign}3) which showed that carbonation activity declined slightly over 5 cycles following severe calcination conditions of 200 C in pure CO{sub 2}. Three different sets of calcination conditions were tested. Initial carbonation activity (as measured by extent of reaction in the first 25 minutes) was greatest subsequent to calcination at 120 C in He, slightly less subsequent to calcination in 80% CO{sub 2}/20% H{sub 2}O, and lowest subsequent to calcination in pure CO{sub 2} at 200 C. Differences in the extent of reaction after 150 minutes of carbonation, subsequent to calcination under the same conditions followed the same trend but were less significant. The differences between fractional carbonation under the three calcination conditions declined with increasing cycles. A preliminary fixed bed reactor test was also conducted at LSU. Following calcination, the sorbent removed approximately 19% of the CO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. CO{sub 2} evolved during subsequent calcination was consistent with an extent of carbonation of approximately 49%. Following successful testing of SBC{number_sign}3 sorbent at RTI reported in the last quarter, a two cycle fluidized bed reactor test was conducted with trona as the sorbent precursor, which was calcined to sodium carbonate. In the first carbonation cycle, CO{sub 2} removal rates declined from 20% to about 8% over the course of three hours. Following calcination, a second carbonation cycle was conducted, at a lower temperature with a lower water vapor content. CO{sub 2} removal and sorbent capacity utilization declined under these conditions. Modifications were made to the reactor to permit addition of extra water for testing in the next quarter. Thermodynamic analysis of the carbonation reaction suggested the importance of other phases, intermediate between sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, and the potential for misapplication of thermodynamic data from the literature. An analysis of initial rate data from TGA experiments suggested that the data may fit a model controlled by the heat transfer from the sorbent particle surface to the bulk gas.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA); Wronski, Christopher R. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Investigation on Aluminum-Based Amorphous Metallic Glass as New Anode Material in Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum based amorphous metallic glass powders were produced and tested as the anode materials for the lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Ground Al??Ni₁?La₁? was found to have a ...

Meng, Shirley Y.

426

Modeling the mechanical behavior of amorphous metals by shear transformation zone dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new mesoscale modeling technique for the thermo-mechanical behavior of amorphous metals is proposed. The modeling framework considers the shear transformation zone (STZ) as the fundamental unit of deformation, and ...

Homer, Eric Richards, 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effect of High Temperature Aging on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron Based Amorphous Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Iron-based amorphous alloys can be more resistant to corrosion than polycrystalline materials of similar compositions. However, when the amorphous alloys are exposed to high temperatures they may recrystallize (or devitrify) thus losing their resistance to corrosion. Four different types of amorphous alloys melt spun ribbon specimens were exposed to several temperatures for short periods of time. The resulting corrosion resistance was evaluated in seawater at 90 C and compared with the as-prepared ribbons. Results show that the amorphous alloys can be exposed to 600 C for 1-hr. without losing the corrosion resistance; however, when the ribbons were exposed at 800 C for 1-hr. their localized corrosion resistance decreased significantly.

Day, S D; Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C; Rebak, R B

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Stable Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Germanium for Photovoltaic Applications. Experimental and Computational Studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research was aimed at the optimisation of low band gap amorphous silicon germanium (a-SiGe:H) materials with special emphasis on developing a highly absorbing material (more)

Jimnez Zambrano, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 June 2010 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol F. Kabir Kazi, J. Fortman, and R. Anex Iowa State University G. Kothandaraman ConocoPhillips Company D. Hsu, A. Aden, and A. Dutta National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46588 June 2010 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol F. Kabir Kazi, J. Fortman, and R. Anex

430

Catalytic Mechanism of Cellulose Degradation by a Cellobiohydrolase, CelS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrolysis of cellulose is the bottleneck in cellulosic ethanol production. The cellobiohydrolase CelS from Clostridium thermocellum catalyzes the hydrolysis of cello-oligosaccharides via inversion of the anomeric carbon. Here, to examine key features of the CelS-catalyzed reaction, QM/MM (SCCDFTB/MM) simulations are performed. The calculated free energy profile for the reaction possesses a 19 kcal/mol barrier. The results confirm the role of active site residue Glu87 as the general acid catalyst in the cleavage reaction and show that Asp255 may act as the general base. A feasible position in the reactant state of the water molecule responsible for nucleophilic attack is identified. Sugar ring distortion as the reaction progresses is quantified. The results provide a computational approach that may complement the experimental design of more efficient enzymes for biofuel production.

