Sample records for reformulated rbob mgbc

  1. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  2. Reformulation Instead of Renormalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kalitvianski

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article I show why the fundamental constants obtain perturbative corrections in higher orders, why the renormalizations work and how to reformulate the theory in order to avoid these technical and conceptual complications. I demonstrate that the perturbative mass and charge corrections are caused exclusively with the kinetic nature of the interaction Lagrangian. As soon as it is not purely quantum mechanical (or QFT) specific feature, the problem can be demonstrated on a classical two-body problem. The latter can be solved in different ways, one of them being correct and good for applying the perturbation theory (if necessary) and another one being tricky and awkward. The first one is physically and technically natural - it is a center-of-inertia-and-relative-variable formulation. The second one - mixed variable formulation - is unnecessarily complicated and leads to the mass and charge corrections even in the Newtonian mechanics of two bound bodies. The perturbation theory in QFT is factually formulated in the mixed variables - that is why it brings corrections to the fundamental constants. This understanding opens a way of correctly formulating the QFT equations and thus to simplify the QFT calculations technically and conceptually. For example, in scattering problems in QED it means accounting exactly the quantized electromagnetic field influence in the free in and out states of charged particles so no infrared and ultraviolet problems arise. In bound states it means obtaining the energy corrections (the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment) quite straightforwardly and without renormalizations.

  3. Reformulating and Reconstructing Quantum Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucien Hardy

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a reformulation of finite dimensional quantum theory in the circuit framework in terms of mathematical axioms, and a reconstruction of quantum theory from operational postulates. The mathematical axioms for quantum theory are the following: [Axiom 1] Operations correspond to operators. [Axiom 2] Every complete set of physical operators corresponds to a complete set of operations. The following operational postulates are shown to be equivalent to these mathematical axioms: [P1] Sharpness. Associated with any given pure state is a unique maximal effect giving probability equal to one. This maximal effect does not give probability equal to one for any other pure state. [P2] Information locality. A maximal measurement on a composite system is effected if we perform maximal measurements on each of the components. [P3] Tomographic locality. The state of a composite system can be determined from the statistics collected by making measurements on the components. [P4] Compound permutability. There exists a compound reversible transformation on any system effecting any given permutation of any given maximal set of distinguishable states for that system. [P5] Sturdiness. Filters are non-flattening. Hence, from these postulates we can reconstruct all the usual features of quantum theory: States are represented by positive operators, transformations by completely positive trace non-increasing maps, and effects by positive operators. The Born rule (i.e. the trace rule) for calculating probabilitieso follows. A more detailed abstract is provided in the paper.

  4. Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

  5. Towards CSP Model Reformulation at Multiple Levels of Abstraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel, Ian

    Towards CSP Model Reformulation at Multiple Levels of Abstraction Alan M. Frisch 1 , Brahim Hnich 2Æcult at another. Therefore we argue that it is essential for a system for the auto- matic reformulation of CSPs individual CSP instances, could be augmented to reformulate models at various levels of abstraction and to re

  6. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  7. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States (Cents per...

  8. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  9. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States (Cents per...

  10. Automatic Dantzig-Wolfe Reformulation of Mixed Integer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 20, 2012 ... bounds can be obtained from the automatically reformulated model .... matrix structure via key words in the modeling language is taken in [7,13 ...

  11. A strong conic quadratic reformulation for machine-job assignment ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Selim Akturk

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 26, 2007 ... A strong conic quadratic reformulation for machine-job assignment with ... Category 2: Linear, Cone and Semidefinite Programming ...

  12. An independent refiner`s approach to reformulated gasolines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, H.M. [Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Included in this paper are brief reviews of Ashland Petroleum Company`s renewable oxygenate (ethanol) usage, the latest CAA oxygenate supply and demand forecasts, oxygenated fuel and reformulated blending economics, some very brief comments on the EPA proposed renewable oxygenate standard (ROS), and Ashland`s approach to reformulated gasolines (RFG).

  13. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chornet, Esteban (Golden, CO)

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

  14. 0101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",1,150,"MOGAS, REFORMULATED",0131,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",1,150,"MOGAS, REFORMULATED",0131,"PORTSMOUTH, NH","NH",100,260,"CANADA",240,0,0 0101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",2,462,"DIST, > 0.05% SUL (DOM.)",0401,"BOSTON,...

  15. Thermodynamic aspects of reformulation of automotive fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zudkevitch, D. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Murthy, A.K.S. [BOC Gases, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Gmehling, J. [Univ. Oldenburg (Germany)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of procedures for measuring and predicting the RVP and the initial vapor emissions of reformulated gasoline blends which contain one or more oxygenated compounds, viz., Ethanol, MTBE, ETBE, and TAME is discussed. Two computer simulation methods were programmed and tested. In one method, Method A, the D-86 distillation data on the blend are used for predicting the blend`s RVP from a simulation of the Mini RVPE (RVP Equivalent) experiment. The other method, Method B, relies on analytical information (PIANO analyzes) on the nature of the base gasoline and utilizes classical thermodynamics for simulating the same RVPE, Mini experiment. Method B, also, predicts the composition and other properties of the initial vapor emission from the fuel. The results indicate that predictions made with both methods agree very well with experimental values. The predictions with Method B illustrate that the admixture of an oxygenate to a gasoline blend changes the volatility of the blend and, also, the composition of the vapor emission. From the example simulations, a blend with 10 vol % ethanol increases the RVP by about 0.8 psi. The accompanying vapor emission will contain about 15% ethanol. Similarly, the vapor emission of a fuel blend with 11 vol % MTBE was calculated to contain about 11 vol % MTBE. Predictions of the behavior of blends with ETBE and ETBE+Ethanol are also presented and discussed. Recognizing that quite some efforts have been invested in developing empirical correlations for predicting RVP, the writers consider the purpose of this paper to be pointing out that the methods of classical thermodynamics are adequate and that there is a need for additional work in developing certain fundamental data that are still lacking.

  16. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S., LLNL

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  17. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    61.5 70.8 92.7 90.7 81.5 72.8 - 78.0 See footnotes at end of table. 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 146 Energy Information...

  18. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    62.6 71.7 92.3 89.9 82.6 72.7 - 78.2 See footnotes at end of table. 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 146 Energy Information...

  19. Automatic acquisition of semantic-based question reformulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosseim, Leila

    as the core of their QA system. This approach searches in the document collec- tion for predefined patterns recently, [1] also uses simple word permutations and verb movements to generate paraphrases to improve information retrieval. While in [8] reformulation rules to transform a question of the form What

  20. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chornet, Esteban (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  1. Quaternionic reformulation of Maxwell's equations for inhomogeneous media and new solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladislav V. Kravchenko

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple quaternionic reformulation of Maxwell's equations for inhomogeneous media and use it in order to obtain new solutions in a static case.

  2. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  3. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  4. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92.4 92.1 83.7 74.1 W 80.9 See footnotes at end of table. 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 24 Energy Information Administration ...

  5. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92.8 92.5 84.0 72.5 W 80.7 See footnotes at end of table. 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 24 Energy Information Administration ...

  6. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.6 3.7 7.9 3.1 W 11.0 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  7. A Simply Constrained Optimization Reformulation of KKT Systems Arising from Variational Inequalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facchinei, F. [Dipartimento di Informatica e Sistemistica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Via Buonarroti 12, I-00185 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: soler@dis.uniroma1.it; Fischer, A. [Department of Mathematics, University of Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany)], E-mail: fischer@math.uni-dortmund.de; Kanzow, C. [Institute of Applied Mathematics, University of Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 55, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: kanzow@math.uni-hamburg.de; Peng, J.-M. [State Key Laboratory of Scientific and Engineering Computing, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 2719, Beijing, 100080 (China)], E-mail: pjm@lsec.cc.ac.cn

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions can be regarded as optimality conditions for both variational inequalities and constrained optimization problems. In order to overcome some drawbacks of recently proposed reformulations of KKT systems, we propose casting KKT systems as a minimization problem with nonnegativity constraints on some of the variables. We prove that, under fairly mild assumptions, every stationary point of this constrained minimization problem is a solution of the KKT conditions. Based on this reformulation, a new algorithm for the solution of the KKT conditions is suggested and shown to have some strong global and local convergence properties.

  8. Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models, Berkeley, California 94720-8168, USA Lithium-ion batteries are typically modeled using porous electrode the active materials of porous electrodes for a pseudo-two- dimensional model for lithium-ion batteries

  9. Mathematical Model Reformulation for Lithium-Ion Battery Simulations: Galvanostatic Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Mathematical Model Reformulation for Lithium-Ion Battery Simulations: Galvanostatic Boundary of physics-based lithium-ion battery models to improve computational efficiency. While the additional steps, 2008. Published January 30, 2009. Mathematical modeling of lithium-ion batteries involves

  10. Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models and characterize capacity fade in lithium-ion batteries. As a comple- ment to approaches to mathematically model been made in developing lithium-ion battery models that incor- porate transport phenomena

  11. Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Efficient Reformulation of Solid-Phase Diffusion in Physics-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Models materials of porous electrodes for a rigorous pseudo-2D model for lithium-ion batteries. Concentration-ion battery models is the inclusion of solid phase diffusion in a second dimension r. It increases

  12. Automatic Reformulation of Children's Search Queries Maarten van Kalsbeek, Joost de Wit, Dolf Trieschnigg,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    Terms Algorithms, Human Factors, Design Keywords Automatic Query Expansion, Search Behavior, 1 children may make. Most of the search engines offer only the possibility to enter a Boolean queryAutomatic Reformulation of Children's Search Queries Maarten van Kalsbeek, Joost de Wit, Dolf

  13. Domestic reformulation of the moral issues at stake in the drive against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    about the laundering of dirty money is formulated. This article does not, how- ever, set out to study domestic debates on the definition of dirty money emerge and how they modify the objectives of the driveDomestic reformulation of the moral issues at stake in the drive against money laundering: the case

  14. Refinery fuel oxygenates in view of the complex model for reformulated gasline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.D.; Haelsig, C.P. [Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final version of the Complex Model for reformulated gasoline (RFG) has now been issued with some surprising features that will significantly affect refinery fuel oxygenates planning. These include the following: (1) The only oxygenates included in the model are MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and Ethanol. (2) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME are significantly more effective for reduction of air toxics emissions than Ethanol and ETBE. (3) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME typically produce about equal reduction in air toxics emissions at the same RFG oxygen content. Although gasoline certification by the Complex Model is optional prior to 1998, after 1998 it will be mandatory for both reformulated and conventional gasolines. This paper considers refinery oxygenates production in view of these features of the Complex Model for RFG, basing the discussion on 2.0 weight percent oxygen content for RFG.

  15. Estimating Impacts of Diesel Fuel Reformulation with Vector-based Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2003-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the refining cost, investment, and operating impacts of specifications for reformulated diesel fuel (RFD) produced in refineries of the U.S. Midwest in summer of year 2010. The study evaluates different diesel fuel reformulation investment pathways. The study also determines whether there are refinery economic benefits for producing an emissions reduction RFD (with flexibility for individual property values) compared to a vehicle performance RFD (with inflexible recipe values for individual properties). Results show that refining costs are lower with early notice of requirements for RFD. While advanced desulfurization technologies (with low hydrogen consumption and little effect on cetane quality and aromatics content) reduce the cost of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel, these technologies contribute to the increased costs of a delayed notice investment pathway compared to an early notice investment pathway for diesel fuel reformulation. With challenging RFD specifications, there is little refining benefit from producing emissions reduction RFD compared to vehicle performance RFD. As specifications become tighter, processing becomes more difficult, blendstock choices become more limited, and refinery benefits vanish for emissions reduction relative to vehicle performance specifications. Conversely, the emissions reduction specifications show increasing refinery benefits over vehicle performance specifications as specifications are relaxed, and alternative processing routes and blendstocks become available. In sensitivity cases, the refinery model is also used to examine the impact of RFD specifications on the economics of using Canadian synthetic crude oil. There is a sizeable increase in synthetic crude demand as ultra low sulfur diesel fuel displaces low sulfur diesel fuel, but this demand increase would be reversed by requirements for diesel fuel reformulation.

  16. A quantative evaluation of the reformulated 1996 path-goal theory of work unit leadership via structural equation modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howieson, William B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Professor Robert J House published a reformulated Path-Goal Theory of Work Unit Leadership, based on his earlier 1971 and 1974 theories. Path-goal leadership attempts to explain the impact that leader behaviour ...

  17. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. This second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

  18. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. The second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

  19. ,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click

  20. Hyperbolic reformulation of a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model and ADER finite volume schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montecinos, Gino I.; Müller, Lucas O.; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of ADER finite volume methods to solve hyperbolic balance laws with stiff source terms in the context of well-balanced and non-conservative schemes is extended to solve a one-dimensional blood flow model for viscoelastic vessels, reformulated as a hyperbolic system, via a relaxation time. A criterion for selecting relaxation times is found and an empirical convergence rate assessment is carried out to support this result. The proposed methodology is validated by applying it to a network of viscoelastic vessels for which experimental and numerical results are available. The agreement between the results obtained in the present paper and those available in the literature is satisfactory. Key features of the present formulation and numerical methodologies, such as accuracy, efficiency and robustness, are fully discussed in the paper.

  1. Reformulation of DFT+U as a pseudo-hybrid Hubbard density functional Luis A. Agapito,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    the true energy of the many-body system of the electrons and the approxi- mate energy that we can computeReformulation of DFT+U as a pseudo-hybrid Hubbard density functional Luis A. Agapito,1, 2 Stefano have seen two competing approaches unfold to address these problems: DFT+U and hybrid exact exchange

  2. Energy and crude oil input requirements for the production of reformulated gasolines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States); McNutt, B. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy and crude oil requirements for the production of reformulated gasolines (RFG) are estimated. Both the energy and crude oil embodied in the final product and the process energy required to manufacture the RFG and its components are included. The effects on energy and crude oil use of using various oxygenates to meet the minimum oxygen content level required by the Clean Air Act Amendments are evaluated. The analysis illustrates that production of RFG requires more total energy than that of conventional gasoline but uses less crude oil. The energy and crude oil use requirements of the different RFGs vary considerably. For the same emissions performance level, RFG with ethanol requires substantially more total energy and crude oil than RFG with MTBE or ETBE. A specific proposal by the EPA designed to allow the use of ethanol in RFG would increase the total energy required to produce RFG by 2% and the total crude oil required by 2.0 to 2.5% over that for the base RFG with MTBE.

  3. Disposition, metabolism, and toxicity of methyl tertiary butyl ether, an oxygenate for reformulated gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutcheon, D.E.; Hove, W. ten; Boyle, J. III [UMDNJ, New Jersey Medical Schook, Newark, NJ (United States)] [UMDNJ, New Jersey Medical Schook, Newark, NJ (United States); Arnold, J.D. [Arnold & Arnold, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)] [Arnold & Arnold, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the toxicology of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) were reviewed as a possible information base for evaluating the health effects of evaporative emissions from reformulated gasoline (RFG). Perirenal fat/blood MTBE concentration ratios ranged from 9.7 to 11.6 after 15 wk of intermittent exposure. During an oxyfuels program in Fairbanks, AK, blood levels of occupationally exposed workers were 0.2-31.5 {mu}g/L MTBE and 1.6 to 72.2 {mu}g/L TBA with a mean TBA:MTBE blood concentration ratio of 4.2. In patients who received MTBE by percutaneous, transhepatic puncture for the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones, concentrations of MTBE in fat tissue reached 60 and 300 {mu}g/g at a treatment time when mean blood MTBE was less than 20 {mu}g/ml. The results of laboratory and clinical studies indicate that metabolites of MTBE may contribute to the nephropathy, neoplasms, and other pathological changes associated with repeated exposure to MTBE in experimental animals. It is concluded that such studies can provide a well-defined database for quantitatitive safety comparisons and health risk-benefit analyses of MTBE and other oxygenates in RFG. 39 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, K.S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

  5. Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

  6. 7, 849910, 2007 Reformulating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent so- lutions and the associated Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References Tables Figures Back Close Full Screen / Esc Back Close Full Screen / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract Modeling

  7. Stocks of Reformulated Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO) Highlights

  8. Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0622Product:Refiners Switch to

  9. Reformulated diesel fuel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for mathematically identifying at least one diesel fuel suitable for combustion in an automotive diesel engine with significantly reduced emissions and producible from known petroleum blendstocks using known refining processes, including the use of cetane additives (ignition improvers) and oxygenated compounds.

  10. PERSPECTIVE REFORMULATION AND APPLICATIONS 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate power. We do ..... inequality (4.9) to the bth power and multiply both sides by z aij ?bij .... problem, there is a set N of assets available for purchase.

  11. Reformulations in Mathematical Programming: Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo Liberti

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 3, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  12. EXPLICIT REFORMULATIONS FOR ROBUST OPTIMIZATION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    well-defined uncertainty set. ... “uniformly good” for realizations of data from the uncertainty set. ..... Let us mention some auxiliary results and definitions. Given a

  13. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0622Product:Refiners Switch

  14. mathematical programs with cardinality constraints: reformulation by ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    matical programs which are typically solved by global techniques from ... introduced here yield a nonlinear program whose structure is very similar to a math-.

  15. Perspective Reformulations of Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programs ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Since software for nonlinear programs continues to become more efficient ... Mathematical Sciences Department, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, York- ...... the instances are reported at http://www.di.unipi.it/optimize/Data/

  16. On mixed integer reformulations of monotonic probabilistic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    papa

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    May 16, 2010 ... minimization of the probability of default (Roy 1952) or in solution of a .... k. I k K. ? are finite ordered index sets;. (. ) , ,P. ? ? be a probability ...

  17. Semidefinite Programming Reformulation of Completely Positive ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 6, 2014 ... can replace the completely positive programming characterization of the moment ...... actual water storage in the reservoir across the n periods:.

  18. Trace Norm Regularization: Reformulations, Algorithms, and Multi ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ?Department of Mathematics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA ... ‡Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Center for Evolutionary .... Recently, proximal gradient methods have been applied to solve (1). These.

  19. Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436INCIDENCE OF AN2009979

  20. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are there Gains

  1. Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06 2.01394-2015 East

  2. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0October

  3. A possible geometrical origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montiel, Ariadna; Cordero, Rubén; Rojas, Efraín

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modified geodetic brane cosmology (MGBC) is tested with observational data. The MGBC is derived from the geodetic brane gravity action corrected by the extrinsic curvature of the braneworld. The density parameter coming from this additional term produces an accelerated expansion of geometrical origin. Subject to the Supernovae Ia, Observable Hubble parameter, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and Cosmic Microwave Background probes, the obtained fit provides enough evidence in the sense that the extrinsic curvature effect is able to reproduce the accelerated expansion of the universe without need of invoking dark energy, exotic matter or cosmological constant. Moreover the MGBC is free of the problems present in other braneworld models.

  4. Reformulations, Relaxations and Cutting Planes for Linear Generalized Disjunctive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    model allows for a combination of algebraic and logical equations through disjunctions and logic by Raman and Grossmann [1994], is an extension of the well-known disjunctive programming paradigm developed the underlying logical structure of the problem, in both the linear [Raman & Grossmann, 1994] and nonlinear cases

  5. A Decade of Progress in Constraint Modelling and Reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    and Automation Alan M Frisch Artificial Intelligence Group Dept of Computer Science University ofYork 1 #12 Languages: Direct Systems · Inherited from GAMS and MGG mathematical programming languages. Later AMPL to be specified separately. This is used to specify instances. t = 12 1. Base Case: 2. Parameterise: 3. Lift: 10

  6. Reformulating Competition? Gasoline Content Regulation and Wholesale Gasoline Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jennifer; Hastings, Justine; Mansur, Erin T.; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation and Arbitrage in Wholesale Gasoline Markets,Content Regulation and Wholesale Gasoline Prices JenniferCONTENT REGULATION AND WHOLESALE GASOLINE PRICES by Jennifer

  7. Optimization Online - Reformulation of a model for hierarchical ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonia Cafieri

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Pierre Hansen (pierre.hansen ***at*** gerad.ca). Abstract: Finding clusters, or communities, in a graph, or network is a very important problem ...

  8. Reformulation versus cutting-planes for robust optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    simple and comparable to other constraint generation methods. The method ...... matical Programming Society COAL Newsletter 13, 10–12 (1985). 13. Goh, J.

  9. Towards Multidocument Summarization by Reformulation: Progress and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barzilay, Regina

    was devastated by a car bomb in Oklahoma City on April 19th 1995. Around 250 people are still unaccounted for

  10. assisted query reformulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Terms Algorithms, Human Factors, Design Keywords Automatic Query Expansion, Search Behavior, 1 children may make. Most of the search engines offer only the possibility...

  11. Reformulating Competition? Gasoline Content Regulation and Wholesale Gasoline Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jennifer; Hastings, Justine; Mansur, Erin T.; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are added to gasoline at the terminal. Therefore, gasolinegasoline from one market and shipping it to another. These firms may own terminals

  12. Reformulation and Sampling to Solve a Stochastic Network ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 31, 2006 ... “A large-scale deterministic equivalent binary integer program may be ...... Examining our (preliminary) attempts and the statistical bounds. 21 ...

  13. Reformulating Competition? Gasoline Content Regulation and Wholesale Gasoline Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jennifer; Hastings, Justine; Mansur, Erin T.; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation Date Utica N Y Harrisburg PA, Philadelphia P AOdessa T X , Tucson A Z Harrisburg PA, Roanoke V A Austin TK S Sinking Springs P A Harrisburg PA, Macungie P A Tucson A

  14. A Penalized Quadratic Convex Reformulation Method for Random ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2013 ... reliability problem. Extensions of this approach to limited ...... approach for the placement of electronic circuits. Mathematical Programming ...

  15. A Level-3 Reformulation-Linearization Technique Based Bound for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Hahn

    2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical and Systems Engineering, The University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia ... Mathematics and Computer Science, High Point University ... Vandenbussche (2006), the bundle method bound by Rendl and Sotirov (2007), and the Hahn-.

  16. Solving Bilevel Mixed Integer Program by Reformulations and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    With deregulations of power systems and organizations of electricity markets ... applications for strategic planning and system vulnerability analysis [1, 43, 10, 14

  17. Transportation Center Seminar "A Reformulation-based Exact Algorithm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    equipment (WEEE) in Europe. The WEEE Directive establishes that each company that sells electronic products

  18. Model Reformulation and Design of Lithium-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    -ion chemistry has been identified as a good candidate for high-power/high-energy secondary batteries implantable cardiovascular defibrillators (ICDs) operating at 10 mA current to hybrid vehicles requiring, these models have not been employed for parameter estimation or dynamic optimization of operating conditions

  19. Reformulation of a model for hierarchical divisive graph modularity ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pajek Datasets. http://vlado.fmf.uni-lj.si/pub/networks/data/. Billionnet, A., Elloumi, S., & Lambert, A. (2010). Extending the QCR method to general mixed-integer.

  20. DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshore WindEnergy's FY2016Appoints DOEDOE

  1. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177391.0 91.0 80.14.6

  2. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177391.0 91.0

  3. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177391.0 91.084.5 84.3

  4. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177391.0 91.084.5

  5. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177391.0 91.084.559.5

  6. DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » ContactDepartment ofa SiteDepartmentDepartmentII)Awarded

  7. Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : 42Q)2Q)6)2k(STEO)

  8. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : 42Q)2Q)6)2k(STEO)

  9. U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude OilNov-149,271.5

  10. U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude OilNov-149,271.5502

  11. Refiner and Blender Net Production of Reformulated Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0622 1,652 1,632 1,641

  12. Efficient Simulation and Reformulation of Lithium-Ion Battery Models for Enabling Electric Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northrop, Paul W. C.

    Improving the efficiency and utilization of battery systems can increase the viability and cost-effectiveness of existing technologies for electric vehicles (EVs). Developing smarter battery management systems and advanced ...

  13. A Lower Bound for the Quadratic Assignment Problem Based on a Level-2 Reformulation-Linearization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terri Anne Johnson, Clemson University Monique Guignard-Spielberg, The University of Pennsylvania-and-bound are the most successful, but the lack of sharp lower bounds in these algorithms has been one of the major

  14. Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline On Motor Vehicle Emissions. 1. Mass Emission Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Singer, Brett C.; Harley, Robert A.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    propane standard. Methane,MTBE, speciated and NMHC concentrations were determined following the pro-

  15. Net exchange reformulation of radiative transfer in the CO2 15m band on Mars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ´et´eorogogie Dynamique, IPSL; CNRS and Universit´e Pierre et Marie Curie; Paris; France 2 Laboratoire d'Energ mass) and airborne dust particles (even outside large planetary scale dust-storms, extinction of solar

  16. Reformulation RELAP5-3D in FORTRAN 95 and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELAP5-3D is a nuclear power plant code used worldwide for safety analysis, design, and operator training. In keeping with ongoing developments in the computing industry, we have re-architected the code in the FORTRAN 95 language, the current, fully-available, FORTRAN language. These changes include a complete reworking of the database and conversion of the source code to take advantage of new constructs. The improvements and impacts to the code are manifold. It is a completely machine-independent code that produces machine independent fluid property and plot files and expands to the exact size needed to accommodate the user’s input. Runtime is generally better for larger input models. Other impacts of code conversion are improved code readability, reduced maintenance and development time, increased adaptability to new computing platforms, and increased code longevity. The conversion methodology, code improvements and testing upgrades are presented in a manner that will be useful to future conversion projects for other such large codes. Comparison between the pre- and post-conversion code are made on the basis of code metrics and code performance.

  17. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1996 ... 10.7 11.1 26.1 20.5 8.0 54.6 3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 1997 January ... 11.3 11.8 27.2 19.8 7.3 54.3 3.2 3.3 7.9 3.0 W 10.8...

  18. Generation of query-biased concepts using content and structure for query reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Y-J.; Wang, J.; Lalmas, M.

    Chang,Y-J. Wang,J. Lalmas,M. 13th International Conference on Applications of Natural Language to Information Systems (NLDB2008), London pp 136-141 LNCS, Springer

  19. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1996 January ... 7.5 7.8 19.3 15.7 3.8 38.7 2.9 3.0 7.0 2.7 - 9.7 February ... 7.7 8.0 20.3 16.9 5.9 43.1 3.0 3.0 7.4 3.0 - 10.4 March...

  20. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0.3 0.3 1.7 0.8 1.4 3.9 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.2 - 0.6 December ... 6.7 7.0 23.0 W W 47.3 2.0 2.0 7.5 W W 10.7 1994 ... 0.6 0.6 2.1 1.6 0.6...

  1. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program (Released in the STEO June 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 107(d) of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990 (the Act), required states to identify all areas that do not meet the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone, and directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to designate these areas as ozone nonattainment areas. Section 181 of the Act required EPA to classify each area as a marginal, moderate, serious, severe or extreme ozone nonattainment area. EPA classified all areas that were designated as in nonattainment for ozone at the time of the enactment of the 1990 Amendments, except for certain "nonclassifiable" areas (56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991).

  2. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1996 ... 83.4 83.0 78.8 69.8 67.7 73.8 92.4 92.1 83.7 74.1 W 80.9 1997 January ... 82.4 82.1 77.1 74.3 73.6 75.6 92.1 91.8 82.7...

  3. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1996 January ... 71.4 71.0 67.6 59.2 56.0 63.1 80.9 80.6 72.3 63.8 - 69.9 February ... 72.2 71.7 67.8 59.8 56.8 63.2 81.3 81.0 73.1 64.2 -...

  4. Exact Computation of Emergy Based on a Reformulation of the Rules of Emergy Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    `emes Energ´etiques et Environnement c Dpt. Automatique-Productique Abstract The emergy algebra is based is associated with the co-product problem. The addition is linked with the split prob- lem or more generaly

  5. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

  6. AN EFFICIENT REFORMULATION BASED VLSI ARCHITECTURE FOR ADAPTIVE VITERBI DECODING IN WIRELESS APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Tughrul

    Edinburgh UK, EH93JL Email: y.gang@ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT New trends in wireless communication systems has and 256 in 3G protocol. On the other hand, combining cost, performance and energy complex to implement the con- ventional FEC scheme based on VA. The strategy of adaptation

  7. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Paul Chin; Dr. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts; Professor James J. Spivey; Mr. Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Dr. James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Dr. Richard W. Rice

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several different catalytic reactions must be carried out in order to convert hydrocarbons (or alcohols) into hydrogen for use as a fuel for polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Each reaction in the fuel-processing sequence has a different set of characteristics, which influences the type of catalyst support that should be used for that particular reaction. A wide range of supports are being evaluated for the various reactions in the fuel-processing scheme, including porous and non-porous particles, ceramic and metal straight-channel monoliths, and ceramic and metal monolithic foams. These different types of support have distinctly different transport characteristics. The best choice of support for a given reaction will depend on the design constraints for the system, e.g., allowable pressure drop, and on the characteristics of the reaction for which the catalyst is being designed. Three of the most important reaction characteristics are the intrinsic reaction rate, the exothermicity/endothermicity of the reaction, and the nature of the reaction network, e.g., whether more than one reaction takes place and, in the case of multiple reactions, the configuration of the network. Isotopic transient kinetic analysis was used to study the surface intermediates. The preferential oxidation of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen (PROX) is an important final step in most fuel processor designs. Data on the behavior of straight-channel monoliths and foam monolith supports will be presented to illustrate some of the factors involved in choosing a support for this reaction.

