Sample records for reflector lamps comply

  1. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Sumner, Thomas L. (Wheaton, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  2. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  3. DuraLamp USA: Order (2010-CE-0912)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered DuraLamp USA, Inc. to pay a $2,500 civil penalty after finding DuraLamp USA had failed to certify that model PAR 30, an incandescent reflector lamp, complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  5. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, Bruce A. (825 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Siminovitch, Michael (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  6. 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and incandescent reflectors lamps, as issued by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on April 11, 2014.

  7. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  8. Discharge lamp with reflective jacket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

  9. One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

  10. Electrodeless lamp using a single magnetron and improved lamp envelope therefor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ury, M. G.; Ryan, P. J.; Wood, Ch. H.

    1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generated electrodeless lamp using a single magnetron, and an improved lamp envelope therefor. An elongated lamp envelope containing a plasma forming medium is disposed in a microwave chamber comprised of a reflector and mesh. The reflector includes a pair of coupling slots, each of which is disposed equidistant from the ends of the lamp envelope. A waveguide means is provided which has a wall which is comprised of a portion of the reflector which includes the slots, and has means for introducing microwave energy thereto at an area equidistant from the two slots so that the energy couples equally to the slots. When the frequency of the microwave energy and chamber dimensions are arranged so that a symmetrical standing wave exists in the chamber, a balanced system results wherein after a short start-up period, approximately equal light output is obtained from the respective ends of the lamp envelop. In order to prevent recondensation of the envelope fill during operation at areas of low temperature, and improved envelope is provided in which such areas are severly tapered to cause hotter operation thereat.

  11. Aperture lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

  12. LED lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  13. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  14. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  15. Electric lamp, base for use therewith and method of assembling same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Harold L. (Beverly, MA); English, George J. (Reading, MA); Chakrabarti, Kirti B. (Danvers, MA)

    1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric lamp including a reflector, at least one conductive ferrule located within a surface of the reflector and a lead-in conductor electrically connected to the ferrule and extending within the reflector. The lamp includes a base having an insulative (e.g., ceramic) cap located substantially about the ferrule, barrier means (e.g., ceramic fiber) located within the cap to define an open chamber substantially about the ferrule, an electrical conductor (e.g., wire) extending within the cap and electrically connected (e.g., silver soldered) to the ferrule, and sealing means (e.g., high temperature cement) located within the cap to provide a seal therefore. The barrier means serves to separate the sealing means from the open chamber about the ferrule such that the heat generated by the ferrule can be vented through spaced apertures located within the cap's side wall. A method of assembling a base on an electric lamp is also provided.

  16. Fluorescent Tube Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum efficiency standards for fluorescent lamps. The program will issue updated energy efficiency requirements when the market distribution of this product category stabilizes and when doing so has the potential to result in significant Federal energy savings.

  17. Turning on LAMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  18. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Gaithersburg, MD); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Smith, Malcolm (Alexandria, VA); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  19. Turning on LAMP

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  20. Method and apparatus for mounting a dichroic mirror in a microwave powered lamp assembly using deformable tabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, M.; Sowers, F.; Harper, C.; Love, W.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector secured at the juncture of the two sections to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. The reflector is mounted in the cavity by tabs formed in the screen unit and bendable into the cavity to define support planes abutting respective surfaces of the reflector. The mesh section and tabs are preferably formed by etching a thin metal sheet. 7 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for mounting a dichroic mirror in a microwave powered lamp assembly using deformable tabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD); Sowers, Frank (Frederick, MD); Harper, Curt (Wheaton, MD); Love, Wayne (Olney, MD)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector secured at the juncture of the two sections to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. The reflector is mounted in the cavity by tabs formed in the screen unit and bendable into the cavity to define support planes abutting respective surfaces of the reflector. The mesh section and tabs are preferably formed by etching a thin metal sheet.

  2. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  3. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

  4. LED MR16 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following CALiPER report provides detailed analysis of LED MR16 lamp performance, covering basic performance characteristics as well as subjective evaluation of beam, shadow, and color quality. Pending reports will offer analysis on performance attributes that are not captured by LM-79 testing. These reports are intended to educate the industry on market trends, potential issues, and important areas for improvement.

  5. IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC-97, 39-45, St. Louis, 1997. A MHz Electronic Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps Michael Gulko and Sam Ben-Yaakov* Power Electronics Laboratory lamps designated for automotive headlight applications was investigated theoretically, by simulation and experimentally. The study reveals that a based ballast (CS-PPRI) complies with the automotive requirement of very

  6. LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following CALiPER reports provide detailed analysis of LED PAR38 lamp performance, covering basic performance characteristics as well as subjective evaluation of beam, shadow, and color quality. Pending reports will offer analysis on flicker, dimming and power quality characteristics; stress testing; and lumen and chromaticity maintenance. These reports are intended to educate the industry on market trends, potential issues, and important areas for improvement.

  7. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  8. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

  9. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

  10. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  11. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Page, Erik (Berkeley, CA); Gould, Carl T. (Medford, OR)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  12. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (El Sobrante, CA); Page, Erik (Berkeley, CA); Gould, Carl T. (Medford, OR)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  13. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  14. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    light emitting diode (LED) lamps will eventually come toare also looking to make LED lamps compatible with standardelectronics design, an LED lamp can be made dimmable over a

  15. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  16. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, LBNL-4998E. General Electric Lamp and BallastEuropean Union General Electric High Intensity DischargeEnergy Saver”; and General Electric has a 26 watt T5 lamp (

  17. Application of vane-type resonator to microwave powered electrodeless HID lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochi, Akira; Takeda, Mamoru

