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Sample records for reformulated rbob mgbc

  1. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other

  2. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor

  3. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Normal Butane/Butylene Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional

  4. Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, as of Dec. 31

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Normal Butane/Butylene Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional

  5. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  6. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated

  7. Reformulated gasoline quality issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Felch, D.E.; Edgar, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    One year ago, a panel of industry experts were interviewed in the November/December 1994 issue of Fuel Reformulation (Vol. 4, No. 6). With the focus then and now on refinery investments, the panelists were asked to forecast which refining processes would grow in importance. It is apparent from their response, and from other articles and discussions throughout the year, that hydroprocessing and catalytic conversion processes are synergistic in the overall refinery design, with flexibility and process objectives varying on a unit-by-unit case. To an extent, future refinery investments in downstream petrochemicals, such as for paraxylene production, are based on available catalytic reforming feedstock. Just a importantly, hydroprocessing units (hydrotreating, hydrocracking) needed for clean fuel production (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel), are heavily dependent on hydrogen production from the catalytic reformer. Catalytic reforming`s significant influence in the refinery hydrogen balance, as well as its status as a significant naphtha conversion route to higher-quality fuels, make this unit a high-priority issue for engineers and planners striving for flexibility.

  8. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reformulated Gasoline Program Contents * Introduction * Mandated RFG Program Areas o Table 1. Mandated RFG Program Areas * RFG Program Opt-In Areas o Table 2. RFG Program Opt-In Areas * RFG Program Opt-Out Procedures and Areas o Table 3. History of EPA Rulemaking on Opt-Out Procedures o Table 4. RFG Program Opt-Out Areas * State Programs o Table 5. State Reformulated Gasoline Programs * Endnotes Spreadsheets Referenced in this Article * Reformulated Gasoline Control Area Populations Related EIA

  9. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  10. Reformulated gasoline deal with Venezuela draws heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begley, R.

    1994-04-06

    A fight is brewing in Congress over a deal to let Venezuela off the hook in complying with the Clean Air Act reformulated gasoline rule. When Venezuela threatened to call for a GATT panel to challenge the rule as a trade barrier, the Clinton Administration negotiated to alter the rule, a deal that members of Congress are characterizing as {open_quotes}secret{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}back door.{close_quotes}

  11. Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished

  12. Prompt-Month Energy Futures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished

  13. DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel May 19, 2006 - 10:46am Addthis Available free of Licensing Fees, Cleaner for the Environment WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that it has developed, patented, and made commercially available reformulated diesel fuels which when used can reduce nitrogen oxides up to 10% and particulate matter up to 22% compared to those currently available. The diesel fuel formulations covered

  14. ,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...www.eia.govdnavpetpetprirefmg2cnusepm0rdpgalm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ... Reformulated Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Dollars per ...

  15. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States (Cents per...

  16. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States (Cents per...

  17. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  18. Efficient Conservative Reformulation Schemes for Lithium Intercalation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urisanga, PC; Rife, D; De, S; Subramanian, VR

    2015-02-18

    Porous electrode theory coupled with transport and reaction mechanisms is a widely used technique to model Li-ion batteries employing an appropriate discretization or approximation for solid phase diffusion with electrode particles. One of the major difficulties in simulating Li-ion battery models is the need to account for solid phase diffusion in a second radial dimension r, which increases the computation time/cost to a great extent. Various methods that reduce the computational cost have been introduced to treat this phenomenon, but most of them do not guarantee mass conservation. The aim of this paper is to introduce an inherently mass conserving yet computationally efficient method for solid phase diffusion based on Lobatto III A quadrature. This paper also presents coupling of the new solid phase reformulation scheme with a macro-homogeneous porous electrode theory based pseudo 20 model for Li-ion battery. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  19. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    1999-09-28

    A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

  20. DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel May 19, 2006 - 10:46am Addthis Available free of Licensing Fees, Cleaner for the Environment WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of...

  1. Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o

  2. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  3. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gasoline in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining industry.

  4. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61.5 70.8 92.7 90.7 81.5 72.8 - 78.0 See footnotes at end of table. 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 146 Energy Information...

  5. Table 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    62.6 71.7 92.3 89.9 82.6 72.7 - 78.2 See footnotes at end of table. 34. Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 146 Energy Information...

  6. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chornet, Esteban (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-09

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  7. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, RBOB grew out of suppliers inability to ship ethanol, or gasoline containing ethanol, through pipelines. Now that nearly all RFG, which...

  8. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  9. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92.8 92.5 84.0 72.5 W 80.7 See footnotes at end of table. 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 24 Energy Information Administration ...

  10. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92.4 92.1 83.7 74.1 W 80.9 See footnotes at end of table. 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 24 Energy Information Administration ...

  11. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.6 3.7 7.9 3.1 W 11.0 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  12. A Simply Constrained Optimization Reformulation of KKT Systems Arising from Variational Inequalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facchinei, F. Fischer, A. Kanzow, C. Peng, J.-M.

    1999-01-15

    The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions can be regarded as optimality conditions for both variational inequalities and constrained optimization problems. In order to overcome some drawbacks of recently proposed reformulations of KKT systems, we propose casting KKT systems as a minimization problem with nonnegativity constraints on some of the variables. We prove that, under fairly mild assumptions, every stationary point of this constrained minimization problem is a solution of the KKT conditions. Based on this reformulation, a new algorithm for the solution of the KKT conditions is suggested and shown to have some strong global and local convergence properties.

  13. Estimating Impacts of Diesel Fuel Reformulation with Vector-based Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2003-01-23

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the refining cost, investment, and operating impacts of specifications for reformulated diesel fuel (RFD) produced in refineries of the U.S. Midwest in summer of year 2010. The study evaluates different diesel fuel reformulation investment pathways. The study also determines whether there are refinery economic benefits for producing an emissions reduction RFD (with flexibility for individual property values) compared to a vehicle performance RFD (with inflexible recipe values for individual properties). Results show that refining costs are lower with early notice of requirements for RFD. While advanced desulfurization technologies (with low hydrogen consumption and little effect on cetane quality and aromatics content) reduce the cost of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel, these technologies contribute to the increased costs of a delayed notice investment pathway compared to an early notice investment pathway for diesel fuel reformulation. With challenging RFD specifications, there is little refining benefit from producing emissions reduction RFD compared to vehicle performance RFD. As specifications become tighter, processing becomes more difficult, blendstock choices become more limited, and refinery benefits vanish for emissions reduction relative to vehicle performance specifications. Conversely, the emissions reduction specifications show increasing refinery benefits over vehicle performance specifications as specifications are relaxed, and alternative processing routes and blendstocks become available. In sensitivity cases, the refinery model is also used to examine the impact of RFD specifications on the economics of using Canadian synthetic crude oil. There is a sizeable increase in synthetic crude demand as ultra low sulfur diesel fuel displaces low sulfur diesel fuel, but this demand increase would be reversed by requirements for diesel fuel reformulation.

  14. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-29

    This report is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. The second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

  15. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-28

    This report is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. This second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

  16. Energy and crude oil input requirements for the production of reformulated gasolines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; McNutt, B.

    1993-10-01

    The energy and crude oil requirements for the production of reformulated gasoline (RFG) are estimated. The scope of the study includes both the energy and crude oil embodied in the final product and the process energy required to manufacture the RFG and its components. The effects on energy and crude oil use of employing various oxygenates to meet the minimum oxygen-content level required by the Clean Air Act Amendments are evaluated. The analysis shows that production of RFG requires more total energy, but uses less crude oil, than that of conventional gasoline. The energy and crude oil use requirements of the different RFGs vary considerably. For the same emissions performance level, RFG with ethanol requires substantially more total energy and crude oil than does RFG with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) or ethyl tertiary butyl ether. A specific proposal by the US Environmental Protection Agency, designed to allow the use of ethanol in RFG, would increase the total energy required to produce RFG by 2% and the total crude oil required by 2.0 to 2.5% over the corresponding values for the base RFG with MTBE.

  17. Energy and crude oil input requirements for the production of reformulated gasolines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; McNutt, B.

    1993-11-01

    The energy and crude oil requirements for the production of reformulated gasolines (RFG) are estimated. Both the energy and crude oil embodied in the final product and the process energy required to manufacture the RFG and its components are included. The effects on energy and crude oil use of using various oxygenates to meet the minimum oxygen content level required by the Clean Air Act Amendments are evaluated. The analysis illustrates that production of RFG requires more total energy than that of conventional gasoline but uses less crude oil. The energy and crude oil use requirements of the different RFGs vary considerably. For the same emissions performance level, RFG with ethanol requires substantially more total energy and crude oil than RFG with MTBE or ETBE. A specific proposal by the EPA designed to allow the use of ethanol in RFG would increase the total energy required to produce RFG by 2% and the total crude oil required by 2.0 to 2.5% over that for the base RFG with MTBE.

  18. Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, K.S.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

  19. Defining the politics changing markets of fuel reformulation: A perspective from Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, F.L. )

    1994-01-01

    On the specific issue of RFG and US motor fuel policy, 1993 NPRA Annual meeting keynote speaker Daniel Yergin said it best, once the refining industry proved it could compete on an environmental basis with alternative fuels through the introduction of ARCO's EC-1, the challenge of economic competitiveness once again became the burden of proof for the alternative fuels industry. This economic need for turning the wheels of public policy change, along with the new tax revenue requirements to fulfill the president's campaign promises, created the policy foundation for President Clinton's original Btu tax proposal. Through the leadership of the NPRA and the chief executive officers of the major oil companies, the petroleum industry turned back the Btu tax. This was accomplished by emphasizing the importance of jobs and cost-effective public policy. The increase in the Btu tax proposal was eventually replaced by a modest increase in the gasoline excise tax. The see-saw battle of economic versus environmental-benefit claims continues in Washington today. No case study is as insightful as the battle over RFG and EPA's newly proposed renewable oxygenate standard (ROS). EPA's proposed ROS offers US petroleum refiners certain benefits not now well understood. The paper discusses the US public policy and economics of the petroleum industry; possible benefits to US refiners from EPA's ROS; public policy formation and campaign contributions; American agriculture and the politics of productivity; how US petroleum refiners can seize public policy initiative; and the choice of foreign methanol and MTBE or ROS and US hydrocarbons. Appendices contain three articles from recent journals, two related to reformulated gasoline and the third about ethanol processing and the federal budget impact.

  20. Impact of California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline on atmospheric reactivity of exhaust and evaporative emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, T.W.; Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.; Kendall, G.R.; Traverse, M.