Saharay, Moumita [ORNL; Guo, Hong [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Processing cellulosic solids for methane production by a combined chemical and biological process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic solids are pretreated by calcium hydroxide to produce salts of volatile organic acids and other water-soluble substances. Pure cellulose, sawdust, and waste paper are used as model substances for the study of alkaline degradation. It was found that sawdust is more difficult to degrade than the other two substances. The cooking conditions for high conversion of model substance and high yield of organic acids are found to be 275/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C with the corresponding reaction time from 30 to 15 minutes. The cooking liquor can be readily fermented in an anaerobic fluidized-bed digester for methane production. The cooking liquor from different reaction conditions can all be digested by the methanogens. Higher than 90% of COD can be removed under the conditions of low organic loading rate (<2.0 g COD/1/day) and low hydraulic retention time (1.5-2.0 days).

Tsai, G.J.; Tsao, G.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Milling induces disorder in crystalline griseofulvin and order in its amorphous counterpart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates two apparently similar thermal signatures, shaped as bimodal exotherms, observed when either the crystalline or the amorphous from of the drug are subjected to milling. Crystalline griseofulvin was cryomilled and the (quenched-melt) amorphous form was subjected to either cryomilling or grinding. The thermal and surface properties of the resulting samples were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and surface energy analysis. After milling, both the crystalline and the amorphous material revealed visually similar bimodal exothermic events when the heating rate was 20 C min{sup -1}. Under different heating rates, the pair of DSC peaks for the bimodal exotherm of each material behaved entirely different from each other. The two peaks of the bimodal event, as well as the glass transition, can be kinetically resolved for the ground amorphous form using standard mode DSC. In contrast, similar analysis was unable to resolve the bimodal exotherm or a glass transition in the case of the cryomilled crystals. Furthermore, cryomilled crystals do not exhibit a glass transition even when analyzed using modulated DSC. Synchrotron sourced X-ray analysis revealed that grinding the amorphous material results in the nucleation and growth of the crystalline form. Milling thus induces disorder in the crystals of griseofulvin but induces order in the amorphous form of the drug. The surface of the two milled systems consistently exhibited different energetics under a wide range of relative humidity conditions. These findings suggest that cryomilling induces both bulk and surface disorder, specifically, a certain level of dislocations on the crystal. In contrast, grinding the amorphous material lowers the activation energy for crystal formation, inducing nuclei formation and growth throughout the amorphous matrix.

Otte, Andrew; Zhang, Yan; Carvajal, M. Teresa; Pinal, Rodolfo (Purdue)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Generation of energy by means of a working fluid, and regeneration of a working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided of optimizing, within limits imposed by a heating medium from the surface of an ocean and a cooling medium from an ocean depth, the energy supply capability of a gaseous working fluid which is expanded from a charged high pressure level to a spent low pressure level to provide available energy, the method comprising expanding the gaseous working fluid to a spent low pressure level where the condensation temperature of the working fluid is below the minimum temperature of the cold water, and regenerating the spent working fluid by, in at least one regeneration stage, absorbing the working fluid being regenerated in an absorption stage by dissolving it in a solvent solution while cooling with the cold water, the solvent solution comprising a solvent having an initial working fluid concentration which is sufficient to provide a solution having a boiling point, after dissolving the working fluid being regenerated, which is above the minimum temperature of the cold water to permit effective absorption of the working fluid being regenerated, increasing the pressure and then evaporating the working fluid being regenerated by heating in an evaporation stage with the available hot water, feeding the evaporated working fluid and the solvent solution to a separator stage for separating the evaporated working fluid and the solvent solution, recovering the evaporated, separated working fluid, and recycling the balance of the solvent solution from the separator stage to constitute the solvent solution for the absorption stage; and an apparatus for carrying out the method.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