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cavity resonator has been generally used as microwave applicator for an electrodeless high intensity discharge (HID) lamp. The size of a cavity resonator is determined by the wavelength of a microwave applied. For example, for a microwave of 2.45 GHz, an inner diameter of more than about 76 mm is necessary for obtaining a microwave resonant field, and then the size of a plasma arc capable of maintaining a stable discharge is experimentally limited at about 15 mm and above. Accordingly the microwave powered electrodeless HID lamp device using cavity resonator is inappropriate in applications where a point light source is required. A vane-type resonator is generally known as an anode of a magnetron, which decides the oscillation frequency of the magnetron. The authors used 3-D finite element method simulation for a design of a vane-type resonator with parabolic reflector to obtain a desired resonant frequency. According to the results of the simulation, the sizes of a 4-vanes resonator with the parabolic reflector were decided, and the resonator made of aluminum and copper was prepared. An electrodeless lamp with InBr and Ar gas enclosed in a spherical quartz glass tube having an inner diameter of about 4 mm was also prepared, and was set at center portion of the resonator. The total luminous flux was about 2,150 lm at microwave input of 27 W. Incidentally, the CRI and Tc for this lamp were 93 and 10,200 K, respectively. Thus, it becomes possible to efficiently couple microwave energy with a smaller-sized electrodeless HID lamp than conventional.

  18. Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches Echelle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches Echelle ECH60S5.1 La Serena, December 09, 2009 #12)...............................................................................12 CTIO 60 inches Echelle / Comparison lamps automation, ECH60S5.1 2 #12;Introduction The present document is just a brief summary of the work done automating the 60 inches echelle comparison lamps

  19. Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches CHIRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches CHIRON CHI60HF5.2 La Serena, March 16, 2011 #12;Table)...............................................................................12 CTIO 60 inches Chiron / Comparison lamps automation, CHI60HF5.2 2 #12;Introduction The present document is just a brief summary of the work done automating the 60 inches chiron comparison lamps

  20. LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The CALiPER program performed a series of investigations on linear LED lamps. Each report in the series covers the performance of up to 31 linear LED lamps, which were purchased in late 2012 or 2013. The first report focuses on bare lamp performance of LED T8 replacement lamps and subsequent reports examine performance in various troffers, as well as cost-effectiveness. There is also a concise guidance document that describes the findings of the Series 21 studies and provides practical advice to manufacturers, specifiers, and consumers (Report 21.4: Summary of Linear (T8) LED Lamp Testing , 5 pages, June 2014).

  1. Development and Testing of Solar Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C.; Terwilliger, K.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To make concentrating solar power technologies more cost competitive, it is necessary to develop advanced reflector materials that are low in cost and maintain high reflectance for extended lifetimes under severe outdoor environments. The Advanced Materials Team performs durability testing of candidate solar reflectors at outdoor test sites and in accelerated weathering chambers. Several materials being developed by industry have been submitted for evaluation. These include silvered glass mirrors, aluminized reflectors, and front-surface mirrors. In addition to industry-supplied materials, NREL is funding the development of new, innovative reflectors, including a new commercial laminate reflector and an advanced solar reflective mirror (ASRM). To help commercialize the ASRM, a cost analysis was performed; it shows the total production cost could meet the goal. The development, performance, and durability of these candidate solar reflectors and cost analysis results will be described.

  2. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  3. LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting...

  4. Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category.

  5. Solid-state lamp with integral occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, John J.

    Previous work demonstrated a retrofit proximity detector for fluorescent lamps using the lamp's own stray electric fields. This paper extends the retrofit sensor system to a solid-state (LED) lamp. The design and implementation ...

  6. Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  7. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure Sodium Light Emitting Diode Lamp Lumen Depreciationit is expected that light emitting diode (LED) lamps willLED Technology Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are an emerging

  8. A Review of the Reflector Compact Fluorescent Lights Technology Procurement Program: Conclusions and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), from 2000 to 2007 to improve the performance of reflector type (R-lamp) compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and increase their availability throughout the United States by means of a technology development and procurement strategy. In 2000, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Emerging Technologies Program and its predecessors, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory undertook a technology procurement seeking R-CFLs that were specifically designed for use in ICAT recessed can fixtures and that met other minimum performance criteria including minimum light output and size restrictions (to ensure they fit in standard residential recessed cans). The technology procurement included two phases. In Phase I, requests for proposals (RFPs) were issued in October 2002 and five manufacturers responded with 12 lamp models. Eight of these models met the minimum requirements and passed the 6-hour short-term test in a simulated ICAT environment. These eight models were subjected to long-term tests of 6,000 or more hours in a simulated ICAT environment. Three of these models passed the short- and long-term tests and were promoted through the program website (www.pnl.gov/rlamps), press releases, and fliers. To increase the number of qualifying models, a second RFP was issued in June 2005. In April 2007, DOE announced that 16 reflector CFL (R-CFL) models by four manufacturers had met all the minimum requirements of Phase 2 of the R-CFL Technology Innovation Competition. PNNL developed both the criteria and the test apparatus design for Elevated Temperature Life Testing (ETLT), which has been included by DOE in its draft ENERGY STAR specifications for the reflector category of CFLs. PNNL promoted the winning lamps through a program website, press releases, and fliers as well as through program partners. PNNL also helped engage distributors including Costco, the Home Depot, Bonneville Power Administration, and utility organizations.

  9. Cost effectiveness of long life incandescent lamps and energy buttons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

    1980-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen hours are determined for each lamp system. It is found that the most important component lighting cost is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial unit cost of $20.00, is the most cost-effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined.

  10. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  11. LED lamp power management system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A. M.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp power management system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 reduces power loss in one of the channel switch 62 and the shunt switch 68 when LED lamp electronics power loss (P.sub.loss) exceeds an LED lamp electronics power loss limit (P.sub.lim); and each of the channel switches 62 receives a channel switch control signal 63 from the LED controller 58 and each of the shunt switches 68 receives a shunt switch control signal 69 from the LED controller 58.