    1997-12-31

    Phase 2 of California`s reformulated gasoline (RFG) program took effect statewide in the first half of 1996. Changes to gasoline composition required by Phase 2 specifications included: lower vapor pressure; lower olefin, aromatic, benzene, and sulfur content; lower T50 and T90; and a minimum oxygen content. In this paper, impacts of Phase 2 RFG on the atmospheric reactivity of motor vehicle exhaust and evaporative emissions are described. Volatile organic compounds in motor vehicle exhaust were measured at the Caldecott tunnel in summer 1995 and 1996. Aggregate emissions of greater than 8000 vehicles were measured each day. Regular and premium grade gasoline samples were collected from service stations in Berkeley concurrently with tunnel measurements both summers. Liquid gasoline samples and their headspace vapors were analyzed to determine detailed chemical composition. Normalized reactivity was calculated for exhaust and evaporative emissions by applying maximum incremental reactivity values to the detailed speciation profiles. Results indicate that the composition of gasoline in 1996 differed markedly from that of 1995. Changes in liquid gasoline composition led to corresponding changes in the speciation of vehicle exhaust and of gasoline headspace vapors. Benzene concentration in liquid gasoline decreased from 2.0 to 0.6 wt%, which contributed to a 70 and 37% reduction in benzene weight fraction in headspace vapors and vehicle exhaust, respectively. Addition of MTBE and reduction of olefins and aromatics in gasoline led to significant reductions in the atmospheric reactivity of unburned gasoline and gasoline headspace vapors. The normalized reactivity of liquid gasoline and headspace vapors decreased by 23 and 19%, respectively, between 1995 and 1996. The normalized reactivity of non-methane organic compounds in vehicle exhaust decreased by about 8%, but the uncertainty in this change was large.

  1. Efficient simulation and model reformulation of two-dimensional electrochemical thermal behavior of lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northrop, Paul W. C.; Pathak, Manan; Rife, Derek; De, Sumitava; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Subramanian, Venkat R.

    2015-03-09

    Lithium-ion batteries are an important technology to facilitate efficient energy storage and enable a shift from petroleum based energy to more environmentally benign sources. Such systems can be utilized most efficiently if good understanding of performance can be achieved for a range of operating conditions. Mathematical models can be useful to predict battery behavior to allow for optimization of design and control. An analytical solution is ideally preferred to solve the equations of a mathematical model, as it eliminates the error that arises when using numerical techniques and is usually computationally cheap. An analytical solution provides insight into the behavior of the system and also explicitly shows the effects of different parameters on the behavior. However, most engineering models, including the majority of battery models, cannot be solved analytically due to non-linearities in the equations and state dependent transport and kinetic parameters. The numerical method used to solve the system of equations describing a battery operation can have a significant impact on the computational cost of the simulation. In this paper, a model reformulation of the porous electrode pseudo three dimensional (P3D) which significantly reduces the computational cost of lithium ion battery simulation, while maintaining high accuracy, is discussed. This reformulation enables the use of the P3D model into applications that would otherwise be too computationally expensive to justify its use, such as online control, optimization, and parameter estimation. Furthermore, the P3D model has proven to be robust enough to allow for the inclusion of additional physical phenomena as understanding improves. In this study, the reformulated model is used to allow for more complicated physical phenomena to be considered for study, including thermal effects.

  2. Efficient simulation and model reformulation of two-dimensional electrochemical thermal behavior of lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Northrop, Paul W. C.; Pathak, Manan; Rife, Derek; De, Sumitava; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Subramanian, Venkat R.

    2015-03-09

    Lithium-ion batteries are an important technology to facilitate efficient energy storage and enable a shift from petroleum based energy to more environmentally benign sources. Such systems can be utilized most efficiently if good understanding of performance can be achieved for a range of operating conditions. Mathematical models can be useful to predict battery behavior to allow for optimization of design and control. An analytical solution is ideally preferred to solve the equations of a mathematical model, as it eliminates the error that arises when using numerical techniques and is usually computationally cheap. An analytical solution provides insight into the behaviormore » of the system and also explicitly shows the effects of different parameters on the behavior. However, most engineering models, including the majority of battery models, cannot be solved analytically due to non-linearities in the equations and state dependent transport and kinetic parameters. The numerical method used to solve the system of equations describing a battery operation can have a significant impact on the computational cost of the simulation. In this paper, a model reformulation of the porous electrode pseudo three dimensional (P3D) which significantly reduces the computational cost of lithium ion battery simulation, while maintaining high accuracy, is discussed. This reformulation enables the use of the P3D model into applications that would otherwise be too computationally expensive to justify its use, such as online control, optimization, and parameter estimation. Furthermore, the P3D model has proven to be robust enough to allow for the inclusion of additional physical phenomena as understanding improves. In this study, the reformulated model is used to allow for more complicated physical phenomena to be considered for study, including thermal effects.« less

  3. Materials Data on Mg(BC)2 (SG:64) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Reformulation of Density Functional Theory for N-Representable Densities and the Resolution of the v-Representability Problem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gonis, A.; Zhang, X. G.; Stocks, G. M.; Nicholson, D. M.

    2015-10-23

    Density functional theory for the case of general, N-representable densities is reformulated in terms of density functional derivatives of expectation values of operators evaluated with wave functions leading to a density, making no reference to the concept of potential. The developments provide a complete solution of the v-representability problem by establishing a mathematical procedure that determines whether a density is v-representable and in the case of an affirmative answer determines the potential (within an additive constant) as a derivative with respect to the density of a constrained search functional. It also establishes the existence of an energy functional of themore » density that, for v-representable densities, assumes its minimum value at the density describing the ground state of an interacting many-particle system. The theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn emerge as special cases of the formalism.« less

  5. Reformulation of Density Functional Theory for N-Representable Densities and the Resolution of the v-Representability Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonis, A.; Zhang, X. G.; Stocks, G. M.; Nicholson, D. M.

    2015-10-23

    Density functional theory for the case of general, N-representable densities is reformulated in terms of density functional derivatives of expectation values of operators evaluated with wave functions leading to a density, making no reference to the concept of potential. The developments provide a complete solution of the v-representability problem by establishing a mathematical procedure that determines whether a density is v-representable and in the case of an affirmative answer determines the potential (within an additive constant) as a derivative with respect to the density of a constrained search functional. It also establishes the existence of an energy functional of the density that, for v-representable densities, assumes its minimum value at the density describing the ground state of an interacting many-particle system. The theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn emerge as special cases of the formalism.

  6. Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. 579,640 560,048 615,821 596,893 629,128 623,399 1981-2016 PADD 1 111,134 108,298 116,657 117,779 124,581 122,761 1981-2016 East Coast 102,516 99,863 107,399 108,926 114,581 112,738 1993-2016 Appalachian No. 1 8,618 8,435 9,258 8,853 10,000 10,023 1995-2016 PADD 2 134,984 129,316 136,443 134,788 142,373 144,249 1981-2016 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 86,793 84,335 87,237 86,002 90,545 92,240 1993-2016 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 19,305 18,330

  7. Stocks of Reformulated Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    89,599 89,865 91,903 93,744 96,135 98,510 1993-2016 PADD 1 5,149 5,056 5,686 6,572 7,067 6,896 1993-2016 New England 594 594 594 594 594 595 1993-2016 Central Atlantic 2,904 2,774 3,360 3,613 4,088 3,871 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic 1,652 1,687 1,733 2,365 2,385 2,430 1993-2016 PADD 2 28,758 28,751 28,701 28,846 29,088 28,803 1993-2016 PADD 3 52,770 53,081 54,223 54,959 56,526 59,073 1993-2016 PADD's 4 & 5 2,922 2,978 3,293 3,367 3,454 3,738

    39 40 45 40 40 45 1993-2016 PADD 1 21 21 29 28 29

  8. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications

  9. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pipeline Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock.

  10. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Blender Net Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other

  11. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Net Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Conventional Gasoline, Ed55 and Lower Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with a maximum of 55 volume percent denatured fuel ethanol. Conventional Gasoline, Greater than Ed55

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Formulation, Grade, Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Conventional Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Spot Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition Brent A blended crude stream produced in the North Sea region which serves as a reference or "marker" for pricing a number of other crude streams. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural

  14. EIA Report 9/10/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 0, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/10/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/3/2008 Year Ago 9/10/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 102.58 115.46 -12.88 109.35 77.49 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 266.16 285.42 -19.26 276.68 197.86 Heating Oil (c/gal) 290.24 319.19 -28.95 307.88 217.16 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.39 7.94 -0.55 7.26 5.89 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  15. EIA Report 9/11/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 1, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/11/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/4/2008 Year Ago 9/11/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 100.87 115.46 -14.59 107.89 78.23 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 274.88 285.42 -10.54 274.04 198.11 Heating Oil (c/gal) 291.55 319.19 -27.64 302.37 218.27 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.25 7.94 -0.69 7.32 5.93 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  16. EIA Report 9/12/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 2, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/12/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/5/2008 Year Ago 9/12/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 101.18 115.46 -14.28 106.23 79.91 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 276.96 285.42 -8.46 268.61 201.60 Heating Oil (c/gal) 293.91 319.19 -25.28 298.28 221.91 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.37 7.94 -0.57 7.45 6.44 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  17. EIA Report 9/13/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets Saturday, September 13, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/12/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/5/2008 Year Ago 9/12/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 101.18 115.46 -14.28 106.23 79.91 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 276.96 285.42 -8.46 268.61 201.60 Heating Oil (c/gal) 293.91 319.19 -25.28 298.28 221.91 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.37 7.94 -0.57 7.45 6.44 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB),

  18. EIA Report 9/15/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 15, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/15/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/8/2008 Year Ago 9/14/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 95.71 115.46 -19.75 106.34 79.10 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 256.14 285.42 -29.28 275.03 203.64 Heating Oil (c/gal) 279.12 319.19 -40.07 301.31 220.78 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.37 7.94 -0.57 7.53 6.28 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  19. EIA Report 9/16/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets Tuesday, September 16, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/16/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/9/2008 Year Ago 9/17/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 91.15 115.46 -24.31 103.26 80.57 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 240.08 285.42 -45.34 265.26 204.42 Heating Oil (c/gal) 271.97 319.19 -47.22 292.47 222.87 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.28 7.94 -0.66 7.54 6.65 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB),

  20. EIA Report 9/17/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 7, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/17/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/10/2008 Year Ago 9/17/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 97.16 115.46 -18.30 102.58 80.57 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 246.30 285.42 -39.12 266.16 204.42 Heating Oil (c/gal) 282.47 319.19 -36.72 290.24 222.87 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.91 7.94 -0.03 7.39 6.65 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  1. EIA Report 9/18/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 18, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/18/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/11/2008 Year Ago 9/18/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 97.88 115.46 -17.58 100.87 81.51 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 248.24 285.42 -37.18 274.88 206.03 Heating Oil (c/gal) 278.24 319.19 -40.95 291.55 224.23 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.62 7.94 -0.32 7.25 6.57 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  2. EIA Report 9/19/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 19, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/19/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/12/2008 Year Ago 9/18/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 104.55 115.46 -10.91 101.18 81.93 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 259.97 285.42 -25.45 276.96 209.34 Heating Oil (c/gal) 289.78 319.19 -29.41 293.91 224.53 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.53 7.94 -0.41 7.37 6.18 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  3. EIA Report 9/22/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 22, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/22/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/15/2008 Year Ago 9/21/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 120.92 115.46 5.46 95.71 81.62 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 270.38 285.42 -15.04 256.14 211.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 304.30 319.19 -14.89 279.12 225.62 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.66 7.94 -0.28 7.37 6.08 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  4. EIA Report 9/23/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 3, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/23/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/16/2008 Year Ago 9/21/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 106.61 115.46 -8.85 91.15 81.62 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 259.50 285.42 -25.92 240.08 211.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 299.63 319.19 -19.56 271.97 225.62 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.93 7.94 -0.01 7.28 6.08 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  5. EIA Report 9/24/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 4, 4:00 pm U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/24/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/17/2008 Year Ago 9/24/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 105.73 115.46 -9.73 91.16 80.95 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 259.47 285.42 -25.95 246.30 208.34 Heating Oil (c/gal) 301.33 319.19 -17.86 282.47 223.06 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.68 7.94 -0.26 7.91 6.37 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs to