  8. Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braatz, Richard D.

    Many researchers have worked to develop methods to analyze and characterize capacity fade in lithium-ion batteries. As a complement to approaches to mathematically model capacity fade that require detailed understanding ...

  9. P2P query reformulation over BothasView data transformation rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBrien, Peter

    and Alexandra Poulovassilis 2 1 Dept. of Computing, Imperial College, Univ. of London, pjm@doc.ic.ac.uk 2 School

  10. Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle Emissions. 2. Volatile Organic Compound Speciation and Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas; Singer, Brett; Harley, Robert

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diurnal, hot-soak, and running loss emissions lie somewherea contribution from running loss evaporative emissions. Asof diurnal, hot-soak, and running loss evaporative emissions

  11. Reconstituting Lives: Somali Women's Efforts to Reformulate Household and Community Values in Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippi-Franz, Melissa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research addresses what Somali women living in Kansas City, Missouri do to assist their households and communities to come to terms with the consequences of forced migration. Women's contributions to wellbeing are found ...

  12. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 2503

  13. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 2503

  14. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 2503

  15. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 2503

  16. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25031996

  17. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  18. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  19. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  20. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333 1996

  1. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  2. The Prym Torelli problem: an update and a reformulation as a question in birational geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roy

    canonical curves Riemann singularities theorem for Pryms Density of double points in â??â??stableâ??â?? singular locus Deformation theoretic rank 6 quadrics problem 4. Andreottiâ??s approach to Torelli via Gauss maps Non normality of Jacobian Gauss divisors Normality of general Prym Gauss divisors 5. Andreotti

  3. ,"U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to

  4. Postmodern man in search of a soul: towards a (re)formulation of the sociology of religion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segura, Clasina Buffelen

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and explain individual and collective level religious and spiritual experience in our contemporary postmodern social landscape. Current theoretical frameworks for the sociology of religion have failed to provide an adequate lens through which to view religious...

  5. Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using First-Principles-Based Efficient Reformulated Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using First parameters of lithium-ion batteries are estimated using a first-principles electrochemical engineering model and understanding of lithium-ion batteries using physics-based first-principles models. These models are based

  6. ORNL/TM-2002/225 Estimating Impacts of Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/TM-2002/225 Estimating Impacts of Diesel Fuel Reformulation with Vector-based Blending IMPACTS OF DIESEL FUEL REFORMULATION WITH VECTOR-BASED BLENDING G. R. Hadder Transportation Technology

  7. Optimization Online - Mathematical Programs with Cardinality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Burdakov

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2014 ... Mathematical Programs with Cardinality Constraints: Reformulation by Complementarity-type Constraints and a Regularization Method.

  8. A Unified Network Performance Importance Identification and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Guire, and Winsten (1956), that electric power generation and distribution networks can be reformulated and solved, in press. #12;The Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks The Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks Electric Power Supply

  9. EXPLOITING STRUCTURAL DYNAMISM IN FUNCTIONAL HYBRID MODELLING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsson, Henrik

    is that of a breaking pendulum as dis- cussed in the Modelica tutorial [5, pp. 31­33], where a causal reformulation enough in languages like Modelica. Howe

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    these purposes, a clean fuel is any fuel, including diesel, ethanol (including E85), hydrogen, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), natural gas, reformulated gasoline, or other...

  11. A Modified Prony Algorithm for Fitting Functions Defined by Difference Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    National University, Canberra 2601, Australia. Department of Mathematics, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4067, Australia. 1 #12;1 Introduction This paper reformulates, generalizes and investigates

  12. ancilla-driven universal quantum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Computers Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: The halt scheme for quantum Turing machines, originally proposed by Deutsch, is reformulated precisely and is proved to...

  13. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD District and State, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Conventional Reformulated Total 15 ppm...

  14. Optimization and homotopy methods for the Gibbs free energy of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Cassioli

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    May 31, 2011 ... Abstract: In this paper we consider a mathematical model for magmatic mixtures based on the Gibbs free energy. Different reformulations of the ...

  15. Development of a microscopic activity-based framework for analyzing the potential impacts of transportation control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detwiler, Russell

    . The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) establish rules for gasoline volatility, evapo- rative and running losses, tailpipe emissions standards, alternative fuel programs, reformulated and oxygenated fuels

  16. Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    into GM vehicles and powered by a variety of alternative fuels including B20 biodiesel, E85 ethanol, reformulated gasoline, and hydrogen. GM, DOE, and the Canadian...

  17. Comput Optim Appl (2012) 51:199221 DOI 10.1007/s10589-010-9341-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solodov, Mikhail V.

    for the lifted reformulation of mathematical programs with complementarity constraints A.F. Izmailov · A constraints, where by introducing an artificial variable the constraints are con- verted into equalities which are once but not twice differentiable. We show that the Lagrange optimality system of such a reformulation

  18. Locality and stability of the cascades of two-dimensional turbulence.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios - Department of Mathematics, University of Texas

    chemical combustion Stabilize plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor Propagation of laser through turbulence;Outline Why study turbulence? Brief overview of K41 theory (3D turbulence) Frisch reformulation of K41 theory. KLB theory (2D turbulence). My reformulation of Frisch to address 2D turbulence Locality

  19. A Transportation Network Efficiency Measure that Captures Flows, Behavior,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Guire, and Winsten (1956), that electric power generation and distribution networks can be reformulated and solved Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks Electric Power Supply with Applications to Network Component Importance Identification and Vulnerability Anna NagurneyAnna Nagurney Qiang

  20. Column Generation for Extended Formulations - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 8, 2011 ... reformulation in order to define a good quality outer approximation of the .... extends to the case where one only has a good reformulation in an ..... by inspection. ..... the formulation is kept under control by way of managing its variables .... ming solution as a hyper-path (associated to a unit flow incoming to

  1. The histories interpretation: stability instead of consistency?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. S. Clarke

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a reformulation of conventional results in decoherence theory, a condition is proposed for singling out a distinguished class of histories which includes those which use the ``pointer basis'' of Zurek.

  2. Combining computational effects: commutativity and sum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyland, Martin; Plotkin, Gordon; Power, John

    2003-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We begin to develop a unified account of modularity for computational effects. We use the notion of enriched Lawvere theory, together with its relationship with strong monads, to reformulate Moggi’s paradigm for modelling ...

  3. Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    August 8, 2002 Present Address: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC,Victoria BC, Canada, V8P 5C2 0 #12;Abstract A reformulation of the simple model

  4. Gauge-potential approach to the kinematics of a moving car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marian Fecko

    1997-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinematics of the motion of a car is reformulated in terms of the theory of gauge potentials (connection on principal bundle). E(2)-connection originates in the no-slipping contact of the car with a road.

  5. A CHARACTERIZATION OF DYNKIN ELEMENTS PAUL E. GUNNELLS AND ERIC SOMMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnells, Paul

    A CHARACTERIZATION OF DYNKIN ELEMENTS PAUL E. GUNNELLS AND ERIC SOMMERS ABSTRACT. We give November 2002. 1 #12; 2 PAUL E. GUNNELLS AND ERIC SOMMERS explained in Vogan [19]. Vogan's reformulation

  6. The ramifications of diffusive volume transport in classical fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielenberg, James R. (James Ronald), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis that follows consists of a collection of work supporting and extending a novel reformulation of fluid mechanics, wherein the linear momentum per unit mass in a fluid continuum, m, is supposed equal to the volume ...

  7. FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Energy Commission Air Resources Board #12;#12;v ABSTRACT Emissions associated with the production) emissions for methanol, diesel, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and electric vehicle operation. Reformulated of extraction, production, and distribution equipment. Emissions associated with the production

  8. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Porous Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Todd Richard

    We reformulate and extend porous electrode theory for non-ideal active materials, including those capable of phase transformations. Using principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we relate the cell voltage, ionic ...

  9. Detection of mutual phase synchronization in multivariate signals and application to phase ensembles and chaotic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutt, Axel

    of phasic data, we reformulate the K-means cluster algorithm on a flat torus and apply a segmentation index, in which temporal segments of phase- synchronized states are registered. A comparison with results from

  10. Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

  11. Preliminary assessment of future refining impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary assessment of the future refining impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has been performed with the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting Systems. The assessment suggests that gasoline reformulation costs in domestic coastal and near-coastal refining regions in the year 2000 could be 3.5 to 5.6 cents per gallon (in terms of 1989 currency). For heating value equivalent to one gallon of conventional gasoline, the regional total added costs (including reformulation costs) for reformulated gasoline could be 5.9 to 8.0 cents. In blending reformulated gasolines, the reduction of butane for lower Reid vapor pressure and the reduction of reformate for lower aromatics are generally compensated by increased percentages of alkylate and/or straight run naphthas. Relatively larger refinery process capacity additions are required for butane isomerization, alkylation, aromatics recovery, and distillate hydrotreating. 21 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. WHO'S AFRAID OF MICHELLE: FORCING THE FEMININE STYLE TO RECAST OBAMA'S IDENTITY DURING THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Ryan

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 Michelle Obama faced a crisis of identity in the midst of her husband's campaign to become the president of the United States. We know from polling data that Michelle Obama effectively managed that crisis, successfully reformulated her...

  13. Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required...

  14. Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required...

  15. The Integration of Problem Posing in Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosli, Roslinda

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Problem posing is commonly perceived as a cognitive activity that emerges in the process solving a problem but appears less commonly in the process of classroom instruction. The creation and reformulation of mathematics problems engages students...

  16. A Transportation Network EfficiencyA Transportation Network Efficiency Measure that Captures Flows,Measure that Captures Flows,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Guire, and Winsten (1956), that electric power generation and distribution networks can be reformulated and solved of Electric Power Supply Chain NetworksPower Supply Chain Networks Electric Power Supply Transportation Chain Component Importanceto Network Component Importance Identification and Vulnerability

  17. A penalization method for calculating the flow beneath travelling water waves of large amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Constantin; Konstantinos Kalimeris; Otmar Scherzer

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A penalization method for a suitable reformulation of the governing equations as a constrained optimization problem provides accurate numerical simulations for large-amplitude travelling water waves in irrotational flows and in flows with constant vorticity.

  18. UNIVERSITE PARIS VI Memoire en vue d'obtenir l'habilitation `a diriger des

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Straten, Duco

    d'approche purement topologique : celle de la m´ethode BKW complexe. On gagnerait certainement beaucoup a reformuler cette analyse BKW dans notre contexte. Mais c'est un point que je n'ai pas en- core

  19. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 21612176, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/2161/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    is oxygenated by addition of ethyl-tertio-butyl ether (ETBE), the second is based on a reformulation of its the ethyl- tertio-butyl-ether or ETBE) allows the

  20. Using Semantic Constraints to Improve Question Answering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosseim, Leila

    as the core of their QA system. This approach searches the document collection for predefined patterns and verb movements to generate paraphrases for their multilingual QA system. In the work of [5, 6, 7] reformulation rules to transform a qu

  1. New computational approach for the linearized scalar potential formulation of the magnetostatic field problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linearized scalar potential formulation of the magnetostatic field problem is considered. The approach involves a reformulation of the continuous problem as a parametric boundary problem. By the introduction of a spherical interface and the use of spherical harmonics, the infinite boundary condition can also be satisfied in the parametric framework. The reformulated problem is discretized by finite element techniques and a discrete parametric problem is solved by conjugate gradient iteration. This approach decouples the problem in that only standard Neumann type elliptic finite element systems on separate bounded domains need be solved. The boundary conditions at infinity and the interface conditions are satisfied during the boundary parametric iteration.

  2. Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 158 (12) A1461-A1477 (2011) A1461 0013-4651/2011/158(12)/A1461/17/$28.00 The Electrochemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reformulation and Simulation of Electrochemical-Thermal Behavior of Lithium-Ion Battery Stacks Paul W. C of the operation of lithium- ion batteries is not trivial, as concentration and potential fields must be evaluated for lithium-ion batteries can be found elsewhere in the literature.10­12 Table I depicts a pseudo

  3. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    -time (milliseconds) parameter estimation of lithium-ion batteries using reformulated physics-based models online 7 May 2008 Keywords: Lithium-ion battery Battery modeling Real-time simulation Parameter estimation a b s t r a c t In this paper, transport and kinetic parameters of lithium-ion batteries

  4. Generalized Disjunctive Programming as a Systematic Modeling Framework to Derive Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    variables and constraints, but it may compromise computational performance. On the other hand, the convex hull reformulation is tighter, which generally helps to speed up the search procedure. GDP formulations. The best performer is, however, a multiple time grid model which can be derived from the convex hull

  5. Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 00(0):000000 (2001) 1064-3389/01/$.50

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    water contamination by methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) have made policymakers more cognizant of the need reformulated gasoline (RFG) (2% oxygen) year-round to reduce emissions that contribute to ozone formation. MTBE-making process that lead to the widespread use of MTBE over the last decade is now quite controversial (BRP, 1999

  6. MTBE still facing pressure from ethanol under latest fuel proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, A.

    1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The US EPA's finalized reformulated gasoline rule, part of Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act, signals a possible turnaround for the sluggish methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) market. But if a 30% renewable fuels proposal favoring ethanol passes, pressure could continue for MTBE.

  7. Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    , if any, of the differences in retail gasoline prices between markets is attributable to differences substantially higher retail gasoline prices than other regions of the country. For example, for the first week of August 1999, the price of reformulated gasoline in California was 39.6 cents higher than the average

  8. NET-VISA: Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis by Nimar S. Arora, Stuart Russell,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Stuart

    . This paper reports on a project begun in 2009 to reformulate this problem in a Bayesian framework. A Bayesian half of the reported events are spurious. A large team of expert analysts postprocesses the automatic the resulting matrix equations (Menke, 1989; Lay and Wal- lace, 1995) and by the use of azimuth and slowness

  9. Extraction costs in the theory of exhaustible resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    Extraction costs in the theory of exhaustible resources Robert M. Solow Professor of Economics. First, it reformulates the theory of optimal use of an exhaustible resource with more attention in the supply of exhausti- ble resources. Our most striking result is, in fact, the suggestion that relatively

  10. North West Hydro Resource Model Research to identify potential capacity and assist NW hydro power development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    North West Hydro Resource Model Research to identify potential capacity and assist NW hydro power University wide research, aims to develop a system to promote the exploitation of hydro power in North with regard to hydro schemes Reviewing and re-formulating ill defined requirements for environmental

  11. 1861.ps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 ... We analyze two integer programming reformulations of the knapsack feasibility problem. ?1 ..... We now complete the proof of Theorem 1, based on a simple transference result between branch- .... This is indeed what is shown in Theorem .... we don't know how to use the general results for a better analysis of the ...

  12. A String Diagram Calculus for Predicate Logic and C. S. Peirce's System Beta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, Geraldine

    A String Diagram Calculus for Predicate Logic and C. S. Peirce's System Beta Geraldine Brady, called Beta, is reformulated here in modern terms, using developments in cate- gorical logic with Peirce's system Beta, is shown to be sound and complete with respect to #12;rst-order logic. 1991 Math

  13. SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 73, No. 6, pp. 22242246

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    cosponsorships in the United States Congress [64], functional modules in biology networks [28,39], and many other: we reformulate modularity optimization as a minimization problem of an energy functional that consists of a total variation term and an 2 balance term. By employing numerical techniques from image

  14. Practical Variational Inference for Neural Networks Alex Graves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    are energy-based models such as restricted Boltzmann machines [24] whose log- loss is intractable. 1 #12-loss parametric model--which includes most neural networks1 Variational inference can be reformulated as the optimisation of a Minimum Description length (MDL; [21]) loss function; indeed it was in this form

  15. Sustainable Transport Practices in Latin America Jorge Rogat and Miriam Hinostroza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it necessary and went ahead to reformulate transport policies with the aim of providing safe, cost the potential implications of such a development, policy makers and officials found it necessary and went ahead. BRT systems are operational or under construction in Mexico City, Mexico; Sao Paulo, Brazil; Santiago

  16. Thoughts on entropic gravity in the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling model of Hawking radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Yu Wen

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we use the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling model of Hawking radiation to illustrate that a reformulation of Verlinde's entropic gravity is needed to derive the Newton's law for a temperature-varying screen, demanded by the conservation of energy. Furthermore, the entropy stored in the holographic screen is shown to be additive and its temperature dependence can be obtained.

  17. A Transportation Network EfficiencyA Transportation Network Efficiency Measure that Captures Flows, Behavior,Measure that Captures Flows, Behavior,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    ), that electric power generation and distribution networks can be reformulated and solved as transportation and VulnerabilityVulnerability University of California, Berkeley, #12;Funding for our research has been provided Memorial Fund - University of Massachusetts at Amherst #12;Network VulnerabilityNetwork Vulnerability

  18. A Network Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Satellite and Undersea Cable Networks British Electricity Grid Some Critical Infrastructure Networks #12 by Beckmann, McGuire, and Winsten (1956), that electric power generation and distribution networks can Reformulation of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks Electric Power Supply Transportation Chain Network Network

  19. In Gnoli & Mazzocchi (eds.), Paradigms and conceptual systems in Knowledge Organization, Advances in Knowledge Organization, vol. 12, 2010, pp. 115-121.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reformulations of old questions which have been around for a long time (classification, thesauri). However database (Library, Information Science, and Technology Abstracts). In contrast to the previous studies on mainstream topics like cataloguing, classification. However, the pre-web era was characterized more

  20. CHARLES UNIVERSITY IN PRAGUE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanyk, Ladislav

    for the computation of temporal responses of viscoelastic Earth models to a surface load. Mathematically it is a reformulation of evolutional partial di#11;erential equations governing the in#12;nitesimal response of the pre the #12;eld partial di#11;erential equations, continue with the spherical harmonic decomposition

  1. CHARLES UNIVERSITY IN PRAGUE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    models to a surface load. Mathematically it is a reformulation of evolutional partial differential the initial-value formulation in full detail. We begin from the field partial differential equations, continue via the Method of Lines 2 1.1 Field Partial Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. ELEC4705 Fall 2009 Classical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smy, Tom

    · Laws of motion · Law of gravitation 2.2.1. Maxwell's Equations Maxwell's equations in electromagnetism and laws such as F = ma with more powerful expressions ­ very often differential operators. We will now reformulate the laws of physics in powerful concise expressions that allow us to solve difficult problems

  3. Cellulose and Biomass Conversion Technology and Its Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    have risen markedly over the last few years.' Because OPEC con- trols about 75% of tbe world's oil re-carbon sugar that has historically been more difficult to con- 68 FUEL REFORMULATION vert into useful products,700 million dry tons of cellulosic biomass per year at prices from $20-70 per dry ton." 10 This quantity

  4. A Discrete Chain Graph Model for 3d+t Cell Tracking with High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    the exact MAP solution by integer linear programming (ILP), and­ when comparing to the gold standard by assignment is well suited for tracking a varying number of divisible cells, but suffers from false positive detections. We reformulate tracking by assignment as a chain graph­a mixed directed- undirected probabilistic

  5. Alternative mixed-integer linear programming models of a maritime inventory routing problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Alternative mixed-integer linear programming models of a maritime inventory routing problem Jiang is enhanced by reformulating the time assignment constraints. Next, we present a model based on event points. Sherali et al (1999) formulated a mixed-integer programming model based on a discrete time representation

  6. The Interface Fresnel Zone revisited Nathalie Favretto-Cristini, Paul Cristini and Eric de Bazelaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Interface Fresnel Zone revisited Nathalie Favretto-Cristini, Paul Cristini and Eric de, and for seismic resolution. We reformulate the concepts of Fresnel volumes (FV) and Interface Fresnel zones (IFZ ray path (i.e., the 1st Fresnel volume) contributes to the received wavefield for each frequency

  7. 5, 1206712102, 2005 Alternative fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 12067­12102, 2005 Alternative fuel blends and regional air quality J.-F. Vinuesa et al and Physics Discussions Impacts of using reformulated and oxygenated fuel blends on the regional air quality License. 12067 #12;ACPD 5, 12067­12102, 2005 Alternative fuel blends and regional air quality J

  8. Optimization Online Digest -- November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Portfolio using a Coherent Risk Measure: Application to Oil and Energy Industries ... Consideration of Gas Supply Contracts with Take-or-pay Clauses in the ... Sensitivity analysis of the optimal solutions to Huff-type competitive location and ... Reformulations and Algorithms for the Optimization of Switching Decisions in ...

  9. Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consideration of Gas Supply Contracts with Take-or-pay Clauses in the Brazilian ... using a Coherent Risk Measure: Application to Oil and Energy Industries ... Reformulations and Algorithms for the Optimization of Switching Decisions in ... Sensitivity analysis of the optimal solutions to Huff-type competitive location and ...

  10. Forcing for IZF in Sheaf Toposes Thomas STREICHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    at the Occasion of his 50th Birthday Abstract In [Sco] D. Scott has shown how the interpretation of intuitionistic set theory IZF in presheaf toposes can be reformulated in a more concrete fashion `a la forcing by external transfinite recursion over the class On of ordinals a sequence P (0) On where P0 (0) = 0 P+1 (0

  11. Alan M. Frisch and Jimmy Lee (Ed.) Constraint Modelling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Alan M. Frisch and Jimmy Lee (Ed.) Constraint Modelling and Reformulation (ModRef'09) Eighth 2009 Alan M. Frisch and Jimmy Lee Programme Chairs #12;Programme Committee Sebastian Brand (University University, United Kingdom) (Co-Chair) Jimmy Lee (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China) Toni Mancini

  12. Insect Repellent Picking the right insect repellent could protect your health! Mosquitoes, biting flies, and ticks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .27 1­2 hours Not labeled for ticks Reformulated (with aloe); tested version may still be available Off that the product bears an EPA-approved label and registration number. Never use a product that has not been approved by the EPA! Read the entire label before using an insect repellent. Even if you have used

  13. On a HeleShaw type domain evolution with convected surface energy density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    generalizes surface­tension driven Hele­Shaw flow to the case of non­ constant surface tension coe#cient taken the surface tension coe#cient degenerates. The problem is reformulated as a vector­valued, degenerate variations of the surface energy density (corresponding to the surface tension coe#cient #) on surface

  14. An inexact proximal bundle method with applications to convex ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    function ? : z ?? maxw?We ?z,w? is nonpositive at ?s. If e ? int(K. ?. ) is chosen to .... Since the direct monotone SCLCP reformulation will double the ...... We write Lu for the Lyapunov transformation Lu(v) := u ? v for all v ? V. The quadratic ..... Incremental-like bundle methods with application to energy planning. Comput.

  15. Implications of ethanol-based fuels for greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DeLuchi, M.A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies; Wyman, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a rule which would mandate that 30% of the oxygen content of reformulated gasoline be provided by renewable oxygenates. The rule would essentially require that biomass-based ethanol, or ETBE derived from ethanol, be used to supply 30% of the oxygen in reformulated gasoline. This short statement addresses the very narrow question, ``Would this rule result in a net decrease in greenhouse gas emissions?`` The challenge then is to determine how much greenhouse gas is emitted during the ethanol fuel cycle, a fuel cycle that is much less mature and less well documented than the petroleum fuel cycle. In the petroleum fuel cycle, most of the greenhouse gas emissions come from fuel combustion. In the ethanol fuel cycle most of the greenhouse gas emissions come from the fuel production processes. Details of corn productivity, fertilizer use, process efficiency, fuel source, etc. become very important. It is also important that the ethanol fuel cycle produces additional products and the greenhouse gas emissions have somehow to be allocated among the respective products. With so many variables in the ethanol fuel cycle, the concern is actually with ethanol-based additives which will be produced in response to the proposed rule, and not necessarily with the average of ethanol which is being produced now. A first important observation is that the difference between standard gasoline and reformulated gasoline is very small so that when differences are drawn against alternative fuels, it makes little difference whether the contrast is against standard or reformulated gasoline. A second observation is that for this base case comparison, emissions of CO{sub 2} alone are roughly 13% less for the ethanol fuel cycle than for the reformulated gasoline cycle.

  16. Diesel fuel component contribution to engine emissions and performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erwin, J.; Ryan, T.W. III; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary diesel fuel is a blend of several refinery streams chosen to meet specifications. The need to increase yield of transportation fuel from crude oil has resulted in converting increased proportions of residual oil to lighter products. This conversion is accomplished by thermal, catalytic, and hydrocracking of high molecular weight materials rich in aromatic compounds. The current efforts to reformulate California diesel fuel for reduced emissions from existing engines is an example of another driving force affecting refining practice: regulations designed to reduce exhaust emissions. Although derived from petroleum crude oil, reformulated diesel fuel is an alternative to current specification-grade diesel fuel, and this alternative presents opportunities and questions to be resolved by fuel and engine research. Various concerned parties have argued that regulations for fuel reformulation have not been based on an adequate data base. Despite numerous studies, much ambiguity remains about the relationship of exhaust parameters to fuel composition, particularly for diesel fuel. In an effort to gather pertinent data, the automobile industry and the oil refiners have joined forces in the Air Quality Improvement Research Program (AUTO/OIL) to address this question for gasoline. The objective of that work is to define the relationship between gasoline composition and the magnitude and composition of the exhaust emissions. The results of the AUTO/OEL program will also be used, along with other data bases, to define the EPA {open_quotes}complex model{close_quotes} for reformulated gasolines. Valuable insights have been gained for compression ignition engines in the Coordinating Research Council`s VE-1 program, but no program similar to AUTO/OIL has been started for diesel fuel reformulation. A more detailed understanding of the fuel/performance relationship is a readily apparent need.

  17. Interaction between Titles 2 and 3 of the Clean Air Act as amended, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines Some issues that would I affect the refining industry if the requirements for hazardous air pollutants set out in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments were to impede the market entrance of oxygenated fuels, as me; required by Title II. It describes the mandate for reformulated gasoline; considers gasoline characteristics in light of component shifts in refining; examines the supply of, demand for, and cost of various feedstocks and blendstocks; and identifies the emissions and atmospheric impacts that might result from the production and use of reformulated gasoline. Attention is focused on methanol and MTBE, two potential blendstocks that are also hazardous air pollutants, and on maximum achievable control technology standards, which might be applied to the stationary sources that produce them.

  18. EPA`s proposed renewable oxygenate requirement (ROR): Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, H.M. [Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its final rule that sets for the details for requirements to sell reformulated gasoline (RFG) in certain ozone non-attainment areas. At the same time, EPA also issued a proposed rule to require that 30% of the oxygen required in RFG be based on a renewable oxygenate. Renewables include ethanol and its ether derivatives such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE). The RFG rule is a final rule, while the Renewable Oxygenate Requirement (ROR) rule is a proposed rule yet to be finalized and subject to revision. Included in this paper are brief reviews of Ashland petroleum Company`s ethanol usage, oxygenated fuel and reformulated gasoline blending economics, and some comments on the EPA proposed renewable oxygenate requirement.

  19. Simple and Compact Expressions for Neutrino Oscillation Probabilities in Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minakata, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reformulate perturbation theory for neutrino oscillations in matter with an expansion parameter related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric Delta m^2 scales. Unlike previous works, we use a renormalized basis in which certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using this perturbation theory we derive extremely compact expressions for the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter. We find, for example, that the $\

  20. Race to license new MTBE and TAME routes heats up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotman, D.

    1993-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With refineries and petrochemical manufacturers continuing to gear up production of oxygenates for use in reformulated fuels, new routes to methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) are clearly hot items in the licensing market. And probably nowhere has the competition become as intense as in offerings for skeletal isomerization technologies to boost ethers production from fluid catalytic cracking and steam cracking.

  1. Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

    emission sources, SCE has identified and evaluated a number of alternative solutions and is currently implementing four demonstrations for promising technologies. The SCE program focuses on three major strategies: (1) reformulation, (2) application... is primarily a three-pronged approach, consisting of problem identification, alternatives evaluation, and technology demonstrations. For problem identification, the main thrust was to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the California state and the South...