  12. Integral CFLs performance in table lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, E.; Driscoll, D.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on performance variations associated with lamp geometry and distribution in portable table luminaires. If correctly retrofit with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), these high use fixtures produce significant energy savings, but if misused, these products could instead generate consumer dissatisfaction with CFLs. It is the authors assertion that the lumen distribution of the light source within the luminaires plays a critical role in total light output, fixture efficiency and efficacy, and, perhaps most importantly, perceived brightness. The authors studied nearly 30 different integral (screw-based) CFLs available on the market today in search of a lamp, or group of lamps, which work best in portable table luminaires. The findings conclusively indicate that horizontally oriented CFLs outperform all other types of CFLs in nearly every aspect.

  13. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

  14. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, Richard H. (Schenectady, NY); Zdeb, John J. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  15. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  16. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

  17. 6035 Hg(Ar) Lamp in 6058 Fiber Optic Accessory. Pencil Style Calibration Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    to that of the Hg(Ar) Lamp, which is the characteristic mercury line spectrum. Forced air-cooling (i.e. from of the handle for connection to the power supply. Table 1 Usable Wavelengths of Spectral Calibration Lamps (in.2 1079.8 1084.5 1114.3 Power Supplies; AC versus DC We offer different power supplies for different needs

  18. iLamp: A Sensor-Enhanced Lamp with Surface-Tracking Capability Based on Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    . The lamp has a robot arm and some LEDs as light sources. When finding that the sensed light intensity robot arm, to a better location and then adjust its LEDs to satisfy the bookmark's need. Central to our interface. This lamp is composed of a ZigBee module, a microprocessor, and a robot arm holding four sets

  19. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

  20. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Dymond, Jr., Lauren E. (North Potomac, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD); Grimm, William G. (Silver Spring, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Ola, Samuel A. (Silver Spring, MD); Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  1. Lumiram Electric: Order (2010-CE-1014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order and entered into a Compromise Agreement with Lumiram Electric Corporation after finding Lumiram Electric had failed to certify that certain models of incandescent reflector lamps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. Westinghouse Lighting: Order (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Westinghouse Lighting Corporation to pay a $50,000 civil penalty after finding Westinghouse Lighting had failed to certify that certain models of general service flourescent and incandescent reflector lamps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  3. Electrodeless lamp energized by microwave energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervin, R.M.; Perret, J.

    1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an electrodeless lamp. It comprises: a microwave cavity; a source of microwaves in communication with the cavity; a lamp envelope containing a plasma-forming medium mounted within the microwave cavity; a gas manifold for feeding gas to at least one gas passageway for directing a stream of gas to the outer surface of the envelope; a gas leak passageway leading from the gas manifold; a conductive mesh assembly for retaining microwaves within the cavity and permitting light to be emitted from the cavity. The assembly including gas flow blocking means for preventing the flow of gas through the gas leak passageway when the screen is in place in the lamp; and means for shutting off the source of microwaves when the gas pressure in the manifold drops below a predetermined value.

  4. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Proctor, Larry Duane [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  5. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of LED T8 Replacement Lamp Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A report on a lab setting analysis involving LED lamps intended to directly replace T8 fluorescent lamps (4') showing light output, power, and economic comparisons with other fluorescent options.

  7. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce...

  8. DuraLamp USA: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-0912)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that DuraLamp USA, Inc. failed to certify a variety of general service fluorescent lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps" webcast, held June 20, 2011.

  10. Modelling of a Fluorescent Lamp Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr. R.A. van Santen, voor een TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Hartgers, Albertus Modelling of a Fluorescent Lamp Plasma / by Albertus Hartgers. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2003. - Proefschrift. ISBN 90-386-1665-1 NUR 924

  11. Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    doctor aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Beks, Mark Louwrens Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps/ door Beks, M.L. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2008. Proefschrift. ISBN: 978

  12. Modeling of highly loaded fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, G.G.; Lawler, J.E.; Curry, J.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of the positive column of fluorescent lamps under conditions of high current density are of current interest, particularly in view of recent developments in electrodeless lamps. Current models tend to overestimate radiation output, and consequently the maintenance electric field in these discharges. Under highly loaded conditions, mercury-rare gas fluorescent lamps exhibit strong mercury depletion on axis (cataphoresis), and an understanding of resonance radiation transport under these conditions is therefore vital to the development of models with a predictive capability. The authors have explored the effect of radial cataphoresis on resonance radiation trapping for situations in which the radiation transport is dominated by foreign gas broadening, Doppler broadening, or resonance collisional broadening of the spectral line. Several different production rates per unit volume of resonance (excited) atoms have also been studied. It is advantageous in many cases to parameterize the trapped decay rate in terms of the total number of ground state atoms in the positive column independent of their radial distribution. The results of this work have been included in a numerical model of the positive column and the predicted influence on discharge parameters will be presented for cases of interest to highly loaded lamps.

  13. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled.

  14. LED lamp color control system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A.M.

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp color control system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; and a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 determines whether the LED source 80 is in a feedback controllable range, stores measured optical flux for the LED source 80 when the LED source 80 is in the feedback controllable range, and bypasses storing the measured optical flux when the LED source 80 is not in the feedback controllable range.

  15. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

  16. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Butler, PA); Turner, Brian (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

  17. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  18. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  19. arc lamp heal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cultures) -- (Animal Behaviour Wang, Yan 40 Spatial and time-dependent distribution of plasma parameters in the metal-halide arc lamp. Physics Websites Summary: for the...

  20. ave lamp margareete: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wm; Kaufmann, David E; Davis, Michael W; Versteeg, Maarten 2012-01-01 213 Study of the electrodeless discharge lamps for photochemical applications and temperature dependence of...

  1. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  2. Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

  3. RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes arranged to cool the lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabor, George (820 Skywood Rd., Lafayette, CA 94549); Orr, Thomas Robert (2285 Vestal, Castro Valley, CA 94546); Greene, Charles Maurice (6450 Regent St., Oakland, CA 94618); Crawford, Douglas Gordon (33 Longridge Rd., Orinda, CA 94563); Berman, Samuel Maurice (2832 Union St., San Francisco, CA 94123)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance.