  6. EIA Report 9/25/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 25, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/25/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/18/2008 Year Ago 9/25/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 108.02 115.46 -7.44 97.88 79.53 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 269.73 285.42 -15.69 248.24 203.79 Heating Oil (c/gal) 302.58 319.19 -16.61 278.24 218.13 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.64 7.94 -0.30 7.62 6.36 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  7. EIA Report 9/26/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 26, 4:00 pm U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/26/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/19/2008 Year Ago 9/26/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 108.89 115.46 -8.57 104.55 80.30 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 266.51 285.42 -18.91 259.97 202.74 Heating Oil (c/gal) 299.49 319.19 -19.70 289.78 218.26 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.47 7.94 -0.47 7.53 6.40 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs

  8. EIA Report 9/3/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 3, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/3/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/27/2008 Year Ago 9/4/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 109.35 115.46 -6.11 118.15 75.08 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 276.68 285.42 -8.74 291.72 199.10 Heating Oil (c/gal) 307.88 319.19 -11.31 328.15 207.95 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.26 7.94 -0.68 8.61 5.63 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs to

  9. EIA Report 9/4/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 4, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/4/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/28/2008 Year Ago 9/4/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 107.89 115.46 -7.57 115.59 75.08 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 274.04 285.42 -11.38 286.44 199.10 Heating Oil (c/gal) 302.37 319.19 -16.82 320.21 207.95 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.32 7.94 -0.62 8.05 5.63 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that needs to

  10. EIA Report 9/5/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 5, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/5/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/29/2008 Year Ago 9/5/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 106.23 115.46 -9.23 115.46 75.73 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 268.61 285.42 -16.81 285.42 199.65 Heating Oil (c/gal) 298.28 319.19 -20.91 319.19 209.99 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.45 7.94 -0.49 7.94 5.81 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  11. EIA Report 9/8/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 8, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/8/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/2/2008 Year Ago 9/7/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 106.34 115.46 -9.12 109.71 76.70 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 275.03 285.42 -10.39 273.37 198.64 Heating Oil (c/gal) 301.31 319.19 -17.88 307.36 214.32 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.53 7.94 -0.41 7.26 5.50 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline that

  12. EIA Report 9/9/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets 9, 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/9/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/2/2008 Year Ago 9/10/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 103.26 115.46 -12.20 109.71 77.49 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 265.26 285.42 -20.16 273.37 197.86 Heating Oil (c/gal) 292.47 319.19 -26.72 307.36 217.16 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.54 7.94 -0.40 7.26 5.89 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB), the base gasoline

  13. Efficient Reformulation of Solid Phase Diffusion in Electrochemical-Mechanical Coupled Models for Lithium-Ion Batteries: Effect of Intercalation Induced Stresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, S; Suthar, B; Rife, D; Sikha, G; Subramanian, VR

    2013-07-23

    Lithium-ion batteries are typically modeled using porous electrode theory coupled with various transport and reaction mechanisms with an appropriate discretization or approximation for the solid phase diffusion within the electrode particle. One of the major difficulties in simulating Li-ion battery models is the need for simulating solid-phase diffusion in the second radial dimension r within the particle. It increases the complexity of the model as well as the computation time/cost to a great extent. This is Particularly true for the inclusion of pressure induced diffusion inside particles experiencing volume change. A computationally efficient representation for solid-phase diffusion is discussed in this paper. The operating condition has a significant effect on the validity, accuracy, and efficiency of various approximations for the solid-phase transport governed by pressure induced diffusion. This paper introduces efficient methods for solid phase reformulation - (1) parabolic profile approach and (2) a mixed order finite difference method for approximating/representing solid-phase concentration variations within the active materials of porous electrodes for macroscopic models for lithium-ion batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  14. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,602 2,515 1,702 2,802 2,710 2,572 1981-2015 Crude Oil 274 590 294 1,100 1,492 906 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 1,328 1,925 1,408 1,702 1,218 1,666 1981-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1981-2002 Unfinished Oils 685 686 571 20 184 550 1981-2015 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 144 710 248 1,157 663 275 1983-2015 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2015 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2015 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol*

  15. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 76 53 92 185 71 125 1986-2016 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2016 Petroleum Products 76 53 92 185 71 125 1986-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1986-2002 Unfinished Oils 67 18 27 19 36 29 1986-2016 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 0 0 27 26 0 52 1986-2016 Reformulated 0 0 0 2005-2016 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 2008-2016 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 0 0 27 26 0 52 2008-2016 CBOB 0 0 27 0 0

  16. Reformulated diesel fuel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-08-22

    A method for mathematically identifying at least one diesel fuel suitable for combustion in an automotive diesel engine with significantly reduced emissions and producible from known petroleum blendstocks using known refining processes, including the use of cetane additives (ignition improvers) and oxygenated compounds.

  17. EIA Report 9/1/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets , 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) (2pm) 9/1/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/25/2008 Year Ago 8/31/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 111.16 115.46 -4.30 115.11 73.98 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 275.10 285.42 -10.32 280.69 196.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 309.24 319.19 -9.95 317.90 205.74 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.98 8.36 -0.38 7.94 6.46 OPEC Basket ($Bbl) NA 111.23 NA 110.61 69.60 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate

  18. EIA Report 9/14/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets Sunday, September 14, 3:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 2:30pm 9/14/2008 Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 9/5/2008 Year Ago 9/12/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 99.17 115.46 -16.29 106.23 79.91 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 264.65 285.42 -20.77 268.61 201.60 Heating Oil (c/gal) 284.80 319.19 -34.39 298.28 221.91 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.43 7.94 -0.51 7.45 6.44 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending

  19. EIA Report 9/2/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets , 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/2/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/26/2008 Year Ago 9/4/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 109.71 115.46 -5.75 116.27 75.08 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 273.37 285.42 -12.05 285.97 199.10 Heating Oil (c/gal) 307.36 319.19 -11.83 323.44 207.95 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.26 7.94 -0.68 8.39 5.63 OPEC Basket ($Bbl) NA 111.23 NA 110.51 70.88 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate

  20. Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2016 Maine - - - - - - 1994-2016 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2016 New Hampshire - - - - - - 1994-2016 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2016 Vermont - - ...

  1. Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    394 - - - - - 1994-2015 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.347 - - - - - 1994-2015 New England (PADD 1A) 2.374 - - - - - 1994-2015 Connecticut 2.415 - - - - - 1994-2015 Maine - - - - - - ...

  2. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    44 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.162 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.209 2.165 2.117 2.095 2.160 2.192 1994-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.165 2.139 2.110 2.105 2.150 2.176 1994-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.009 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 1994-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.132 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 1994-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.980 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 1994-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 2.734 2.668 2.621 2.581 2.636

  3. ,"U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","22016","1151994" ,"Release Date:","522016" ,"Next Release Date:","612016" ,"Excel File Name:","petconsrefmgcnusepm0rmgalpdm.xls" ...

  4. 0101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",1,150,"MOGAS, REFORMULATED",0131,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    REFG & MKTG INC",2,152,"MOGAS, OTHER FINISHED",4908,"PONCE, PR","PR",600,830,"SPAIN",230,0,0 0101,"TEXACO REFG & MKTG INC",3,152,"MOGAS, OTHER FINISHED",1003,"NEWARK,...

  5. Reformulated Gasoline Use Under the 8-Hour Ozone Rule

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact on gasoline price and supply when additional ozone non-attainment areas come under the new 8-hour ozone standard.

  6. U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,725.5 9,007.1 8,999.7 9,201.2 9,316.6 9,664.1 1994-2016 Through Retail Outlets 8,696.9 8,977.3 8,975.9 9,175.7 9,291.9 9,637.8 1994-2016 Sales for Resale, Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2016 DTW 17,295.3 18,395.9 18,390.2 18,584.8 18,492.9 18,354.8 1994-2016 Rack 72,249.7 75,121.0 74,336.9 76,465.1 76,955.7 79,301.2 1994-2016 Bulk 3,222.6 3,308.8 3,422.9 2,916.2 4,005.0 4,319.8

  7. U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    790 1.553 1.736 1.921 2.011 2.078 1994-2016 Through Retail Outlets 1.792 1.554 1.737 1.921 2.012 2.079 1994-2016 Sales for Resale, Average 1.331 1.143 1.463 1.601 1.694 1.740 1994-2016 DTW 1.796 1.471 1.783 1.895 1.917 1.983 1994-2016 Rack 1.221 1.066 1.388 1.533 1.645 1.690 1994-2016 Bulk 1.307 1.074 1.377 1.514 1.602 1.619

  8. Refiner and Blender Net Production of Reformulated Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3,302 3,356 3,343 3,329 3,317 3,298 1993-2016 PADD 1 1,336 1,338 1,322 1,332 1,339 1,318 1993-2016 PADD 2 365 382 372 364 364 362 1993-2016 PADD 3 472 467 471 470 453 452 1993-2016 PADD 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993-2016 PADD 5 1,129 1,170 1,178 1,162 1,161 1,166 1993

  9. ,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File Name:","petprirefmg2cnusepm0rdpgalm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprirefmg2cnusepm0rdpgalm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy ...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    available motor gasoline blending components ( RBOB, CBOB, GTAB, and other), fuel ethanol, and certain other components and the corresponding data on production of finished...

  11. Refiner Crude Oil Inputs

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of RBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of CBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of GTAB Blending ...

  12. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

  13. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program (Released in the STEO June 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Section 107(d) of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990 (the Act), required states to identify all areas that do not meet the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone, and directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to designate these areas as ozone nonattainment areas. Section 181 of the Act required EPA to classify each area as a marginal, moderate, serious, severe or extreme ozone nonattainment area. EPA classified all areas that were designated as in nonattainment for ozone at the time of the enactment of the 1990 Amendments, except for certain "nonclassifiable" areas (56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991).

  14. Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    In October 2003, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those states for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two states over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline.

  15. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24.1 9.1 61.1 3.9 4.0 7.3 3.1 W 10.4 1998 ... 14.3 14.5 28.6 23.0 8.3 59.9 3.7 3.8 7.4 3.1 W 10.5 See footnotes at end of table. 26 Energy Information...

  16. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March ... 76.7 76.3 72.0 65.8 65.5 68.8 86.0 85.7 77.9 70.0 - 75.6 April ... 87.7 87.3 83.5 77.0 77.3 80.2 96.5 96.2 88.8 81.4 -...

  17. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    92.4 92.1 83.7 74.1 W 80.9 1997 January ... 82.4 82.1 77.1 74.3 73.6 75.6 92.1 91.8 82.7 78.1 W 81.4 February ... 82.9 82.6 77.8 71.2 72.9...

  18. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    12.0 69.2 3.4 3.5 6.9 3.1 W 10.1 December ... 14.8 15.1 31.7 29.5 10.8 72.0 3.6 3.7 7.3 3.3 W 10.7 1999 ... 14.5 14.8 29.8 26.1 9.6...