  2. The Initial Value Problem Using Metric and Extrinsic Curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. York

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial value problem is introduced after a thorough review of the essential geometry. The initial value equations are put into elliptic form using both conformal transformations and a treatment of the extrinsic curvature introduced recently. This use of the metric and the extrinsic curvature is manifestly equivalent to the author's conformal thin sandwich formulation. Therefore, the reformulation of the constraints as an elliptic system by use of conformal techniques is complete.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Reservoir Response to Stimulation by Water Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Jun

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    arising from the fluid. Biot?s theory of poroelasticity has been reformulated by a number of investigators (e.g. Geertsma, 1957; Rice and Cleary, 1976). Fig.1.6 shows the mechanics of poroelasticity. 10 Fig.1.6 Mechanics of Poroelasticity... is introduced. The theory of poroelasticity was introduced by Biot in 1941. The theory was subsequently extended by Biot to include dynamics, anisotropy and nonlinear materials. Rice and Cleary (1976) published a much more attractive presentation of theory...

  4. From Logical to Distributional Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Preller

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper relates two variants of semantic models for natural language, logical functional models and compositional distributional vector space models, by transferring the logic and reasoning from the logical to the distributional models. The geometrical operations of quantum logic are reformulated as algebraic operations on vectors. A map from functional models to vector space models makes it possible to compare the meaning of sentences word by word.

  5. The Bethe Ansatz for AdS5 x S5 Bound States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M de Leeuw

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We reformulate the nested coordinate Bethe ansatz in terms of coproducts of Yangian symmetry generators. This allows us to derive the nested Bethe equations for the bound state string S-matrices. We find that they coincide with the Bethe equations obtained from a fusion procedure. The bound state number dependence in the Bethe equations appears through the parameters x^{\\pm} and the dressing phase only.

  6. A New Glauber Theory based on Multiple Scattering Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanobu Yahiro; Kosho Minomo; Kazuyuki Ogata; Mitsuji Kawai

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Glauber theory for nucleus-nucleus scattering at high incident energies is reformulated so as to become applicable also for the scattering at intermediate energies. We test validity of the eikonal and adiabatic approximations used in the formulation, and discuss the relation between the present theory and the conventional Glauber calculations with either the empirical nucleon-nucleon profile function or the modified one including the in-medium effect.

  7. Graphs of subgroups of free groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louder, Larsen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an efficient model for graphs of finitely generated subgroups of free groups. Using this we give a very short proof of Dicks's reformulation of the strengthened Hanna Neumann Conjecture as the Amalgamated Graph Conjecture. In addition, we answer a question of Culler and Shalen on ranks of intersections in free groups. The latter has also been done independently by R. P. Kent IV.

  8. Variational Principle of Hydrodynamics and Quantization by Stochastic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kodama; T. Koide

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The well-known hydrodynamical representation of the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation is reformulated by extending the idea of Nelson-Yasue's stochastic variational method. The fluid flow is composed by the two stochastic processes from the past and the future, which are unified naturally by the principle of maximum entropy. We show that this formulation is easily applicable to the quantization of scalar fields.

  9. A nonlinear study of laser heating for NDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machiraju, Ravi Shanker Srinivas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the absorption of a very short pulse of high power laser light at the surface of a semi- infinite solid is predominantly linear, with the thermophysical properties of the target medium assumed to be constant. The maximum values for the predicted surface... temperatures were unreasonably high. To address this deficiency, temperature dependent thermophysical properties were introduced, and the resulting nonlinear equation was reformulated as a differential equation and solved numerically. Using this approach...

  10. ,"U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline

  11. ,"United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner

  12. ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average

  13. 01-Jan thru 05-Jan-02","12-Jan-02","19-Jan-02","26-Jan-02","02-Feb-02","09-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9

  14. 01-Jan thru 07-Jan-12","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","ap

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,

  15. 01/03-Jan-04",37996,38003,38010,38017,38024,38031,38038,38045,38052,38059,38066,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,27-Mar thru

  16. 01/04-Jan-03",37632,37639,37646,37653,37660,37667,37674,37681,37688,37695,37702,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,27-Mar

  17. New wholesale power market design using linked forward markets : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William; Ellison, James F.; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Guttromson, Ross; Tesfatsion, Leigh S. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report proposes a reformulation of U.S. ISO/RTO-managed wholesale electric power mar- kets for improved reliability and e ciency of system operations. Current markets do not specify or compensate primary frequency response. They also unnecessarily limit the participation of new technologies in reserve markets and o er insu cient economic inducements for new capacity invest- ment. In the proposed market reformulation, energy products are represented as physically-covered rm contracts and reserve products as physically-covered call option contracts. Trading of these products is supported by a backbone of linked ISO/RTO-managed forward markets with planning horizons ranging from multiple years to minutes ahead. A principal advantage of this reformulation is that reserve needs can be speci ed in detail, and resources can o er the services for which they are best suited, without being forced to conform to rigid reserve product de nitions. This should improve the business case for electric energy storage and other emerging technologies to provide reserve. In addition, the facilitation of price discovery should help to ensure e cient energy/reserve procurement and adequate levels of new capacity investment.

  18. Quantum brachistochrone curves as geodesics: obtaining accurate control protocols for time-optimal quantum gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoting Wang; Michele Allegra; Kurt Jacobs; Seth Lloyd; Cosmo Lupo; Masoud Mohseni

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Most methods of optimal control cannot obtain accurate time-optimal protocols. The quantum brachistochrone equation is an exception, and has the potential to provide accurate time-optimal protocols for essentially any quantum control problem. So far this potential has not been realized, however, due to the inadequacy of conventional numerical methods to solve it. Here, using differential geometry, we reformulate the quantum brachistochrone curves as geodesics on the unitary group. With this identification we are able to obtain a numerical method that efficiently solves the brachistochrone problem. We apply it to two examples demonstrating its power.

  19. Practical measurement of joint weak values and their connection to the annihilation operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Lundeen; K. J. Resch

    2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak measurements are a new tool for characterizing post-selected quantum systems during their evolution. Weak measurement was originally formulated in terms of von Neumann interactions which are practically available for only the simplest single-particle observables. In the present work, we extend and greatly simplify a recent, experimentally feasible, reformulation of weak measurement for multiparticle observables [Resch and Steinberg (2004, Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 130402)]. We also show that the resulting ``joint weak values'' take on a particularly elegant form when expressed in terms of annihilation operators.

  20. FO(FD): Extending classical logic with rule-based fixpoint definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ping, Hou; Denecker, Marc; 10.1017/S1471068410000293

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce fixpoint definitions, a rule-based reformulation of fixpoint constructs. The logic FO(FD), an extension of classical logic with fixpoint definitions, is defined. We illustrate the relation between FO(FD) and FO(ID), which is developed as an integration of two knowledge representation paradigms. The satisfiability problem for FO(FD) is investigated by first reducing FO(FD) to difference logic and then using solvers for difference logic. These reductions are evaluated in the computation of models for FO(FD) theories representing fairness conditions and we provide potential applications of FO(FD).

  1. Exponential scaling limit of the single-particle Anderson model via adaptive feedback scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Chulaevsky

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a reformulation of the bootstrap version of the Multi-Scale Analysis (BMSA), developed by Germinet and Klein, to make explicit the fact that BMSA implies asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), in the lattice Anderson models with diagonal disorder, viz. with an IID random potential. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than H\\"older continuity of any positive order.

  2. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  3. Petrochem industry expands North American MTBE capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that petrochemical manufacturers continue to increase methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) capacity in North America. The action reflects refiners' reformulation of gasoline to help reduce auto emissions. Demand for gasoline blending oxygenates such as MTBE is expected to increase as U.S. refiners reconfigure processing trains to produce fuels meeting requirements of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. Recent progress includes plans to build an MTBE plant in Mexico and start-ups of plants on the U.S. Gulf Coast and in Canada.

  4. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 1, summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Coast Alternative Fuels Demonstration, called CleanFleet, was conducted in the Los Angeles area from April 1992 through September 1994. The demonstration consisted of 111 package delivery vans operating on five alternative fuels and the control fuel, unleaded gasoline. The alternative fuels were propane gas, compressed natural gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol with 15 percent RFG (called M-85), and electricity. This volume of the eight volume CleanFleet final report is a summary of the project design and results of the analysis of data collected during the demonstration on vehicle maintenance and durability, fuel economy, employee attitudes, safety and occupational hygiene, emissions, and fleet economics.

  5. CleanFleet. Volume 2, Project Design and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CleanFleet alternative fuels demonstration project evaluated five alternative motorfuels in commercial fleet service over a two-year period. The five fuels were compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), M-85 (85 percent methanol and 15 percent RFG), and electric vans. Eight-four vans were operated on the alternative fuels and 27 vans were operated on gasoline as baseline controls. Throughout the demonstration information was collected on fleet operations, vehicle emissions, and fleet economics. In this volume of the CleanFleet findings, the design and implementation of the project are summarized.

  6. Group action in topos quantum physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flori, C. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street N, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)] [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street N, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Topos theory has been suggested first by Isham and Butterfield, and then by Isham and Doering, as an alternative mathematical structure within which to formulate physical theories. In particular, it has been used to reformulate standard quantum mechanics in such a way that a novel type of logic is used to represent propositions. In this paper, we extend this formulation to include the notion of a group and group transformation in such a way that we overcome the problem of twisted presheaves. In order to implement this we need to change the type of topos involved, so as to render the notion of continuity of the group action meaningful.

  7. The second law of blackhole dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koustubh Ajit Kabe

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the non-generalized or restricted second law blackhole dynamics as given by Bekenstein in the beginning is restated, with a rigid proof, in a different form akin to the statement of the second law of thermodynamics given by Clausius. The various physical possibilities and implications of this statement are discussed therein. This paper is a mere venture into the restricted second law of blackhole dynamics pertaining to blackholes emitting Hawking radiation. The paper thus considers a didactically interesting reformulation of the second law of blackhole thermodynamics after some revisions.

  8. Electromagnetic Radiation and Motion of Really Shaped Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistically covariant form of equation of motion for real particle (neutral in charge) under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived. Various formulations of the equation of motion in the proper frame of reference of the particle are used. Main attention is devoted to the reformulation of the equation of motion in the general frame of reference, e. g., in the frame of reference of the source of electromagnetic radiation. This is the crucial form of equation of motion in applying it to motion of particles (cosmic dust, asteroids, ...) in the Universe if electromagnetic radiation acts on the particles. General relativistic equation of motion is presented.

  9. Transverse Wave Propagation in Relativistic Two-fluid Plasmas around Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Atiqur Rahman

    2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3+1 formalism of Thorne and Macdonald has been used to derive the linear two-fluid equations for transverse waves in the plasma closed to the Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter (SAdS) black hole. We reformulate the relativistic two-fluid equations to take account of gravitational effects due to the event horizon and negative cosmological constant and describe the set of simultaneous linear equations for the perturbations. Using a local approximation we investigate the one-dimensional radial propagation of Alfven and high frequency electromagnetic waves. We derive the dispersion relation for these waves and solve it for the wave number k numerically.

  10. Transverse Wave Propagation in Relativistic Two-fluid Plasmas around Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Atiqur Rahman; M. Hossain Ali

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse electromagnetic waves propagating in a relativistic two-fluid plasma influenced by the gravitational field of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m-de Sitter black hole has been investigated exploiting 3+1 split of spacetime. Reformulating the two-fluid equations, the set of simultaneous linear equations for the perturbations have been derived. Using a local approximation, the one-dimensional radial propagation of Alfv\\'{e}n and high frequency electromagnetic waves are investigated. The dispersion relation for these waves is obtained and solved numerically for the wave number.

  11. Overcoming the dialectic of solitude: historical and narrative discourses in the works of Tomas Rivera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Kevin Lee

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'm. . . . . . . . IV OVERCOMING THE DIALECI'IC OF SOLITUDE: THE DIALOGUES OF OCTAVIO PAZ AND TOMAS RIVERA . . V CONCLUSION. REFERENCES. VITA V1 34 59 98 101 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The publication of Tomds Rivers's. . . y no se lo tragd la tierra... of the modern Chicano narrative tradition. As Hector Calder6n states, earth is "a reformulation of the Mexican-mestizo cultural world into the beginning of a Chicano narrative tradition" (99-100). Ram6n Saldivar writes that "Tierra [earth j represents...

  12. Balmer and Rydberg Equations for Hydrogen Spectra Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Balmer equation for the atomic spectral lines was generalized by Rydberg. Here it is shown that 1) while Bohr's theory explains the Rydberg constant in terms of the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom, quantizing the angular momentum does not explain the Rydberg equation, 2) on reformulating Rydberg's equation, the principal quantum numbers are found to correspond to integral numbers of de Broglie waves and 3) the ground state energy of hydrogen is electromagnetic like that of photons and the frequency of the emitted or absorbed light is the difference in the frequencies of the electromagnetic energy levels.

  13. Plasma Wave Properties of the Schwarzschild Magnetosphere in a Veselago Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Noureen Mukhtar

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-formulate the 3+1 GRMHD equations for the Schwarzschild black hole in a Veselago medium. Linear perturbation in rotating (non-magnetized and magnetized) plasma is introduced and their Fourier analysis is considered. We discuss wave properties with the help of wave vector, refractive index and change in refractive index in the form of graphs. It is concluded that some waves move away from the event horizon in this unusual medium. We conclude that for the rotating non-magnetized plasma, our results confirm the presence of Veselago medium while the rotating magnetized plasma does not provide any evidence for this medium.

  14. Hot Plasma Waves Surrounding the Schwarzschild Event Horizon in a Veselago Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Noureen Mukhtar

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates wave properties of hot plasma in a Veselago medium. For the Schwarzschild black hole, the $3+1$ GRMHD equations are re-formulated which are linearly perturbed and then Fourier analyzed for rotating (non-magnetized and magnetized) plasmas. The graphs of wave vector, refractive index and change in refractive are used to discuss the wave properties. The results obtained confirm the presence of Veselago medium for both rotating (non-magnetized and magnetized) plasmas. This work generalized the isothermal plasma waves in the Veselago medium to hot plasma case.

  15. Nonlinear elasto-plastic model for dense granular flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Kamrin

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a model for granular deformation that predicts the stress and velocity profiles in well-developed dense granular flows. Recent models for granular elasticity (Jiang and Liu 2003) and rate-sensitive plastic flow (Jop et al. 2006) are reformulated and combined into one universal granular continuum law, capable of predicting flowing regions and stagnant zones simultaneously in any arbitrary 3D flow geometry. The unification is performed by justifying and implementing a Kroner-Lee elasto-plastic decomposition, with care taken to ensure certain continuum physical principles are necessarily upheld. The model is then numerically implemented in multiple geometries and results are compared to experiments and discrete simulations.

  16. Light duty vehicle full fuel cycle emissions analysis. Topical report, April 1993-April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darrow, K.G.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a methodology for analyzing full fuel cycle emissions of alternative fuels for vehicles. Included in this analysis is an assessment of the following fuel cycles relevant to vehicle use: gasoline, reformulated gasoline, natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electric power (with onboard battery storage), ethanol, and methanol fuels. The analysis focuses on basic criteria pollutants (reactive organic gases, nitrous oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfurous oxides, and particulates less than 10 microns (PM10)). Emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) are also defined. The analysis was conducted for two cases, United States and the State of California and two time frames, current and year 2000.

  17. MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

  18. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

  19. Energy-momentum currents in Finsler/Kawaguchi Lagrangian formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayoshi Ootsuka; Ryoko Yahagi; Muneyuki Ishida; Erico Tanaka

    2014-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We reformulate the standard Lagrangian formalism to a reparameterisation invariant Lagrangian formalism by means of Finsler and Kawaguchi geometry. In our formalism, various types of symmetries that appears in theories of physics are expressed geometrically by symmetries of Finsler (Kawaguchi) metric, and the conservation law of energy-momentum is a part of Euler-Lagrange equations. The application to scalar field, Dirac field, electromagnetic field and general relativity are discussed. By this formalism, we try to propose an alternative definition of energy-momentum current of gravity.

  20. BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of geometrically exact beam theory (GEBT), was developed to meet the design challenges associated with highly flexible composite wind turbine blades. In this paper, the governing equations of GEBT are reformulated into a nonlinear state-space form to support its coupling within the modular framework of the FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool. Different time integration schemes (implicit and explicit) were implemented and examined for wind turbine analysis. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this new beam solver. An example analysis of a realistic wind turbine blade, the CX-100, is also presented as validation.

  1. Propagating torsion in the Einstein frame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplawski, Nikodem J. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Einstein-Cartan-Saa theory of torsion modifies the spacetime volume element so that it is compatible with the connection. The condition of connection compatibility gives constraints on torsion, which are also necessary for the consistence of torsion, minimal coupling, and electromagnetic gauge invariance. To solve the problem of positivity of energy associated with the torsionic scalar, we reformulate this theory in the Einstein conformal frame. In the presence of the electromagnetic field, we obtain the Hojman-Rosenbaum-Ryan-Shepley theory of propagating torsion with a different factor in the torsionic kinetic term.

  2. Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry.

  3. Random Wave Functions with boundary and normalization constraints: Quantum statistical physics meets quantum chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Diego Urbina; Klaus Richter

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an improved version of Berry's ansatz able to incorporate exactly the existence of boundaries and the correct normalization of the eigenfunction into an ensemble of random waves. We then reformulate the Random Wave conjecture showing that in its new version it is a statement about the universal nature of eigenfunction fluctuations in systems with chaotic classical dynamics. The emergence of the universal results requires the use of both semiclassical methods and a new expansion for a very old problem in quantum statistical physics

  4. Electromagnetic three-dimensional reconstruction of targets from free space experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffrin, J.-M.; Chaumet, P. C.; Eyraud, C.; Belkebir, K.; Sabouroux, P. [Aix-Marseille Universite, Ecole Centrale Marseille, and CNRS, Institut Fresnel, Domaine Universitaire de St Jerome, 13013 Marseille (France)

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the problem of reconstructing the relative permittivity of three-dimensional targets using experimental scattered fields. The fields concerned were measured in an anechoic chamber on the surface of a sphere surrounding the target. The inverse scattering problem is reformulated as an optimization problem that is iteratively solved thanks to a conjugate gradient method and by using the coupled dipoles method as a forward problem solver. The measurement technique and the inversion procedure are briefly described with the inversion results. This work demonstrates the reliability of the experiments and the efficiency of the proposed inverse scattering scheme.

  5. Self-organization without heat: the geometric ratchet effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Smerlak; Ahmed Youssef

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out a surprising feature of diffusion in inhomogeneous media: under suitable conditions, the rectification of the Brownian paths by a diffusivity gradient can result in initially spread tracers spontaneously concentrating. This "geometric ratchet effect" demonstrates that, in violation of the classical statements of the second law of (non-equilibrium) thermodynamics, self-organization can take place in thermodynamic systems at local equilibrium without heat being produced or exchanged with the environment. We stress the role of Bayesian priors in a suitable reformulation of the second law accommodating this geometric ratchet effect.

  6. An independent refiners approach to RFG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was presented by Mike Czeskleba,Senior Business Analyst for Ashland Petroleum Company in Ashland, Kentucky. Ashland is one of the largest independent refiners and a leading marketer of gasoline and other petroleum products in the U.S. The issues addressed in this report concern the use of ethanol as a gasoline extender and renewable oxygenate, and its use in Reformulated Gasolines (RFG). The impact of Clean Air Act requirements for 1995 and beyond on petroleum refiners and producers is discussed. Some of the strategies which Ashland Petroleum Company is using to meet regulation requirements is also presented.

  7. Recent trends in refinery hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitani, A.M.; Siddiqui, M.A.B. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Refiners are experiencing a rise in hydrogen requirements to improve product quality and process heavy sour crudes. Fuel reformulation has disrupted refinery hydrogen balance in two ways: more hydrogen is needed for hydroprocessing and less hydrogen is coproduced from catalytic naphtha reforming. The purpose of this paper is to review trends in maximizing refinery hydrogen production by modifications and alternatives to the conventional steam methane reforming, recovery from refinery off gases and {open_quote}across-the-fence{close_quote} hydrogen supply. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Analysis of community structure in networks of correlated data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, S.; Jensen, P.; Arenas, A.

    2008-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a reformulation of modularity that allows the analysis of the community structure in networks of correlated data. The new modularity preserves the probabilistic semantics of the original definition even when the network is directed, weighted, signed, and has self-loops. This is the most general condition one can find in the study of any network, in particular those defined from correlated data. We apply our results to a real network of correlated data between stores in the city of Lyon (France).

  9. q-Deformed Boson Oscillators and Zero Point Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Narayana Swamy

    1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Just as for the ordinary quantum harmonic oscillators, we expect the zero-point energy to play a crucial role in the correct high temperature behavior. We accordingly reformulate the theory of the statistical distribution function for the q-deformed boson oscillators and develop an approximate theory incorporating the zero-point energy. We are then able to demonstrate that for small deformations, the theory reproduces the correct limits both for very high temperatures and for very low temperatures. The deformed theory thus reduces to the undeformed theory in these extreme cases.

  10. Relation of classical non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidetosni Nishimori

    2015-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of the Ising model is a classical stochastic process whereas quantum mechanics has no stochastic elements in the classical sense. Nevertheless, it has been known that there exists a close formal relationship between these two processes. We reformulate this relationship and use it to compare the efficiency of simulated annealing that uses classical stochastic processes and quantum annealing to solve combinatorial optimization problems. It is shown that classical dynamics can be efficiently simulated by quantum-mechanical processes whereas the converse is not necessarily true. This may imply that quantum annealing may be regarded as a more powerful tool than simulated annealing for optimization problems.

  11. On D. Haegele's approach to the Bessis-Moussa-Villani conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Peter S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reformulation of the Bessis-Moussa-Villani conjecture given by Lieb and Seiringer asserts that the coefficient of t^r in the polynomial Trace[(A+tB)^p], with A and B positive semidefinite matrices, is nonnegative for all p and r. We propose a natural extension of a method of attack on this problem due to Haegele, and investigate for what values of p and r the method is successful, obtaining a complete determination when either p or r is odd.

  12. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  13. Atiyah-Drinfeld-Hitchin-Manin construction of noncommutative U(2) k-instantons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagraa, M. [Laboratoire de physique theorique, Universite d'Oran Es-Senia, 31100 (Algeria)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic objects of the Atiyah-Drinfeld-Hitchin-Manin (ADHM) construction are reformulated in terms of elements of the A{sub {theta}}(R{sup 4}) algebra of the noncommutative R{sub {theta}}{sup 4} space. This new formulation of the ADHM construction makes possible the explicit calculus of the U(2) instanton number which is shown to be the product of a trace of a finite rank projector of the Fock representation space of the algebra A{sub {theta}}(R{sup 4}) times a noncommutative version of the winding number.

  14. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara Oxygenated Reformulated

  15. Fractional Euler-Bernoulli beams: theory, numerical study and experimental validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Sumelka; Tomasz Blaszczyk; Christian Liebold

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam (CEBB) theory is reformulated utilising fractional calculus. Such generalisation is called fractional Euler-Bernoulli beams (FEBB) and results in non-local spatial description. The parameters of the model are identified based on AFM experiments concerning bending rigidities of micro-beams made of the polymer SU-8. In experiments both force as well as deflection data were recorded revealing significant size effect with respect to outer dimensions of the specimens. Special attention is also focused on the proper numerical solution of obtained fractional differential equation.

  16. The Asymptotic Behaviour of a Stochastic 3D LANS-{alpha} Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caraballo, Tomas, E-mail: caraball@us.es; Marquez-Duran, Antonio M., E-mail: ammarquez@us.es; Real, Jose [Dpto. Ecuaciones Diferenciales y Analisis Numerico, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. Correos 1160, 41080-Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: jreal@us.es

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-time behaviour of a stochastic 3D LANS-{alpha} model on a bounded domain is analysed. First, we reformulate the model as an abstract problem. Next, we establish sufficient conditions ensuring the existence of stationary (steady state) solutions of this abstract nonlinear stochastic evolution equation, and study the stability properties of the model. Finally, we analyse the effects produced by stochastic perturbations in the deterministic version of the system (persistence of exponential stability as well as possible stabilisation effects produced by the noise). The general results are applied to our stochastic LANS-{alpha} system throughout the paper.

  17. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

  18. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"Sales Volumes of

  19. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"Sales Volumes

  20. ,"U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"Sales

  1. ,"U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"SalesSales Volumes

  2. ,"U.S. Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"SalesSales

  3. ,"U.S. Total Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"SalesSalesProved

  4. ,"U.S. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner GasolineMonthly","4/2015"

  5. ,"United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average RefinerMonthly","4/2015"

  6. ,"Upcoming U.S. Natural Gas Storage Facilities"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average RefinerMonthly","4/2015"Upcoming

  7. ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average RefinerMonthly","4/2015"Upcoming7

  8. ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table

  9. ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table9 Relative

  10. ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table9 Relative7

  11. ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table9

  12. ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98. Energy

  13. ,,,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98. Energy3

  14. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98.

  15. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98.B39.

  16. ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98.B39.10.3

  17. ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for

  18. ,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for3 Relative

  19. ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for3 Relative4

  20. ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for3 Relative45

  1. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for3

  2. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors

  3. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard ErrorsNumber of

  4. ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard ErrorsNumber of Relative

  5. ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard ErrorsNumber of Relative2

  6. 01-Jan thru 02-Jan-10","09-Jan-10","16-Jan-10","23-Jan-10","30-Jan-10","06-Feb-1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard ErrorsNumber of

  7. 01-Jan thru 02-Jan-10","09-Jan-10","16-Jan-10","23-Jan-10","30-Jan-10","06-Feb-1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard ErrorsNumber

  8. 01-Jan thru 03-Jan-04","10-Jan-04","17-Jan-04","24-Jan-04","31-Jan-04","07-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard

  9. 01-Jan thru 03-Jan-09","10-Jan-09","17-Jan-09","24-Jan-09","31-Jan-09","07-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard29-Mar thru

  10. 01-Jan thru 03-Jan-09","10-Jan-09","17-Jan-09","24-Jan-09","31-Jan-09","07-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard29-Mar

  11. 01-Jan thru 04-Jan-03","11-Jan-03","18-Jan-03","25-Jan-03","01-Feb-03","08-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative

  12. 01-Jan thru 05-Jan-08","12-Jan-08","19-Jan-08","26-Jan-08","02-Feb-08","09-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.930-Mar thru 31-Mar-08",,"01-Apr thru

  13. 01-Jan thru 05-Jan-08","12-Jan-08","19-Jan-08","26-Jan-08","02-Feb-08","09-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.930-Mar thru 31-Mar-08",,"01-Apr

  14. 01-Jan thru 05-Jan-13","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","ap

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.930-Mar thru

  15. 01-Jan thru 06-Jan-07","13-Jan-07","20-Jan-07","27-Jan-07","03-Feb-07","10-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.930-Mar thru,"01-Apr thru

  16. 01-Jan thru 06-Jan-07","13-Jan-07","20-Jan-07","27-Jan-07","03-Feb-07","10-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.930-Mar thru,"01-Apr

  17. 01-Jan thru 07-Jan-06","14-Jan-06","21-Jan-06","28-Jan-06","04-Feb-06","11-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.930-Mar

  18. 01-Jan-05","08-Jan-05","15-Jan-05","22-Jan-05","29-Jan-05","05-Feb-05","12-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,27-Mar thru 31-Mar-05",,"01-Apr thru

  19. 01-Jan-05","08-Jan-05","15-Jan-05","22-Jan-05","29-Jan-05","05-Feb-05","12-Feb-0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,27-Mar thru 31-Mar-05",,"01-Apr

  20. 01-Jan-11","08-Jan-11","15-Jan-11","22-Jan-11","29-Jan-11","05-Feb-11","12-Feb-1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,27-Mar thru 31-Mar-05",,"01-Apr27-Mar thru

  1. 01-Jan-11","08-Jan-11","15-Jan-11","22-Jan-11","29-Jan-11","05-Feb-11","12-Feb-1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated,27-Mar thru 31-Mar-05",,"01-Apr27-Mar

  2. Study downplays health concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  3. Use TAME and heavier ethers to improve gasoline properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatius, J.; Jaervelin, H.; Lindqvist, P. (Neste Engineering, Porvoo (Finland))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing oxygenates from all potential FCC tertiary olefins is one of the most economic methods for reducing olefins and Reid vapor pressure (Rvp) in motor gasoline. MTBE production based on FCC isobutylene has reached a very high level. But the amount of MTBE from a refinery sidestream MTBE unit is insufficient for producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) and additional oxygenates must be purchased. The next phase will see conversion of isoamylenes in FCC light gasoline to TAME. Very little attention has been given to the heavier tertiary olefins present in the FCC light gasoline like tert-hexenes and heptenes. This route allows higher levels of oxygenates production, thereby lowering Rvp and the proportion of olefins in the gasoline pool and maximizing the use of FCC olefins. By using all the components produced by an FCC efficiently, many gasoline problems can be solved. Isobutene is converted to MTBE, C[sub 3]/C[sub 4] olefins are converted to alkylate and C[sub 5] tertiary olefins can be converted to TAME. All of these are preferred components for gasoline quality. By producing more oxygenates like MTBE, TAME and heavier ethers, a refinery can be self-sufficient in blending reformulated gasoline and no oxygenates need to be purchased. The technology for producing TAME and other ethers is described.