  4. RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes arranged to cool the lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabor, G.; Orr, T.R.; Greene, C.M.; Crawford, D.G.; Berman, S.M.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance. 17 figs.

  5. Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending therethrough and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

  6. Lamp for generating high power ultraviolet radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gary L. (Elkridge, MD); Potter, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus is a gas filled ultraviolet generating lamp for use as a liquid purifier. The lamp is powred by high voltage AC, but has no metallic electrodes within or in contact with the gas enclosure which is constructed as two concentric quartz cylinders sealed together at their ends with the gas fill between the cylinders. Cooling liquid is pumped through the volume inside the inner quartz cylinder where an electrically conductive pipe spaced from the inner cylinder is used to supply the cooling liquid and act as the high voltage electrode. The gas enclosure is enclosed within but spaced from a metal housing which is connected to operate as the ground electrode of the circuit and through which the treated fluid flows. Thus, the electrical circuit is from the central pipe, and through the cooling liquid, the gas enclosure, the treated liquid on the outside of the outer quartz cylinder, and to the housing. The high voltage electrode is electrically isolated from the source of cooling liquid by a length of insulated hose which also supplies the cooling liquid.

  7. Compact directed percolation with movable partial reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronald Dickman; Daniel ben-Avraham

    2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a version of compact directed percolation (CDP) in one dimension in which occupation of a site for the first time requires that a "mine" or antiparticle be eliminated. This process is analogous to the variant of directed percolation with a long-time memory, proposed by Grassberger, Chate and Rousseau [Phys. Rev. E 55, 2488 (1997)] in order to understand spreading at a critical point involving an infinite number of absorbing configurations. The problem is equivalent to that of a pair of random walkers in the presence of movable partial reflectors. The walkers, which are unbiased, start one lattice spacing apart, and annihilate on their first contact. Each time one of the walkers tries to visit a new site, it is reflected (with probability r) back to its previous position, while the reflector is simultaneously pushed one step away from the walker. Iteration of the discrete-time evolution equation for the probability distribution yields the survival probability S(t). We find that S(t) \\sim t^{-delta}, with delta varying continuously between 1/2 and 1.160 as the reflection probability varies between 0 and 1.

  8. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps LED T8 Replacement Lamps 2014-05-16 Issuance: Test Procedures for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

  9. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring theadoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.s kiosk illuminated by an LED lamp Radecsky, K. , P.

  10. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  11. Emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless indium halide lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, M.; Hochi, A.; Horii, S.; Matsuoka, T. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrodeless HID lamp excited by microwave has been intensively investigated because of its long life, high efficacy and environmental aspect. This study reports excellent emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless HID lamp containing indium halides. The authors investigate InI and InBr as ingredients, and measure the microwave excited spectra and luminous intensities of lamps which are made from spherical silica glass in 10--40 mm outer diameter and with various amounts of halides. It is well known that such indium halides in the usual metal-halide lamps have strong blue line emission at 410 and 451nm. But, in the authors` microwave excited lamps, continuous spectrum can be observed in addition in the visible region. Increasing input of power of microwave makes this continuous spectrum stronger. Below 1kW microwave input power, the spectrum of InBr lamp almost resembled the CIE standard illuminant D65. As a consequence of the spectrum, they found that the color rendering and the duv of InBr lamp were excellent as high as 95 and smaller than 0.002, respectively, in the region of 400--800W input power. The efficacy higher than 100 lm/W was further achieved at 400W. The authors confirm that the microwave excited indium halides lamps can be applicable to many fields of lighting.

  12. Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

  13. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  14. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

  15. Imaging with Spherically Bent Crystals or Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of two parts: Part I describes the working principle of a recently developed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, where the astigmatism of spherically bent crystals is being used with advantage to record spatially resolved spectra of highly charged ions for Doppler measurements of the ion-temperature and toroidal plasmarotation- velocity profiles in tokamak plasmas. This type of spectrometer was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, and its concept was recently adopted for the design of the ITER crystal spectrometers. Part II describes imaging schemes, where the astigmatism has been eliminated by the use of matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or reflectors. These imaging schemes are applicable over a wide range of the electromagnetic radiation, which includes microwaves, visible light, EUV radiation, and x-rays. Potential applications with EUV radiation and x-rays are the diagnosis of laserproduced plasmas, imaging of biological samples with synchrotron radiation, and lithography.

  16. Method of making reflecting film reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, James G. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector of the reflecting film type is disclosed and which may be used in a heliostatic system for concentrating solar energy and comprising a reflecting film bonded to an appropriate rigid substrate in such a way that specularity of a very high order is achieved. A method of bonding the reflecting film to the substrate is also disclosed and comprises the steps of initially adhering the film to a smooth, clean flat rigid surface with a non-bonding liquid between the rigid surface and film, and then bonding the substrate and film. The non-bonding liquid has a molecular adhesion greater than any stresses due to handling or curing of the bonding agent which is applied between the film and the opposing surface of the rigid substrate.