  19. Reformulation RELAP5-3D in FORTRAN 95 and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2010-08-01

    RELAP5-3D is a nuclear power plant code used worldwide for safety analysis, design, and operator training. In keeping with ongoing developments in the computing industry, we have re-architected the code in the FORTRAN 95 language, the current, fully-available, FORTRAN language. These changes include a complete reworking of the database and conversion of the source code to take advantage of new constructs. The improvements and impacts to the code are manifold. It is a completely machine-independent code that produces machine independent fluid property and plot files and expands to the exact size needed to accommodate the user’s input. Runtime is generally better for larger input models. Other impacts of code conversion are improved code readability, reduced maintenance and development time, increased adaptability to new computing platforms, and increased code longevity. The conversion methodology, code improvements and testing upgrades are presented in a manner that will be useful to future conversion projects for other such large codes. Comparison between the pre- and post-conversion code are made on the basis of code metrics and code performance.

  20. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    retail outlets, e.g., sales to agricultural customers, commercial sales, and industrial sales. Note: Totals may not equal the sum of the components due to rounding....

  1. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    retail outlets, e.g., sales to agricultural customers, commercial sales, and industrial sales. Source: Energy Information Administration Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'Gas...

  2. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

    2005-06-01

    Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

  3. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Paul Chin; Dr. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts; Professor James J. Spivey; Mr. Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Dr. James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Dr. Richard W. Rice

    2002-12-31

    Several different catalytic reactions must be carried out in order to convert hydrocarbons (or alcohols) into hydrogen for use as a fuel for polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Each reaction in the fuel-processing sequence has a different set of characteristics, which influences the type of catalyst support that should be used for that particular reaction. A wide range of supports are being evaluated for the various reactions in the fuel-processing scheme, including porous and non-porous particles, ceramic and metal straight-channel monoliths, and ceramic and metal monolithic foams. These different types of support have distinctly different transport characteristics. The best choice of support for a given reaction will depend on the design constraints for the system, e.g., allowable pressure drop, and on the characteristics of the reaction for which the catalyst is being designed. Three of the most important reaction characteristics are the intrinsic reaction rate, the exothermicity/endothermicity of the reaction, and the nature of the reaction network, e.g., whether more than one reaction takes place and, in the case of multiple reactions, the configuration of the network. Isotopic transient kinetic analysis was used to study the surface intermediates. The preferential oxidation of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen (PROX) is an important final step in most fuel processor designs. Data on the behavior of straight-channel monoliths and foam monolith supports will be presented to illustrate some of the factors involved in choosing a support for this reaction.

  4. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Chin; George W. Roberts; James J. Spivey

    2003-12-31

    Uses for structured catalytic supports, such as ceramic straight-channel monoliths and ceramic foams, have been established for a long time. One of the most prominent examples is the washcoated ceramic monolith as a three-way catalytic converter for gasoline-powered automobiles. A distinct alternative to the ceramic monolith is the metal foam, with potential use in fuel cell-powered automobiles. The metal foams are characterized by their pores per inch (ppi) and density ({rho}). In previous research, using 5 wt% platinum (Pt) and 0.5 wt% iron (Fe) catalysts, washcoated metal foams, 5.08 cm in length and 2.54 cm in diameter, of both varying and similar ppi and {rho} were tested for their activity (X{sub CO}) and selectivity (S{sub CO}) on a CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reaction in the presence of a H{sub 2}-rich gas stream. The variances in these metal foams' activity and selectivity were much larger than expected. Other structured supports with 5 wt% Pt, 0-1 wt% Fe weight loading were also examined. A theory for this phenomenon states that even though these structured supports have a similar nominal catalyst weight loading, only a certain percentage of the Pt/Fe catalyst is exposed on the surface as an active site for CO adsorption. We will use two techniques, pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), to characterize our structured supports. Active metal count, metal dispersion, and other calculations will help clarify the causes for the activity and selectivity variations between the supports. Results on ceramic monoliths show that a higher Fe loading yields a lower dispersion, potentially because of Fe inhibition of the Pt surface for CO adsorption. This theory is used to explain the reason for activity and selectivity differences for varying ppi and {rho} metal foams; less active and selective metal foams have a lower Fe loading, which justifies their higher metal dispersion. Data on the CO desorption temperature and average metal crystallite size for TPD are also collected.

  5. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,720 Conventional 0 50 0 266 199 0 0 145 1,487 CBOB for Blending...

  6. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 576 128 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 120 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 22 26 0 24 0 0 394 0 Conventional 0 315 0 0 1,359 0 1,718 495 CBOB for Blending with...

  7. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 0 0 0 0 3,223 29,499 Conventional 105 0 615 0 0 244 14,011 CBOB for Blending with...

  8. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,497 Conventional 0 0 266 0 0 0 1,099 CBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 0...

  9. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 0 0 0 0 222 1,728 Conventional 25 0 0 0 0 0 817 CBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 0...

  10. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 576 131 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 120 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 22 26 0 24 0 0 0 3,617 31,128 Conventional 105 315 0 615 1,359 0 0 1,962 17,808 CBOB...

  11. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Ether 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 248 1,899 Conventional 25 85 0 0 87 0 0 125 1,055 CBOB for Blending...

  12. Optimal Charging Profiles with Minimal Intercalation-Induced Stresses for Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Pseudo 2-Dimensional Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suthar, B; Northrop, PWC; Braatz, RD; Subramanian, VR

    2014-07-30

    This paper illustrates the application of dynamic optimization in obtaining the optimal current profile for charging a lithium-ion battery by restricting the intercalation-induced stresses to a pre-determined limit estimated using a pseudo 2-dimensional (P2D). model. This paper focuses on the problem of maximizing the charge stored in a given time while restricting capacity fade due to intercalation-induced stresses. Conventional charging profiles for lithium-ion batteries (e.g., constant current followed by constant voltage or CC-CV) are not derived by considering capacity fade mechanisms, which are not only inefficient in terms of life-time usage of the batteries but are also slower by not taking into account the changing dynamics of the system. (C) The Author(s) 2014. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email: oa@electrochem.org. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy & Financial Markets - Petprod - U.S. Energy Information...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... On September 1, the underlying commodity of the RBOB front month contract reverts back to a higher RVP specification, representing a lower-cost gasoline. The gasoline crack spread ...

  14. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commodity Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene Reformulated Conventional Total Reformulated Conventional Total PAD District 1 ......

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Charts Selected Charts Figure 1: Historical crude oil front month futures prices Figure 7: Probability of the January 2016 WTI contract expiring above price levels Figure 8: Historical RBOB futures prices and crack spreads Figure 12: Probability of January 2016 retail gasoline exceeding different prices levels at expiration Figure 14: U.S. natural gas prices and storage Figure 16: Probability of the January 2016 Henry Hub contract expiring above price levels

  16. Refining New-Physics Searches in B→Dτν with Lattice QCD | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Series: Refiner Crude Oil Inputs Refiner Gross Inputs Refiner Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refiner Percent Operable Utilization Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of Motor Gasoline Blending Comp Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of RBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of CBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of GTAB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of All Other Blending Component Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of Fuel Ethanol

  17. Crude Oil Domestic Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Crude Oil Domestic Production Refinery Crude Oil Inputs Refinery Gross Inputs Refinery Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refinery Percent Operable Utilization Net Inputs of Motor Gasoline Blending Components Net Inputs of RBOB Blending Components Net Inputs of CBOB Blending Components Net Inputs of GTAB Blending Components Net Inputs of All Other Blending Components Net Inputs of Fuel Ethanol Net Production - Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production - Finished Motor Gasoline (Excl.

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Spot Prices for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil",2,"Daily","9/6/2016","1/2/1986" ,"Data 2","Conventional Gasoline",2,"Daily","9/6/2016","6/2/1986" ,"Data 3","RBOB Regular

  19. Total Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & < Imports -

  20. Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O.,

  1. Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than

  2. Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55

  3. CSV File Documentation: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O.,

  4. Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Data Series: Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline (Excl. Adj.) Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blenede w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & < Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, > Ed55 Other Conventional Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline Adjustment Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Jet, Commercial Kerosene-Type Jet,

  5. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    February 16, 2016 Reformulated Gasoline States in each PADD Region Procedures & Methodology Gasoline Data collection procedures Sampling methodology Coefficient of variation...

  6. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    several weeks. Another factor that may influence gasoline prices this spring is the transition to ethanol-based summer-grade reformulated gasoline sold in New York and...

  7. Extended Formulations in Mixed-integer Convex Programming | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reformulations are shown to be effective extended formulations themselves because they encode separability structure. For mixed-integer conic-representable problems, we provide the...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also ... Controlling proton movement: electrocatalytic oxidation of ... sphere of the catalyst plays a key role, ...

  9. Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    How they can be made cool: Reformulate or coat black membranes to make them reflective. ... Tips: energy efficient roofs Energy efficient home design Whole-house systems approach ...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    this transition from Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) reformulated gasoline (RFG) to ethanol RFG, since ethanol is not blended into the gasoline mixture until just before the...

  11. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type . . . . . . ....

  12. Polynomial Chaos Based Uncertainty Quantification - Lecture 2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... original code * Reformulated system is factor (P+1) larger than the original system and ... construction * Application to heat transfer example Debusschere - SNL UQ * General ...

  13. Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuels including B20 biodiesel, E85 ethanol, reformulated gasoline, and hydrogen. ... drive using a turbocharged direct-injection diesel engine fueled by B20 biodiesel. ...

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... of which meet the requirements of the reformulated gasoline regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under Section 211(k) of the Clean Air Act. ...

  15. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    -109 -12 Isobutylene 7 0 7 0 0 0 0 Finished Motor Gasoline 21,280 1,066 22,346 25,478 3,607 12,672 41,757 Reformulated 11,460 0 11,460 0 0 0 0 Reformulated Blended with Ether...

  16. Benzene reduction in RFG, a new low cost route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gildert, R.; Gildert, G.

    1994-12-31

    Benzene has been targeted for reduction in reformulated gasoline because it is the largest single contributor to the toxic emissions group. This presentation describes processes of benzene removal for the petroleum refiner. By making maximum use of existing equipment, the refiner can minimize the changes necessary to produce reformulated gasoline with a reduction in benzene levels.

  17. PADD 2 Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 3,834 3,663 3,734 3,734 3,802 1992-2016 Gross Inputs 3,719 3,835 3,666 3,734 3,752 3,806 1990-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 3,924 3,924 3,924 3,924 3,924 3,924 2010-2016 Percent Operable Utilization 94.8 97.7 93.4 95.2 95.6 97.0 2010-2016 Refiner and Blender Net Inputs Motor Gasoline Blending Components 473 498 590 583 331 302 2004-2016 RBOB 68 52 121 69 -1 56 2010-2016 CBOB 331 433 450 513 227 261 2004-2016 GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004-2016 All Other 74 13 19 1 105 -15 2004-2016 Fuel Ethanol

  18. U.S. Total Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    670 16,711 16,725 16,725 16,748 16,689 1982-2016 Gross Inputs 16,957 16,999 16,994 17,008 17,011 16,988 1990-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 18,317 18,320 18,320 18,320 18,320 18,320 1990-2016 Percent Operable Utilization 92.6 92.8 92.8 92.8 92.9 92.7 1990-2016 Refiner and Blender Net Inputs Motor Gasoline Blending Components 790 821 948 1,053 1,041 989 2008-2016 RBOB 271 297 418 463 452 458 2010-2016 CBOB 8 90 145 174 167 39 2010-2016 GTAB 182 148 162 169 127 125 2010-2016 All Other 329

  19. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.3 - 2.9 See footnotes at end of table. 24 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2007 Table 11. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade...