  4. GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

  5. Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elbert, Stephen T.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) are financial insurance tools to help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, first an innovative mathematical reformulation of the FTR problem is presented which dramatically improves the computational efficiency of optimization problem. After having re-formulated the problem, a novel non-linear dynamic system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX™ and tested on both standard IEEE test systems and large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The performance of the NDS is demonstrated to be comparable and in some cases is shown to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms. The proposed formulation and NDS based solver is also easily parallelizable enabling further computational improvement.

  6. Finite-size effects on the radiative energy loss of a fast parton in hot and dense strongly interacting matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caron-Huot, Simon; Gale, Charles [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider finite-size effects on the radiative energy loss of a fast parton moving in a finite-temperature, strongly interacting medium, using the light-cone path integral formalism put forward by B. G. Zakharov [JETP Lett. 63, 952 (1996); 65, 615 (1997)]. We present a convenient reformulation of the problem that makes possible its exact numerical analysis. This is done by introducing the concept of a radiation rate in the presence of finite-size effects. This effectively extends the finite-temperature approach of Arnold, Moore, and Yaffe [J. High Energy Phys. 11 (2001) 057; 12 (2001) 009; 06 (2001) 030] (AMY) to include interference between vacuum and medium radiation. We compare results with those obtained in the regime considered by AMY, with those obtained at leading order in an opacity expansion, and with those obtained deep in the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal regime.

  7. Lassoing Line Outages in the Smart Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast and accurate unveiling of power line outages is of paramount importance not only for preventing faults that may lead to blackouts, but also for routine monitoring and control tasks of the smart grid, including state estimation and optimal power flow. Existing approaches are either challenged by the \\emph{combinatorial complexity} issues involved, and are thus limited to identifying single- and double-line outages; or, they invoke less pragmatic assumptions such as \\emph{conditionally independent} phasor angle measurements available across the grid. Using only a subset of voltage phasor angle data, the present paper develops a near real-time algorithm for identifying multiple line outages at the affordable complexity of solving a quadratic program via block coordinate descent iterations. The novel approach relies on reformulating the DC linear power flow model as a \\emph{sparse} overcomplete expansion, and leveraging contemporary advances in compressive sampling and variable selection using the least-abso...

  8. Refiners Switch to RFG Complex Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 1, 1998, domestic and foreign refineries and importers must stop using the "simple" model and begin using the "complex" model to calculate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic air pollutants (TAP), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from motor gasoline. The primary differences between application of the two models is that some refineries may have to meet stricter standards for the sulfur and olefin content of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) they produce and all refineries will now be held accountable for NOx emissions. Requirements for calculating emissions from conventional gasoline under the anti-dumping rule similarly change for exhaust TAP and NOx. However, the change to the complex model is not expected to result in an increase in the price premium for RFG or constrain supplies.

  9. Economics for iso-olefin production using the fluid catalytic cracking unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClung, R.G.; Witoshkin, A.; Bogert, D.C.; Winkler, W.S. [Englehard Corp., Iselin, NJ (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 requires use of oxygenates in some gasolines to improve both CO and hydrocarbon auto tailpipe emissions. Various oxygenates are currently being used by the refining industry. For the fully integrated refinery having a fluid catalytic cracking unit, the most commonly used oxygenates are methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary amyl ether (TAME). The FCC unit produces the isobutylene and iso-amylases need for manufacture of both MTBE and TAME. The economics for an assumed refinery processing scheme for several FCC cases are examined giving estimates of income and investments for each case. Up to one-third of the total gasoline pool can be made in reformulated gasoline using TAME and MTBE with the FCC unit as the sole source of feedstock. This processing route is much more economical than the alternative scheme using butane isomerization/iosbutane dehydrogenation.

  10. MTBE will be a boon to U. S. gas processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otto, K.W. (Purvin and Gertz, Inc. Dallas, TX (United States))

    1993-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the advent of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the primary oxygenate blending component for oxygenated and reformulated motor fuels promises significant benefits for the U.S. gas-processing industry. Increased demand for isobutane as MTBE-plant feedstock will buoy both normal butane and isobutane pricing in U.S. gulf Coast during the 1990s. Elimination of the need to crack normal butane in U.S. olefin plants will also strengthen competitive feedstocks somewhat, including ethane and propane. And increased use of normal butane as isomerization feedstock will result in wider recognition of the premium quality of gas plant normal butane production compared to most refinery C[sub 4] production.

  11. MTBE, ethanol rules come under fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begley, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA is facing stiff challenges to the mandates for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethanol in its reformulated gasoline (RFG) program. Wisconsin officials are receiving hundreds of complaints about the alleged health effects and other problems with MTBE added to gasoline, and Gov. Tommy Thompson is demanding that EPA suspend the RFG program until April 1. Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R., WI) is threatening to introduce a bill to repeal the program in Wisconsin if EPA does not comply. However, EPA administrator Carol Browner says the agency will {open_quotes}defer any decision{close_quotes} on the request. EPA has sent technical experts to Milwaukee to respond to and monitor citizens` complaints.

  12. EPA proposal sets MTBE back

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, A.

    1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) producers were looking for a boost from the official New Year`s start of EPA`s reformulated gasoline (RFG) program. But that prospect has been dimmed by an EPA-proposal-in reaction to concerns about RFG prices-to allow states to withdraw from the program. The states that have opted to out make up 5%-6% of the total RFG pool says Arthur Zadronzy, director/government outreach for MTBE producer Arco Chemical. {open_quotes}This is not a major hit, but it is one we have felt,{close_quotes} he says. Despite the state and EPA actions, MTBE producers are not worried about long-term consequences.

  13. Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

  14. Topologically Stratified Energy Minimizers in a Product Abelian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Xiaosen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently developed product Abelian gauge field theory by Tong and Wong hosting magnetic impurities is reformulated into an extended model that allows the coexistence of vortices and anti-vortices. The two Abelian gauge fields in the model induce two species of magnetic vortex-lines resulting from $N_s$ vortices and $P_s$ anti-vortices ($s=1,2$) realized as the zeros and poles of two complex-valued Higgs fields, respectively. An existence theorem is established for the governing equations over a compact Riemann surface $S$ which states that a solution with prescribed $N_1, N_2$ vortices and $P_1,P_2$ anti-vortices of two designated species exists if and only if the inequalities \\[ \\left|N_1+N_2-(P_1+P_2)\\right|area of $S$. The minimum energy of these solutions is shown to assume the explicit value \\...

  15. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 5, employee attitude assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiences of couriers, operations managers, vehicle handlers (refuelers), and mechanics who drove and/or worked with alternative fuel vehicles, and the attitudes and perceptions of people with these experiences, are examined. Five alternative fuels studied in the CleanFleet project are considers& compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The three major areas of interest include comparative analysis of issues such as health, safety and vehicle performance, business issues encompassing several facets of station operations, and personal commentary and opinions about the CleanFleet project and the alterative fuels. Results of the employee attitude assessment are presented as both statistical and qualitative analysis.

  16. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knio, Omar M

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a collaborative proposal that aims at developing new methods for the analysis and reduction of complex multiscale networks under uncertainty. The approach is based on combining methods of computational singular perturbation (CSP) and probabilistic uncertainty quantification. In deterministic settings, CSP yields asymptotic approximations of reduced-dimensionality “slow manifolds” on which a multiscale dynamical system evolves. Introducing uncertainty raises fundamentally new issues, particularly concerning its impact on the topology of slow manifolds, and means to represent and quantify associated variability. To address these challenges, this project uses polynomial chaos (PC) methods to reformulate uncertain network models, and to analyze them using CSP in probabilistic terms. Specific objectives include (1) developing effective algorithms that can be used to illuminate fundamental and unexplored connections among model reduction, multiscale behavior, and uncertainty, and (2) demonstrating the performance of these algorithms through applications to model problems.

  17. Superconnections and the Higgs Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the mathematical framework of Quillen, one interprets the Higgs field as part of the superconnection on a superbundle. We propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian bundle with structure group U(n). Spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a consequence of a non-vanishing scalar curvature. The U(1) Higgs model reformulates the Ginzburg-Landau theory, while the U(2) model relates to the electroweak theory with the relation $g^2=3g4^2$ for the gauge coupling constants, the formula $\\sin^2\\theta=1/4$ for the Weinberg angle, and the ratio $ m_W^2 : m_Z^2 : m_H^2 = 3 : 4 : 12 $ for the masses (squared) of the W, Z, and Higgs boson (at tree level).

  18. Superconnections and the Higgs Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roepstorff, G

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the mathematical framework of Quillen, one interprets the Higgs field as part of the superconnection on a superbundle. We propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian bundle with structure group U(n). Spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a consequence of a non-vanishing scalar curvature. The U(1) Higgs model reformulates the Ginzburg-Landau theory, while the U(2) model relates to the electro-weak theory with the relation $g^2=3g4^2$ for the gauge coupling constants, the formula $ m_W^2 : m_Z^2 : m_H^2 = 3 : 4 : 12 $ for the masses (squared) of the W, Z, and Higgs boson (at tree level).

  19. Analysis of a spinning polygon wavelength swept laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Bart; Kuznetsov, Mark; Goldberg, Brian D; Whitney, Peter; Flanders, Dale C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been known for quite some time that spinning polygon, and similar, swept lasers used in OCT favor the short to long wavelength sweep direction because of four wave mixing in the gain medium. Here we have reformulated the problem in the time domain and show experimentally and through numerical simulation that these lasers are pulsed. The emitted pulses modulate the gain medium refractive index to red shift the light. Instead of new wavelengths being built up slowly from spontaneous emission, each pulse hops to a longer wavelength by nonlinear means, tracking the tunable filter. This allows high speed, low noise tuning in the blue to red direction. Based on this model, we make the first coherence length calculations for a swept source.

  20. Contractive Interference Functions and Rates of Convergence of Distributed Power Control Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Hamid Reza Feyzmahdavian 'and' Mikael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard interference functions introduced by Yates have been very influential on the analysis and design of distributed power control laws. While powerful and versatile, the framework has some drawbacks: the existence of fixed-points has to be established separately, and no guarantees are given on the rate of convergence of the iterates. This paper introduces contractive interference functions, a slight reformulation of the standard interference functions that guarantees the existence and uniqueness of fixed-points along with geometric convergence. We show that many power control laws from the literature are contractive and derive, sometimes for the first time, analytical convergence rate estimates for these algorithms. We also prove that contractive interference functions converge when executed totally asynchronously and, under the assumption that the communication delay is bounded, derive an explicit bound on the convergence time penalty due to increased delay. Finally, we demonstrate that although all...

  1. ``Clean`` fuels: Does the new direction make environmental sense?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saricks, C.L.; Wang, M.Q.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the ramifications of this a three-pronged energy philosophy, with special reference to its expected environmental impact if it is fully implemented as policy. To recapitulate, the three prongs are to rely on a free energy market to determine winners and losers, which could certainly include Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) if it remains relatively cheap and clean; refocus the bulk of government-sponsored transportation energy research toward a ``great leap ahead`` to fully renewable and essentially pollution-free fuels such as hydrogen and fuel cells; and discontinue AFV pump priming. Of special interest is a premise that appears common to all prongs--that none of these measures represents a retreat from environmental goals or accomplishments on record since the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 was passed.

  2. Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel economy vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, M.M.; Wang, M.Q.; Vyas, A.D.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents estimates of the full cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into reductions in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns, particularly under the High Market Share Scenario.

  3. Full-fuel-cycle modeling for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Gupta, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Greening, L.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of alternative fuels in the transportation sector has been identified as a potential method for mitigation of petroleum-based energy dependence and pollutant emissions from mobile sources. Traditionally, vehicle tailpipe emissions have served as sole data when evaluating environmental impact. However, considerable differences in extraction and processing requirements for alternative fuels makes evident the need to consider the complete fuel production and use cycle for each fuel scenario. The work presented here provides a case study applied to the southeastern region of the US for conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, natural gas, and methanol vehicle fueling. Results of the study demonstrate the significance of the nonvehicle processes, such as fuel refining, in terms of energy expenditure and emissions production. Unique to this work is the application of the MOBILE5 mobile emissions model in the full-fuel-cycle analysis. Estimates of direct and indirect greenhouse gas production are also presented and discussed using the full-cycle-analysis method.

  4. A potential-splitting approach applied to the Temkin-Poet model for electron scattering off the hydrogen atom and the helium ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarevsky, E; Larson, Å; Elander, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of scattering processes in few body systems is a difficult problem especially if long range interactions are involved. In order to solve such problems, we develop here a potential-splitting approach for three body systems. This approach is based on splitting the reaction potential into a finite range core part and a long range tail part. The solution to the Schr\\"odinger equation for the long range tail Hamiltonian is found analytically, and used as an incoming wave in the three body scattering problem. This reformulation of the scattering problem makes it suitable for treatment by the exterior complex scaling technique in the sense that the problem after the complex dilation is reduced to a boundary value problem with zero boundary conditions. We illustrate the method with calculations on the electron scattering off the hydrogen atom and the positive helium ion in the frame of the Temkin-Poet model.

  5. A note on QUBO instances defined on Chimera graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeeb Dash

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McGeoch and Wang (2013) recently obtained optimal or near-optimal solutions to some quadratic unconstrained boolean optimization (QUBO) problem instances using a 439 qubit D-Wave Two quantum computing system in much less time than with the IBM ILOG CPLEX mixed-integer quadratic programming (MIQP) solver. The problems studied by McGeoch and Wang are defined on subgraphs -- with up to 439 nodes -- of Chimera graphs. We observe that after a standard reformulation of the QUBO problem as a mixed-integer linear program (MILP), the specific instances used by McGeoch and Wang can be solved to optimality with the CPLEX MILP solver in much less time than the time reported in McGeoch and Wang for the CPLEX MIQP solver. However, the solution time is still more than the time taken by the D-Wave computer in the McGeoch-Wang tests.

  6. Five-Dimensional Tangent Vectors in Space-Time: IV. Generalization of Exterior Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Krasulin

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This part of the series is devoted to the generalization of exterior differential calculus. I give definition to the integral of a five-vector form over a limited space-time volume of appropriate dimension; extend the notion of the exterior derivative to the case of five-vector forms; and formulate the corresponding analogs of the generalized Stokes theorem and of the Poincare theorem about closed forms. I then consider the five-vector generalization of the exterior derivative itself; prove a statement similar to the Poincare theorem; define the corresponding five-vector generalization of flux; and derive the analog of the formula for integration by parts. I illustrate the ideas developed in this paper by reformulating the Lagrange formalism for classical scalar fields in terms of five-vector forms. In conclusion, I briefly discuss the five-vector analog of the Levi-Civita tensor and dual forms.

  7. Measure-Driven Algorithm Design and Analysis: A New Approach for Solving NP-hard Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and Reformulations Let X, Y, and Z be three pairwise disjoint symbol sets, and let U = X ?Y ?Z be the product set of X, Y, and Z. Each element t = (x;y;z) in U, where x 2 X, y 2 Y, and z 2 Z, is called a triple. For a triple t = (x;y;z) in U, denote by Val(t) the set... T . Normally it is required that the time for each node be polynomial in the input size n of I, and the height ofT be also polynomial in n. Let Tpath be the summation of the time for all nodes in a path from the root to a leaf in T . Then Tpath is polynomial...

  8. An efficient numerical method for computing dynamics of spin F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Hanquan, E-mail: hanquan.wang@gmail.com [School of Statistics and Mathematics, Yunnan University of Finance and Economics, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650221 (China); Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we extend the efficient time-splitting Fourier pseudospectral method to solve the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations, which model the dynamics of spin F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates at extremely low temperature. Using the time-splitting technique, we split the generalized GP equations into one linear part and two nonlinear parts: the linear part is solved with the Fourier pseudospectral method; one of nonlinear parts is solved analytically while the other one is reformulated into a matrix formulation and solved by diagonalization. We show that the method keeps well the conservation laws related to generalized GP equations in 1D and 2D. We also show that the method is of second-order in time and spectrally accurate in space through a one-dimensional numerical test. We apply the method to investigate the dynamics of spin F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a uniform/nonuniform magnetic field.

  9. Constraints on ADM tetrad gravity parameter space from S2 star in the center of the Galaxy and from the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattia Villani

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ADM tetrad gravity is an Hamiltonian reformulation of General Relativity which gives new insight to the Dark Matter Problem. We impose constraints on the parameter space of ADM tetrad gravity with a Yukawa-like ansatz for the trace of the extrinsic curvature of the 3D hypersurfaces by fitting the orbit of the S2 star around the Black Hole in the Galactic center and using the perihelia of some of the planets of the Solar System. We find very thight constraints on the \\emph{strength} of the coupling, $4.2 \\,\\times \\, 10^{-4} \\, \\text{AU}\\,\\lesssim \\, \\delta \\, \\lesssim \\, 4.6 \\, \\times \\, 10^{-4} \\, \\text{AU}$, and an upper limit for the (inverse) scale length, $\\mu \\, \\lesssim \\, 3.5 \\, \\times \\, 10^{-6} \\, \\text{AU}^{-1}$.

  10. Cosmology of modified (but second order) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomi S. Koivisto

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief review of modified gravity cosmologies. Generically extensions of gravity action involve higher derivative terms, which can result in ghosts and instabilities. There are three ways to circumvent this: Chern-Simons terms, first order variational principle and nonlocality. We consider recent cosmological applications of these three classes of modified gravity models, in particular to the dark energy problem. The viable parameter spaces can be very efficiently constrained by taking into account cosmological data from all epochs in addition to Solar system tests and stability considerations. We make some new remarks concerning so called algebraic scalar-tensor theories, biscalar reformulation of nonlocal actions involving the inverse d'Alembertian, and a possible covariant formulation holographic cosmology with nonperturbative gravity.

  11. Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

    1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

  12. Radiation and Reason Why radiation at modest dose rates is quite harmless and current radiation safety regulations are flawed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on the impact of ionising radiation on life are examined in the light of evolutionary biology. This comparison confirms that fear of nuclear radiation is not justified by science itself; rather it originates in a failure of public trust in nuclear science, a relic of the international politics of the Cold War era. Current ionisation safety regulations appease this fear but without scientific support and they need fundamental reformulation. This should change the reaction to accidents like Fukushima, the cost of nuclear energy and the application of nuclear technology to the supply of food and fresh water. Such a boost to the world economy would require that more citizens study and appreciate the science involved – and then tell others -- not as much fun as the Higgs, perhaps, but no less important! www.radiationandreason.com

  13. The generalized Schrödinger–Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargueño, Pedro, E-mail: p.bargueno@uniandes.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Apartado Aéreo 4976, Bogotá, Distrito Capital (Colombia); Miret-Artés, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, for a Brownian particle interacting with a heat bath, we derive a generalization of the so-called Schrödinger–Langevin or Kostin equation. This generalization is based on a nonlinear interaction model providing a state-dependent dissipation process exhibiting multiplicative noise. Two straightforward applications to the measurement process are then analyzed, continuous and weak measurements in terms of the quantum Bohmian trajectory formalism. Finally, it is also shown that the generalized uncertainty principle, which appears in some approaches to quantum gravity, can be expressed in terms of this generalized equation. -- Highlights: •We generalize the Kostin equation for arbitrary system–bath coupling. •This generalization is developed both in the Schrödinger and Bohmian formalisms. •We write the generalized Kostin equation for two measurement problems. •We reformulate the generalized uncertainty principle in terms of this equation.

  14. Anthropic reasoning in multiverse cosmology and string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven Weinstein

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropic arguments in multiverse cosmology and string theory rely on the weak anthropic principle (WAP). We show that the principle, though ultimately a tautology, is nevertheless ambiguous. It can be reformulated in one of two unambiguous ways, which we refer to as WAP_1 and WAP_2. We show that WAP_2, the version most commonly used in anthropic reasoning, makes no physical predictions unless supplemented by a further assumption of "typicality", and we argue that this assumption is both misguided and unjustified. WAP_1, however, requires no such supplementation; it directly implies that any theory that assigns a non-zero probability to our universe predicts that we will observe our universe with probability one. We argue, therefore, that WAP_1 is preferable, and note that it has the benefit of avoiding the inductive overreach characteristic of much anthropic reasoning.

  15. Polymer quantization of the free scalar field and its classical limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on prior work, a generally covariant reformulation of free scalar field theory on the flat Lorentzian cylinder is quantized using Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) type `polymer' representations. This quantization of the {\\em continuum} classical theory yields a quantum theory which lives on a discrete spacetime lattice. We explicitly construct a state in the polymer Hilbert space which reproduces the standard Fock vacuum- two point functions for long wavelength modes of the scalar field. Our construction indicates that the continuum classical theory emerges under coarse graining. All our considerations are free of the "triangulation" ambiguities which plague attempts to define quantum dynamics in LQG. Our work constitutes the first complete LQG type quantization of a generally covariant field theory together with a semi-classical analysis of the true degrees of freedom and thus provides a perfect infinite dimensional toy model to study open issues in LQG, particularly those pertaining to the definition of quantum dynamics.

  16. Semi-analytic equations to the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method at fixed energy for special cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Palmai; Miklos Horvath; Barnabas Apagyi

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem at fixed energy [1,2,3] is reformulated resulting in semi-analytic equations. The new set of equations for the normalization constants and the nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta are free of matrix inversion operations. This simplification is a result of treating only the input phase shifts of partial waves of a given parity. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied for identical particle scattering of the bosonic type (or for certain cases of identical fermionic scattering). The new formulae are expected to be numerically more efficient than the previous ones. Based on the semi-analytic equations an approximate method is proposed for the generic inverse scattering problem, when partial waves of arbitrary parity are considered.

  17. Notes on a New Philosophy of Empirical Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burfoot, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents a methodology and philosophy of empirical science based on large scale lossless data compression. In this view a theory is scientific if it can be used to build a data compression program, and it is valuable if it can compress a standard benchmark database to a small size, taking into account the length of the compressor itself. This methodology therefore includes an Occam principle as well as a solution to the problem of demarcation. Because of the fundamental difficulty of lossless compression, this type of research must be empirical in nature: compression can only be achieved by discovering and characterizing empirical regularities in the data. Because of this, the philosophy provides a way to reformulate fields such as computer vision and computational linguistics as empirical sciences: the former by attempting to compress databases of natural images, the latter by attempting to compress large text databases. The book argues that the rigor and objectivity of the compression principle sh...

  18. On particle acceleration around shocks. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Vietri

    2003-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a relativistically covariant (although not manifestly so) equation for the distribution function of particles accelerated at shocks, which applies also to extremely relativistic shocks, and arbitrarily anisotropic particle distributions. The theory is formulated for arbitrary pitch angle scattering, and reduces to the well--known case for small angle scatterings via a Fokker--Planck approximation. The boundary conditions for the problem are completely reformulated introducing a physically motivated Green's function; the new formulation allows derivation of the particle spectrum both close and far away from the injection energy in an exact way, while it can be shown to reduce to a power--law at large particle energies. The particle spectral index is also recovered in a novel way. Contact is made with the Newtonian treatment.

  19. The Vacuum Structure, Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics Revisited: a Field Theory No-Geometry Approach within the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Formalisms. Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolai N. Bogolubov, Jr.; Anatoliy K. Prykarpatsky

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The main fundamental principles characterizing the vacuum field structure are formulated and the modeling of the related vacuum medium and charged point particle dynamics by means of devised field theoretic tools are analyzed. The work is devoted to studying the vacuum structure, special relativity, electrodynamics of interacting charged point particles and quantum mechanics, and is a continuation of \\cite{BPT,BRT1}. Based on the vacuum field theory no-geometry approach, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian reformulation of some alternative classical electrodynamics models is devised. The Dirac type quantization procedure, based on the canonical Hamiltonian formulation, is developed for some alternative electrodynamics models. Within an approach developed a possibility of the combined description both of electrodynamics and gravity is analyzed.

  20. Maintenance and operation of the US Alternative Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erwin, J.; Ferrill, J.L.; Hetrick, D.L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels Utilization Program (AFUP) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has investigated the possibilities and limitations of expanded scope of fuel alternatives and replacement means for transportation fuels from alternative sources. Under the AFUP, the Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was created to solve problems in the DOE programs that were grappling with the utilization of shale oil and coal liquids for transportation fuels. This report covers the first year at the 3-year contract. The principal objective was to assist the AFUP in accomplishing its general goals with two new fuel initiatives selected for tasks in the project year: (1) Production of low-sulfur, low-olefin catalytically cracked gasoline blendstock; and (2) production of low-reactivity/low-emission gasoline. Supporting goals included maintaining equipment in good working order, performing reformulated gasoline tests, and meeting the needs of other government agencies and industries for fuel research involving custom processing, blending, or analysis of experimental fuels.

  1. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

  2. Advanced emission-speciation methodologies for the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program. 1. Hydrocarbons and ethers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, T.E.; Siegl, W.O.; Lipari, F.; Loo, J.F.; Sigsby, J.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical method for the determination of hydrocarbon and ether emissions from gasoline-, methanol-, and flexible-fueled vehicles is described. This method was used in Phase I of the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program to provide emissions data for various vehicles using individual reformulated gasolines and alternate fuels. These data would then be used for air modeling studies. Emission samples for tailpipe, evaporative, and running loss were collected in Tedlar bags. Gas chromatographic analysis of the emissions samples included 140 components (hydrocarbons, ethers, alcohols and aldehydes) between C1 and C12 in a single analysis of 54-minutes duration. Standardization, quality control procedures, and inter-laboratory comparisons developed and completed as part of this program are also described. (Copyright (c) 1992 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.).

  3. Distributed Radio Interferometric Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing data volumes delivered by a new generation of radio interferometers require computationally efficient and robust calibration algorithms. In this paper, we propose distributed calibration as a way of improving both computational cost as well as robustness in calibration. We exploit the data parallelism across frequency that is inherent in radio astronomical observations that are recorded as multiple channels at different frequencies. Moreover, we also exploit the smoothness of the variation of calibration parameters across frequency. Data parallelism enables us to distribute the computing load across a network of compute agents. Smoothness in frequency enables us reformulate calibration as a consensus optimization problem. With this formulation, we enable flow of information between compute agents calibrating data at different frequencies, without actually passing the data, and thereby improving robustness. We present simulation results to show the feasibility as well as the advantages of distribute...

  4. Lorentz violation in the gravity sector: the t puzzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonder, Yuri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lorentz violation is a candidate quantum-gravity signal, and the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is a widely used parametrization of such violation. In the gravitational SME sector, there is an elusive coefficient for which no effects have been found. This is is known as the $t$ puzzle and, to date, it has no compelling explanation. In this paper, several approaches to understand the $t$ puzzle are proposed. First, redefinitions of the dynamical fields are studied, which reveal that other SME coefficients can be moved to nongravitational sectors. It is also shown that the gravity SME sector can be treated \\textit{\\`a la} Palatini, and that, in the presence of spacetime boundaries, it is possible to correct its action to get the desired equations of motion. Also, through a reformulation as a Lanczos-type tensor, some problematic features of the $t$ term, that should arise at the phenomenological level, are revealed. Additional potential explanations to the $t$ puzzle are outlined.

  5. Lorentz violation in the gravity sector: the t puzzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Bonder

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lorentz violation is a candidate quantum-gravity signal, and the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is a widely used parametrization of such violation. In the gravitational SME sector, there is an elusive coefficient for which no effects have been found. This is is known as the $t$ puzzle and, to date, it has no compelling explanation. In this paper, several approaches to understand the $t$ puzzle are proposed. First, redefinitions of the dynamical fields are studied, which reveal that other SME coefficients can be moved to nongravitational sectors. It is also shown that the gravity SME sector can be treated \\textit{\\`a la} Palatini, and that, in the presence of spacetime boundaries, it is possible to correct its action to get the desired equations of motion. Also, through a reformulation as a Lanczos-type tensor, some problematic features of the $t$ term, that should arise at the phenomenological level, are revealed. Additional potential explanations to the $t$ puzzle are outlined.