Mechanism of formation of oil by the hot aqueous alkaline digestion of cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall mechanism of cellulose converson in hot aqueous alkali appears to be one of degradation through glucose to low molecular weight saccharinic acids, dihydroxybutyric acid, glycolic acid, and carbonyl products such as acetone, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and similar compounds. Although the products identified in the present report were fairly complex furans, carbocyclic ketones, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds, nevertheless, in most cases, they could have been formed from simple carbonyl compounds through a series of condensations involving carbanion intermediates. It is conceivable that residual alkali in the oil during acetone extraction could have given rise to diacetone alcohol as an artifact. This is refuted by examination of an aqueous residue which was extracted with diethyl ether and which was never exposed to any acetone: Compounds derived from diacetone alcohol (such as mesityl oxide or 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) were also identified in the diethyl ether extract of the aqueous phase. Other compounds were identified in the oil acetone extract which could not have been derived from acetone or diacetone alcohol, but which could have been formed from other carbonyl compounds by the same mechanism. Hence, diacetone alcohol is a genuine product of cellulose conversion although apparently not an intermediate in further synthesis of other products. The further reaction of the postulated cyclic intermediates, and the route to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons of high molecular weight is intended to be the next subject of investigation in the current work. The fundamental difference in the mechanism of cellulose conversion to oil by pyrolysis and by aqueous alkaline digestion predicted by theory is therefore confirmed. Pyrolysis products may be explained generally by carbonium ion and free radical reactions (in fact, cellulose decomposition is acid-catalyzed), while in aqueous alkali, nucleophilic carbanion reactions are favored.

Molten, P.M.; Miller, R.K.; Donovan, J.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids  

SciTech Connect

The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

Goldan, A. H. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States); Rowlands, J. A. [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada)] [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Tousignant, O. [ANRAD Corporation, 4950 Levy Street, Saint-Laurent, Quebec H4R 2P1 (Canada)] [ANRAD Corporation, 4950 Levy Street, Saint-Laurent, Quebec H4R 2P1 (Canada); Karim, K. S. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electrical and optical properties of sputtered amorphous vanadium oxide thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous vanadium oxide (VO{sub x}) is a component found in composite nanocrystalline VO{sub x} thin films. These types of composite films are used as thermistors in pulsed biased uncooled infrared imaging devices when containing face centered cubic vanadium monoxide phase crystallites, and substantial fractions of amorphous material in the composite are necessary to optimize device electrical properties. Similarly, optoelectronic devices exploiting the metal-to-semiconductor transition contain the room-temperature monoclinic or high-temperature (>68 deg. C) rutile vanadium dioxide phase. Thin films of VO{sub x} exhibiting the metal-to-semiconductor transition are typically polycrystalline or nanocrystalline, implying that significant amounts of disordered, amorphous material is present at grain boundaries or surrounding the crystallites and can impact the overall optical or electronic properties of the film. The performance of thin film material for either application depends on both the nature of the crystalline and amorphous components, and in this work we seek to isolate and study amorphous VO{sub x}. VO{sub x} thin films were deposited by pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtering to produce amorphous materials with oxygen contents {>=}2, which were characterized electrically by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements and optically characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Film resistivity, thermal activation energy, and complex dielectric function spectra from 0.75 to 6.0 eV were used to identify the impact of microstructural variations including composition and density.

Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Gauntt, B. D. [Materials Characterization Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Motyka, M. A.; Horn, M. W. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Dickey, E. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

440

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Truher, Joel B. (Palo Alto, CA); Weiner, Kurt H. (Campbell, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regenerated amorphous cellulose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Recombination and metastability in amorphous silicon and silicon germanium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the first year of a continuing research study to understand how recombination, trapping, and band-mobility modification affecting the electronic properties of amorphous semiconductors can be measured, characterized, and described by an appropriate spectrum of defect states, and how light-induced defects in a-Si:H and native defects in a-SiGe:H affect transport properties in these materials. The objective was to determine how the Staebler-Wronski defects affect the electronic processes in a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films. To do this, electroluminescence (EL) and forward bias current in p-i-n devices (i-layer thickness > 2 {mu}m) were studied both experimentally and theoretically before and after light soaking. A simple picture was developed to compare forward bias current to the EL signal. The result was unexpected: the product of the final current times the rise time was not constant before and after light soaking as expected from the concept of gain band width, but instead changed radically. The rise time t{sub x} increased by more than one order of magnitude while the final current I{sub f} did not change significantly with light soaking. On the other hand the I{sub f}t{sub x} product did hold close to a constant when only the applied voltage changed.

Silver, M. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Tritiated Amorphous Silicon: Insights into the Staebler-Wronski Mechanism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen, though essential for device-quality amorphous silicon, likely contributes to the light-induced degradation process (Staebler-Wronski effect) that reduces the solar cell efficiency by about 4 absolute percent. We are testing the role of hydrogen by using its isotope tritium. When tritium bonded to Si spontaneously decays into inert helium-3, it should leave behind the Si dangling bond defect. We have studied degradation due to tritium and note its resemblance to the Staebler-Wronski effect. Surprisingly, 100x fewer defects are created than expected from the tritium decay rate, suggesting a mechanism that heals most of the defects, even at temperatures down to 4 K. We consider different mechanisms for the thermal and athermal healing processes (e.g. motion of hydrogen, effect of beta-electrons, decay of hydrogen-tritium molecules). Our findings shed new light on the degradation mechanism in a Si:H and help reveal the role of hydrogen and structural rearrangements near a newly created defect.

Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.; Whitaker, J.; Viner, J.; Taylor, P. C.; Johnson, E.; Kherani, N.; Zukotynski, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by pyrolysis and photolysis of disilane  

SciTech Connect

A new class of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was prepared by the thermal CVD and photo-CVD of disilane. In the low pressure thermal CVD, the horizontal quartz tube heated by resistance heaters was used as a reactor. The growth rate of the thermal CVD a-Si:H films is plotted as a function of reciprocal substrate temperature. As a new alternative approach to prepare high quality CVD films at temperatures below 300/sup 0/C, the direct photochemical decomposition of disilane has been attempted utilizing a low pressure mercury lamp as a UV radiation source. In the case of undoped and phosphorus doped films, the growth rate is independent of the substrate temperature. In contrast to this, for boron doping, the growth rate has an activation energy of 0.64 eV as in the case of the thermal CVD although the growth rate of the photo-CVD is about three times as large as that of the thermal CVD. This implies that the photoCVD process in boron doping is dominated by the thermal reaction catalyzed with diborane. The dark conductivity and photoconductivity before and after light exposure (AM-1, 200 mW/cm/sup 2/) exhibit no change, indicating the absence of the light-soak degradation in photo-CVD films. The valency control in thermal CVD and photo-CVD is also successfully carried out.

Ashida, Y.; Hirose, M.; Isogaya, K.; Kitagawa, N.; Mishima, Y.; Osuka, Y.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research to improve the understanding of amorphous silicon alloys and other relevant non-semiconductor materials for use in high-efficiency, large-area multijunction modules. The research produced an average subcell initial efficiency of 8.8% over a 1-ft{sup 2} area using same-band-gap, dual-junction cells deposited over a ZnO/AlSi back reflector. An initial efficiency of 9.6% was achieved using a ZnO/Ag back reflector over smaller substrates. A sputtering machine will be built to deposit a ZnO/Ag back reflector over a 1-ft{sup 2} area so that a higher efficiency can also be obtained on larger substrates. Calculations have been performed to optimize the grid pattern, bus bars, and cell interconnects on modules. With our present state of technology, we expect a difference of about 6% between the aperture-area and active-area efficiencies of modules. Preliminary experiments show a difference of about 8%. We can now predict the performance of single-junction cells after long-term light exposure at 50{degree}C by exposing cells to short-term intense light at different temperatures. We find that single-junction cells deposited on a ZnO/Ag back reflector show the highest stabilized efficiency when the thickness of the intrinsic layers is about 2000 {angstrom}. 8 refs.