  20. Florida Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oxygenated (All Grades) - - - - - - 1993-2016 Reformulated (All Grades) - - - - - - 1993-2016 Aviation Gasoline 46.9 49.5 46.1 57.2 61.5 58.8 1983-2016 Naphtha-Type Jet Fuel - - - ...

  1. Mississippi Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oxygenated (All Grades) - - - - - - 1993-2016 Reformulated (All Grades) - - - - - - 1993-2016 Aviation Gasoline 3.7 4.5 3.9 5.7 3.6 4.4 1983-2016 Naphtha-Type Jet Fuel - - - - - - ...

  2. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    per gallon are likely in the coming weeks. Update on Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status...

  3. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas ... of reformulated gasoline in storage and is already helping to ...

  4. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    its lowest level in several years. More specifically, despite the mandated use of federal Phase II reformulated gasoline in ozone non-attainment areas as of January 1, gasoline...

  5. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reformulated Total United States January ... 180,965.9 11,878.2 94,347.8 287,192.0 14,481.5 1,655.4 7,759.4 23,896.4 February...

  6. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    132,440 Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol ...... 442,555 4,158 446,713 102,324 ... 771,975 Conventional Blended with Fuel Ethanol ...... 619,244 85,317 704,561 452,679 ...

  7. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    132,393 Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol ...... 434,150 4,158 438,308 102,324 ... 613,247 Conventional Blended with Fuel Ethanol ...... 619,244 75,378 694,622 434,810 ...

  8. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... of the reformulated gasoline regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under Section 211(k) of the Clean Air Act. (Details on this clean fuel program). ...

  9. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.PDF Table 35. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD District and State, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene Reformulated Conventional Total Reformulated Conventional Total PAD District 1 ............................................ 29 3,477 3,506 15,870 30,353 46,223 821 Connecticut ............................................. - - - 1,103 - 1,103 4 Delaware

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 56. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD District and State, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components 1 Kerosene Reformulated Conventional Total Reformulated Conventional Total PAD District 1 ............................................ 24 1,945 1,969 19,940 35,674 55,614 2,096 Connecticut ............................................. - - - 1,468 - 1,468 36 Delaware

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Terminal A facility used primarily for the storage and/or marketing of petroleum products which has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate

  13. PADD 3 Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,788 8,791 8,855 8,956 8,712 8,580 1992-2016 Gross Inputs 8,889 8,871 8,976 9,014 8,783 8,817 1990-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 9,515 9,515 9,515 9,515 9,515 9,515 2010-2016 Percent Operable Utilization 93.4 93.2 94.3 94.7 92.3 92.7 2010-2016 Refiner and Blender Net Inputs Motor Gasoline Blending Components -2,249 -1,993 -2,117 -2,108 -2,293 -2,034 2004-2016 RBOB -419 -380 -321 -406 -471 -291 2010-2016 CBOB -1,794 -1,684 -1,852 -1,798 -1,870 -1,981 2004-2016 GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004-2016

  14. Implement emission control strategies based on demonstrated effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The ozone transport Commission (OTC) is a Congressionally chartered organization of the 12 states (and District of Columbia) in the Northeast U.S. Its mandate is to develop innovative, regionwide solutions to the ground-level ozone problem experienced throughout the region, especially in the summer. Since its inception in 1991, the OTC has worked with a variety of interested parties in industry, government and the environmental community to fashion strategies for reducing mobile-source and stationary-source emissions. In a discussion with Executive Director Bruce Carhart, Fuel Reformulation`s Fred Potter, Kevin Adler and Linda Micco discuss the OTC`s accomplishments and goals for low-emission vehicles, reformulated gasoline (RFG) and other programs.

  15. CEPAN method of analyzing creep collapse of oval cladding. Volume 5. Evaluation of interpellet gap formation and clad collapse in modern PWR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, W.M.; Fisher, H.D.; Litke, H.J.; Mordarski, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report presents the results from a review of interpellet-gap formation, ovality, creepdown and clad collapse data in modern PWR fuel rods. Conclusions are reached regarding the propensity of modern PWR fuel to form such gaps and to undergo clad collapse. CEPAN, a creep-collapse predictor approved by the NRC in 1976, has been reformulated to include the creep analysis of cladding with finite interpellet gaps. The basis for this reformulation is discussed in detail. The model previously used in the calculation of the augmentation factor, a peak linear heat rate penalty due to the presence of interpellet gaps within the fuel rod, has been modified to incorporate gap-formation statistics from modern fuel. Finnally, the benefits of the limited gap formation and the CEPAN reformulation for the licensing of modern PWR fuel rods are evaluated.

  16. Scheduling & delivery of America`s new clean fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenhaver, B.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation was given by Bill Copenhaver, Senior manager for Transportation Services Central with Colonial Pipeline. This report discusses the effects that reformulated gasolines will have on transportation services such as Colonial`s pipeline system. Currently, Colonial is delivering about 1.2 million barrels per day of gasolines, as well as over 700,000 barrels per day of kerosene, diesel fuel, and fuel oil. Colonial anticipates that there will be additional demands for moving gasolines as a result of the reformulated gasoline regulations.

  17. This Week In Petroleum Gasoline Section

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Regular gasoline retail prices (dollars per gallon) U.S. Average Conventional Reformulated U.S. retail regular gasoline prices graph Retail average regular gasoline prices graph Retail conventional regular gasoline prices graph Retail reformulated regular gasoline prices graph Retail average regular gasoline prices (dollars per gallon) more price data › Year ago Most recent 08/31/15 08/29/16 08/22/16 08/15/16 08/08/16 08/01/16 07/25/16 07/18/16 U.S. 2.510 2.237 2.193 2.149 2.150 2.159 2.182

  18. Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 1766

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This service report addresses the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766. The 'S. 1766' Case reflects provisions of S. 1766 including a renewable fuels standard (RFS) reaching five billion gallons by 2012, a complete phase-out of MTBE within four years, and the option for states to waive the oxygen requirement for reformulated gasoline (RFG).

  19. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    083 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.083 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2000-2016 Regular 1.950 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.950 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.238 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.238 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2000-2016 Premium 2.526 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.526 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540

    Projects published on Beta

  20. New York Times covers National Labs Race to Stop Iran

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    322 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.322 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2000-2016 Regular 2.179 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.179 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.494 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.494 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2000-2016 Premium 2.685 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.685 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.65

    437 2.419 2.384 2.374 2.380

  1. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2.271 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2.271 2003-2016 Regular 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2.163 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2.163 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2.411 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2.411 2003-2016 Premium 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2.618 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2.618

  2. California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2.762 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2.762 1995-2016 Regular 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2.706 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2.706 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2.837 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2.837 1995-2016 Premium 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2.953 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2.953 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  3. Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2.437 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2.437 2000-2016 Regular 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2.313 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2.313 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2.639 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2.639 2000-2016 Premium 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2.979 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2.979 2000

  4. Impact of oxygenates on petroleum refining part 2: Future outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unzelman, G.H.

    1995-07-01

    With the move to a more conservative political outlook in the U.S. in 1995, some have voiced the opinion there may be resistance to the Clean Air Act and specifically to reformulated gasoline (RFG). There has been some evidence that substantiates early resistance to RFG, brought about by price hikes as high as 10 cents/gal at the pump. Pennsylvania, Maine, New York and Wisconsin have elected to {open_quotes}opt out{close_quotes} about 200,000 b/d of RFG. Certainly a move of this nature may slow the {open_quotes}opt in{close_quotes} movement in other areas of the U.S. On the other hand, the basic RFG program for nine critical areas in the U.S. will remain in place, and as air-quality limits are exceeded in other regions, they will be forced into the program. The movement toward cleaner air is worldwide, and the U.S. has been a leader in fuel reformulation for the past 25 years. While the movement may falter for various reasons, and fine tuning of regulations is inevitable, the ultimate result will be a U.S. gasoline pool that is largely reformulated - and the presence of oxygenates is fundamental to reformulation.

  5. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Imports & Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline 2 2 0 0 0 0 2008-2016 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2016 Blended with Fuel Ethanol 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2016 Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Conventional 2 2 0 0 0 0 2008-2016...

  6. California Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    846 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.846 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 1995-2016 Regular 2.792 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.792 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.918 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.918 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 1995-2016 Premium 3.029 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.029 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  7. Chin Guok

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    339 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.339 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2000-2016 Regular 2.215 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.215 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.549 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.549 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2000-2016 Premium 2.877 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.877 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2000

    Chin Guok About ESnet

  8. Model the Deformation and Failure of Solids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-10-19

    EMU models the deformation and failure of solids based on a reformulated theory of continuum mechanics known as the Peridynamic model. This approach allows dynamic fracture and other failure mechanisms to be simulated with a minimum of mesh effeces and without a need for supplementary kinetic relations for crack growth. Penetration by a rigid projectile is also included in the code.

  9. Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2.109 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2.109 2000-2016 Regular 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 1.977 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 1.977 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2.265 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2.265 2000-2016 Premium 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2.550 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2.550

  10. Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2.792 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2.792 2000-2016 Regular 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2.739 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2.739 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2.852 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2.852 2000-2016 Premium 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2.959 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2.959

  11. Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    251 2.204 2.184 2.234 2.268 2.267 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.251 2.204 2.184 2.234 2.268 2.267 2003-2016 Regular 2.144 2.093 2.065 2.132 2.161 2.158 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.144 2.093 2.065 2.132 2.161 2.158 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.383 2.350 2.352 2.356 2.403 2.402 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.383 2.350 2.352 2.356 2.403 2.402 2003-2016 Premium 2.570 2.533 2.531 2.543 2.587 2.597 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.570 2.533 2.531 2.543 2.587 2.597

  12. New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2.311 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2.311 2000-2016 Regular 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2.168 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2.168 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2.481 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2.481 2000-2016 Premium 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2.673 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2.673

  13. San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2.802 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2.802 2000-2016 Regular 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2.743 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2.743 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2.884 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2.884 2000-2016 Premium 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 3.002 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 3.002

  14. U.S. Sales for Resale, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2016 by Grade Regular NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2016 Midgrade NA NA NA NA NA NA 1988-2016 Premium NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2016 by Formulation Conventional NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2016 Oxygenated - - - - - - 1994-2016 Reformulated NA NA NA NA NA NA

  15. BoxLib Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    287 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.287 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2003-2016 Regular 2.178 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.178 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.437 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.437 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2003-2016 Premium 2.626 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.626 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.59

    BoxLib Case Study BoxLib

  16. Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    922 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.922 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2000-2016 Regular 2.864 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.864 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2000-2016 Midgrade 3.004 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.004 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2000-2016 Premium 3.118 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.118 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.00

    Sandia grew out of America's

  17. Louis Stokes Midwest Center for Excellence | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    858 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.858 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2000-2016 Regular 2.808 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.808 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.915 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.915 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2000-2016 Premium 3.015 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.015 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943

    Los alamos national

  18. Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    A review of the market implications resulting from the rapid change from methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to ethanol-blended reformulated gasoline (RFG) on the East Coast and in Texas. Strains in ethanol supply and distribution will increase the potential for price volatility in these regions this summer.