  6. Wick polynomials and time-evolution of cumulants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jani Lukkarinen; Matteo Marcozzi

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how Wick polynomials of random variables can be defined combinatorially as the unique choice which removes all "internal contractions" from the related cumulant expansions, also in a non-Gaussian case. We discuss how an expansion in terms of the Wick polynomials can be used for derivation of a hierarchy of equations for the time-evolution of cumulants. These methods are then applied to simplify the formal derivation of the Boltzmann-Peierls equation in the kinetic scaling limit of the discrete nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation (DNLS) with suitable random initial data. We also present a reformulation of the standard perturbation expansion using cumulants which could simplify the problem of a rigorous derivation of the Boltzmann-Peierls equation by separating the analysis of the solutions to the Boltzmann-Peierls equation from the analysis of the corrections. This latter scheme is general and not tied to the DNLS evolution equations.

  7. A space-efficient quantum computer simulator suitable for high-speed FPGA implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Frank; Liviu Oniciuc; Uwe Meyer-Baese; Irinel Chiorescu

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional vector-based simulators for quantum computers are quite limited in the size of the quantum circuits they can handle, due to the worst-case exponential growth of even sparse representations of the full quantum state vector as a function of the number of quantum operations applied. However, this exponential-space requirement can be avoided by using general space-time tradeoffs long known to complexity theorists, which can be appropriately optimized for this particular problem in a way that also illustrates some interesting reformulations of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we describe the design and empirical space-time complexity measurements of a working software prototype of a quantum computer simulator that avoids excessive space requirements. Due to its space-efficiency, this design is well-suited to embedding in single-chip environments, permitting especially fast execution that avoids access latencies to main memory. We plan to prototype our design on a standard FPGA development board.

  8. Shadow prices and well-posedness in the problem of optimal investment and consumption with transaction costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jinhyuk; Zitkovic, Gordan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the optimal investment and consumption model of Davis and Norman (1990) and Shreve and Soner (1994), following a shadow-price approach similar to that of Kallsen and Muhle-Karbe (2010). Making use of the completeness of the model without transaction costs, we reformulate and reduce the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation for this singular stochastic control problem to a non-standard free-boundary problem for a first-order ODE with an integral constraint. Having shown that the free boundary problem has a smooth solution, we use it to construct the solution of the original optimal investment/consumption problem in a self-contained manner and without any recourse to the dynamic programming principle. Furthermore, we provide an explicit characterization of model parameters for which the value function is finite.

  9. Global dynamics and asymptotics for monomial scalar field potentials and perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alho, Artur; Uggla, Claes

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a minimally coupled scalar field with a monomial potential and a perfect fluid in flat FLRW cosmology. We apply local and global dynamical systems techniques to a new three-dimensional dynamical systems reformulation of the field equations on a compact state space. This leads to a visual global description of the solution space and asymptotic behavior. At late times we employ averaging techniques to prove statements about how the relationship between the equation of state of the fluid and the monomial exponent of the scalar field affects asymptotic source dominance and asymptotic manifest self-similarity breaking. We also situate the `attractor' solution in the three-dimensional state space and show that it corresponds to the one-dimensional unstable center manifold of a de Sitter fixed point, located on an unphysical boundary associated with the dynamics at early times. By deriving a center manifold expansion we obtain approximate expressions for the attractor solution. We subsequently improve th...

  10. On a three-layer Hele-Shaw model of enhanced oil recovery with a linear viscous profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a non-standard eigenvalue problem that arises in the linear stability of a three-layer Hele-Shaw model of enhanced oil recovery. A nonlinear transformation is introduced which allows reformulation of the non-standard eigenvalue problem as a boundary value problem for Kummer's equation when the viscous profile of the middle layer is linear. Using the existing body of works on Kummer's equation, we construct an exact solution of the eigenvalue problem and provide the dispersion relation implicitly through the existence criterion for the non-trivial solution. We also discuss the convergence of the series solution. It is shown that this solution reduces to the physically relevant solutions in two asymptotic limits: (i) when the linear viscous profile approaches a constant viscous profile; or (ii) when the length of the middle layer approaches zero.

  11. Anisotropic Elastic Resonance Scattering model for the Neutron Transport equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed Ouisloumen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Shadi Z. Ghrayeb

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonance scattering transfer cross-section has been reformulated to account for anisotropic scattering in the center-of-mass of the neutron-nucleus system. The main innovation over previous implementations is the relaxation of the ubiquitous assumption of isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass and the actual effective use of scattering angle distributions from evaluated nuclear data files in the computation of the angular moments of the resonant scattering kernels. The formulas for the high order anisotropic moments in the laboratory system are also derived. A multi-group numerical formulation is derived and implemented into a module incorporated within the NJOY nuclear data processing code. An ultra-fine energy mesh cross section library was generated using these new theoretical models and then was used for fuel assembly calculations with the PARAGON lattice physics code. The results obtained indicate a strong effect of this new model on reactivity, multi-group fluxes and isotopic inventory during depletion.

  12. Fourier Methods for Harmonic Scalar Waves in General Waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders Andersson; Borje Nilsson; Thomas Biro

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of semi-analytical techniques based on Fourier analysis is used to solve wave scattering problems in variously shaped waveguides with varying normal admittance boundary conditions. Key components are newly developed conformal mapping methods, wave splitting, Fourier series expansions in eigen-functions to non-normal operators, the building block method or the cascade technique, Dirichlet-to-Neumann operators, and reformulation in terms of stable differential equations for reflection and transmission matrices. For an example the results show good correspondence with a finite element method solution to the same problem in the low and medium frequency domain. The Fourier method complements finite element analysis as a waveguide simulation tool. For inverse engineering involving tuning of straight waveguide parts joining complicated waveguide elements, the Fourier method is an attractive alternative including time aspects. The prime motivation for the Fourier method is its added physical understanding primarily at low frequencies.

  13. A generalisation of classical electrodynamics for the prediction of scalar field effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vlaenderen, K J

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of Classical Electrodynamics (CED) it is common practice to choose freely an arbitrary gauge condition with respect to a gauge transformation of the electromagnetic potentials. The Lorenz gauge condition allows for the derivation of the inhomogeneous potential wave equations (IPWE), but this also means that scalar derivatives of the electromagnetic potentials are considered to be \\emph{unphysical}. However, these scalar expressions might have the meaning of a new physical field, $\\mathsf S$. If this is the case, then a generalised CED is required such that scalar field effects are predicted and such that experiments can be performed in order to verify or falsify this generalised CED. The IPWE are viewed as a generalised Gauss law and a generalised Ampe\\`re law, that also contain derivatives of $\\mathsf S$, after reformulating the IPWE in terms of fields. Some recent experiment show positive results that are in qualitative agreement with the presented predictions of scalar field effects, b...

  14. U(2,2) gravity on noncommutative space with symplectic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Yangang; Xue Zhao; Zhang Shaojun [Department of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical Einstein's gravity can be reformulated from the constrained U(2,2) gauge theory on the ordinary (commutative) four-dimensional spacetime. Here we consider a noncommutative manifold with a symplectic structure and construct a U(2,2) gauge theory on such a manifold by using the covariant coordinate method. Then we use the Seiberg-Witten map to express noncommutative quantities in terms of their commutative counterparts up to the first order in noncommutative parameters. After imposing constraints we obtain a noncommutative gravity theory described by the Lagrangian with up to nonvanishing first-order corrections in noncommutative parameters. This result coincides with our previous one obtained for the noncommutative SL(2,C) gravity.

  15. Noncommutative geometry induced by spin effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colatto, L.P.; Penna, A.L.A.; Santos, W.C. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Avenue Fernando Ferrari, 514, CEP 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, CEP 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the nonlocal effects of noncommutative spacetime on simple physical systems. Our main point is the assumption that the noncommutative effects are consequences of a background field which generates a local spin structure. So, we reformulate some simple electrostatic models in the presence of a spin-deformation contribution to the geometry of the motion, and we obtain an interesting correlation amongst the deformed area vector, the 3D noncommutative effects, and the usual spin vector S-vector given in quantum mechanics framework. Remarkably we can observe that a spin-orbit coupling term comes to light on the spatial sector of a potential written in terms of noncommutative coordinates which indicates that bound states are particular cases in this procedure. Concerning confined or bounded particles in this noncommutative domain, we verify that the kinetic energy is modified by a deformation factor. Finally, we discuss perspectives.

  16. Specific heat and bimodality in canonical and grand canonical versions of the thermodynamic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta

    2007-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We address two issues in the thermodynamic model for nuclear disassembly. Surprisingly large differences in results for specific heat were seen in predictions from the canonical and grand canonical ensembles when the nuclear system passes from liquid-gas co-existence to the pure gas phase. We are able to pinpoint and understand the reasons for such and other discrepancies when they appear. There is a subtle but important difference in the physics addressed in the two models. In particular if we reformulate the parameters in the canonical model to better approximate the physics addressed in the grand canonical model, calculations for observables converge. Next we turn to the issue of bimodality in the probability distribution of the largest fragment in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. We demonstrate that this distribution is very closely related to average multiplicities. The relationship of the bimodal distribution to phase transition is discussed.

  17. UNICOS Evolution: CPC Version 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanco Vinuela, E; Bradu, B; Durand, Ph; Fernandez Adiego, B; Izquierdo Rosas, S; Merezhin, A; Ortola Vidal, J; Rochez, J; Willeman, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UNICOS (UNified Industrial COntrol System) framework was created back in 1998. Since then a noticeable number of applications in different domains have used this framework. Furthermore UNICOS has been formalized and its supervision layer has been reused in other kinds of applications (e.g. monitoring or supervisory tasks) where a control layer is not necessarily UNICOS oriented. The process control package has been reformulated as the UNICOS CPC package (Continuous Process Control) and a reengineering process has been followed. The drive behind these noticeable changes was (1) being able to upgrade to the new more performing IT technologies in the automatic code generation, (2) being flexible enough to create new additional device types to cope with other needs (e.g. Vacuum or Cooling and Ventilation applications) without major impact on the framework or the PLC code baselines and (3) enhance the framework with new functionalities (e.g. recipes). This publication addresses the motivation, changes, new fun...

  18. Superconductivity and the BCS-Bogoliubov Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuji Watanabe

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    First, we reformulate the BCS-Bogoliubov theory of superconductivity from the viewpoint of linear algebra. We define the BCS Hamiltonian on $\\mathbb{C}^{2^{2M}}$, where $M$ is a positive integer. We discuss selfadjointness and symmetry of the BCS Hamiltonian as well as spontaneous symmetry breaking. Beginning with the gap equation, we give the well-known expression for the BCS state and find the existence of an energy gap. We also show that the BCS state has a lower energy than the normal state. Second, we introduce a new superconducting state explicitly and show from the viewpoint of linear algebra that this new state has a lower energy than the BCS state. Third, beginning with our new gap equation, we show from the viewpoint of linear algebra that we arrive at the results similar to those in the BCS-Bogoliubov theory.

  19. Analytical and Numerical Study of Photocurrent Transients in Organic Polymer Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Falco, Carlo; Verri, Maurizio; 10.1016/j.cma.2010.01.018

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is an attempt to provide a self consistent picture, including existence analysis and numerical solution algorithms, of the mathematical problems arising from modeling photocurrent transients in Organic-polymer Solar Cells (OSCs). The mathematical model for OSCs consists of a system of nonlinear diffusion-reaction partial differential equations (PDEs) with electrostatic convection, coupled to a kinetic ordinary differential equation (ODE). We propose a suitable reformulation of the model that allows us to prove the existence of a solution in both stationary and transient conditions and to better highlight the role of exciton dynamics in determining the device turn-on time. For the numerical treatment of the problem, we carry out a temporal semi-discretization using an implicit adaptive method, and the resulting sequence of differential subproblems is linearized using the Newton-Raphson method with inexact evaluation of the Jacobian. Then, we use exponentially fitted finite elements for the spatial...

  20. Radiation Reaction in High-Intense Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Keita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the development of the radiating electron model by P. A. M. Dirac in 1938, many authors have tried to reformulate this model so-called radiation reaction. Recently, this effects has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a method for the stabilization of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum [PTEP 2014, 043A01 (2014), PTEP 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. In the other hand, the field modification by high-intense fields should be required under 10PW lasers, like ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose the combined method how to adopt the high-intense field correction with the stabilization by quantum vacuum as the extension from the model by Dirac.

  1. Radiation Reaction in Quantum Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keita Seto

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model named "radiation reaction". P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the run-away solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. Therefore, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction for estimations. Via my recent research, I found a stabilized model of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum. This leads us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan's charge to mass ratio including radiation, de/dm, derived as the 4th order tensor measure. In this paper, I will discuss the latest update of the model and the ability of the equation of motion with radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings.

  2. Ethanol mandate thrown out by appeals court

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begley, R.

    1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a victory for the oil industry, a federal appeals court has overturned EPA`s mandate for ethanol use in reformulated gasoline (REG), saying the agency lacks authority to require 30% of the oxygenate market be reserved for ethanol. EPA says the ruling does not prevent ethanols use in RFG - {open_quotes}It only says that EPA cannot dictate the recipe.{close_quotes} Charles DiBona, president of the American Petroleum Institute (API), says {open_quotes}API and its member companies are not opposed to the use of ethanol as an oxygenate. We oppose this illegal mandate.{close_quotes} Urvan Sternfels, president of the National Petroleum Refiners Association, says, {open_quotes}Mandating market shares for any product is unsound economic policy.{close_quotes} The two trade groups led the legal battle against the ethanol requirement.

  3. Condensation phenomena in two-flavor scalar QED at finite chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Schmidt; Philippe de Forcrand; Christof Gattringer

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study condensation in two-flavored, scalar QED with non-degenerate masses at finite chemical potential. The conventional formulation of the theory has a sign problem at finite density which can be solved using an exact reformulation of the theory in terms of dual variables. We perform a Monte Carlo simulation in the dual representation and observe a condensation at a critical chemical potential $\\mu_c$. After determining the low-energy spectrum of the theory we try to establish a connection between $\\mu_c$ and the mass of the lightest excitation of the system, which are naively expected to be equal. It turns out, however, that the relation of the critical chemical potential to the mass spectrum in this case is non-trivial: Taking into account the form of the condensate and making some simplifying assumptions we suggest an adequate explanation which is supported by numerical results.

  4. Affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras: The center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Zajj; Virk, Rahbar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degenerate affine and affine BMW algebras arise naturally in the context of Schur-Weyl duality for orthogonal and symplectic Lie algebras and quantum groups, respectively. Cyclotomic BMW algebras, affine Hecke algebras, cyclotomic Hecke algebras, and their degenerate versions are quotients. In this paper the theory is unified by treating the orthogonal and symplectic cases simultaneously; we make an exact parallel between the degenerate affine and affine cases via a new algebra which takes the role of the affine braid group for the degenerate setting. A main result of this paper is an identification of the centers of the affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras in terms of rings of symmetric functions which satisfy a "cancellation property" or "wheel condition" (in the degenerate case, a reformulation of a result of Nazarov). Miraculously, these same rings also arise in Schubert calculus, as the cohomology and K-theory of isotropic Grassmanians and symplectic loop Grassmanians. We also establish new inte...

  5. Simplicity of condensed matter at its core: Generic definition of a Roskilde-simple system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Schrøder; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of isomorphs is reformulated by defining Roskilde-simple systems (those with isomorphs) by the property that the order of the potential energies of configurations at one density is maintained when these are scaled uniformly to a different density. Isomorphs remain curves in the thermodynamic phase diagram along which structure, dynamics, and excess entropy are invariant, implying that the phase diagram is effectively one-dimensional with respect to many reduced-unit properties. In contrast to the original formulation of the isomorph theory, however, the density-scaling exponent is not exclusively a function of density and the isochoric heat capacity is not an exact isomorph invariant. A prediction is given for the latter quantity's variation along the isomorphs. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones and Lennard-Jones Gaussian systems validate the new approach.

  6. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

    1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

  7. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Rejai, Bahman (Lakewood, CO); Bain, Richard L. (Golden, CO); Overend, Ralph P. (Lakewood, CO)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

  8. A Strongly and Superlinearly Convergent SQP Algorithm for Optimization Problems with Linear Complementarity Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Jinbao, E-mail: jianjb@gxu.edu.cn; Li Jianling; Mo Xingde [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a kind of optimization problem with linear complementarity constraints, and presents a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm for solving a stationary point of the problem. The algorithm is a modification of the SQP algorithm proposed by Fukushima et al. [Computational Optimization and Applications, 10 (1998),5-34], and is based on a reformulation of complementarity condition as a system of linear equations. At each iteration, one quadratic programming and one system of equations needs to be solved, and a curve search is used to yield the step size. Under some appropriate assumptions, including the lower-level strict complementarity, but without the upper-level strict complementarity for the inequality constraints, the algorithm is proved to possess strong convergence and superlinear convergence. Some preliminary numerical results are reported.

  9. Rotation and anisotropy of galaxies revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the tensor virial theorem (TVT) as a diagnostic of anisotropic velocity distributions in galaxies is revisited. The TVT provides a rigorous global link between velocity anisotropy, rotation and shape, but the quantities appearing in it are not easily estimated observationally. Traditionally use has been made of a centrally averaged velocity dispersion and the peak rotation velocity. Although this procedure cannot be rigorously justified, tests on model galaxies show that it works surprisingly well. With the advent of integral-field spectroscopy it is now possible to establish a rigorous connection between the TVT and observations. The TVT is reformulated in terms of sky-averages, and the new formulation is tested on model galaxies.

  10. Reduction of risk to the marine environment from oilfield chemicals - balancing environmental and technical needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Neill, J.E.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study argues that the regulation of offshore use of hazardous chemicals for oilfield stimulation and Completion applications is an important but not a total solution to reduce marine pollution from offshore sources. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that for a complete solution, chemical reformulation must be considered hand-in-band with improved operational practices to provide a maximum effect on overall risk reduction. The study is directed at one major service company`s approach to the whole issue of chemical management in the 1990s, based mainly on North Sea experience in cementing, drilling fluid and stimulation activities. Oilfield chemicals are incorporated into a fluid design to solve a specific technical problem in a well, such as well completion, stimulation and damage removal. While it is desirable to replace all the harmful chemicals, the practicalities of doing so are limited if the industry is to continue to produce efficiently. Other alternatives need consideration. By their very chemistry, some chemicals have primary active ingredients which may be harmful if discharged into the environment. Improving the characteristics of chemicals to marine life requires the change of previously acceptable products, such as the elimination of banned materials as well as incorporating components with reduced toxicity and greater biodegradability. The idealistic goal is the immediate replacement of all chemicals by nontoxic, biodegrade alternatives; the practical solution is replacement reformulation where possible and the improved isolation the oilwell and marine environments through improvements in continuous-mix technology along with reduction of the chemicals by better job design.

  11. On the 'principle of the quantumness', the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro [QUIT Group, Dipartimento di Fisica 'A. Volta', 27100 Pavia (Italy) and Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (Italy)

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    I will argue that the proposal of establishing operational foundations of Quantum Theory should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently suggested operational 'principles of the quantumness', I address the problem on whether Quantum Theory and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from causality of Quantum Theory, within the computational paradigm 'the universe is a huge quantum computer', reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Computational Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance. In this scheme even the quantization rule and the Planck constant can in principle be derived as emergent from the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this way Quantum Theory remains the only theory operating the huge computer of the universe.Is the computational paradigm only a speculative tautology (theory as simulation of reality), or does it have a scientific value? The answer will come from Occam's razor, depending on the mathematical simplicity of QCFT. Here I will just start scratching the surface of QCFT, analyzing simple field theories, including Dirac's. The number of problems and unmotivated recipes that plague QFT strongly motivates us to undertake the QCFT project, since QCFT makes all such problems manifest, and forces a re-foundation of QFT.

  12. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  13. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  14. Universal Whitham hierarchy, dispersionless Hirota equations and multi-component KP hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanehisa Takasaki; Takashi Takebe

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to identify the universal Whitham hierarchy of genus zero with a dispersionless limit of the multi-component KP hierarchy. To this end, the multi-component KP hierarchy is (re)formulated to depend on several discrete variables called ``charges''. These discrete variables play the role of lattice coordinates in underlying Toda field equations. A multi-component version of the so called differential Fay identity are derived from the Hirota equations of the $\\tau$-function of this ``charged'' multi-component KP hierarchy. These multi-component differential Fay identities have a well-defined dispersionless limit (the dispersionless Hirota equations). The dispersionless Hirota equations turn out to be equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for the $S$-functions of the universal Whitham hierarchy. The differential Fay identities themselves are shown to be a generating functional expression of auxiliary linear equations for scalar-valued wave functions of the multi-component KP hierarchy.

  15. Twistors and 2T-physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Bars

    2005-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-Time physics applies broadly to the formulation of physics and correctly describes the physical world as we know it. Recently it was applied to a 2T re-formulation of the d=4 twistor superstring, which was suggested by Witten as an efficient approach for computations of physical processes in the maximally supersymmetric N=4 Yang-Mills field theory in four dimensions. The 2T formalism provides a six dimensional view of this theory and suggests the existence of other d=4 dual forms of the same theory. Furthermore the 2T approach led to the first formulation of a twistor superstring in d=10 appropriate for AdS{5}xS{5} backgrounds, and a twistor superstring in d=6 related to the little understood superconformal theory in d=6. The proper generalization of twistors to higher dimensions is an essential ingredient which is provided naturally by 2T-physics. These developments are summarized in this lecture.

  16. A Robust Artificial Noise Aided Transmit Design for Miso Secrecy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qiang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers an artificial noise (AN) aided secrecy rate maximization (SRM) problem for a multi-input single-output (MISO) channel overheard by multiple single-antenna eavesdroppers. We assume that the transmitter has perfect knowledge about the channel to the desired user but imperfect knowledge about the channels to the eavesdroppers. Therefore, the resultant SRM problem is formulated in the way that we maximize the worst-case secrecy rate by jointly designing the signal covariance ${\\bf W}$ and the AN covariance ${\\bf \\Sigma}$. However, such a worst-case SRM problem turns out to be hard to optimize, since it is nonconvex in ${\\bf W}$ and ${\\bf \\Sigma}$ jointly. Moreover, it falls into the class of semi-infinite optimization problems. Through a careful reformulation, we show that the worst-case SRM problem can be handled by performing a one-dimensional line search in which a sequence of semidefinite programs (SDPs) are involved. Moreover, we also show that the optimal ${\\bf W}$ admits a rank-one str...

  17. Uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, R.E.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation is made of the suitability of analytical and statistical sampling methods for making uncertainty analyses. The adjoint method is found to be well-suited for obtaining sensitivity coefficients for computer programs involving large numbers of equations and input parameters. For this purpose the Latin Hypercube Sampling method is found to be inferior to conventional experimental designs. The Latin hypercube method can be used to estimate output probability density functions, but requires supplementary rank transformations followed by stepwise regression to obtain uncertainty information on individual input parameters. A simple Cork and Bottle problem is used to illustrate the efficiency of the adjoint method relative to certain statistical sampling methods. For linear models of the form Ax=b it is shown that a complete adjoint sensitivity analysis can be made without formulating and solving the adjoint problem. This can be done either by using a special type of statistical sampling or by reformulating the primal problem and using suitable linear programming software.

  18. Reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei : The SOLA method for time-series inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank P. Pijpers; Ignaz Wanders

    1994-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a new method is presented to find the transfer function of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. The subtractive optimally localized averages (SOLA) method is a modified version of the Backus-Gilbert method and is presented as an alternative to the more often used maximum-entropy method. The SOLA method has been developed for use in helioseismology. It has been applied to the solar oscillation frequency splitting data currently available to deduce the internal rotation rate of the sun. The original SOLA method is reformulated in the present paper to cope with the slightly different problem of inverting time series. We use simulations to test the viability of the method and apply the SOLA method to the real data of the Seyfert-1 galaxy NGC 5548. We investigate the effects of measurement errors and how the resolution of the TF critically depends upon both the sampling rate and the photometric accuracy of the data. A uuencoded compressed postscript file of the paper which includes the figures is available by anonymous ftp at ftp://solaris.astro.uu.se/pub/articles/atmos/frank/PijWan.uue

  19. MTBE still in poor health, despite the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.

    1994-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    After the second winter oxygenated fuels program of the 1990 Clean Air Act, producers of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) are still feeling the chill of poor profitability. Despite the strong demand growth for MTBE to meet oxygen requirements in reformulated gasoline (RFG), oversupply still dogs the market. That, combined with a run-up in feedstock prices, has seen margins for MTBE markers all but evaporate. And it seems matters are likely to get worse before they get better. This week, Belvieu Environmental Fuels (BEF; Houston) expects to startup its 15,000-bbl/day MTBE plant at Mont Belvieu, TX. In late July, Texaco will start up its 15,000-bbl/day MTBE/propylene oxide (PO) plant at Port Neches, TX. In addition, a rash of refinery-based MTBE and tert-amyl methyl ether projects are nearing completion. {open_quotes}Profitability in MTBE has been extremely poor,{close_quotes} says Marvin O. Schlanger, president of Arco Chemical Americas, the largest MTBE producer. There has, however, been some recent recovery on the spot market, with MTBE moving from less than 60 cts/gal to near cash-cost levels of 70 cts/gal. But contract prices remain depressed, and strength in butane and methanol pricing have all buy wiped out any gains in MTBE.

  20. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes - phase V. Topical report, February 1993--October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made excellent progress toward a practical route from field butanes to MTBE, the oxygenate of choice for high-octane, clean-burning, environmentally acceptable reformulated gasoline. We have evaluated two proprietary process possibilities with a potential commercial partner and have conducted a joint catalyst evaluation program. The first of the two potential processes considered during the past quarter utilizes a two-step route from isobutane to tert-butyl alcohol, TBA. Not only is TBA an intermediate for MTBE production but is equally applicable for ETBE-an oxygenate which utilizes renewable ethanol in its` manufacture. In the two-step process, isobutane is oxidized in a non-catalytic reaction to a roughly equal mixture of TBA and tert-butyl hydroperoxide. TBHP, eq. 1. We have developed an inexpensive new catalyst system based on an electron-deficient macrocyclic metal complex that selectively converts TBHP to TBA, eq. 2, and meets or exceeds all of the process criteria that we have set.

  1. Meeting the challenge of MTBE biodegradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eweis, J.B.; Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Scow, K.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Morton, R.L.; Caballero, R.C. [Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts, Carson, CA (United States). Joint Water Pollution Control Plant

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygenated and reformulated gasolines have been developed in response to air pollution control regulations targeted at reducing carbon monoxide emissions and photochemical air pollution. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required the addition of fuel oxygenates to gasoline in areas where the level of carbon monoxide exceeded national ambient air quality standards. In the South Coast Air Basin gasoline containing oxygenated compounds has been in use since the late 1980`s. One oxygenated fuel additive most often selected by producers to meet the requirements is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). However, large production numbers associated with MTBE production, combined with the compound`s high water solubility, chemical stability, and toxicity, make it a potentially important groundwater pollutant. The County Sanitation District of Los Angeles, Joint Water Pollution Control Plant in Carson, California is one of the few wastewater treatment plants in the nation that receives refinery wastewater discharge. It has operated several pilot-scale compost-based biofilters for control of various volatile organic contaminants throughout the plant since a 1991 joint study with the University of California, Davis. After one year of operation, one of the biofilters spontaneously developed the ability to degrade MTBE. The paper describes the collaborative efforts to determine the feasibility of transferring the degrading microbial population from the solid to liquid phase, without loss of activity, and to determine some of the environmental requirements necessary for survival of the microbial culture.

  2. Health concerns fuel EPA study of ETBE and TAME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, A.

    1994-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Citing possible health risks associated with the use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in winter-blend gasoline and requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA has called for testing the health effects of ethyl tert-butyl ether (EBTE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). The program calls for toxicity testing to develop data on the health effects of ETBE and TAME. EPA may require chemical manufacturers and processors to provide the data. A public meeting will be held this week to begin working on an agreement. EPA says most of the data should be collected in 1995 and expects the program to cost approximately $3 million. In December, EPA floated a proposal to require 30% of the oxygenates used in the reformulated gasoline program to come from renewable sources such as ETBE and ethanol. Although EPA found no serious health risks associated with MTBE, questions remain, which is why EPA says it will test the use of ETBE and TAME. William Piel, business manager for oxygenated fuels at Arco Chemical (Newtown Square, PA), says testing is {open_quotes}just a formality.{close_quotes} There should be no difference in results among MTBE, ETBE, or TAME, he says. But ETBE and TAME have much lower volatility than MTBE, which would mean significantly less exposure to these oxygenates, Piel says. Arco is the biggest producer of MTBE but also has capability to make ETBE.