Guha, S. (United Solar Systems Corp., Troy, MI (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the progress made during Phase 1 of research and development program to obtain high-efficiency amorphous silicon alloy multijunction modules. Using a large-area deposition system, double-and triple-junction cells were made on stainless steel substrates of over 1 ft{sup 2} area with Ag and ZnO predeposited back reflector. Modules of over 1 ft{sup 2} were produced with between 9.2% and 9.9 initial aperture-area efficiencies as measured under a USSC Spire solar simulator. Efficiencies as measured under the NREL Spire solar simulator were found to be typically 15% to 18% lower. The causes for this discrepancy are now being investigated. The modules show about 15% degradation after 600 hours of one-sun illumination at 50{degrees}C. To optimize devices for higher stabilized efficiency, a new method was developed by which the performance of single-junction cells after long-term, one-sun exposure at 50{degrees}C can be predicted by exposing cells to short-term intense light at different temperatures. This method is being used to optimize the component cells of the multijunction structure to obtain the highest light-degraded efficiency.

Banerjee, A.; Chen, E.; Clough, R.; Glatfelter, T.; Guha, S.; Hammond, G.; Hopson, M.; Jackett, N.; Lycette, M.; Noch, J.; Palmer, T.; Pawlikiewicz, A.; Rosenstein, I.; Ross, R.; Wolf, D.; Xu, X.; Yang, J.; Younan, K.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

Bogaert, R.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Amorphous carbon thin films for optoelectric device application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C and a-C:H) have been deposited using different carbon precursor materials such as camphor--a natural source, graphite and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} mixture by different deposition methods, such as ion beam sputtering, pyrolysis, pulsed laser deposition and r.f. plasma CVD. The films are subjected to various standard characterization techniques in order to tailor the required structural and opto-electrical properties for device applications. The effects of deposition parameters and annealing temperatures on the properties of carbon thin films have been investigated. Both p- and n- type of carbon films have been obtained either through controlling the deposition parameters of a particular method or by doping. Solar cells of various configurations, such as n-C/p-Si, p-C/n-Si and n-C/p-C/p-Si, have been fabricated and their photoresponse characteristics are studied. An efficiency of 1.52% has been obtained, so far, for the cell of configuration n-C/p-C/p-Si. Effects of substrate temperature on the photovoltaic properties are also outlined in brief.

Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.; Krishna, K.M.; Umeno, M.

2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cyclic process for producing methane with catalyst regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. For practical commercial operations utilizing the two-step process of the invention of a cyclic basis, nickel, cobalt, ruthenium, thenium and alloys thereof are especially prepared for use in a metal state, with CO disproportionation being carried out at temperatures up to about 350.degree. C. and with the conversion of active surface carbon to methane being carried out by reaction with steam. The catalyst is employed in such cyclic operations without the necessity for employing a regeneration step as part of each processing cycle. Inactive carbon or coke that tends to form on the catalyst over the course of continuous operations utilizing such cyclic process is effectively and advantageously removed, on a periodic basis, in place of conventional burn off with an inert stream containing a low concentration of oxygen.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY); Risch, Alan P. (New Fairfield, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perforated plates having very small holes with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a [open quotes]wire drawing[close quotes] process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er[sub 3]Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er[sub 3]Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations, one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed. 10 figures.