  19. Diesel fuel component contribution to engine emissions and performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erwin, J.; Ryan, T.W. III; Moulton, D.S.

    1994-11-01

    Contemporary diesel fuel is a blend of several refinery streams chosen to meet specifications. The need to increase yield of transportation fuel from crude oil has resulted in converting increased proportions of residual oil to lighter products. This conversion is accomplished by thermal, catalytic, and hydrocracking of high molecular weight materials rich in aromatic compounds. The current efforts to reformulate California diesel fuel for reduced emissions from existing engines is an example of another driving force affecting refining practice: regulations designed to reduce exhaust emissions. Although derived from petroleum crude oil, reformulated diesel fuel is an alternative to current specification-grade diesel fuel, and this alternative presents opportunities and questions to be resolved by fuel and engine research. Various concerned parties have argued that regulations for fuel reformulation have not been based on an adequate data base. Despite numerous studies, much ambiguity remains about the relationship of exhaust parameters to fuel composition, particularly for diesel fuel. In an effort to gather pertinent data, the automobile industry and the oil refiners have joined forces in the Air Quality Improvement Research Program (AUTO/OIL) to address this question for gasoline. The objective of that work is to define the relationship between gasoline composition and the magnitude and composition of the exhaust emissions. The results of the AUTO/OEL program will also be used, along with other data bases, to define the EPA {open_quotes}complex model{close_quotes} for reformulated gasolines. Valuable insights have been gained for compression ignition engines in the Coordinating Research Council`s VE-1 program, but no program similar to AUTO/OIL has been started for diesel fuel reformulation. A more detailed understanding of the fuel/performance relationship is a readily apparent need.

  20. Interaction between Titles 2 and 3 of the Clean Air Act as amended, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1996-02-01

    This report examines Some issues that would I affect the refining industry if the requirements for hazardous air pollutants set out in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments were to impede the market entrance of oxygenated fuels, as me; required by Title II. It describes the mandate for reformulated gasoline; considers gasoline characteristics in light of component shifts in refining; examines the supply of, demand for, and cost of various feedstocks and blendstocks; and identifies the emissions and atmospheric impacts that might result from the production and use of reformulated gasoline. Attention is focused on methanol and MTBE, two potential blendstocks that are also hazardous air pollutants, and on maximum achievable control technology standards, which might be applied to the stationary sources that produce them.

  1. Optimization-based additive decomposition of weakly coercive problems with applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bochev, Pavel B.; Ridzal, Denis

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we present an abstract mathematical framework for an optimization-based additive decomposition of a large class of variational problems into a collection of concurrent subproblems. The framework replaces a given monolithic problem by an equivalent constrained optimization formulation in which the subproblems define the optimization constraints and the objective is to minimize the mismatch between their solutions. The significance of this reformulation stems from the fact that one can solve the resulting optimality system by an iterative process involving only solutions of the subproblems. Consequently, assuming that stable numerical methods and efficient solvers are available for every subproblem,more » our reformulation leads to robust and efficient numerical algorithms for a given monolithic problem by breaking it into subproblems that can be handled more easily. An application of the framework to the Oseen equations illustrates its potential.« less

  2. EPA`s proposed renewable oxygenate requirement (ROR): Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    In December 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its final rule that sets for the details for requirements to sell reformulated gasoline (RFG) in certain ozone non-attainment areas. At the same time, EPA also issued a proposed rule to require that 30% of the oxygen required in RFG be based on a renewable oxygenate. Renewables include ethanol and its ether derivatives such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE). The RFG rule is a final rule, while the Renewable Oxygenate Requirement (ROR) rule is a proposed rule yet to be finalized and subject to revision. Included in this paper are brief reviews of Ashland petroleum Company`s ethanol usage, oxygenated fuel and reformulated gasoline blending economics, and some comments on the EPA proposed renewable oxygenate requirement.

  3. TABLE34.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 187 0 0 0 0 Petroleum Products ................................................ 123 76 0 1,568 1,163 0 26,454 414 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 334 0 Unfinished Oils ...................................................... 36 0 0 36 227 0 0 0 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 0 32 0 0 0 0 381 0 Finished Motor Gasoline ....................................... 0 0 0 808 38 0 15,816 255 Reformulated

  4. The U.S. as a market for RFG & alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, C.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes the outlook for the U.S. regarding the use of Reformulated Gasoline. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 and its impact on the federal fleet of vehicles are discussed. Target numbers for the quantity of federal fleet vehicles which are fueled by alternative energy, a breakdown of technology types used in the vehicles, and resulting annual gasoline savings are also discussed.

  5. Changing national policy priorities and the ROS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daschle, T.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the effects of changing national policy priorities regarding the use of reformulated fuels and oxygenated fuels. The importance of the use of oxygenated fuels in reducing carbon monoxide pollution of the atmosphere and ways for people to work together to achieve this goal are discussed. MTBE and ETBE are important additives in the fuels industry and the economic outlook affecting their usage is briefly described.

  6. West Coast (PADD 5) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas

  7. West Virginia Native Selected to Present at the Council for Chemical Research Me

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas

  8. MTEM Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production Costs 3. Relationship between price of MTBE and Reformulated Gasoline 4. Influence of Natural Gas Prices on the Gasoline Market 5. Regression Results 6. Data Sources 7. End Notes 1. Summary Last year the price of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) increased dramatically on two occasions (Figure 1) (see Data Sources at end of article.): 1. Between April and June 2000, the price (U.S. Gulf Coast waterborne

  9. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low Carbon Fuel Standard California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) Program requires a reduction in the carbon intensity of transportation fuels that are sold, supplied, or offered for sale in the state by a minimum of 10% by 2020. The California Air Resources Board (ARB) regulations require transportation fuel producers and importers to meet specified average carbon intensity requirements for fuel. In the regulations, carbon intensity reductions are based on reformulated gasoline mixed with

  11. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.PDF Table 21. Blender Net Production of Petroleum Products by PAD Districts, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Finished Motor Gasoline ........................................... 75,867 5,597 81,464 33,855 8,365 9,820 52,040 Reformulated ........................................................

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 June 2016 Table 33. Blender Net Production of Petroleum Products by PAD District, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Finished Motor Gasoline ........................................... 92,262 7,022 99,284 45,894 9,917 14,867 70,678 Reformulated

  13. MTBE Production Economics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production Costs 3. Relationship between price of MTBE and Reformulated Gasoline 4. Influence of Natural Gas Prices on the Gasoline Market 5. Regression Results 6. Data Sources 7. End Notes 1. Summary Last year the price of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) increased dramatically on two occasions (Figure 1) (see Data Sources at end of article.): 1. Between April and June 2000, the price (U.S. Gulf Coast waterborne

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports & Exports Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether),

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Inputs & Utilization Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether),

  16. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and

  17. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Weekly Supply Estimates Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether),

  18. International issues in energy policy, development, and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorian, J.P.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-01-01

    Events in the international oil market have shaped energy policies in both developed and developing countries for the last two decades. This collection of 19 articles explores this situation. The articles are grouped under three headings: Global Markets and Policy, Energy Issues and Trends, and Economic development. The focus of the articles is on specific topics such as reformulated gasoline, neoclassical growth theory and energy conservation with a limited focus on the broady picture of the world's energy problems and prospects.

  19. New wholesale power market design using linked forward markets : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William; Ellison, James F.; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Guttromson, Ross; Tesfatsion, Leigh S.

    2013-04-01

    This report proposes a reformulation of U.S. ISO/RTO-managed wholesale electric power mar- kets for improved reliability and e ciency of system operations. Current markets do not specify or compensate primary frequency response. They also unnecessarily limit the participation of new technologies in reserve markets and o er insu cient economic inducements for new capacity invest- ment. In the proposed market reformulation, energy products are represented as physically-covered rm contracts and reserve products as physically-covered call option contracts. Trading of these products is supported by a backbone of linked ISO/RTO-managed forward markets with planning horizons ranging from multiple years to minutes ahead. A principal advantage of this reformulation is that reserve needs can be speci ed in detail, and resources can o er the services for which they are best suited, without being forced to conform to rigid reserve product de nitions. This should improve the business case for electric energy storage and other emerging technologies to provide reserve. In addition, the facilitation of price discovery should help to ensure e cient energy/reserve procurement and adequate levels of new capacity investment.

  20. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

  1. MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

  2. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2015-01-01

    BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of geometrically exact beam theory (GEBT), was developed to meet the design challenges associated with highly flexible composite wind turbine blades. In this paper, the governing equations of GEBT are reformulated into a nonlinear state-space form to support its coupling within the modular framework of the FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool. Different time integration schemes (implicit and explicit) were implemented and examined for wind turbine analysis. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this new beam solver. An example analysis of a realistic wind turbine blade, the CX-100, is also presented as validation.

  4. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  5. CleanFleet. Volume 2, Project Design and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The CleanFleet alternative fuels demonstration project evaluated five alternative motorfuels in commercial fleet service over a two-year period. The five fuels were compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), M-85 (85 percent methanol and 15 percent RFG), and electric vans. Eight-four vans were operated on the alternative fuels and 27 vans were operated on gasoline as baseline controls. Throughout the demonstration information was collected on fleet operations, vehicle emissions, and fleet economics. In this volume of the CleanFleet findings, the design and implementation of the project are summarized.

  6. Khler potentials for Planck inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: m.scalisi@rug.nl

    2013-11-01

    We assess which Khler potentials in supergravity lead to viable single-field inflationary models that are consistent with Planck. We highlight the role of symmetries, such as shift, Heisenberg and supersymmetry, in these constructions. Also the connections to string theory are pointed out. Finally, we discuss a supergravity model for arbitrary inflationary potentials that is suitable for open string inflation and generalise it to the case of closed string inflation. Our model includes the recently discussed supergravity reformulation of the Starobinsky model of inflation as well as an interesting alternative with comparable predictions.

  7. Emissions credit trading: A new revenue stream for refiners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, J.; Hirshfeld, D.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes several innovations in the fossil fuels and automotive/petroleum industries which have been improved or invented as a result of the necessity to comply with Clean Air Act regulations. Such innovations as boiler modifications, usage of low-sulfur coal, improved combustion, pre-combustion cleaning of coal, reformulated gasolines, and oxygenated fuels have all contributed to reductions in air pollution emissions from fossil fuel-powered plants and automotive emissions. Market alternatives for reducing the impacts of the usage of fossil fuels and automotive emissions on the ozone layer are also described.

  8. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  9. The strategic outlook for petroleum refiners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, C.

    1994-12-31

    After several years of acceptable and relatively reliable profitability, refiners were plunged into uncertainty once again following passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in 1990. While many of the original uncertainties that attended these regulations have since been resolved, the industry now must prepare for the new manufacturing, distributions, and transportation challenges that undoubtedly will accompany the first stages of reformulated gasoline (RFG) compliance in early 1995. This impending challenge introduces several fundamental questions: (1) How has the industry changed and adjusted to respond to anticipated future needs? (2) What strategies are refiners employing today? (3) What are industry performance expectations over the next several years?