  3. Technical and operational overview of the C[sub 4] Oleflex process at Valero refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohnholt, J.F.; Payne, D. (Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Gregor, J.; Smith, E. (UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in gasoline composition stemming from the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments prompted Valero Energy Corporation to evaluate options for producing reformulated gasoline. The evaluation culminated in a project to upgrade butanes into methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Technology selection focused on the dehydrogenation of isobutane, and the UOP Oleflex process was selected. The MTBE project was implemented in 34 months and was $3 million under budget. The guaranteed MTBE production of 12,500 BPSD was achieved within one month of mechanical completion and has since reached 15,000 BPSD. Even at the low MTBE prices prevailing in late 1993, the butane upgrading project contributed significantly to Valero Refinery's overall profitability. Worldwide demand is expected to increase MTBE prices in 1996, thereby further increasing profits. The paper describes the project evaluation activities which led to the selection of the Oleflex process, engineering and construction, the MTBE complex start-up and operation, the Valero MTBE complex performance, and future plans. The paper also discusses feedstock utilization efficiency and MTBE market analysis.

  4. High-resolution NMR process analyzer for oxygenates in gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skloss, T.W.; Kim, A.J.; Haw, J.F. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a high-resolution 42-MHz[sup 1]HFT-NMR instrument that is suitable for use as a process analyzer and demonstrate its use in the determination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in a flowing stream of gasoline. This spectrometer is based on a 55-kg permanent magnet with essentially no fringe field. A spectral resolution of 3 Hz was typically obtained for spinning samples, and this performance was only slightly degraded with flowing samples. We report a procedure for magnet drift compensation using a software procedure rather than a field-frequency lock channel. This procedure allowed signal averaging without loss of resolution. Regulatory changes to be implemented in the near future have created a need for the development of methods for the determination of MTBE and other oxygenates in reformulated gasolines. Existing methods employing gas chromatography are not fast enough for process control of a gasoline blender and suffer from other limitations. This study demonstrates that process analysis NMR is well-suited to the determination of MTBE in a simulated gasoline blender. The detection limit of 0.5 vol % MTBE was obtained with a measurement time of 1 min. The absolute standard deviation of independent determinations was 0.17% when the MTBE concentration was 10%, a nominal value. Preliminary results also suggest that the method may be applicable to gasolines containing mixtures of oxygenate additives as well as the measurement of aromatic and olefinic hydrogens. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  6. Assessment of capital requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure under the PNGV program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.; Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an assessment of the capital requirements of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a new Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels include two petroleum-based fuels (reformulated gasoline and low-sulfur diesel) and four alternative fuels (methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen). This study develops estimates of cumulative capital needs for establishing fuels production and distribution infrastructure to accommodate 3X vehicle fuel needs. Two levels of fuel volume-70,000 barrels per day and 1.6 million barrels per day-were established for meeting 3X-vehicle fuel demand. As expected, infrastructure capital needs for the high fuel demand level are much higher than for the low fuel demand level. Between fuel production infrastructure and distribution infrastructure, capital needs for the former far exceed those for the latter. Among the four alternative fuels, hydrogen bears the largest capital needs for production and distribution infrastructure.

  7. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 3, vehicle maintenance and durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CleanFleet is a demonstration of panel vans operating on five alternative motorfuels in commercial package delivery operations in the South Coast Air Basin of California. The five alternative fuels are propane gas, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol (M-85 with 15 percent RFG), and electricity. Data were gathered on in-use emissions, operations, and fleet economics. This volume of the final report summarizes the maintenance required on these vans from the time they were introduced into the demonstration (April through early November 1992) until the end of the demonstration in September 1994. The vans were used successfully in FedEx operations; but, to varying degrees, the alternative fuel vehicles required more maintenance than the unleaded gasoline control vehicles. The maintenance required was generally associated with the development state of the fuel-related systems. During the demonstration, no non-preventive maintenance was required on the highly developed fuel-related systems in any of the unleaded gasoline production vehicles used either as controls or as RFG test vehicles. The maintenance problems encountered with the less developed systems used in this demonstration may persist in the short term with vehicles featuring the same or similar systems. This means that fleet operators planning near-term acquisitions of vehicles incorporating such systems should consider the potential for similar problems when (1) selecting vendors and warranty provisions and (2) planning maintenance programs.

  8. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 8, fleet economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The costs that face a fleet operator in implementing alternative motor fuels into fleet operations are examined. Five alternatives studied in the CleanFleet project are considered for choice of fuel: compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The cost assessment is built upon a list of thirteen cost factors grouped into the three categories: infrastructure costs, vehicle owning costs, and operating costs. Applicable taxes are included. A commonly used spreadsheet was adapted as a cost assessment tool. This tool was used in a case study to estimate potential costs to a typical fleet operator in package delivery service in the 1996 time frame. In addition, because electric cargo vans are unlikely to be available for the 1996 model year from original equipment manufacturers, the case study was extended to the 1998 time frame for the electric vans. Results of the case study are presented in cents per mile of vehicle travel for the fleet. Several options available to the fleet for implementing the fuels are examined.

  9. Approach clean air issues cost effectively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharr, S.L. [Star Enterprise, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star Enterprise is a 50/50 joint venture partnership formed in 1989 between Texaco and Saudi Aramco subsidiaries. Star is the sixth largest refiner and marketer in the U.S. and operates three refineries located in Port Arthur, Texas; Convent, La; and Delaware City, Del. These three plants have a combined crude processing capacity of 600,000 b/d. Star Enterprise markets more than 5 billion gal/year of gasoline and 1.8 billion gal/year of diesel fuel through 9,000 Texaco-branded wholesale and retail outlets in 26 states in the eastern and Gulf coast regions of the U.S. Not long after Star was formed, we began making large capital investments in our refineries and in our marketing system to comply with federally mandated fuel requirements. First there was the 1993 diesel fuel specifications for on-road diesels. Then there was the roll out of reformulated gasoline (RFG) in December 1994. As marketers in the East and Gulf Coast regions, a significant portion of the marketing arena is in mandatory and optional RFG areas.

  10. ABJM theory as a Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos Marino; Pavel Putrov

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The partition function on the three-sphere of many supersymmetric Chern-Simons-matter theories reduces, by localization, to a matrix model. We develop a new method to study these models in the M-theory limit, but at all orders in the 1/N expansion. The method is based on reformulating the matrix model as the partition function of an ideal Fermi gas with a non-trivial, one-particle quantum Hamiltonian. This new approach leads to a completely elementary derivation of the N^{3/2} behavior for ABJM theory and N=3 quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories. In addition, the full series of 1/N corrections to the original matrix integral can be simply determined by a next-to-leading calculation in the WKB or semiclassical expansion of the quantum gas, and we show that, for several quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories, it is given by an Airy function. This generalizes a recent result of Fuji, Hirano and Moriyama for ABJM theory. It turns out that the semiclassical expansion of the Fermi gas corresponds to a strong coupling expansion in type IIA theory, and it is dual to the genus expansion. This allows us to calculate explicitly non-perturbative effects due to D2-brane instantons in the AdS background.

  11. Bell Transform, Teleportation Operator and Teleportation-Based Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Zhang; Kun Zhang

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of the Bell transform to represent known quantum gates in the literature, which are a unitary basis transformation from the product basis to the Bell states or the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. The algebraic structure of the four dimensional Bell transform has been studied systematically in this paper and we point out that it may be not a Clifford gate. The representative examples of the four dimensional Bell transform are verified as maximally entangling Clifford gates and some of them are recognized as parity-preserving gates or matchgates or Yang--Baxter gates. We define the teleportation operator in terms of the four dimensional Bell transform and apply it to the reformulation of the fault-tolerant construction of single-qubit gates and two-qubit gates in teleportation-based quantum computation. The algebraic structure of the higher dimensional Bell transform is also included and representative examples for it are verified as multi-qubit Clifford gates. Our research suggests that the Bell transform may play important roles in quantum information and computation as a new type of quantum transform.

  12. Dynamical Energy Analysis - determining wave energy distributions in complex vibro-acoustical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Tanner

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach towards determining the distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave energy in complex built-up structures. The technique interpolates between standard Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and full ray tracing containing both these methods as limiting case. By writing the flow of ray trajectories in terms of linear phase space operators, it is suggested here to reformulate ray-tracing algorithms in terms of boundary operators containing only short ray segments. SEA can now be identified as a low resolution ray tracing algorithm and typical SEA assumptions can be quantified in terms of the properties of the ray dynamics. The new technique presented here enhances the range of applicability of standard SEA considerably by systematically incorporating dynamical correlations wherever necessary. Some of the inefficiencies inherent in typical ray tracing methods can be avoided using only a limited amount of the geometrical ray information. The new dynamical theory - Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA) - thus provides a universal approach towards determining wave energy distributions in complex structures.

  13. Quantum Internal Model Principle: Decoherence Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan Ganesan; Tzyh-Jong Tarn

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we study the problem of designing a Decoherence Control for quantum systems with the help of a scalable ancillary quantum control and techniques from geometric control theory, in order to successfully and completely decouple an open quantum system from its environment. We re-formulate the problem of decoherence control as a disturbance rejection scheme which also leads us to the idea of Internal Model Principle for quantum control systems which is first of its kind in the literature. It is shown that decoupling a quantum disturbance from an open quantum system, is possible only with the help of a quantum controller which takes into account the model of the environmental interaction. This is demonstrated for a simple 2-qubit system wherein the effects of decoherence are completely eliminated. The theory provides conditions to be imposed on the controller to ensure perfect decoupling. Hence the problem of decoherence control naturally gives rise to the quantum internal model principle which relates the disturbance rejecting control to the model of the environmental interaction. Classical internal model principle and disturbance decoupling focus on different aspects viz. perfect output tracking and complete decoupling of output from external disturbances respectively. However for quantum systems, the two problems come together and merge in order to produce an effective platform for decoherence control. In this article we introduce a seminal connection between disturbance decoupling and the corresponding analog for internal model principle for quantum systems.

  14. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  15. Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

  16. Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

  17. GREET 1.0 -- Transportation fuel cycles model: Methodology and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, Co, NOx, SOx, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

  18. On quantum potential dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon Goldstein; Ward Struyve

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-relativistic de Broglie-Bohm theory describes particles moving under the guidance of the wave function. In de Broglie's original formulation, the particle dynamics is given by a first-order differential equation. In Bohm's reformulation, it is given by Newton's law of motion with an extra potential that depends on the wave function--the quantum potential--together with a constraint on the possible velocities. It was recently argued, mainly by numerical simulations, that relaxing this velocity constraint leads to a physically untenable theory. We provide further evidence for this by showing that for various wave functions the particles tend to escape the wave packet. In particular, we show that for a central classical potential and bound energy eigenstates the particle motion is often unbounded. This work seems particularly relevant for ways of simulating wave function evolution based on Bohm's formulation of the de Broglie-Bohm theory. Namely, the simulations may become unstable due to deviations from the velocity constraint.

  19. Can the wave function in configuration space be replaced by single-particle wave functions in physical space?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travis Norsen; Damiano Marian; Xavier Oriols

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ontology of Bohmian mechanics includes both the universal wave function (living in 3N-dimensional configuration space) and particles (living in ordinary 3-dimensional physical space). Proposals for understanding the physical significance of the wave function in this theory have included the idea of regarding it as a physically-real field in its 3N-dimensional space, as well as the idea of regarding it as a law of nature. Here we introduce and explore a third possibility in which the configuration space wave function is simply eliminated -- replaced by a set of single-particle pilot-wave fields living in ordinary physical space. Such a re-formulation of the Bohmian pilot-wave theory can exactly reproduce the statistical predictions of ordinary quantum theory. But this comes at the rather high ontological price of introducing an infinite network of interacting potential fields (living in 3-dimensional space) which influence the particles' motion through the pilot-wave fields. We thus introduce an alternative approach which aims at achieving empirical adequacy (like that enjoyed by GRW type theories) with a more modest ontological complexity, and provide some preliminary evidence for optimism regarding the (once popular but prematurely-abandoned) program of trying to replace the (philosophically puzzling) configuration space wave function with a (totally unproblematic) set of fields in ordinary physical space.

  20. Monte Carlo Study of Strongly-Interacting Degenerate Fermions: a Model for Voltage-Biased Bilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wes Armour; Simon Hands; Costas Strouthos

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a model of N_f=4 flavors of relativistic fermion in 2+1d in the presence of a chemical potential mu coupled to two flavor doublets with opposite sign, akin to isopsin chemical potential in QCD. This is argued to be an effective theory for low energy electronic excitations in bilayer graphene, in which an applied voltage between the layers ensures equal populations of particles on one layer and holes on the other. The model is then reformulated on a spacetime lattice using staggered fermions, and in the absence of a sign problem, simulated using an orthodox hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. With the coupling strength chosen to be close to a quantum critical point believed to exist for N_f

  1. Isosuperconductivity: A nonlocal-nonhamiltonian theory of pairing in high-T{sub c} superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Animalu, A.O.E. [Univ. of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria)]|[The Institute for Basic Research, Palm Harbor, FL (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents a review and reformulation of the author`s recent nonlocal-nonhamiltonian generalization of the standard BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) theory of electron pairing in superconductors, here called iso-superconductivity or iso-standard model for short, by drawing two analogies. The first analogy is a geometrical (relativistic) one between the internal (isominkowskian) structures of the neutral pion and the Cooper pair envisaged in the generalization; and the second analogy is a dynamical (fluid mechanics) one between the classical Hamilton-Santilli limit of the generalization and its apparent local/nonlocal two-dimensional (London) superfluid mechanics realizations for flows in the CuO{sub 2} planes of the high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors. By using the analogies and physical considerations, the author elucidates the origins of the interactions responsible for the fluctuations in the iso-characteristics of the electron within the pair due to the mutual overlapping of the paired electron wavefunctions. The fluctuations are defined in terms of a single quantity, namely an integral operator or {open_quotes}iso unit{close_quotes}. 33 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Dipolar Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchet, Luc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because the two types of dark matter interact through the vector field, a ghostly degree of fre...

  3. Many-body Propagator Theory with Three-Body Interactions: a Path to Exotic Open Shell Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barbieri

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab-initio predictions of nuclei with masses up to A~100 or more is becoming possible thanks to novel advances in computations and in the formalism of many-body physics. Some of the most fundamental issues include how to deal with many-nucleon interactions, how to calculate degenerate--open shell--systems, and pursuing ab-initio approaches to reaction theory. Self-consistent Green's function (SCGF) theory is a natural approach to address these challenges. Its formalism has recently been extended to three- and many-body interactions and reformulated within the Gorkov framework to reach semi-magic open shell isotopes. These exciting developments, together with the predictive power of chiral nuclear Hamiltonians, are opening the path to understanding large portions of the nuclear chart, especially within the $sd$ and $pf$ shells. The present talk reviews the most recent advances in ab-initio nuclear structure and many-body theory that have been possible through the SCGF approach.

  4. New general approach in few-body scattering calculations: Solving discretized Faddeev equations on a graphics processing unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Pomerantsev; V. I. Kukulin; O. A. Rubtsova

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The numerical solution of few-body scattering problems with realistic interactions is a difficult problem that normally must be solved on powerful supercomputers, taking a lot of computer time. This strongly limits the possibility of accurate treatments for many important few-particle problems in different branches of quantum physics. Purpose: To develop a new general highly effective approach for the practical solution of few-body scattering equations that can be implemented on a graphics processing unit. Methods: The general approach is realized in three steps: (i) the reformulation of the scattering equations using a convenient analytical form for the channel resolvent operator; (ii) a complete few-body continuum discretization and projection of all operators and wave functions onto a $L_2$ basis constructed from stationary wave packets and (iii) the ultra-fast solution of the resulting matrix equations using graphics processor. Results: The whole approach is illustrated by a calculation of the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering cross section below and above the three-body breakup threshold with a realistic $NN$ potential which is performed on a standard PC using a graphics processor with an extremely short runtime. Conclusions: The general technique proposed in this paper opens a new way for a fast practical solution of quantum few-body scattering problems both in non-relativistic and relativistic formulations in hadronic, nuclear and atomic physics.

  5. Analytical and Numerical Study of Photocurrent Transients in Organic Polymer Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo de Falco; Riccardo Sacco; Maurizio Verri

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is an attempt to provide a self consistent picture, including existence analysis and numerical solution algorithms, of the mathematical problems arising from modeling photocurrent transients in Organic-polymer Solar Cells (OSCs). The mathematical model for OSCs consists of a system of nonlinear diffusion-reaction partial differential equations (PDEs) with electrostatic convection, coupled to a kinetic ordinary differential equation (ODE). We propose a suitable reformulation of the model that allows us to prove the existence of a solution in both stationary and transient conditions and to better highlight the role of exciton dynamics in determining the device turn-on time. For the numerical treatment of the problem, we carry out a temporal semi-discretization using an implicit adaptive method, and the resulting sequence of differential subproblems is linearized using the Newton-Raphson method with inexact evaluation of the Jacobian. Then, we use exponentially fitted finite elements for the spatial discretization, and we carry out a thorough validation of the computational model by extensively investigating the impact of the model parameters on photocurrent transient times.

  6. National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

  7. An Advanced Integrated Diffusion/Transport Method for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Very-High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzad Rahnema; Dingkang Zhang; Abderrafi Ougouag; Frederick Gleicher

    2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to develop an integrated diffusion/transport (IDT) method to substantially improve the accuracy of nodal diffusion methods for the design and analysis of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Because of the presence of control rods in the reflector regions in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR-VHTR), traditional nodal diffusion methods do not accurately model these regions, within which diffusion theory breaks down in the vicinity of high neutron absorption and steep flux gradients. The IDT method uses a local transport solver based on a new incident flux response expansion method in the controlled nodes. Diffusion theory is used in the rest of the core. This approach improves the accuracy of the core solution by generating transport solutions of controlled nodes while maintaining computational efficiency by using diffusion solutions in nodes where such a treatment is sufficient. The transport method is initially developed and coupled to the reformulated 3-D nodal diffusion model in the CYNOD code for PBR core design and fuel cycle analysis. This method is also extended to the prismatic VHTR. The new method accurately captures transport effects in highly heterogeneous regions with steep flux gradients. The calculations of these nodes with transport theory avoid errors associated with spatial homogenization commonly used in diffusion methods in reactor core simulators

  8. Metastring Theory and Modular Space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freidel, Laurent; Minic, Djordje

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory is canonically accompanied with a space-time interpretation which determines S-matrix-like observables, and connects to the standard physics at low energies in the guise of local effective field theory. Recently, we have introduced a reformulation of string theory which does not rely on an {\\it a priori} space-time interpretation or a pre-assumption of locality. This \\hlt{metastring theory} is formulated in such a way that stringy symmetries (such as T-duality) are realized linearly. In this paper, we study metastring theory on a flat background and develop a variety of technical and interpretational ideas. These include a formulation of the moduli space of Lorentzian worldsheets, a careful study of the symplectic structure and consequently consistent closed and open boundary conditions, and the string spectrum and operator algebra. What emerges from these studies is a new quantum notion of space-time that we refer to as a quantum Lagrangian or equivalently a \\hlt{modular space-time}. This conce...

  9. Demonstration of alcohol as an aviation fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently funded Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP) project with Baylor University will demonstrate the effectiveness of ethanols as an aviation fuel while providing several environmental and economic benefits. Part of this concern is caused by the petroleum industry. The basis for the petroleum industry to find an alternative aviation fuel will be dictated mainly by economic considerations. Three other facts compound the problem. First is the disposal of oil used in engines burning leaded fuel. This oil will contain too much lead to be burned in incinerators and will have to be treated as a toxic waste with relatively high disposal fees. Second, as a result of a greater demand for alkalites to be used in the automotive reformulated fuel, the costs of these components are likely to increase. Third, the Montreal Protocol will ban in 1998 the use of Ethyl-Di-Bromide, a lead scavenger used in leaded aviation fuel. Without a lead scavenger, leaded fuels cannot be used. The search for alternatives to leaded aviation fuels has been underway by different organizations for some time. As part of the search for alternatives, the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, has received a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to improve the efficiencies of ethanol powered aircraft engines and to test other non-petroleum alternatives to aviation fuel.

  10. Improved Approximations for Fermion Pair Production in Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Don N. Page

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reformulating the instantons in a complex plane for tunneling or transmitting states, we calculate the pair-production rate of charged fermions in a spatially localized electric field, illustrated by the Sauter electric field E_0 sech^2 (z/L), and in a temporally localized electric field such as E_0 sech^2 (t/T). The integration of the quadratic part of WKB instanton actions over the frequency and transverse momentum leads to the pair-production rate obtained by the worldline instanton method, including the prefactor, of Phys. Rev. D72, 105004 (2005) and D73, 065028 (2006). It is further shown that the WKB instanton action plus the next-to-leading order contribution in spinor QED equals the WKB instanton action in scalar QED, thus justifying why the WKB instanton in scalar QED can work for the pair production of fermions. Finally we obtain the pair-production rate in a spatially localized electric field together with a constant magnetic field in the same direction.

  11. U. S. refiners move into another challenging technical era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, J.R. (Ashland Oil Inc., Ashland, KY (US))

    1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With the transition to unleaded gasoline scarcely behind us, another new era is dawning for the U.S. refiner. No one yet knows the exact configuration of the refinery of the future and no two refineries are likely to adapt in exactly the same way. What is certain, however, is that by the year 2000, refineries will be more technologically advanced, their products will be more environmentally acceptable, and their operators will be more highly trained. The typical U.S. refinery in the year 2000 will be located at an existing refinery site because economic and environmental considerations will make it impossible to build new grassroots capacity. As a result of the Clean Air act, the refinery of tomorrow will produce cleaner fuels The entire U.S. gasoline pool will likely be reformulated. Most of the diesel fuel pool will consist of ultralow-sulfur product. And jet fuel-which is experiencing rapid demand growth-will be an increasingly important product. Many existing refining process will remain in use, but they will be more efficient and more technologically advanced. Energy efficiency will be a primary concern, as refiners seek to combat ever-increasing crude oil costs and refinery operating expenses. The refinery of the future also will be much more environmentally acceptable. The article is a closer look at the refinery of the future.

  12. Nuclear evaporation process with simultaneous multiparticle emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo P. G. De Assis; Sergio B. Duarte; Bianca M. Santos

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear evaporation process is reformulated by taking into account simultaneous multiparticle emission from a hot compound nucleus appearing as an intermediate state in many nuclear reaction mechanisms. The simultaneous emission of many particles is particularly relevant for high excitation energy of the compound nucleus.These channels are effectively open in competition with the single particle emissions and fission in this energy regime. Indeed, the inclusion of these channels along the decay evaporating chain shows that the yield of charged particles and occurrence of fission are affected by these multiparticle emission processes of the compounded nucleus, when compared to the single sequential emission results. The effect also shows a qualitative change in the neutron multiplicity of different heavy compound nucleus considered. This should be an important aspect for the study of spallation reaction in Acceleration Driven System (ADS) reactors. The majority of neutrons generated in these reactions come from the evaporation stage of the reaction, the source of neutron for the system. A Monte Carlo simulation is employed to determine the effect of these channels on the particle yield and fission process. The relevance of the simultaneous particle emission with the increasing of excitation energy of the compound nucleus is explicitly shown.

  13. Variable Light-Cone Theory of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. T. Drummond

    1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to reformulate Variable Speed of Light Theories (VSLT) in a covariant fashion as Variable Light-Cone Theories (VLCT) by introducing two vierbein bundles each associated with a distinct metric. The basic gravitational action relates to one bundle while matter propagates relative to the other in a conventional way. The variability of the speed of light is represented by the variability of the matter light-cone relative to the gravitational light-cone. The two bundles are related locally by an element M, of SL(4,R). The dynamics of the field M is that of a SL(4,R)-sigma model gauged with respect to local (orthochronous) Lorentz transformations on each of the bundles. Only the ``massless'' version of the model with a single new coupling, F, that has the same dimensions as Newton's constant $G_N$, is considered in this paper. When F vanishes the theory reduces to standard General Relativity. We verify that the modified Bianchi identities of the model are consistent with the standard conservation law for the matter energy-momentum tensor in its own background metric. The implications of the model for some simple applications are examined, the Newtonian limit, the flat FRW universe and the spherically symmetric static solution.

  14. Maximum-likelihood density modification using pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A likelihood-based density-modification method is extended to include pattern recognition of structural motifs. The likelihood-based approach to density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] is extended to include the recognition of patterns of electron density. Once a region of electron density in a map is recognized as corresponding to a known structural element, the likelihood of the map is reformulated to include a term that reflects how closely the map agrees with the expected density for that structural element. This likelihood is combined with other aspects of the likelihood of the map, including the presence of a flat solvent region and the electron-density distribution in the protein region. This likelihood-based pattern-recognition approach was tested using the recognition of helical segments in a largely helical protein. The pattern-recognition method yields a substantial phase improvement over both conventional and likelihood-based solvent-flattening and histogram-matching methods. The method can potentially be used to recognize any common structural motif and incorporate prior knowledge about that motif into density modification.

  15. Geometric Constrained Variational Calculus. I. - Piecewise smooth extremals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Massa; Danilo Bruno; Gianvittorio Luria; Enrico Pagani

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric setup for constrained variational calculus is presented. The analysis deals with the study of the extremals of an action functional defined on piecewise differentiable curves, subject to differentiable, non-holonomic constraints. Special attention is paid to the tensorial aspects of the theory. As far as the kinematical foundations are concerned, a fully covariant scheme is developed through the introduction of the concept of infinitesimal control. The standard classification of the extremals into normal and abnormal ones is discussed, pointing out the existence of an algebraic algorithm assigning to each admissible curve a corresponding abnormality index, related to the co-rank of a suitable linear map. Attention is then shifted to the study of the first variation of the action functional. The analysis includes a revisitation of Pontryagin's equations and of the Lagrange multipliers method, as well as a reformulation of Pontryagin's algorithm in hamiltonian terms. The analysis is completed by a general result, concerning the existence of finite deformations with fixed endpoints.

  16. The processing of alcohols, hydrocarbons and ethers to produce hydrogen for a PEMFC for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dams, R.A.J.; Hayter, P.R.; Moore, S.C. [Wellman CJB Limited, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wellman CJB Limited is involved in a number of projects to develop fuel processors to provide a hydrogen-rich fuel in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) systems for transportation applications. This work started in 1990 which resulted in the demonstration of 10kW PEMFC system incorporating a methanol reformer and catalytic gas clean-up system. Current projects include: The development of a compact fast response methanol reformer and gas clean-up system for a motor vehicle; Reforming of infrastructure fuels including gasoline, diesel, reformulated fuel gas and LPG to produce a hydrogen rich gas for PEMFC; Investigating the potential of dimethylether (DME) as source of hydrogen rich gas for PEMFCs; The use of thin film palladium diffusers to produce a pure hydrogen stream from the hydrogen rich gas from a reformer; and Processing of naval logistic fuels to produce a hydrogen rich gas stream for PEMFC power system to replace diesel generators in surface ships. This paper outlines the background to these projects and reports their current status.

  17. Relative ozone forming potential of methanol-fueled vehicle emissions and gasoline-fueled vehicle emisons in outdoor smog chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental program compares the relative NO oxidation and O3 forming capabilities of surrogate VOC mixtures that are representative of urban air, emissions from vehicles using methanol fuels, and emission from vehicles using industry-average gasoline and Fuel F, one of the reformulated fuels used in the Auto/Oil test program. The urban VOC mixture was based upon ambient air analyses conducted by EPA for 6-9 AM in 41 cities over the period 1984-1988. The automotive VOC mixtures were based upon exhaust, evaporative, and running loss measurements made in the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program and upon the application of EPA`s MOBILE4 emissions model applied in an Urban Airshed scenario in Dallas/Fort Worth in the year 2005. In addition to testing the relative reactivity of each VOC mixture against the other mixtures, the majority of the experiments used mixtures in which 50% of the carbon was from urban mix and 50% of the carbon was from industry-average gasoline vehicle emissions or 50% of the carbon was from the methanol-fueled vehicle emissions. Some experiments were also conducted with higher fractions of formaldehyde (HCHO) in either the urban mix or in the methanol mix. Another set of experiments compared just the alkane and alkene fractions while in another set, just the aromatic species reactivities were compared.