  17. Application Summary Report 22: LED MR16 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the independently tested photometric performance of 27 LED MR16 lamps. It describes initial performance based on light output, efficacy, distribution, color quality, electrical characteristics, and form factor, with comparisons to a selection of benchmark halogen MR16s and ENERGY STAR qualification thresholds. Three types of products were targeted. First, CALiPER sought 3000 K lamps with the highest rated lumen output (i.e., at least 500 lm) or a claim of equivalency to a 50 W halogen MR16 or higher. The test results indicate that while the initial performance of LED MR16s has improved across the board, market-available products still do not produce the lumen output and center beam intensity of typical 50 W halogen MR16 lamps. In fact, most of the 18 lamps in this category had lower lumen output and center beam intensity than a typical 35 W halogen MR16 lamp. Second, CALiPER sought lamps with a CRI of 90 or greater. Only four manufacturers were identified with a product in this category. CALiPER testing confirmed the performance of these lamps, which are a good option for applications where high color fidelity is needed. A vast majority of the LED MR16 lamps have a CRI in the low 80s; this is generally acceptable for ambient lighting, but may not always be acceptable for focal lighting. For typical LED packages, there is a fundamental tradeoff between CRI and efficacy, but the lamps in the high-CRI group in this report still offer comparable performance to the rest of the Series 22 products in other performance areas. Finally, CALiPER sought lamps with a narrow distribution, denoted as a beam angle less than 15°. Five such lamps were purchased. Notably, no lamp was identified as having high lumen output (500 lumens or greater), high CRI (90 or greater), a narrow distribution (15° or less), and an efficacy greater than 60 lm/W. This would be an important achievement for LED MR16s especially if output could reach approximately 700 800 lumens, or the approximate equivalent of a 50 W halogen MR16 lamp. Many factors beyond photometric performance should be considered during specification. For example, performance over time, transformer and dimmer compatibility, and total system performance are all critical to a successful installation. Subsequent CALiPER reports will investigate more complex issues.

  18. Optical Durability of Candidate Solar Reflectors for Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C. E.; Terwilliger, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies use large mirrors to collect sunlight to convert thermal energy to electricity. The viability of CSP systems requires the development of advanced reflector materials that are low in cost and maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under severe outdoor environments. The long-standing goals for a solar reflector are specular reflectance above 90% into a 4 mrad half-cone angle for at least 10 years outdoors with a cost of less than $13.8/m{sup 2} (the 1992 $10.8/m{sup 2} goal corrected for inflation to 2002 dollars) when manufactured in large volumes. Durability testing of a variety of candidate solar reflector materials at outdoor test sites and in laboratory accelerated weathering chambers is the main activity within the Advanced Materials task of the CSP Program at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Test results to date for several candidate solar reflector materials will be presented. These include the optical durability of thin glass, thick glass, aluminized reflectors, front-surface mirrors, and silvered polymer mirrors. The development, performance, and durability of these materials will be discussed. Based on accelerated exposure testing the glass, silvered polymer, and front-surface mirrors may meet the 10 year lifetime goals, but at this time because of significant process changes none of the commercially available solar reflectors and advanced solar reflectors have demonstrated the 10 year or more aggressive 20 year lifetime goal.

  19. Identifying, Implementing and Complying with Environment, Safety and Health Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Policy sets forth the framework for identifying, implementing and complying with environment, safety and health (ES&H) requirements so that work is performed in the DOE complex in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public and the environment. Ownership of this policy is shared between GC and HS. Cancels DOE P 450.2. Canceled by DOE P 450.4A.

  20. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  1. Space Reflector Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Nash; V. Munne; LL Stimely

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two materials studied in depth which appear to have the most promise in a Prometheus reflector application are beryllium (Be) and beryllium oxide (BeO). Three additional materials, magnesium oxide (MgO), alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were also recently identified to be of potential interest, and may have promise in a Prometheus application as well, but are expected to be somewhat higher mass than either a Be or BeO based reflector. Literature review and analysis indicates that material properties for Be are largely known, but there are gaps in the properties of Be0 relative to the operating conditions for a Prometheus application. A detailed preconceptual design information document was issued providing material properties for both materials (Reference (a)). Beryllium oxide specimens were planned to be irradiated in the JOY0 Japanese test reactor to partially fill the material property gaps, but more testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) test reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was expected to be needed. A key issue identified for BeO was obtaining material for irradiation testing with an average grain size of {approx}5 micrometers, reminiscent of material for which prior irradiation test results were promising. Current commercially available material has an average grain size of {approx}10 micrometers. The literature indicated that improved irradiation performance could be expected (e.g., reduced irradiation-induced swelling) with the finer grain size material. Confirmation of these results would allow the use of historic irradiated materials test results from the literature, reducing the extent of required testing and therefore the cost of using this material. Environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concerns associated with manufacturing are significant but manageable for Be and BeO. Although particulate-generating operations (e.g., machining, grinding, etc.) involving Be-bearing materials require significant controls, handling of clean, finished products requires only modest controls. Neither material was initially considered to be viable as a structural material, however, based on improved understanding of its unirradiated properties, Be should be evaluated due to having potentially acceptable structural properties in the unirradiated condition, i. e., during launch, when loads might be most limiting. All three of the alternative materials are non-hazardous, and thus do not engender the ES&H concerns associated with use of Be or BeO. Aluminum oxide is a widely available ceramic material with well characterized physical properties and well developed processing practices. Although the densest (3.97 g/cm{sup 3} versus Be: 1.85, BeO: 3.01, MgO: 3.58, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: 3.60, all theoretical density), and therefore the heaviest, of all the materials considered for this application, its ease of fabrication, mechanical properties, availability and neutronic characteristics warrant its evaluation. Similarly, MgO is widely used in the refractory materials industry and has a large established manufacturing base while being lighter than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Most of the commercially available MgO products incorporate additives or a second phase to avoid the formation of Mg(OH){sub 2} due to spontaneous reaction with ambient humidity. The hygroscopicity of MgO makes it a more difficult material to work with than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnesium aluminate spinel, although not as widely available as either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO, has the advantage of a density almost as low as MgO without being hygroscopic, and shares comparable neutronic performance characteristics in the reflector application.

  2. Neutronic evaluation of GCFR core diluents and reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kun, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials are evaluated for use as in-core diluents and as peripheral reflectors for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) service, using coupled Monte Carlo (MCNP) and isotopics (ORIGEN) codes. The principal performance indices ...