  10. Group action in topos quantum physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flori, C.

    2013-03-15

    Topos theory has been suggested first by Isham and Butterfield, and then by Isham and Doering, as an alternative mathematical structure within which to formulate physical theories. In particular, it has been used to reformulate standard quantum mechanics in such a way that a novel type of logic is used to represent propositions. In this paper, we extend this formulation to include the notion of a group and group transformation in such a way that we overcome the problem of twisted presheaves. In order to implement this we need to change the type of topos involved, so as to render the notion of continuity of the group action meaningful.

  11. Emissions with butane/propane blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This article reports on various aspects of exhaust emissions from a light-duty car converted to operate on liquefied petroleum gas and equipped with an electrically heated catalyst. Butane and butane/propane blends have recently received attention as potentially useful alternative fuels. Butane has a road octane number of 92, a high blending vapor pressure, and has been used to upgrade octane levels of gasoline blends and improve winter cold starts. Due to reformulated gasoline requirements for fuel vapor pressure, however, industry has had to remove increasing amounts of butane form the gasoline pool. Paradoxically, butane is one of the cleanest burning components of gasoline.

  12. A Green's function quantum average atom model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Starrett, Charles Edward

    2015-05-21

    A quantum average atom model is reformulated using Green's functions. This allows integrals along the real energy axis to be deformed into the complex plane. The advantage being that sharp features such as resonances and bound states are broadened by a Lorentzian with a half-width chosen for numerical convenience. An implementation of this method therefore avoids numerically challenging resonance tracking and the search for weakly bound states, without changing the physical content or results of the model. A straightforward implementation results in up to a factor of 5 speed-up relative to an optimized orbital based code.

  13. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  14. Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the laboratory effort to identify and quantify organic exhaust species generated from alternative-fueled light-duty vehicles operating over the Federal Test Procedure on compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, ethanol, and reformulated gasoline. The exhaust species from these vehicles were identified and quantified for fuel/air equivalence ratios of 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, nominally, and were analyzed with and without a vehicle catalyst in place to determine the influence of a catalytic converter on species formation.

  15. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 1, summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The South Coast Alternative Fuels Demonstration, called CleanFleet, was conducted in the Los Angeles area from April 1992 through September 1994. The demonstration consisted of 111 package delivery vans operating on five alternative fuels and the control fuel, unleaded gasoline. The alternative fuels were propane gas, compressed natural gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol with 15 percent RFG (called M-85), and electricity. This volume of the eight volume CleanFleet final report is a summary of the project design and results of the analysis of data collected during the demonstration on vehicle maintenance and durability, fuel economy, employee attitudes, safety and occupational hygiene, emissions, and fleet economics.

  16. Shape invariant potentials in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhya, R.; Sree Ranjani, S.; Kapoor, A.K.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the shape invariance property of a potential in one dimension. We show that a simple ansatz allows us to reconstruct all the known shape invariant potentials in one dimension. This ansatz can be easily extended to arrive at a large class of new shape invariant potentials in arbitrary dimensions. A reformulation of the shape invariance property and possible generalizations are proposed. These may lead to an important extension of the shape invariance property to Hamiltonians that are related to standard potential problems via space time transformations, which are found useful in path integral formulation of quantum mechanics.

  17. Entropic uncertainty relations for the ground state of a coupled system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santhanam, M.S.

    2004-04-01

    There is a renewed interest in the uncertainty principle, reformulated from the information theoretic point of view, called the entropic uncertainty relations. They have been studied for various integrable systems as a function of their quantum numbers. In this work, focussing on the ground state of a nonlinear, coupled Hamiltonian system, we show that approximate eigenstates can be constructed within the framework of adiabatic theory. Using the adiabatic eigenstates, we estimate the information entropies and their sum as a function of the nonlinearity parameter. We also briefly look at the information entropies for the highly excited states in the system.

  18. M-transfer activity of MCM-41 materials in 1-hexene isomerization reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, J.M.; Hernandez, F.; Terres, E.; Toledo, A.; Navarrete, J.

    1996-10-01

    The gasoline reformulation scheme includes the use of oxygenated additives MTBE (methyl-ter-butyl-ether), TAME (ter-amyl-methyl-ether), ETBE (ethyl-ter-butyl-ether) and DIPE (di-isopropyl-ether), which have the iso-olefins (i-C{sub 3}{sup =}, i-C{sub 4}{sup =}, i-C{sub 5}{sup =}) as precursors. In this respect, olefin production from FCC units must be enhanced to cover the demand. A series of new catalytic materials with lower hydrogen transfer activity could enhance the olefin yield from the FCC reactors.

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * During the April-through-September summer driving season this year, regular gasoline retail prices are forecast to average $3.57/gallon (gal). The projected monthly national average regular retail gasoline price falls from $3.66/gal in May to $3.46/gal in September. EIA expects regular gasoline retail prices to average $3.45/gal in 2014 and $3.37/gal in 2015, compared with $3.51/gal in 2013. The July 2014 New York Harbor reformulated blendstock for

  20. Multilayer shallow shelf approximation: Minimisation formulation, finite element solvers and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jouvet, Guillaume

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, a multilayer generalisation of the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA) is considered. In this recent hybrid ice flow model, the ice thickness is divided into thin layers, which can spread out, contract and slide over each other in such a way that the velocity profile is layer-wise constant. Like the SSA (1-layer model), the multilayer model can be reformulated as a minimisation problem. However, unlike the SSA, the functional to be minimised involves a new penalisation term for the interlayer jumps of the velocity, which represents the vertical shear stresses induced by interlayer sliding. Taking advantage of this reformulation, numerical solvers developed for the SSA can be naturally extended layer-wise or column-wise. Numerical results show that the column-wise extension of a Newton multigrid solver proves to be robust in the sense that its convergence is barely influenced by the number of layers and the type of ice flow. In addition, the multilayer formulation appears to be naturally better conditioned than the one of the first-order approximation to face the anisotropic conditions of the sliding-dominant ice flow of ISMIP-HOM experiments.

  1. Migratory Birds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    65 2.164 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.153 2.152 2.186 2.193 2.243 2.294 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.242 2.320 2.304 2.360 2.436 1994-2016 Regular 2.078 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.069 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.132 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.323 2.328 2.361 2.361 2.411 2.461 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.304 2.309 2.337 2.339 2.387 2.434

  2. Determination of combustion products from alternative fuels - part 1. LPG and CNG combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.A.; Bailey, B.K.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes efforts underway to identify volatile organic exhaust species generated by a light-duty vehicle operating over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) on CNG and LPG, and to compare them to exhaust constituents generated from the same vehicle operating on a fuel blended to meet California Phase 2 specifications. The exhaust species from this vehicle were identified and quantified for fuel/air equivalence ratios of 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, nominally, and were analyzed with and without the vehicle`s catalytic converter in place to determine the influence of the vehicle`s catalyst on species formation. Speciation data showed greater than 87 percent of all LPG and greater than 95 percent of all CNG hydrocarbon exhaust constituents to be composed of C{sub 1} to C{sub 3} compounds. In addition, toxic emissions from the combustion of CNG and LPG were as low as 10 percent of those generated by combustion of gasoline. A comparison of ozone forming potential of the three fuels was made based on the Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale used by the California Air Resources Board. Post-catalyst results from stoichiometric operation indicated that LPG and CNG produced 63 percent and 88 percent less potential ozone than reformulated gasoline, respectively. On average over all equivalence ratios, CNG and LPG exhaust constituents were approximately 65 percent less reactive than those from reformulated gasoline. 4 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. GyroSolé’ Harmonic Engine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    088 2.054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.088 2.056 2.037 2.053 2.077 2.127 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 1994-2016 Regular 1.980 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.980 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.980 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.224 2.195 2.179 2.204 2.218 2.259 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.221 2.195 2.174 2.207 2.219 2.267

  4. West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    488 2.454 2.414 2.419 2.457 2.469 1998-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.553 2.526 2.492 2.493 2.529 2.539 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.180 2.111 2.043 2.065 2.115 2.140 1998-2016 Regular 2.421 2.387 2.347 2.352 2.391 2.401 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.490 2.462 2.428 2.430 2.467 2.473 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.020 1.953 1.975 2.025 2.051 1998-2016 Midgrade 2.623 2.587 2.548 2.551 2.596 2.612 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.660 2.626 2.626 2.670 2.685

  5. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    263 2.244 2.210 2.221 2.270 2.314 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.240 2.227 2.193 2.215 2.266 2.318 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.301 2.271 2.238 2.230 2.276 2.308 1994-2016 Regular 2.120 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.095 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.162 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.395 2.378 2.345 2.364 2.407 2.451 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.358 2.346 2.313 2.344 2.395 2.442

  6. U.S. States - Maps - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 2.267 2.256 2.256 2.299 2.341 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.211 2.198 2.193 2.203 2.243 2.292 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.447 2.406 2.384 2.364 2.413 2.441 1994-2016 Regular 2.182 2.159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.105 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.344 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.434 2.413 2.398 2.401 2.441 2.481 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.345 2.335 2.325 2.340 2.378 2.424

  7. A numerical method for the quasi-incompressible Cahn–Hilliard–Navier–Stokes equations for variable density flows with a discrete energy law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Lin, P.; Lowengrub, J.S.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically a diffuse interface model for the Navier–Stokes equation with fluid–fluid interface when the fluids have different densities [48]. Under minor reformulation of the system, we show that there is a continuous energy law underlying the system, assuming that all variables have reasonable regularities. It is shown in the literature that an energy law preserving method will perform better for multiphase problems. Thus for the reformulated system, we design a C{sup 0} finite element method and a special temporal scheme where the energy law is preserved at the discrete level. Such a discrete energy law (almost the same as the continuous energy law) for this variable density two-phase flow model has never been established before with C{sup 0} finite element. A Newton method is introduced to linearise the highly non-linear system of our discretization scheme. Some numerical experiments are carried out using the adaptive mesh to investigate the scenario of coalescing and rising drops with differing density ratio. The snapshots for the evolution of the interface together with the adaptive mesh at different times are presented to show that the evolution, including the break-up/pinch-off of the drop, can be handled smoothly by our numerical scheme. The discrete energy functional for the system is examined to show that the energy law at the discrete level is preserved by our scheme.

  8. Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    310 2.283 2.283 2.326 2.357 2.361 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.346 2.321 2.326 2.371 2.412 2.405 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.288 2.260 2.256 2.298 2.323 2.334 1994-2016 Regular 2.172 2.144 2.143 2.187 2.220 2.225 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.224 2.198 2.204 2.246 2.290 2.285 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.139 2.110 2.105 2.150 2.176 2.187 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.450 2.423 2.424 2.467 2.494 2.497 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.446 2.426 2.429 2.484 2.514 2.503

  9. East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44 2.210 2.221 2.270 2.314 2.314 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.227 2.193 2.215 2.266 2.318 2.314 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.271 2.238 2.230 2.276 2.308 2.315 1994-2016 Regular 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 2.173 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 2.171 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 2.176 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.378 2.345 2.364 2.407 2.451 2.440 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.346 2.313 2.344 2.395 2.442 2.422

  10. Environmental regulations and changes in petroleum refining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidderdale, T.C.M.