  18. Foundations of a quantum gravity at large scales of length and its consequences for the dynamics of cosmological expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, Claudio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to find new symmetries in the space-time structure,leading to a modified gravitation at large length scales,which provides the foundations of a quantum gravity at very low energies. This search begins by considering a unified model for electrodynamics and gravitation,so that the influence of the gravitational field on the electrodynamics at very large distances leads to a reformulation of our understanding about space-time through the elimination of the classical idea of rest at quantum level. This leads us to a modification of the relativistic theory by introducing the idea of a universal minimum speed related to Planck minimum length. Such a speed,unattainable by the particles,represents a privileged inertial reference frame associated with a cosmic background field (a kind vacuum energy). The structure of space-time becomes extended due to such a vacuum energy density,which leads to a negative pressure at the cosmological length scales as being an anti-gravity,playing the role of the cosmologica...

  19. Methanol market slowly tightens as Brazil starts soaking up material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the US methanol market's response to mandated oxygen requirements in reformulated gasoline has been disappointing, the European market has surprisingly been tightening in recent weeks and looks set for a price rise in first-quarter 1993. The tightness is being felt mainly in the Mediterranean market, where the Libyan methanol plant is running at only 70% because of problems with gas feedstock supplies. More significantly, the Brazilian government has now given the go-ahead for a yearlong extension on imports of methanol for use as an ethanol replacement in fuel blending. The new authorization sets a monthly import limit of 48,000 m.t. during that period. Libya is an important supplier of methanol to the Brazilian market and has already shipped about 20,000 m.t. since the authorization was given. Another major supplier to Brazil is Russia, from its two giant 750,000-m.t./year plants at Gubakha and Tomsk. The material is shipped from the terminal at Yuzhnyy on the Black Sea, in Ukrainian territory since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  20. Jacobi stability analysis of the Lorenz system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiberiu Harko; Chor Yin Ho; Chun Sing Leung; Stan Yip

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform the study of the stability of the Lorenz system by using the Jacobi stability analysis, or the Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory. The Lorenz model plays an important role for understanding hydrodynamic instabilities and the nature of the turbulence, also representing a non-trivial testing object for studying non-linear effects. The KCC theory represents a powerful mathematical method for the analysis of dynamical systems. In this approach we describe the evolution of the Lorenz system in geometric terms, by considering it as a geodesic in a Finsler space. By associating a non-linear connection and a Berwald type connection, five geometrical invariants are obtained, with the second invariant giving the Jacobi stability of the system. The Jacobi (in)stability is a natural generalization of the (in)stability of the geodesic flow on a differentiable manifold endowed with a metric (Riemannian or Finslerian) to the non-metric setting. In order to apply the KCC theory we reformulate the Lorenz system as a set of two second order non-linear differential equations. The geometric invariants associated to this system (nonlinear and Berwald connections), and the deviation curvature tensor, as well as its eigenvalues, are explicitly obtained. The Jacobi stability of the equilibrium points of the Lorenz system is studied, and the condition of the stability of the equilibrium points is obtained. Finally, we consider the time evolution of the components of the deviation vector near the equilibrium points.

  1. Quantum steering of multimode Gaussian states by Gaussian measurements: monogamy relations and the Peres conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Se-Wan Ji; M. S. Kim; Hyunchul Nha

    2015-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a topic of fundamental and practical importance how a quantum correlated state can be reliably distributed through a noisy channel for quantum information processing. The concept of quantum steering recently defined in a rigorous manner is relevant to study it under certain circumstances and we here address quantum steerability of Gaussian states to this aim. In particular, we attempt to reformulate the criterion for Gaussian steering in terms of local and global purities and show that it is sufficient and necessary for the case of steering a 1-mode system by a $N$-mode system. It subsequently enables us to reinforce a strong monogamy relation under which only one party can steer a local system of 1-mode. Moreover, we show that only a negative partial-transpose state can manifest quantum steerability by Gaussian measurements in relation to the Peres conjecture. We also discuss our formulation for the case of distributing a two-mode squeezed state via one-way quantum channels making dissipation and amplification effects, respectively. Finally, we extend our approach to include non-Gaussian measurements, more precisely, all orders of higher-order squeezing measurements, and find that this broad set of non-Gaussian measurements is not useful to demonstrate steering for Gaussian states beyond Gaussian measurements.

  2. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Stuart F [Colorado School of Mines; Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  3. Higher-order finite-difference formulation of periodic Orbital-free Density Functional Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Swarnava

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a real-space formulation and higher-order finite-difference implementation of periodic Orbital-free Density Functional Theory (OF-DFT). Specifically, utilizing a local reformulation of the electrostatic and kernel terms, we develop a generalized framework suitable for performing OF-DFT simulations with different variants of the electronic kinetic energy. In particular, we develop a self-consistent field (SCF) type fixed-point method for calculations involving linear-response kinetic energy functionals. In doing so, we make the calculation of the electronic ground-state and forces on the nuclei amenable to computations that altogether scale linearly with the number of atoms. We develop a parallel implementation of this formulation using the finite-difference discretization, using which we demonstrate that higher-order finite-differences can achieve relatively large convergence rates with respect to mesh-size in both the energies and forces. Additionally, we establish that the fixed-point iteration c...

  4. Effects of uncertainty in SAPRC90 rate constants and selected product yields on reactivity adjustment factors for alternative fuel vehicle emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergin, M.S.; Russell, A.G.; Yang, Y.J.; Milford, J.B.; Kirchner, F.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropospheric ozone is formed in the atmosphere by a series of reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). While NOx emissions are primarily composed of only two compounds, nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), there are hundreds of different VOCs being emitted. In general, VOCs promote ozone formation, however, the rate and extent of ozone produced by the individual VOCs varies considerably. For example, it is widely acknowledged that formaldehyde (HCHO) is a very reactive VOC, and produces ozone rapidly and efficiently under most conditions. On the other hand, VOCs such as methane, ethane, propane, and methanol do not react as quickly, and are likely to form less urban ozone than a comparable mass of HCHO. The difference in ozone forming potential is one of the bases for the use of alternative fuels. The fuels considered in this study included compressed natural gas, LPG, mixtures of methanol and gasoline, ethanol and gasoline, and a reformulated gasoline.

  5. Quantum corrected non-thermal radiation spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subenoy Chakraborty; Subhajit Saha; Christian Corda

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH) emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda) introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking's periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  6. Metastring Theory and Modular Space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Freidel; Robert G. Leigh; Djordje Minic

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory is canonically accompanied with a space-time interpretation which determines S-matrix-like observables, and connects to the standard physics at low energies in the guise of local effective field theory. Recently, we have introduced a reformulation of string theory which does not rely on an {\\it a priori} space-time interpretation or a pre-assumption of locality. This \\hlt{metastring theory} is formulated in such a way that stringy symmetries (such as T-duality) are realized linearly. In this paper, we study metastring theory on a flat background and develop a variety of technical and interpretational ideas. These include a formulation of the moduli space of Lorentzian worldsheets, a careful study of the symplectic structure and consequently consistent closed and open boundary conditions, and the string spectrum and operator algebra. What emerges from these studies is a new quantum notion of space-time that we refer to as a quantum Lagrangian or equivalently a \\hlt{modular space-time}. This concept embodies the standard tenets of quantum theory and implements in a precise way a notion of {relative locality}. The usual string backgrounds (non-compact space-time along with some toroidally compactified spatial directions) are obtained from modular space-time by a limiting procedure that can be thought of as a correspondence limit.

  7. Petroleum Marketing Monthly, April 1995, with data for January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International crude oil prices rose moderately in January 1995, under the combined influences of lower production and higher demand. Crude oil output both from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and from non-OPEC nations declined from December levels due to a variety of causes, including severe weather in the North Sea and a platform explosion offshore Nigeria. At the same time, strong demand, especially from Asia, revised buying patterns and tightened markets worldwide. In the United States, reformulated gasoline (RFG) remained the dominant market influence, with the official start of the program at the retail level on January 1. Repercussions from the {open_quotes}opting out{close_quotes} of counties in Pennsylvania, New York, and Maine in December continued to disrupt supply patterns and confuse markets. Gasoline prices spiked at mid-month, but ended near where they began, while distillate prices declined due to warm weather and high inventories. A sharp seasonal decline in motor gasoline volumes led total refiner sales of the major petroleum products down 5.9 percent from December levels. January market and sales activity for crude oil and the principal petroleum products is summarized in the following sections.

  8. SU(4) harmonic superspace and supersymmetric gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Zupnik

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the harmonic-superspace formalism in the $N=4$ supersymmetry using the $SU(4)/SU(2)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ harmonics which was earlier applied to the abelian gauge theory. The N=4 non-abelian constraints in a standard superspace are reformulated as the harmonic-superspace equations for two basic analytic superfields: the independent superfield strength W of a dimension 1 and the dimensionless harmonic gauge 4-prepotential V having the $U(1)$ charge 2. These constraint equations I manifestly depend on the Grassmann coordinates $\\theta$, although they are covariant under the unusual N=4 supersymmetry transformations. We analyze an alternative harmonic formalism of the supergauge theory for two unconstrained nonabelian analytic superfields W and V. The gauge-invariant action A(W,V) in this formalism contains $\\theta$ factors in each term, it is invariant under the $SU(4)$ automorphism group. In this model, the interaction of two infinite-dimensional N=4 supermultiplets with the physical and auxiliary fields arises at the level of component fields. The action A(W,V) generate analytic equations of motion II alternative to the harmonic-superspace superfield constraints I. Both sets of equations give us the equivalent equations for the physical component fields of the $N=4$ gauge supermultiplet, they connect auxiliary and physical fields of two superfields. The nonlinear effective interaction of the abelian harmonic superfield W is constructed.

  9. Uncertainty quantification in reacting flow modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le MaÒitre, Olivier P. (UniversitÔe d'Evry Val d'Essonne, Evry, France); Reagan, Matthew T.; Knio, Omar M. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Ghanem, Roger Georges (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Najm, Habib N.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) in the computational modeling of physical systems is important for scientific investigation, engineering design, and model validation. In this work we develop techniques for UQ based on spectral and pseudo-spectral polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, and we apply these constructions in computations of reacting flow. We develop and compare both intrusive and non-intrusive spectral PC techniques. In the intrusive construction, the deterministic model equations are reformulated using Galerkin projection into a set of equations for the time evolution of the field variable PC expansion mode strengths. The mode strengths relate specific parametric uncertainties to their effects on model outputs. The non-intrusive construction uses sampling of many realizations of the original deterministic model, and projects the resulting statistics onto the PC modes, arriving at the PC expansions of the model outputs. We investigate and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and identify their utility under different conditions. We also outline areas where ongoing and future research are needed to address challenges with both approaches.

  10. Quantum theory and the role of mind in nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry P. Stapp

    2001-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Orthodox Copenhagen quantum theory renounces the quest to understand the reality in which we are imbedded, and settles for practical rules describing connections between our observations. Many physicist have regarded this renunciation of our effort to describe nature herself as premature, and John von Neumann reformulated quantum theory as a theory of an evolving objective universe interacting with human consciousness. This interaction is associated both in Copenhagen quantum theory and in von Neumann quantum theory with a sudden change that brings the objective physical state of a system in line with a subjectively felt psychical reality. The objective physical state is thereby converted from a material substrate to an informational and dispositional substrate that carries both the information incorporated into it by the psychical realities, and certain dispositions for the occurrence of future psychical realities. The present work examines and proposes solutions to two problems that have appeared to block the development of this conception of nature. The first problem is how to reconcile this theory with the principles of relativistic quantum field theory; the second problem is to understand whether, strictly within quantum theory, a person's mind can affect the activities of his brain, and if so how. Solving the first problem involves resolving a certain nonlocality question. The proposed solution to the second problem is based on a postulated connection between effort, attention, and the quantum Zeno effect. This solution explains on the basis of quantum physics a large amount of heretofore unexplained data amassed by psychologists.

  11. Theory versus experiment for vacuum Rabi oscillations in lossy cavities (II): Direct test of uniqueness of vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Wilczewski; Marek Czachor

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper continues the analysis of vacuum Rabi oscillations we started in Part I [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 79}, 033836 (2009)]. Here we concentrate on experimental consequences for cavity QED of two different classes of representations of harmonic oscillator Lie algebras. The zero-temperature master equation, derived in Part I for irreducible representations of the algebra, is reformulated in a reducible representation that models electromagnetic fields by a gas of harmonic oscillator wave packets. The representation is known to introduce automatic regularizations that in irreducible representations would have to be justified by ad hoc arguments. Predictions based on this representation are characterized in thermodynamic limit by a single parameter $\\varsigma$, responsible for collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations in exact vacuum. Collapses and revivals disappear in the limit $\\varsigma\\to\\infty$. Observation of a finite $\\varsigma$ would mean that cavity quantum fields are described by a non-Wightmanian theory, where vacuum states are zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates of a finite-particle bosonic oscillator gas and, thus, are non-unique. The data collected in the experiment of Brune {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf{76}}, 1800 (1996)] are consistent with any $\\varsigma>400$.

  12. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

  13. A Note on Quantum Security for Post-Quantum Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang Song

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shor's quantum factoring algorithm and a few other efficient quantum algorithms break many classical crypto-systems. In response, people proposed post-quantum cryptography based on computational problems that are believed hard even for quantum computers. However, security of these schemes against \\emph{quantum} attacks is elusive. This is because existing security analysis (almost) only deals with classical attackers and arguing security in the presence of quantum adversaries is challenging due to unique quantum features such as no-cloning. This work proposes a general framework to study which classical security proofs can be restored in the quantum setting. Basically, we split a security proof into (a sequence of) classical security reductions, and investigate what security reductions are "quantum-friendly". We characterize sufficient conditions such that a classical reduction can be "lifted" to the quantum setting. We then apply our lifting theorems to post-quantum signature schemes. We are able to show that the classical generic construction of hash-tree based signatures from one-way functions and and a more efficient variant proposed in~\\cite{BDH11} carry over to the quantum setting. Namely, assuming existence of (classical) one-way functions that are resistant to efficient quantum inversion algorithms, there exists a quantum-secure signature scheme. We note that the scheme in~\\cite{BDH11} is a promising (post-quantum) candidate to be implemented in practice and our result further justifies it. Finally we demonstrate the generality of our framework by showing that several existing works (Full-Domain hash in the quantum random-oracle model~\\cite{Zha12ibe} and the simple hybrid arguments framework in~\\cite{HSS11}) can be reformulated under our unified framework.

  14. On the equivalence of dynamically orthogonal and bi-orthogonal methods: Theory and numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minseok [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sapsis, Themistoklis P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george_karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Karhunen–Lòeve (KL) decomposition provides a low-dimensional representation for random fields as it is optimal in the mean square sense. Although for many stochastic systems of practical interest, described by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs), solutions possess this low-dimensional character, they also have a strongly time-dependent form and to this end a fixed-in-time basis may not describe the solution in an efficient way. Motivated by this limitation of standard KL expansion, Sapsis and Lermusiaux (2009) [26] developed the dynamically orthogonal (DO) field equations which allow for the simultaneous evolution of both the spatial basis where uncertainty ‘lives’ but also the stochastic characteristics of uncertainty. Recently, Cheng et al. (2013) [28] introduced an alternative approach, the bi-orthogonal (BO) method, which performs the exact same tasks, i.e. it evolves the spatial basis and the stochastic characteristics of uncertainty. In the current work we examine the relation of the two approaches and we prove theoretically and illustrate numerically their equivalence, in the sense that one method is an exact reformulation of the other. We show this by deriving a linear and invertible transformation matrix described by a matrix differential equation that connects the BO and the DO solutions. We also examine a pathology of the BO equations that occurs when two eigenvalues of the solution cross, resulting in an instantaneous, infinite-speed, internal rotation of the computed spatial basis. We demonstrate that despite the instantaneous duration of the singularity this has important implications on the numerical performance of the BO approach. On the other hand, it is observed that the BO is more stable in nonlinear problems involving a relatively large number of modes. Several examples, linear and nonlinear, are presented to illustrate the DO and BO methods as well as their equivalence.

  15. LIDEM unit for the production of methyl tert-butyl ether from butanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudin, M.G.; Zadvornov, M.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the basic problems in the production of motor fuels is how to obtain high-octane unleaded gasolines that will meet today`s ecological requirements. The term {open_quotes}reformulated gasolines{close_quotes} has come into general use throughout the world to denote fuels with a certain chemical composition. These gasolines consist of preselected components; as shown by worldwide experience, they must include oxygen-containing compounds that are distinguished by high octane numbers and low reactivities. Standards in effect in the United States, Japan, and certain Western European countries require that automotive gasolines must contain at least 2-4% by weight of oxygen-containing compounds (calculated as oxygen). In the last 15 years, in order to meet these requirements, production has been set up in various countries for the manufacture of high-octane oxygen-containing components known as oxygenates. The most common of these is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), obtained by etherification of isobutene by methanol. Process technology developed by this last organization was used as the basis for constructing a unit in the Nizhnekamskneftekhim Production Association and at the Mazheikyai Petroleum Refinery in Lithuania. MTBE production has been held back mainly by a shortage of isobutene, which is obtained mainly from butane-butene cuts produced in cat crackers. In order to alleviate this shortage, it has been proposed that MTBE should be obtained from saturated C{sub 4} hydrocarbons that are recovered in processing oilfield associated gas, and also in the refinery from primary distillation units, catalytic reformers, and hydrocrackers. A working design was developed in 1991-1992 by Lengiproneftekhim for a basically new combination unit designed for the processing of saturated C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, which has been termed the LIDEM unit (Leningrad - isomerization - dehydrogenation - MTBE).

  16. Detections of MTBE in surficial and bedrock aquifers in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grady, S.J. [Geological Survey, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was detected in 24% of water samples collected from surficial and bedrock aquifers in areas of New England. MTBE was the most frequently detected volatile organic compound among the 60 volatile chemicals analyzed and was present in 33 of 133 wells sampled from July 1993 through September 1995. The median MTBE concentration measured in ground-water samples was 0.45 microgram per liter and concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 microgram per liter. The network of wells sampled for MTBE consisted of 103 monitoring wells screened in surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers and 30 domestic-supply wells in fractured crystalline bedrock aquifers. Seventy-seven percent of all MTBE detections were from 26 shallow monitoring wells screened in surficial aquifers. MTBE was detected in42% of monitoring wells in urban areas. In agricultural areas, MTBE was detected i 8% (2 of 24) of wells and was not detected in undeveloped areas. Sixty-two percent of the MTBE detections in surficial aquifers were from wells within 0.25 mile of gasoline stations or underground gasoline storage tanks; all but one of these wells were in Connecticut and Massachusetts, where reformulated gasoline is used. MTBE was detected in 23% of deep domestic-supply wells that tapped fractured bedrock aquifers. MTBE was detected in bedrock wells only in Connecticut and Massachusetts; land use near the wells was suburban to rural, and none of the sampled bedrock wells were within 0.25 mile of a gasoline station.

  17. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Beckenbach, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R. [California State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  18. MTBE -- A global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlow, W.I.; Miller, K.D. Jr.; Liew, R.E. van [DeWitt and Co., Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is a major and familiar component of Reformulated and Oxygenated gasoline in the US. As such, it is essential to the success of the Clean Air Act programs now reaching a crescendo in major urban areas. In less than ten years, US MTBE capacity has grown from about 4,000 B/D to more than 200,000 B/D. Outside of the USA, its role is less widely understood. Although MTBE markets elsewhere are much less driven by legislation, they have seen the same spectacular growth prospects. Overall, about as much MTBE is used today overseas as in the US. To date, this has to be one of the petrochemical industry`s major success stories. Yet today, the MTBE industry stands at a crossroads, with the direction of future development uncertain at best. DeWitt`s gasoline and oxygenates team has closely observed the ups and downs of this market during most of its turbulent history. In this paper, the authors shall try to set down the major developments and prospects, with the personal familiarity of having been there when things changed. The story begins with a brief historical sketch, leading up to the identification of four critical periods in which major changes took place. The causes of today`s uncertainty lie in all of these stages, and are in a very real sense an example of the ``Law of Unintended consequences.`` Having set the stage, a cautious set of predictions will be put forth. These are neither as promising as proponents would like, nor as unpromising as some would tend to believe.

  19. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark J. Rigali; Mike L. Fulcher

    2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    During the reporting period, work continued on development of formulations using the materials down-selected from the initially identified contenders for the fibrous monolith wear resistant components. In the previous reporting period, a two-stage binder removal process was developed that resulted in prototype parts free of voids and other internal defects. During the current reporting period, work was performed to characterize the two-stage binder removal process for WC-Co based FM material systems. Use of this process has resulted in the fabrication of defect free sintered WC-Co FM bodies, with minimal free carbon porosity and densities approaching 100% theoretical. With the elimination of free carbon porosity and other binder removal process related defects, development work focused on optimizing the densification and eliminating defects observed in WC-Co based FM consolidated by pressureless sintering. Shrinkage of the monolithic core and shell materials used in the WC-Co based FM system was measured, and differences in material shrinkage were identified as a potential cause of cell boundary cracking observed in sintered parts. Re-formulation of material blends for this system was begun, with the goal of eliminating mechanical stresses during sintering by matching the volumetric shrinkage of the core and shell materials. Thirty-three 7/8 inch drill bit inserts (WC-Co(6%)/WC-Co(16%) FM) were hot pressed during the reporting period. Six of these inserts were delivered for field-testing by Superior Rock Bit during the upcoming reporting period. In addition, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiCN FM cutting tool inserts were fabricated, and cutting tests performed.

  20. State of Maine residential heating oil survey: 1994--1995 Season summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994--95 heating season approached with more attention to petroleum products than experienced in some time. This year, however, the focus was on transportation fuels with the introduction of reformulated gasolines scheduled for the first of 1995. Last year transportation fuels had been in the spotlight in the Northeast as well, for the ills experienced with a new winter mix for diesel fuel. Would RFG have the same dubious entrance as diesel`s winter mix? Would RFG implementation work and what effect would the change in stocks have on the refineries? With worries related to transportation fuels being recognized, would there be reason for concern with heating fuels? As the new year approached, the refineries seemed to have no problem with supplies and RFG stocks were eased in about the second week of December. In Maine, the southern half of the state was effected by the gasoline substitution but seven of Maine`s sixteen counties were directed to follow the recommended criteria. Since the major population concentration lies in the southern three counties, concern was real. Attention paid to emission testing had come to a head in the fall, and RFG complaints were likely. There have been years when snow and cold arrived by Thanksgiving Day. In northern Maine, snow easily covers the ground before the SHOPP survey begins. The fall slipped by with no great shocks in the weather. December was more of the same, as the weather continued to favor the public. Normally the third week in January is considered the coldest time in the year, but not this year. By the end of January, two days were recorded as being more typical of winter. By March and the end of the survey season, one could only recognize that there were perhaps a few cold days this winter. Fuel prices fluctuated little through the entire heating season. There were no major problems to report and demand never placed pressure on dealers.

  1. Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

  2. Feasibility of a fast inverse dose optimization algorithm for IMRT via matrix inversion without negative beamlet intensities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, S.P.; Chen, J.Z.; Battista, J.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics and Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario and London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for adaptive radiotherapy of the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms such as the conjugate gradient search, with positive beam weight constraints, generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We present here a direct solution of the inverse problem that does not yield unphysical negative beam weights. The objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reduced to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad-hoc constraints. The method has been demonstrated with a test phantom and a few clinical radiotherapy cases, using primary dose calculations. We achieve highly conformal primary dose distributions with very rapid optimization times. Typical optimization times for a single anatomical slice (two dimensional) (head and neck) using a LAPACK matrix inversion routine in a single processor desktop computer, are: 0.03 s for 500 beamlets; 0.28 s for 1000 beamlets; 3.1 s for 2000 beamlets; and 12 s for 3000 beamlets. Clinical implementation will require the additional time of a one-time precomputation of scattered radiation for all beamlets, but will not impact the optimization speed. In conclusion, the new method provides a fast and robust technique to find a global minimum that yields excellent results for the inverse planning of IMRT.

  3. [sup 27]Al NMR, GT-IR and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD characterization of fluorided alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCanio, E.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States) Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Bruno, J.W. (Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Nero, V.P.; Edwards, J.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New environmental legislation in the United States requiring reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels is making its necessary to develop better, alternative acid catalysts for alkylation and isomerization reactions, and for hydrotreating catalysts for sulfur and nitrogen removal from refinery streams. A series of F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples (wt % F = 0 to 20) has been studied using a combination of solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR, FT-IR, and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD techniques. Solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR is particularly sensitive to amorphous phases or small crystallites present on the catalyst surface, many of which cannot be detected by XRD. [sup 27]Al NMR shows the presence of three types of AlF[sub 3](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] species (with n varying between 0 and 3) on fluorided alumina. FT-IR studies of ethanol adsorption show that fluoride blocks the sites required for dissociative chemisorption of ethanol. A similar analysis of adsorbed pyridine shows an increase in the number of Broensted acid sites with the addition of up to 10 wt % fluoride. However, increasing the fluoride loading to 20 wt % decreases the number of Broensted acid sites. The TPD of ethanol-[sup 18]O from F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples shows that at low levels fluoride serves to block Lewis acid sites, but at higher levels its predominant role is to increase the Broensted acidity of the alumina surface. The pyridine adsorption and TPD experiments show that fluoride strengthens the remaining Lewis acid sites. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Carbon-Type Analysis and Comparison of Original and Reblended FACE Diesel Fuels (FACE 2, FACE 4, and FACE 7)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel blends, FD-2B, FD 4B, and FD-7B, and makes comparison of the new blends with the original FACE diesel blends, FD 2A, FD 4A, and FD-7A, respectively. Generally, FD-2A and FD-2B are more similar than the A and B blends of FD-4 and FD-7. The aromatic carbon content is roughly equivalent, although the new FACE blends have decreased monoaromatic content and increased di- and tri-cycloaromatic content, as well as a higher overall aromatic content, than the original FACE blends. The aromatic components of the new FACE blends generally have a higher alkyl substitution with longer alkyl substituents. The naphthenic and paraffinic contents remained relatively consistent. Based on aliphatic methyl and methylene carbon ratios, cetane numbers for FD-2A and -2B, and FD-7A and -7B are predicted to be consistent, while the cetane number for FD-4B is predicted to be higher than FD-4A. Overall, the new FACE fuel blends are fairly consistent with the original FACE fuel blends, but there are observable differences. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of the team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the use of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

  5. The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicola Scafetta

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system, which since Pythagoras of Samos (ca. 570-495 BC) is known as the music of the spheres, is briefly reviewed from the Renaissance up to contemporary research. Copernicus' heliocentric model from 1543 suggested that the planets of our solar system form a kind of mutually ordered and quasi-synchronized system. From 1596 to 1619 Kepler formulated preliminary mathematical relations of approximate commensurabilities among the planets, which were later reformulated in the Titius-Bode rule (1766-1772) that successfully predicted the orbital position of Ceres and Uranus. Following the discovery of the ~11 yr sunspot cycle, in 1859 Wolf suggested that the observed solar variability could be approximately synchronized with the orbital movements of Venus, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Modern research have further confirmed that: (1) the planetary orbital periods can be approximately deduced from a simple system of resonant frequencies; (2) the solar system oscillates with a specific set of gravitational frequencies, and many of them (e.g. within the range between 3 yr and 100 yr) can be approximately constructed as harmonics of a base period of ~178.38 yr; (3) solar and climate records are also characterized by planetary harmonics from the monthly to the millennia time scales. This short review concludes with an emphasis on the contribution of the author's research on the empirical evidences and physical modeling of both solar and climate variability based on astronomical harmonics. The general conclusion is that the solar system works as a resonator characterized by a specific harmonic planetary structure that synchronizes also the Sun's activity and the Earth's climate.