Hendricks, J.B.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying  

SciTech Connect

Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create maintenance problems nor will it significantly increase operating expenses. An energy balance on the boiler showed that heat loss through the insulated jacket was 10%. This value is much higher than the 2% to 5% that is typical of most boilers and indicates a need to better insulate the unit. With insulation that brings jacket losses down to 5%, a 1?-effect regenerator that uses this boiler as its high-temperature stage will have a gas-based COP of 1.05. The estimated cost to manufacture a 300-lb/h, 1?-effect regenerator at 500 units per year is $17,140. Unfortunately, the very high cost for natural gas that now prevails in the U.S. makes it very difficult for a gas-fired LDAC to compete against an electric vapor-compression air conditioner in HVAC applications. However, there are important industrial markets that need very dry air where the high price of natural gas will encourage the sale of a LDAC with the 1?-effect regenerator since in these markets it competes against less efficient gas-fired desiccant technologies. A manufacturer of industrial dehumidification equipment is now negotiating a sales agreement with us that would include the 1?-effect regenerator.

Andrew Lowenstein

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heat and mass transfer in packed bed liquid desiccant regenerators -- An experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid desiccant cooling can provide control of temperature and humidity, while at the same time lowering the electrical energy requirement for air conditioning. Since the largest energy requirement associated with desiccant cooling is low temperature heat for desiccant regeneration, the regeneration process greatly influences the overall system performance. Therefore, the effects of variables such as air and desiccant flow rates, air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and the area available for heat and mass transfer on the regeneration process are of great interest. Due to the complexity of the regeneration process, which involves simultaneous heat and mass transfer, theoretical modeling must be verified by experimental studies. However, a limited number of experimental studies are reported in the literature. This paper presents results from a detailed experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer between a liquid desiccant (triethylene glycol) and air in a packed bed regenerator using high liquid flow rates. To regenerate the desiccant, it is heated to temperatures readily obtainable from flat-plate solar collectors. A high performance packing that combines good heat and mass transfer characteristics with low pressure drop is used. The rate of water evaporation, as well as the effectiveness of the regeneration process is assessed based on the variables listed above. Good agreement is shown to exist between the experimental findings and predictions from finite difference modeling. In addition, the findings in the present study are compared to findings previously reported in the literature. Also, the results presented here characterize the important variables that impact the system design.

Martin, V.; Goswami, D.Y.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Formation of an amorphous phase of Al-Si during dry wear of a Al-Si/SiCp composite  

SciTech Connect

The present study reports on the formation of an amorphous phase at the surface of an SiCp-Al/Si composite during reciprocal dry wear. By using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) together with EDX analysis, the characterization and the formation mechanism of the amorphous band are discussed. The present TEM investigation has shown the formation of an amorphous phase band induced by dry sliding wear on the Al matrix composite. The formation mechanism of this amorphous phases relates to some mechanical mixing alloying models proposed earlier. A full understanding of these transformations in the surface layers will lead to better control of wear in multiphase materials.

Li, X.Y.; Tandon, K.N. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering  

SciTech Connect

The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Breaking the Biological barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda  