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. petroleum industry has responded to four major new federal rules on motor gasoline product quality in the last 6 years: Phase 1 Summer Volatility (Rvp) Regulation, June 1989; Phase 2 Summer Volatility (Rvp) regulation, May 1992; oxygenated Gasoline, November 1992; and reformulated Gasoline Phase I Simple Model, December 1994. These regulations have generated significant changes in domestic refinery operations, affecting marginal production costs and market prices, refinery yields, and the seasonality of production. Some changes have been dramatic. The price of motor gasoline has increased by as much as 60 {cents}/gal due to regulations. Refinery yields of motor gasoline (refinery output of motor gasoline as a fraction of refinery inputs or total refinery output), which historically peaked in the early summer to meet high summer driving demand, now are highest during the winter months. These changes in domestic refining operations are identified and related to the vapor pressure, oxygenated and reformulated gasoline (RFG) product quality regulations. This analysis uses linear regression equations from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts appearing in the EIA`s Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  11. Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation fuel-cyl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Michael

    2000-06-20

    The GREET model estimates the full fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehile technologies applied to motor vehicles. GREET 1.5 includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and dimethyl ether; and landfill gases to methanol. For a given fuel/transportation technology combination, GREET 1.5 calculates (1) the fuel-cycle consumption of total energy (all energy sources), fossil fuels (petroleum, natural gas, and coal), and petroleum; (2) the fuel-cycle emissions of GHGs -- primarily carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N20); and (3) the fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (C0), nitrogen oxides (N0x), sulfur oxides (S0x), and particulate matter with a diameter measuring 10 micrometers or less (PM10). The model is designed to readily allow researchers to input their own assumptions and generate fuel-cycle energy and emission results for specified fuel/technology combinations.

  12. Environmental implications of alternative-fueled automobiles: Air quality and greenhouse gas tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MaClean, H.L.; Lave, L.B.

    2000-01-15

    The authors analyze alternative fuel-powerstrain options for internal combustion engine automobiles. Fuel/engine efficiency, energy use, pollutant discharges, and greenhouse gas emissions are estimated for spark and compression ignited, direct injected (DI), and indirect injected (II) engines fueled by conventional and reformulated gasoline, reformulated diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and alcohols. Since comparisons of fuels and technologies in dissimilar vehicles are misleading, the authors hold emissions level, range, vehicle size class, and style constant. At present, CNG vehicles have the best exhaust emissions performance while DI diesels have the worst. Compared to a conventional gasoline fueled II automobile, greenhouse gases could be reduced by 40% by a DI CNG automobile and by 25% by a DI diesel. Gasoline- and diesel-fueled automobiles are able to attain long ranges with little weight or fuel economy penalty. CNG vehicles have the highest penalty for increasing range, due to their heavy fuel storage systems, but are the most attractive for a 160-km range. DI engines, particularly diesels, may not be able to meet strict emissions standards, at least not without lowering efficiency.

  13. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.793 3.528 3.610 3.511 3.376 2.423 1994-2015 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.921 3.675 3.822 3.707 3.559 2.718 1994-2015 Regular 2.782 3.521 3.618 3.505 3.358 2.429 1990-2015 Conventional Areas 2.742 3.476 3.552 3.443 3.299 2.334 1990-2015 Reformulated Areas 2.864 3.616 3.757 3.635 3.481 2.629 1994-2015 Midgrade 2.902 3.644 3.756 3.663 3.539 2.645

  14. Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation fuel-cyl

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-06-20

    The GREET model estimates the full fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehile technologies applied to motor vehicles. GREET 1.5 includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; corn, woody biomass, andmore » herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and dimethyl ether; and landfill gases to methanol. For a given fuel/transportation technology combination, GREET 1.5 calculates (1) the fuel-cycle consumption of total energy (all energy sources), fossil fuels (petroleum, natural gas, and coal), and petroleum; (2) the fuel-cycle emissions of GHGs -- primarily carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N20); and (3) the fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (C0), nitrogen oxides (N0x), sulfur oxides (S0x), and particulate matter with a diameter measuring 10 micrometers or less (PM10). The model is designed to readily allow researchers to input their own assumptions and generate fuel-cycle energy and emission results for specified fuel/technology combinations.« less

  15. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 2.113 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.056 2.037 2.053 2.077 2.127 2.113 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 1994-2016 Regular 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 2.005 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 2.005 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.195 2.179 2.204 2.218 2.259 2.251 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.195 2.174 2.207 2.219 2.267 2.247

  16. Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    84 2.149 2.175 2.227 2.284 2.281 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.187 2.150 2.179 2.231 2.287 2.284 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.156 2.138 2.133 2.181 2.249 2.245 1994-2016 Regular 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 2.125 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 2.130 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 2.075 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.321 2.285 2.322 2.371 2.424 2.402 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.317 2.280 2.320 2.371 2.423 2.399

  17. Midwest (PADD 2) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 2.269 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.152 2.186 2.193 2.243 2.294 2.259 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.320 2.304 2.360 2.436 2.337 1994-2016 Regular 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 2.180 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 2.172 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 2.227 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.328 2.361 2.361 2.411 2.461 2.424 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.309 2.337 2.339 2.387 2.434 2.406

  18. New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    79 2.237 2.219 2.270 2.305 2.309 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.286 2.261 2.246 2.294 2.336 2.346 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.278 2.231 2.212 2.264 2.298 2.299 1994-2016 Regular 2.168 2.125 2.104 2.166 2.201 2.202 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.181 2.156 2.141 2.192 2.239 2.248 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.165 2.117 2.095 2.160 2.192 2.191 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.441 2.404 2.391 2.410 2.449 2.455 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.439 2.416 2.401 2.439 2.471 2.481

  19. New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    419 2.384 2.374 2.380 2.399 2.405 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.340 2.313 2.304 2.320 2.358 2.359 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.487 2.445 2.434 2.433 2.434 2.444 2000-2016 Regular 2.296 2.262 2.253 2.260 2.279 2.284 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.232 2.204 2.195 2.212 2.252 2.251 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.355 2.315 2.304 2.303 2.303 2.313 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.559 2.521 2.506 2.509 2.527 2.536 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.453 2.424 2.413 2.418 2.461 2.465

  20. PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    677 2.635 2.596 2.637 2.656 2.660 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.553 2.526 2.492 2.493 2.529 2.539 1995-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.727 2.680 2.639 2.696 2.707 2.709 1995-2016 Regular 2.614 2.573 2.534 2.573 2.592 2.594 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.490 2.462 2.428 2.430 2.467 2.473 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.668 2.621 2.581 2.636 2.647 2.647 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.785 2.741 2.702 2.747 2.766 2.773 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.660 2.626 2.626 2.670 2.685

  1. Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    063 2.049 2.057 2.081 2.113 2.117 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.075 2.055 2.065 2.088 2.130 2.119 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 2000-2016 Regular 1.959 1.944 1.953 1.978 2.013 2.016 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.974 1.954 1.963 1.988 2.035 2.023 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.223 2.209 2.217 2.230 2.258 2.264 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.243 2.219 2.235 2.240 2.277 2.264

  2. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.071 2.216 2.371 2.467 2.345 2.284 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.996 2.129 2.303 2.405 2.263 2.226 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.223 2.390 2.509 2.593 2.512 2.402 1994-2016 Regular 1.969 2.113 2.268 2.366 2.239 2.178 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 1.895 2.027 2.199 2.303 2.157 2.119 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.124 2.293 2.413 2.497 2.411 2.300 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.210 2.355 2.510 2.603

  3. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    67 2.256 2.256 2.299 2.341 2.329 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.198 2.193 2.203 2.243 2.292 2.277 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.406 2.384 2.364 2.413 2.441 2.436 1994-2016 Regular 2.159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 2.223 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 2.170 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 2.333 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.413 2.398 2.401 2.441 2.481 2.468 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.335 2.325 2.340 2.378 2.424 2.405

  4. Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elbert, Stephen T.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu

    2012-07-26

    Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) are financial insurance tools to help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, first an innovative mathematical reformulation of the FTR problem is presented which dramatically improves the computational efficiency of optimization problem. After having re-formulated the problem, a novel non-linear dynamic system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX™ and tested on both standard IEEE test systems and large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The performance of the NDS is demonstrated to be comparable and in some cases is shown to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms. The proposed formulation and NDS based solver is also easily parallelizable enabling further computational improvement.

  5. Lu Gan | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    92 2.184 2.149 2.175 2.227 2.284 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.193 2.187 2.150 2.179 2.231 2.287 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.182 2.156 2.138 2.133 2.181 2.249 1994-2016 Regular 2.033 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.036 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.009 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.327 2.321 2.285 2.322 2.371 2.424 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.322 2.317 2.280 2.320 2.371 2.423

  6. Refiners Switch to RFG Complex Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    On January 1, 1998, domestic and foreign refineries and importers must stop using the "simple" model and begin using the "complex" model to calculate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic air pollutants (TAP), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from motor gasoline. The primary differences between application of the two models is that some refineries may have to meet stricter standards for the sulfur and olefin content of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) they produce and all refineries will now be held accountable for NOx emissions. Requirements for calculating emissions from conventional gasoline under the anti-dumping rule similarly change for exhaust TAP and NOx. However, the change to the complex model is not expected to result in an increase in the price premium for RFG or constrain supplies.

  7. Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

  8. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

  9. Newton-based optimization for Kullback-Leibler nonnegative tensor factorizations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plantenga, Todd; Kolda, Tamara G.; Hansen, Samantha

    2015-04-30

    Tensor factorizations with nonnegativity constraints have found application in analysing data from cyber traffic, social networks, and other areas. We consider application data best described as being generated by a Poisson process (e.g. count data), which leads to sparse tensors that can be modelled by sparse factor matrices. In this paper, we investigate efficient techniques for computing an appropriate canonical polyadic tensor factorization based on the Kullback–Leibler divergence function. We propose novel subproblem solvers within the standard alternating block variable approach. Our new methods exploit structure and reformulate the optimization problem as small independent subproblems. We employ bound-constrained Newton andmore » quasi-Newton methods. Finally, we compare our algorithms against other codes, demonstrating superior speed for high accuracy results and the ability to quickly find sparse solutions.« less

  10. An implicit energy-conservative 2D Fokker-Planck algorithm -- 1. Difference scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chacon, L.; Barnes, D.C.; Knoll, D.A.; Miley, G.H.

    2000-01-20

    Numerical energy conservation in Fokker-Planck problems requires the energy moment of the Fokker-Planck equation to cancel exactly. However, standard discretization techniques not only do not observe this requirement (thus precluding exact energy conservation), but they also demand very refined meshes to keep the energy error under control. In this paper, a new difference scheme for multidimensional Fokker-Planck problems that improves the numerical cancellation of the energy moment is proposed. Crucial to this new development is the reformulation of the friction term in the Fokker-Planck collision operator takes the form of a double divergence operating on a tensor, which is suitable for particle and energy conservative differencing. Numerical results show that the new discretization scheme improves the cancellation of the energy moment integral over standard approaches by at least an order of magnitude.