  6. Optimal Control of Quantum Dissipative Dynamics: Analytic solution for cooling the three level $?$ system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomo E. Sklarz; David J. Tannor; Navin Khaneja

    2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of optimal control of dissipative quantum dynamics. Although under most circumstances dissipation leads to an increase in entropy (or a decrease in purity) of the system, there is an important class of problems for which dissipation with external control can decrease the entropy (or increase the purity) of the system. An important example is laser cooling. In such systems, there is an interplay of the Hamiltonian part of the dynamics, which is controllable and the dissipative part of the dynamics, which is uncontrollable. The strategy is to control the Hamiltonian portion of the evolution in such a way that the dissipation causes the purity of the system to increase rather than decrease. The goal of this paper is to find the strategy that leads to maximal purity at the final time. Under the assumption that Hamiltonian control is complete and arbitrarily fast, we provide a general framework by which to calculate optimal cooling strategies. These assumptions lead to a great simplification, in which the control problem can be reformulated in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of $\\rho$, rather than $\\rho$ itself. By combining this formulation with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman theorem we are able to obtain an equation for the globaly optimal cooling strategy in terms of the spectrum of the density matrix. For the three-level $\\Lambda$ system, we provide a complete analytic solution for the optimal cooling strategy. For this system it is found that the optimal strategy does not exploit system coherences and is a 'greedy' strategy, in which the purity is increased maximally at each instant.

  7. A comparison of estimates of cost-effectiveness of alternative fuels and vehicles for reducing emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) is a measure of the monetary value of resources expended to obtain reductions in emissions of air pollutants. The CER can lead to selection of the most effective sequence of pollution reduction options. Derived with different methodologies and technical assumptions, CER estimates for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) have varied widely among pervious studies. In one of several explanations of LCER differences, this report uses a consistent basis for fuel price to re-estimate CERs for AFVs in reduction of emissions of criteria pollutants, toxics, and greenhouse gases. The re-estimated CERs for a given fuel type have considerable differences due to non-fuel costs and emissions reductions, but the CERs do provide an ordinal sense of cost-effectiveness. The category with CER less than $5,000 per ton includes compressed natural gas and ed Petroleum gas vehicles; and E85 flexible-fueled vehicles (with fuel mixture of 85 percent cellulose-derived ethanol in gasoline). The E85 system would be much less attractive if corn-derived ethanol were used. The CER for E85 (corn-derived) is higher with higher values placed on the reduction of gas emissions. CER estimates are relative to conventional vehicles fueled with Phase 1 California reformulated gasoline (RFG). The California Phase 2 RFG program will be implemented before significant market penetration by AFVs. CERs could be substantially greater if they are calculated incremental to the Phase 2 RFG program. Regression analysis suggests that different assumptions across studies can sometimes have predictable effects on the CER estimate of a particular AFV type. The relative differences in cost and emissions reduction assumptions can be large, and the effect of these differences on the CER estimate is often not predictable. Decomposition of CERs suggests that methodological differences can make large contributions to CER differences among studies.

  8. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  9. Quantum Field Theory in de Sitter Universe: Ambient Space Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Vahid Takook

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum field theory in the $4$-dimensional de Sitter space-time is constructed on a unique Bunch-Davies vacuum state in the ambient space formalism in a rigorous mathematical framework. This work is based on the group representation theory and the analyticity of the complexified pseudo-Riemannian manifolds. The unitary irreducible representations of de Sitter group and their corresponding Hilbert spaces are reformulated in the ambient space formalism. Defining the creation and annihilation operators, quantum field operators and their corresponding analytic two-point functions for various spin fields ($s=0,\\frac{1}{2},1,\\frac{3}{2}, 2$) have been constructed. The various spin massless fields can be constructed in terms of the massless conformally coupled scalar field in this formalism. Then the quantum massless minimally coupled scalar field operator, for the first time, is also constructed on Bunch-Davies vacuum state which preserve the analyticity. We show that the massless fields with $s\\leq 2$ can only propagate in de Sitter ambient space formalism. The massless gauge invariant field equations with $s=1, \\frac{3}{2}, 2$ are studied by using the gauge principle. The conformal quantum spin-$2$ field, based on the gauge gravity model, is studied. The gauge spin-$\\frac{3}{2}$ fields satisfy the Grassmannian algebra, and hence, naturally provoke one to couple them with the gauge spin-$2$ field and the super-algebra is automatically appeared. We conclude that the gravitational field may be constructed by three parts, namely, the de Sitter background, the gauge spin-$2$ field and the gauge spin-$\\frac{3}{2}$ field.

  10. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, M.R.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  11. An improved multipole approximation for self-gravity and its importance for core-collapse supernova simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couch, Sean M.; Graziani, Carlo; Flocke, Norbert, E-mail: smc@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-gravity computation by multipole expansion is a common approach in problems such as core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae, where single large condensations of mass must be treated. The standard formulation of multipole self-gravity in arbitrary coordinate systems suffers from two significant sources of error, which we correct in the formulation presented in this article. The first source of error is due to the numerical approximation that effectively places grid cell mass at the central point of the cell, then computes the gravitational potential at that point, resulting in a convergence failure of the multipole expansion. We describe a new scheme that avoids this problem by computing gravitational potential at cell faces. The second source of error is due to sub-optimal choice of location for the expansion center, which results in angular power at high multipole l values in the gravitational field, requiring a high—and expensive—value of multipole cutoff l {sub max}. By introducing a global measure of angular power in the gravitational field, we show that the optimal coordinate for the expansion is the square-density-weighted mean location. We subject our new multipole self-gravity algorithm, implemented in the FLASH simulation framework, to two rigorous test problems: MacLaurin spheroids for which exact analytic solutions are known, and core-collapse supernovae. We show that key observables of the core-collapse simulations, particularly shock expansion, proto-neutron star motion, and momentum conservation, are extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the multipole gravity, and the accuracy of their computation is greatly improved by our reformulated solver.

  12. State of heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    California is unique in the United States because it has the largest heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees}API gravity) resource, estimated to be in excess of 40 billion barrels. Of the current 941,543 barrels/day of oil produced in California (14% of the U.S. total), 70% or 625,312 barrels/day is heavy oil. Heavy oil constituted only 20% of California`s oil production in the early 1940s, but development of thermal oil production technology in the 1960s allowed the heavy industry to grow and prosper to the point where by the mid-1980s, heavy oil constituted 70% of the state`s oil production. Similar to the rest of the United States, light oil production in the Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Region, and San Joaquin Valley peaked and then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Unlike other states, California developed a heavy oil industry that replaced declining light oil production and increased the states total oil production, despite low heavy oil prices, stringent environmental regulations and long and costly delays in developing known oil resources. California`s deep conversion refineries process the nation`s highest sulfur, lowest API gravity crude to make the cleanest transportation fuels available. More efficient vehicles burning cleaner reformulated fuels have significantly reduced the level of ozone precursors (the main contributor to California`s air pollution) and have improved air quality over the last 20 years. In a state where major oil companies dominate, the infrastructure is highly dependent on the 60% of ANS production being refined in California, and California`s own oil production. When this oil is combined with the small volume of imported crude, a local surplus of marketed oil exists that inhibits exploitation of California`s heavy oil resources. As ANS production declines, or if the export restrictions on ANS sales are lifted, a window of opportunity develops for increased heavy oil production.

  13. TIDAL DISSIPATION COMPARED TO SEISMIC DISSIPATION: IN SMALL BODIES, EARTHS, AND SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil [U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    While the seismic quality factor and phase lag are defined solely by the bulk properties of the mantle, their tidal counterparts are determined by both the bulk properties and the size effect (self-gravitation of a body as a whole). For a qualitative estimate, we model the body with a homogeneous sphere, and express the tidal phase lag through the lag in a sample of material. Although simplistic, our model is sufficient to understand that the lags are not identical. The difference emerges because self-gravitation pulls the tidal bulge down. At low frequencies, this reduces strain and the damping rate, making tidal damping less efficient in larger objects. At higher frequencies, competition between self-gravitation and rheology becomes more complex, though for sufficiently large super-Earths the same rule applies: the larger the planet, the weaker the tidal dissipation in it. Being negligible for small terrestrial planets and moons, the difference between the seismic and tidal lagging (and likewise between the seismic and tidal damping) becomes very considerable for large exoplanets (super-Earths). In those, it is much lower than what one might expect from using a seismic quality factor. The tidal damping rate deviates from the seismic damping rate, especially in the zero-frequency limit, and this difference takes place for bodies of any size. So the equal in magnitude but opposite in sign tidal torques, exerted on one another by the primary and the secondary, have their orbital averages going smoothly through zero as the secondary crosses the synchronous orbit. We describe the mantle rheology with the Andrade model, allowing it to lean toward the Maxwell model at the lowest frequencies. To implement this additional flexibility, we reformulate the Andrade model by endowing it with a free parameter {zeta} which is the ratio of the anelastic timescale to the viscoelastic Maxwell time of the mantle. Some uncertainty in this parameter's frequency dependence does not influence our principal conclusions.

  14. Surface tension of multi-phase flow with multiple junctions governed by the variational principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani; Kota Nakano; Katsuhiko Shinjo

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a computational model of an incompressible fluid with a multi-phase field in three-dimensional Euclidean space. By investigating an incompressible fluid with a two-phase field geometrically, we reformulate the expression of the surface tension for the two-phase field found by Lafaurie, Nardone, Scardovelli, Zaleski and Zanetti (J. Comp. Phys. \\vol{113} \\yr{1994} \\pages{134-147}) as a variational problem related to an infinite dimensional Lie group, the volume-preserving diffeomorphism. The variational principle to the action integral with the surface energy reproduces their Euler equation of the two-phase field with the surface tension. Since the surface energy of multiple interfaces even with singularities is not difficult to be evaluated in general and the variational formulation works for every action integral, the new formulation enables us to extend their expression to that of a multi-phase ($N$-phase, $N\\ge2$) flow and to obtain a novel Euler equation with the surface tension of the multi-phase field. The obtained Euler equation governs the equation of motion of the multi-phase field with different surface tension coefficients without any difficulties for the singularities at multiple junctions. In other words, we unify the theory of multi-phase fields which express low dimensional interface geometry and the theory of the incompressible fluid dynamics on the infinite dimensional geometry as a variational problem. We apply the equation to the contact angle problems at triple junctions. We computed the fluid dynamics for a two-phase field with a wall numerically and show the numerical computational results that for given surface tension coefficients, the contact angles are generated by the surface tension as results of balances of the kinematic energy and the surface energy.

  15. Transfer operators and topological field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Ovchinnikov

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer operator (TO) formalism of the dynamical systems (DS) theory is reformulated here in terms of the recently proposed cohomological theory (ChT) of stochastic differential equations (SDE). It turns out that the stochastically generalized TO (GTO) of the DS theory is the finite-time ChT Fokker-Planck evolution operator. As a result comes the supersymmetric trivialization of the so-called sharp trace and sharp determinant of the GTO, with the former being the Witten index of the ChT. Moreover, the Witten index is also the stochastic generalization of the Lefschetz index so that it equals the Euler characteristic of the (closed) phase space for any flow vector field, noise metric, and temperature. The enabled possibility to apply the spectral theorems of the DS theory to the ChT Fokker-Planck operators allows to extend the previous picture of the spontaneous topological supersymmetry (Q-symmetry) breaking onto the situations with negative ground state's attenuation rate. The later signifies the exponential growth of the number of periodic solutions/orbits in the large time limit, which is the unique feature of chaotic behavior proving that the spontaneous breakdown of Q-symmetry is indeed the field-theoretic definition and stochastic generalization of the concept of deterministic chaos. In addition, the previously proposed low-temperature classification of SDE's, i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium / noise-induced chaos ((anti-)instanton condensation) / ordinary chaos (non-integrability), is complemented by the discussion of the high-temperature regime where the sharp boundary between the noise-induced and ordinary chaotic phases must smear out into a crossover, and at even higher temperatures the Q-symmetry is restored. An unambiguous resolution of the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma in favor of the Stratonovich approach and/or Weyl quantization is also presented.

  16. Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Lee, H.

    2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang et al. 1997; Wang et al. 1999; Levelton Engineering et al. 1999; Shapouri et al. 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in the types of diesel engines that will likely be targeted first in the marketplace. This report documents the results of our study. The draft report was delivered to DCCA in January 2003. This final report incorporates revisions by the sponsor and by Argonne.

  17. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU analyses. Additionally, current analyses suggest that the NUREG-1465 release fractions are conservative by about a factor of 2 in terms of release fractions and that release durations for in-vessel and late in-vessel release periods are in fact longer than the NUREG-1465 durations. It is currently planned that a subsequent report will further characterize these results using more refined statistical methods, permitting a more precise reformulation of the NUREG-1465 alternative source term for both LBU and HBU fuels, with the most important finding being that the NUREG-1465 formula appears to embody significant conservatism compared to current best-estimate analyses.

  18. Ultra-Clean Diesel Fuel: U.S. Production and Distribution Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel engines have potential for use in a large number of future vehicles in the US. However, to achieve this potential, proponents of diesel engine technologies must solve diesel's pollution problems, including objectionable levels of emissions of particulates and oxides of nitrogen. To meet emissions reduction goals, diesel fuel quality improvements could enable diesel engines with advanced aftertreatment systems to achieve the necessary emissions performance. The diesel fuel would most likely have to be reformulated to be as clean as low sulfur gasoline. This report examines the small- and large-market extremes for introduction of ultra-clean diesel fuel in the US and concludes that petroleum refinery and distribution systems could produce adequate low sulfur blendstocks to satisfy small markets for low sulfur (30 parts per million) light duty diesel fuel, and deliver that fuel to retail consumers with only modest changes. Initially, there could be poor economic returns on under-utilized infrastructure investments. Subsequent growth in the diesel fuel market could be inconsistent with U.S. refinery configurations and economics. As diesel fuel volumes grow, the manufacturing cost may increase, depending upon how hydrodesulfurization technologies develop, whether significantly greater volumes of the diesel pool have to be desulfurized, to what degree other properties like aromatic levels have to be changed, and whether competitive fuel production technologies become economic. Low sulfur (10 parts per million) and low aromatics (10 volume percent) diesel fuel for the total market could require desulfurization, dearomatization, and hydrogen production investments amounting to a third of current refinery market value. The refinery capital cost component alone would be 3 cents per gallon of diesel fuel. Outside of refineries, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant investment cost would be 3 to 6 cents per gallon. With total projected investments of $11.8 billion (6 to 9 cents per gallon) for the U.S. Gulf Coast alone, financing, engineering, and construction and material availability are major issues that must be addressed, for both refinery and GTL investments.

  19. Cartan gravity, matter fields, and the gauge principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westman, Hans F., E-mail: hwestman74@gmail.com [Imperial College Theoretical Physics, Huxley Building, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Zlosnik, Tom G., E-mail: t.zlosnik@imperial.ac.uk [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-B, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity is commonly thought of as one of the four force fields in nature. However, in standard formulations its mathematical structure is rather different from the Yang–Mills fields of particle physics that govern the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions. This paper explores this dissonance with particular focus on how gravity couples to matter from the perspective of the Cartan-geometric formulation of gravity. There the gravitational field is represented by a pair of variables: (1) a ‘contact vector’ V{sup A} which is geometrically visualized as the contact point between the spacetime manifold and a model spacetime being ‘rolled’ on top of it, and (2) a gauge connection A{sub ?}{sup AB}, here taken to be valued in the Lie algebra of SO(2,3) or SO(1,4), which mathematically determines how much the model spacetime is rotated when rolled. By insisting on two principles, the gauge principle and polynomial simplicity, we shall show how one can reformulate matter field actions in a way that is harmonious with Cartan’s geometric construction. This yields a formulation of all matter fields in terms of first order partial differential equations. We show in detail how the standard second order formulation can be recovered. In particular, the Hodge dual, which characterizes the structure of bosonic field equations, pops up automatically. Furthermore, the energy–momentum and spin-density three-forms are naturally combined into a single object here denoted the spin-energy–momentum three-form. Finally, we highlight a peculiarity in the mathematical structure of our first-order formulation of Yang–Mills fields. This suggests a way to unify a U(1) gauge field with gravity into a SO(1,5)-valued gauge field using a natural generalization of Cartan geometry in which the larger symmetry group is spontaneously broken down to SO(1,3)×U(1). The coupling of this unified theory to matter fields and possible extensions to non-Abelian gauge fields are left as open questions. -- Highlights: •Develops Cartan gravity to include matter fields. •Coupling to gravity is done using the standard gauge prescription. •Matter actions are manifestly polynomial in all field variables. •Standard equations recovered on-shell for scalar, spinor and Yang–Mills fields. •Unification of a U(1) field with gravity based on the orthogonal group SO(1,5)

  20. Fuel-cycle assessment of selected bioethanol production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Hong, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large amount of corn stover is available in the U.S. corn belt for the potential production of cellulosic bioethanol when the production technology becomes commercially ready. In fact, because corn stover is already available, it could serve as a starting point for producing cellulosic ethanol as a transportation fuel to help reduce the nation's demand for petroleum oil. Using the data available on the collection and transportation of corn stover and on the production of cellulosic ethanol, we have added the corn stover-to-ethanol pathway in the GREET model, a fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory. We then analyzed the life-cycle energy use and emission impacts of corn stover-derived fuel ethanol for use as E85 in flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). The analysis included fertilizer manufacturing, corn farming, farming machinery manufacturing, stover collection and transportation, ethanol production, ethanol transportation, and ethanol use in light-duty vehicles (LDVs). Energy consumption of petroleum oil and fossil energy, emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}], nitrous oxide [N{sub 2}O], and methane [CH{sub 4}]), and emissions of criteria pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], volatile organic compounds [VOCs], nitrogen oxide [NO{sub x}], sulfur oxide [SO{sub x}], and particulate matter with diameters smaller than 10 micrometers [PM{sub 10}]) during the fuel cycle were estimated. Scenarios of ethanol from corn grain, corn stover, and other cellulosic feedstocks were then compared with petroleum reformulated gasoline (RFG). Results showed that FFVs fueled with corn stover ethanol blends offer substantial energy savings (94-95%) relative to those fueled with RFG. For each Btu of corn stover ethanol produced and used, 0.09 Btu of fossil fuel is required. The cellulosic ethanol pathway avoids 86-89% of greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike the life cycle of corn grain-based ethanol, in which the ethanol plant consumes most of the fossil fuel, farming consumes most of the fossil fuel in the life cycle of corn stover-based ethanol.

  1. Lithium Ion Cell Development for Photovoltaic Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Babinec

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall project goal is to reduce the cost of home and neighborhood photovoltaic storage systems by reducing the single largest cost component â?? the energy storage cells. Solar power is accepted as an environmentally advantaged renewable power source. Its deployment in small communities and integrated into the grid, requires a safe, reliable and low cost energy storage system. The incumbent technology of lead acid cells is large, toxic to produce and dispose of, and offer limited life even with significant maintenance. The ideal PV storage battery would have the safety and low cost of lead acid but the performance of lithium ion chemistry. Present lithium ion batteries have the desired performance but cost and safety remain the two key implementation barriers. The purpose of this project is to develop new lithium ion cells that can meet PVES cost and safety requirements using A123Systems phosphate-based cathode chemistries in commercial PHEV cell formats. The cost target is a cell design for a home or neighborhood scale at <$25/kWh. This DOE program is the continuation and expansion of an initial MPSC (Michigan Public Service Commission) program towards this goal. This program further pushes the initial limits of some aspects of the original program â?? even lower cost anode and cathode actives implemented at even higher electrode loadings, and as well explores new avenues of cost reduction via new materials â?? specifically our higher voltage cathode. The challenge in our materials development is to achieve parity in the performance metrics of cycle life and high temperature storage, and to produce quality materials at the production scale. Our new cathode material, M1X, has a higher voltage and so requires electrolyte reformulation to meet the high temperature storage requirements. The challenge of thick electrode systems is to maintain adequate adhesion and cycle life. The composite separator has been proven in systems having standard loading electrodes; the challenge with this material will be to maintain proven performance when this composite is coated onto a thicker electrode; as well the high temperature storage must meet application requirements. One continuing program challenge was the lack of specific performance variables for this PV application and so the low power requirements of PHEV/EV transportation markets were again used.

  2. POLYETHYLENE ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyethylene microencapsulation physically homogenizes and incorporates mixed waste particles within a molten polymer matrix, forming a solidified final waste form upon cooling. Each individual particle of waste is embedded within the polymer block and is surrounded by a durable, leach-resistant coating. The process has been successfully applied for the treatment of a broad range of mixed wastes, including evaporator concentrate salts, soil, sludges, incinerator ash, off-gas blowdown solutions, decontamination solutions, molten salt oxidation process residuals, ion exchange resins, granular activated carbon, shredded dry active waste, spill clean-up residuals, depleted uranium powders, and failed grout waste forms. For waste streams containing high concentrations of soluble toxic metal contaminants, additives can be used to further reduce leachability, thus improving waste loadings while meeting or exceeding regulatory disposal criteria. In this configuration, contaminants are both chemically stabilized and physically solidified, making the process a true stabilization/solidification (S/S) technology. Unlike conventional hydraulic cement grouts or thermosetting polymers, thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene require no chemical. reaction for solidification. Thus, a stable, solid, final waste form product is assured on cooling. Variations in waste chemistry over time do not affect processing parameters and do not require reformulation of the recipe. Incorporation of waste particles within the polymer matrix serves as an aggregate and improves the mechanical strength and integrity of the waste form. The compressive strength of polyethylene microencapsulated waste forms varies based on the type and quantity of waste encapsulated, but is typically between 7 and 17.2 MPa (1000 and 2500 psi), well above the minimum strength of 0.4 MPa (160 psi) recommended by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for low-level radioactive waste forms in support of 10 CFR 61 (NRC, 1991; 1983) Because polyethylene is a relatively new material, it is difficult to predict its long-term durability. However, prior to scale-up of the microencapsulation process, a study was conducted to evaluate potential degradation mechanisms. The study examined potential effects on mechanical integrity from exposure to chemicals and solvents, thermal cycling, saturated environments, microbial attack, and high gamma-radiation fields (Kalb et al., 1991). At ambient temperatures, polyethylene is relatively inert to most chemicals, including organic solvents, acids, and alkaline solutions. Exposure to changes in temperature or saturated soil conditions have been shown to degrade the mechanical integrity of some waste forms, but had little or no measurable impact on polyethylene waste forms. Low-density polyethylene is not susceptible to growth of microbial organisms, a fact that is evidenced by the lack of plastics decomposition in municipal waste landfills. When exposed to gamma-radiation at total doses of up to lo8 rad, additional cross-linking of the polymer occurs, resulting in increased strength and lower leachability.

  3. Partition-of-unity finite-element method for large scale quantum molecular dynamics on massively parallel computational platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pask, J E; Sukumar, N; Guney, M; Hu, W

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of the past two decades, quantum mechanical calculations have emerged as a key component of modern materials research. However, the solution of the required quantum mechanical equations is a formidable task and this has severely limited the range of materials systems which can be investigated by such accurate, quantum mechanical means. The current state of the art for large-scale quantum simulations is the planewave (PW) method, as implemented in now ubiquitous VASP, ABINIT, and QBox codes, among many others. However, since the PW method uses a global Fourier basis, with strictly uniform resolution at all points in space, and in which every basis function overlaps every other at every point, it suffers from substantial inefficiencies in calculations involving atoms with localized states, such as first-row and transition-metal atoms, and requires substantial nonlocal communications in parallel implementations, placing critical limits on scalability. In recent years, real-space methods such as finite-differences (FD) and finite-elements (FE) have been developed to address these deficiencies by reformulating the required quantum mechanical equations in a strictly local representation. However, while addressing both resolution and parallel-communications problems, such local real-space approaches have been plagued by one key disadvantage relative to planewaves: excessive degrees of freedom (grid points, basis functions) needed to achieve the required accuracies. And so, despite critical limitations, the PW method remains the standard today. In this work, we show for the first time that this key remaining disadvantage of real-space methods can in fact be overcome: by building known atomic physics into the solution process using modern partition-of-unity (PU) techniques in finite element analysis. Indeed, our results show order-of-magnitude reductions in basis size relative to state-of-the-art planewave based methods. The method developed here is completely general, applicable to any crystal symmetry and to both metals and insulators alike. We have developed and implemented a full self-consistent Kohn-Sham method, including both total energies and forces for molecular dynamics, and developed a full MPI parallel implementation for large-scale calculations. We have applied the method to the gamut of physical systems, from simple insulating systems with light atoms to complex d- and f-electron systems, requiring large numbers of atomic-orbital enrichments. In every case, the new PU FE method attained the required accuracies with substantially fewer degrees of freedom, typically by an order of magnitude or more, than the current state-of-the-art PW method. Finally, our initial MPI implementation has shown excellent parallel scaling of the most time-critical parts of the code up to 1728 processors, with clear indications of what will be required to achieve comparable scaling for the rest. Having shown that the key remaining disadvantage of real-space methods can in fact be overcome, the work has attracted significant attention: with sixteen invited talks, both domestic and international, so far; two papers published and another in preparation; and three new university and/or national laboratory collaborations, securing external funding to pursue a number of related research directions. Having demonstrated the proof of principle, work now centers on the necessary extensions and optimizations required to bring the prototype method and code delivered here to production applications.

  4. Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and durability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engines have been used extensively to power almost all highway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine carriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35 to 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon Dioxides), which have been implicated in global warming. Although the emissions of CIDI engines have been reduced significantly over the last decade, there remains concern with the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) and Particulate Matter (PM) emission levels. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulations. Meeting the Tier II standards requires NOX and PM emissions to be reduced dramatically. Achieving such low emissions while minimizing fuel economy penalty cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOX and PM aftertreatment control devices. A joint effort was made between Cummins Inc. and the Department of Energy to develop the generic aftertreatment subsystem technologies applicable for Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) and Light-Duty Truck (LDT) engines. This paper provides an update on the progress of this joint development program. Three NOX reduction technologies including plasmaassisted catalytic NOX reduction (PACR), active lean NOX catalyst (LNC), and adsorber catalyst (AC) technology using intermittent rich conditions for NOX reduction were investigated in parallel in an attempt to select the best NOX control approach for light-duty aftertreatment subsystem integration and development. Investigations included system design and analysis, critical lab/engine experiments, and ranking then selection of NOX control technologies against reliability, up-front cost, fuel economy, service interval/serviceability, and size/weight. The results of the investigations indicate that the best NOX control approach for LDV and LDT applications is a NOX adsorber system. A greater than 83% NOX reduction efficiency is required to achieve 0.07g/mile NOX Tier II vehicle-out emissions. Both active lean NOX and PACR technology are currently not capable of achieving the high conversion efficiency required for Tier II, Bin 5 emissions standards. In this paper, the NOX technology assessment and selection is first reviewed and discussed. Development of the selected NOX technology (NOX adsorber) and PM control are then discussed in more detail. Discussion includes exhaust sulfur management, further adsorber formulation development, reductant screening, diesel particulate filter development & active regeneration, and preliminary test results on the selected integrated SOX trap, NOX adsorber, and diesel particulate filter system over an FTP-75 emissions cycle, and its impact on fuel economy. Finally, the direction of future work for continued advanced aftertreatment technology development is discussed. (SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-1867 © 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  5. WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LAW GLASSES VLS-10R1790-1 FINAL REPORT REV 0 12/1/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MULLER IS; JOSEPH I; MATLACK KS; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW pilot melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing the glass waste loading; and (4) Operating the melter at a slightly higher temperature. The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA) and Energy Solutions, Inc. have evaluated several of these potential incremental improvements for ORP in support of its evaluation of WTP LAW facility optimization. Some of these incremental improvements have been tested at VSL including increasing the waste loading, increasing the processing temperature, and increasing the fraction of the sulfur in the feed that is partitioned to the off-gas (in the event that a decision is made to break the present WTP recycle loop). These approaches successfully demonstrated increases in glass production rates and significant increases in sulfate incorporation at the nominal melter operating temperature of 1150 C and at slightly higher than nominal glass processing temperatures. Subsequent tests demonstrated further enhancement of glass formulations for all of the LAW waste envelopes, thereby reducing the amount of glass to be produced by the WTP for the same amount of waste processed. The next phase of testing determined the applicability of these improvements over the expected range of sodium and sulfur concentrations for Hanford LAW. This approach was subsequently applied to an even wider range of LAW wastes types, including those with high potassium concentration. The feasibility of formulating higher waste loading glasses using SnO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in place of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} as glass former additives was also evaluated. The present report provides data from investigation of the effects of magnesium content (up to {approx}10 wt%) on LAW glass properties and from work to identify improved high waste loading glass formulations that meets all processing and product quality requirements for two waste compositions. The scope of testing is detailed in the Test Plan for this work. A glass composition previously developed and tested at VSL for LAW from tank AN-105 (LAWA187) was varied by substituting Mg for other glass former additives such as Ca, B and Si in an attempt to formulate a glass with improved properties, such as higher waste loading and greater sulfur tolerance. The results were used to reformulate another glass (ORPLG9) developed for LAW from tank AP-101 that contains high concentrations of alkalis (Na and K). Glass formulation goals for this waste were to increase the sulfur tolerance of the