  3. Studies on Temperature Dependence of Rubidium Lamp for Atomic Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosal, Bikash; Banik, Alak; Vats, Vaibhav; Pal, Sukamal; Bahl, R. K [Space Applications Centre, ISRO, Ahmedabad-380015 (India)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rb lamp is a very critical component of the Rb atomic clock's Physics Package. The Rb lamp's performance is very sensitive to temperature and its stability. In this paper we discuss the behaviors of Rb Lamp with temperature. The Rb lamp exciter power and temperature of Rb bulb are very important parameters in controlling the performance of the Rb Lamp. It is observed that at temperatures beyond 110 deg. C, the lamp mode changes from the ring to red mode resulting in abnormal broadening of emission lines and self reversal. The results of our studies on spectral analysis of Rb lamp under various operating conditions are reported in the paper.

  4. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar...

  5. NEWS & VIEWS synchrotron or helium-lamp studies. But

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    NEWS & VIEWS synchrotron or helium-lamp studies. But the low energy of the laser photons raises that of a conventional metal. The effects of projection have led to detailed quantitative insights into the properties

  6. Solar cell comprising a plasmonic back reflector and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, I-Kang; Zhu, Jia; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael David

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a solar cell having a plasmonic back reflector is disclosed. The method includes the formation of a nanoimprinted surface on which a metal electrode is conformally disposed. The surface structure of the nanoimprinted surface gives rise to a two-dimensional pattern of nanometer-scale features in the metal electrode enabling these features to collectively form the plasmonic back reflector.

  7. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Richardson, Robert W. (Pelham, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  8. Application of the OPTEX method for computing reflector parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebert, A. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079 suce. Centre-Ville, Montreal QC. H3C 3A7 (Canada); Leroyer, H. [EDF - R and D, SINETICS, 1 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are investigating the OPTEX reflector model for obtaining few-group reflector parameters consistent with a reference power distribution in the core. In our study, the reference power distribution is obtained using a 142,872-region calculation defined over a 2D eighth-of-core pressurized water reactor and performed with the method of characteristics. The OPTEX method is based on generalized perturbation theory and uses an optimization algorithm known as parametric linear complementarity pivoting. The proposed model leads to few-group diffusion coefficients or P1-weighted macroscopic total cross sections that can be used to represent the reflector in full-core calculations. These few-group parameters can be spatially heterogeneous in order to correctly represent steel baffles present in modern pressurized water reactors. The optimal reflector parameters are compared to those obtained with a flux-volume weighting of the reflector cross sections recovered from the reference calculation. Important improvements in full-core power distribution are observed when the optimal parameters are used. (authors)

  9. Red phosphors for use in high CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Vankatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel red emitting phosphors for use in fluorescent lamps resulting in superior color rendering index values compared to conventional red phosphors. Also disclosed is a fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer comprising blends of one or more of a blue phosphor, a blue-green phosphor, a green phosphor and a red a phosphor selected from the group consisting of SrY.sub.2 O.sub.4 :Eu.sup.3+, (Y,Gd)Al.sub.3 B.sub.4 O.sub.12 :Eu.sup.3+, and [(Y.sub.1-x-y-m La.sub.y)Gd.sub.x ]BO.sub.3 :Eu.sub.m wherein y<0.50 and m=0.001-0.3. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of the disclosed red phosphors in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over the course of the lamp life.

  10. A powerful reflector in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yibing, E-mail: caoyibing@nint.ac.cn; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Lijun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Chen, Changhua [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved TM{sub 021} resonant reflector is put forward. Similarly with most of the slow wave structures used in relativistic backward wave oscillator, the section plane of the proposed reflector is designed to be trapezoidal. Compared with the rectangular TM{sub 021} resonant reflector, such a structure can depress RF breakdown more effectively by weakening the localized field convergence and realizing good electrostatic insulation. As shown in the high power microwave (HPM) generation experiments, with almost the same output power obtained by the previous structure, the improved structure can increase the pulse width from 25?ns to over 27?ns and no obvious surface damage is observed even if the generated HPM pulses exceed 1000 shots.

  11. Microwave generated electrodeless lamp for producing bright output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Ch. H.; Ury, M. G.

    1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generated electrodeless light source for producing a bright output comprising a lamp structure including a microwave chamber and a plasma medium-containing lamp envelope having a maximum dimension which is substantially less than a wavelength disposed therein. To provide the desired radiation output the interior of the chamber is coated with a UV-reflective material and the chamber has an opening for allowing UV radiation to exit, which is covered with a metallic mesh. The chamber is arranged to be near-resonant at a single wavelength, and the lamp envelope has a fill including mercury at an operating pressure of 1-2 atmospheres, while a power density of at least 250-300 (watts/cm/sup 3/) is coupled to the envelope to result in a relatively high deep UV output at a relatively high brightness.

  12. Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.D.

    1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an electrodeless arc lamp for forming a ring shaped plasma in a region therein during operation comprising a tube having a raised bottom center section, and an optically transparent outer jacket hermetically sealing the tube to protect the tube from cooling by convection. The raised center section rises centrally to form a ring shaped reservoir below the region in which the rig shaped plasma is formed to minimize wall cooling during operation of the lamp so that there is enhanced excitation near the center of the tube.

  13. Practical features of illumination with high pressure sodium lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corth, R.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of concerns raised about the health effects of high pressure sodium lamps (HPS) are discussed. The notion of a ''natural'' human photic environment based on sunlight is disputed. Humans are better adapted to the ''greenish'' spectral composition of forest light than to direct sunlight. It is ironic that the artificial light source which has received the most disapproval, cool white flourescent lamp, has a spectral composition similar to that of forest light. HPS is also available in a full range of colors. Some successful examples of HPS--from North Division High School, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to museum exhibits at National Geographic in Washington--are listed.

  14. Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D. (Schenectady, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless arc lamp comprises an outer jacket hermetically sealing and thermally protecting an arc tube inside which has an upwardly convex bottom center section. The absence of chemically reactive electrode material makes it possible to use metal halides other than iodides. The tube contains chlorides, bromides or a mixture thereof of scandium and sodium in a nearly equimolar relationship in addition to mercury and an inert gas. Good color balance can be obtained at reduced reservoir temperature and with less power loss. Reduction in wall temperature makes it possible to attain longer lamp life.