SciTech Connect

A robust fusion of the agricultural, industrial biotechnology, and energy industries can create a new strategic national capability for energy independence and climate protection. In his State of the Union Address (Bush 2006), President George W. Bush outlined the Advanced Energy Initiative, which seeks to reduce our national dependence on imported oil by accelerating the development of domestic, renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels. The president has set a national goal of developing cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable alternative energy sources to substantially replace oil imports in the coming years. Fuels derived from cellulosic biomass - the fibrous, woody, and generally inedible portions of plant matter - offer one such alternative to conventional energy sources that can dramatically impact national economic growth, national energy security, and environmental goals. Cellulosic biomass is an attractive energy feedstock because it is an abundant, domestic, renewable source that can be converted to liquid transportation fuels. These fuels can be used readily by current-generation vehicles and distributed through the existing transportation-fuel infrastructure. The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 7-9, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme. The core barrier is cellulosic-biomass recalcitrance to processing to ethanol. Biomass is composed of nature's most ready energy source, sugars, but they are locked in a complex polymer composite exquisitely created to resist biological and chemical degradation. Key to energizing a new biofuel industry based on conversion of cellulose (and hemicelluloses) to ethanol is to understand plant cell-wall chemical and physical structures - how they are synthesized and can be deconstructed. With this knowledge, innovative energy crops - plants specifically designed for industrial processing to biofuel - can be developed concurrently with new biology-based treatment and conversion methods. Recent advances in science and technological capabilities, especially those from the nascent discipline of systems biology, promise to accelerate and enhance this development. Resulting technologies will create a fundamentally new process and biorefinery paradigm that will enable an efficient and economic industry for converting plant biomass to liquid fuels. These key barriers and suggested research strategies to address them are described in this report. As technologies mature for accomplishing this task, the technical strategy proceeds through three phases: In the research phase, within 5 years, an understanding of existing feedstocks must be gained to devise sustainable, effective, and economical methods for their harvest, deconstruction, and conversion to ethanol. Research is centered on enzymatic breakdown of cellulosic biomass to component 5- and 6-carbon sugars and lignin, using a combination of thermochemical and biological processes, followed by cofermentation of sugars to specified endproducts such as ethanol. Processes will be integrated and consolidated to reduce costs, improve efficacy, reduce generation of and sensitivity to inhibitors, and improve overall yields and viability in biorefinery environments. The technology deployment phase, within 10 years, will include creation of a new generation of energy crops with enhanced sustainability, yield, and composition, coupled with processes for simultaneous breakdown of biomass to sugars and cofermentation of sugars via new biological system

Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Using liquid desiccant as a regenerable filter for capturing and deactivating contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, and systems for implementing such method, for purifying and conditioning air of weaponized contaminants. The method includes wetting a filter packing media with a salt-based liquid desiccant, such as water with a high concentration of lithium chloride. Air is passed through the wetted filter packing media and the contaminants in are captured with the liquid desiccant while the liquid desiccant dehumidifies the air. The captured contaminants are then deactivated in the liquid desiccant, which may include heating the liquid desiccant. The liquid desiccant is regenerated by applying heat to the liquid desiccant and then removing moisture. The method includes repeating the wetting with the regenerated liquid desiccant which provides a regenerable filtering process that captures and deactivates contaminants on an ongoing basis while also conditioning the air. The method may include filtration effectiveness enhancement by electrostatic or inertial means.

Slayzak, Steven J. (Denver, CO); Anderson, Ren S. (Broomfield, CO); Judkoff, Ronald D. (Golden, CO); Blake, Daniel M. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Ryan, Joseph P. (Golden, CO)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Pilot plant studies of the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in several areas of research. The following cellulosic raw materials were selected for study: wheat, barley, and rice straws, rice hulls, sorghum, corn stover, cotton gin trash, newsprint, ground wood, and masonite steam-treated Douglas fir and redwood. Samples were collected, prepared, and analyzed for hexosans, pentosans, lignin, ash, and protein. Results of acid extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis are discussed. Yields of glucose, polyglucose, xylose, and arabinose are reported. Progress in process design and economic studies, as well as pilot plant process development and design studies, is summarized. (JGB)

Wilke, C.R.

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Free-energy functional for freezing transitions: Hard sphere systems freezing into crystalline and amorphous structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A free-energy functional that contains both the symmetry conserved and symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function has been used to investigate the freezing of a system of hard spheres into crystalline and amorphous structures. The freezing parameters for fluid-crystal transition have been found to be in very good agreement with the results found from simulations. We considered amorphous structures found from the molecular dynamics simulations at packing fractions $\\eta$ lower than the glass close packing fraction $\\eta_{J}$ and investigated their stability compared to that of a homogeneous fluid. The existence of free-energy minimum corresponding to a density distribution of overlapping Gaussians centered around an amorphous lattice depicts the deeply supercooled state with a heterogeneous density profile.