  15. Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, P.D.

    1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless arc lamp comprises an outer jacket hermetically sealing and thermally protecting an arc tube inside which has an upwardly convex bottom center section. The absence of chemically reactive electrode material makes it possible to use metal halides other than iodides. The tube contains chlorides, bromides or a mixture thereof of scandium and sodium in a nearly equimolar relationship in addition to mercury and an inert gas. Good color balance can be obtained at reduced reservoir temperature and with less power loss. Reduction in wall temperature makes it possible to attain longer lamp life.

  16. U. S. gas pipelines move to comply with Order 636

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that more US interstate gas pipelines have unveiled plans to comply with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636 megarestructuring rule. In the latest developments: Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. (Tetco) filed the first Order 636 compliance proposal with FERC outlining new transportation rates, operational issues, and services the company plans to offer. Tenneco Gas will eliminate a layer of managers and split marketing and transportation functions into four divisions to deal with Order 646. ANR Pipeline Co. made organizational changes expected to help it participate faster and more effectively under Order 636. The company in mid-May made gas sales a stand alone activity, reorganized system sales by region, and consolidated transportation and storage functions. FERC's long awaited megarestructuring rule, issued early in April, aims to assure the open access, interstate pipelines provide equal services for all gas supplies. Companies are to submit transition plans to FERC by Nov. 2.

  17. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  18. Study of high frequency & low frequency electronic ballasts for HID lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Hua

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamp electronic ballasting is receiving increasing attention in the recent years as low wattage HID lighting systems are finding indoor applications. Advantages of high frequency electronic ballast for HID lamps...

  19. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on LED T8 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released an Application Summary Report that focuses on the bare-lamp performance of 31 linear LED lamps intended as an alternative to T8...

  20. LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR®

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 19, 2009 webcast summarized CALiPER's recent benchmark testing of common omnidirectional incandescent lamps (e.g., A-lamps), and provided an update on ENERGY STAR criteria for LED integral...

  1. April 2002, L. Henn-Lecordier LAMP general operating procedures 1 Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    written request ­ Receive safety training from DES ­ Lab orientation with the lab manager ­ Equipment training and qualification #12;April 2002, L. Henn-Lecordier LAMP general operating procedures 9 LAMP "10

  2. Steam-circuit Model for the Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector , G. L. Morrison1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steam-circuit Model for the Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector Prototype J. D. Pye1 , G. L. Morrison1.pye@student.unsw.edu.au Abstract The Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) is a linear-concentrating solar thermal energy system The Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) was first conceived of in 1992-1993 and was patented in 1995

  3. Birefringent omnidirectional reflector Kate Kaminska and Kevin Robbie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbie, Kevin

    silica Ref. 4 multilayer structures and in the near infrared with amorphous silicon silica Ref. 5 and Ga, and expensive. We demonstrate an omnidirectional reflector operat- ing at near-infrared wavelengths, made reflection of radiation at 1.1 m for all incidence angles and polarizations. The thin-film device

  4. Thermal element for maintaining minimum lamp wall temperature in fluorescent fixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, an improvement is disclosed for maintaining a lamp envelope area at a cooler, reduced temperature relative to the enclosed housing ambient. The improvement comprises a thermal element in thermal communication with the housing extending to and springably urging thermal communication with a predetermined area of the lamp envelope surface. 12 figs.

  5. A Behavioral SPICE Compatible Model of an Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp Sam Ben-Yaakov*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the plasma. In the case of the lamp with electrodes, coupling is via wires. In the case of the electrodelessA Behavioral SPICE Compatible Model of an Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp Sam Ben-Yaakov*1 , Moshe, SPICE compatible, model was developed for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp (OSRAM SYLVANIA ICETRON

  6. Issues, Models and Solutions for Triac Modulated Phase Dimming of LED Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    Issues, Models and Solutions for Triac Modulated Phase Dimming of LED Lamps Dustin Rand (Raytheon Edison socket LED lamps directly from residential phase modulated dimmer switches. In order to explain brightness "White Light" LEDs have experts predicting that the "bright white replacement lamp" could trigger

  7. Thermal element for maintaining minimum lamp wall temperature in fluorescent fixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, an improvement is disclosed for maintaining a lamp envelope area at a cooler, reduced temperature relative to the enclosed housing ambient. The improvement comprises a thermal element in thermal communication with the housing extending to and springably urging thermal communication with a predetermined area of the lamp envelope surface.

  8. Basics of lava-lamp convection Balzs Gyre1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jánosi, Imre M.

    marketed only since the sixties 1 . The most essential ingredients are two immis- cible fluids of densities function, the lava lamp has been used also as visual aid in geoscience courses 2 demonstrat- ing phenomena such as the transformation of energy, force and motion, adiabatic circulations in the atmosphere and oceans, or magma

  9. Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re can be recycled infinitely without losing its purity or strength. While the primary end product

  10. Complying with Law for RE in the Automotive Domain Birgit Penzenstadler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Germany Abstract The automotive industry is concerned with develop- ing large and complex embedded systems the automotive industry performs require- ments engineering in order to comply with government lawsComplying with Law for RE in the Automotive Domain Birgit Penzenstadler penzenst

  11. All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury lamp recycling separates a number of materials for further use in new products. · The mercury is reused

  12. ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

  13. The electrical and lumen output characteristics of an RF lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrovich, B.M.; Godyak, V.A.; Piejak, R.B. [Osram Sylvania Inc., Beverly, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low pressure rf discharges have been studied for over a century. Their first practical application for lighting was proposed by Tesla in 1891. Since then hundreds of patents have been published attempting to implement rf lighting. However, progress in understanding rf discharge phenomena (mostly driven by plasma processing needs) and dramatic improvement in the performance/cost ratio of rf power sources have recently opened the door for development of rf light sources. Today commercial inductively coupled electrodeless lamps are offered by Matsuhita, Philips and GE. In this work the authors present measurements of the electrical characteristics and lumen output from a 2.65 MHz driven inductively coupled light source. Measurements were made on a spherical lamp of 3.125 inch diameter with a re-entrant cavity that houses a cylindrical ferrite core around which is wrapped the primary coil.