Swarn Lata Singh; Atul S. Bharadwaj; Yashwant Singh

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation ena- Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation ena- bled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, Zhiguang Zhu, Y.-H. Percival Zhang PII: S0960-8524(12)00712-2 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.04.088 Reference: BITE 9966 To appear in: Bioresource Technology Received Date: 29 February 2012 Revised Date: 21 April 2012 Accepted Date: 21 April 2012 Please cite this article as: Sathitsuksanoh, N., Zhu, Z., Percival Zhang, Y.-H., Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent- based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks, Bioresource Technology (2012), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.04.088 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers

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461

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Treutlen County, Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 October 15, 2007 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for the PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A CELLULOSIC ETHANOL PLANT, TREUTLEN COUNTY, GEORGIA SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential impacts associated with the construction and operation of a proposed cellulosic ethanol plant in Treutlen County, Georgia. DOE, through its Golden Field Office, in Golden, Colorado, would provide funding to Range Fuels, Inc., a Colorado based corporation, to support the construction and initial operation of the proposed plant. All discussion, analysis and findings related to the potential impacts of construction and operation ofthe proposed cellulosic ethanol plant (including the applicant-committed practices presented in the Proposed Action) are contained in the Final EA. The Final EA is hereby incorporated

462

CTR Fuel recovery system using regeneration of a molecular sieve drying bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A primary molecular sieve drying bed is regenerated by circulating a hot inert gas through the heated primary bed to desorb water held on the bed. The inert gas plus water vapor is then cooled and passed through an auxiliary molecular sieve bed which adsorbs the water originally desorbed from the primary bed. The main advantage of the regeneration technique is that the partial pressure of water can be reduced to the 10.sup.-9 atm. range. This is significant in certain CTR applications where tritiated water (T.sub.2 O, HTO) must be collected and kept at very low partial pressure.

Folkers, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Alternating-polarity operation for complete regeneration of electrochemical deionization system  

SciTech Connect

An electrically regeneratable battery of electrochemical cells for capacitive deionization (including electrochemical purification) and regeneration of electrodes is operated at alternate polarities during consecutive cycles. By polarizing the cells, ions are removed from the electrolyte and are held in the electric double layers formed at the carbon aerogel surfaces of the electrodes. As the electrodes of each cell of the battery are saturated with the removed ions, the battery is regenerated electrically at a reversed polarity from that during the deionization step of the cycle, thus significantly minimizing secondary wastes.

Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Lenz, David J. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Local entropy generation analysis of a rotary magnetic heat pump regenerator  

SciTech Connect

The rotary magnetic heat pump has attractive thermodynamic performance but it is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of the regenerator. This study uses local entropy generation analysis to evaluate the regenerator design and to suggest design improvements. The results show that performance of the proposed design is dominated by heat transfer related entropy generation. This suggests that enhancement concepts that improve heat transfer should be considered, even if the enhancement causes a significant increase in viscous losses (pressure drop). One enhancement technique, the use of flow disrupters, was evaluated and the results showed that flow disrupters can significantly reduce thermodynamic losses.

Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Maxwell rigidity and topological constraints in amorphous phase-change networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations of different telluride amorphous networks, we develop a method for the enumeration of radial and angular topological constraints, and show that the phase diagram of the most popular system Ge-Sb-Te can be split into two compositional elastic phases: a tellurium rich flexible phase and a stressed rigid phase that contains most of the materials used in phase-change applications. This sound atomic scale insight should open new avenues for the understanding of phase-change materials and other complex amorphous materials from the viewpoint of rigidity.

Micoulaut, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Boite 121, CNRS UMR 7600, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Otjacques, C.; Raty, J.-Y. [Physique de la Matiere Condensee, B5, Universite de Liege, B4000 Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Bichara, C. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille (CINaM), CNRS and Aix-Marseille Universities, Campus de Luminy, Case 913, 13288 Marseille (France)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z