  14. Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps CALiPER Benchmark Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Paget, Maria L.; Lingard, Robert D.

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting (CALiPER) Program was established in 2006 to investigate the performance of light-emitting diode (LED) based luminaires and replacement lamps. To help users better compare LED products with conventional lighting technologies, CALiPER has also performed benchmark research and testing of traditional (i.e., non-LED) lamps and fixtures. This benchmark report addresses standard 4-foot fluorescent lamps (i.e., T12 and T8) and the 2-foot by 4-foot recessed troffers in which they are commonly used. This report also examines available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps, and their application in fluorescent troffers. The construction and operation of linear fluorescent lamps and troffers are discussed, as well as fluorescent lamp and fixture performance, based on manufacturer data and CALiPER benchmark testing. In addition, the report describes LED replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, and compares their bare lamp and in situ performance with fluorescent benchmarks on a range of standard lighting measures, including power usage, light output and distribution, efficacy, correlated color temperature, and the color rendering index. Potential performance and application issues indicated by CALiPER testing results are also examined.

  15. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study RRL3.2 Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Tucker, Joseph C.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lumen depreciation and color shift of 17 different A lamps (15 LED, 1 CFL, 1 halogen) was monitored in the automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA) for more than 7,500 hours. Ten samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at an ambient temperature of 45°C (-1°C). Importantly, the steady-state test conditions were not optimized for inducing catastrophic failure for any of the lamp technologies—to which thermal cycling is a strong contributor— and are not typical of normal use patterns—which usually include off periods where the lamp cools down. Further, the test conditions differ from those used in standardized long-term test methods (i.e., IES LM-80, IES LM-84), so the results should not be directly compared. On the other hand, the test conditions are similar to those used by ENERGY STAR (when elevated temperature testing is called for). Likewise, the conditions and assumptions used by manufacturers to generated lifetime claims may vary; the CALiPER long-term data is informative, but cannot necessarily be used to discredit manufacturer claims. The test method used for this investigation should be interpreted as one more focused on the long-term effects of elevated temperature operation, at an ambient temperature that is not uncommon in luminaires. On average, the lumen maintenance of the LED lamps monitored in the ALTA was better than benchmark lamps, but there was considerable variation from lamp model to lamp model. While three lamp models had average lumen maintenance above 99% at the end of the study period, two products had average lumen maintenance below 65%, constituting a parametric failure. These two products, along with a third, also exhibited substantial color shift, another form of parametric failure. While none of the LED lamps exhibited catastrophic failure—and all of the benchmarks did—the early degradation of performance is concerning, especially with a new technology trying to build a reputation with consumers. Beyond the observed parametric failures nearly half of the products failed to meet early-life thresholds for lumen maintenance, which were borrowed from ENERGY STAR specifications. That is, the lumen maintenance was sufficiently low at 6,000 hours that seven of the products are unlikely to have lumen maintenance above 70% at their rated lifetime (which was usually 25,000 hours). Given the methods used for this investigation—most notably continuous operation—the results should not be interpreted as indicative of a lamp’s performance in a typical environment. Likewise, these results are not directly relatable to manufacturer lifetime claims. This report is best used to understand the variation in LED product performance, compare the robustness of LED lamps and benchmark conventional lamps, and understand the characteristics of lumen and chromaticity change. A key takeaway is that the long-term performance of LED lamps can vary greatly from model to model (i.e., the technology is not homogenous), although the lamp-to-lamp consistency within a given model is relatively good. Further, operation of LED lamps in an enclosed luminaire (or otherwise in high ambient temperatures), can induce parametric failure of LEDs much earlier than their rated lifetime; manufacturer warnings about such conditions should be followed if performance degradation is unacceptable.

  16. Comparison of different light lamps for collecting diptera associated with livestock concentration areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neeb, Charles W

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Texas Tech (Jniversity Directed by: Mr. M. A. Price The attractiveness of radrant energy emitted by blacklight (BL), blacklight-blue (BLH), strontium ? blue and argon ultraviolet lamps was compared in standard- survey omnidirectional light traps... with livestock concentration areas. Pecos County. Lrgon study area. 1967. . . . . . . . . . . 6B Field comparison of light wavelengths emitted from BL fluorescent lamp with light wavelengths emitted from BLB, strontium and argon lamps on attractiveness...

  17. Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lumen depreciation and color shift of 38 different lamps (32 LED, 2 CFL, 1 ceramic metal halide [CMH], 3 halogen) were monitored in a specially developed automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA2) for nearly 14,000 hours. Five samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at a target ambient temperature between 44°C and 45°C.

  18. Low pressure arc discharge lamp apparatus with magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Maya, J.

    1987-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-pressure arc discharge apparatus having a magnetic field generating means for increasing the output of a discharge lamp is disclosed. The magnetic field generating means, which in one embodiment includes a plurality of permanent magnets, is disposed along the lamp for applying a constant transverse magnetic field over at least a portion of the positive discharge column produced in the arc discharge lamp operating at an ambient temperature greater than about 25 C. 3 figs.

  19. Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for CSP Collectors Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors Oak Ridge National Laboratory logo The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  20. EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts.

  1. Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following is a text version of a video about CALiPER Application Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting.

  2. Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR®

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® webcast.

  3. LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting: CALiPER Report Series 21

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Beeson, Tracy; Miller, Naomi

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Video about CALiPER Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting, featuring interviews with Tracy Beeson and Naomi Miller of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  4. Microwave power spectral density and its effects on exciting electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, S.J.; Goss, H.H.; Lapatovich, W.P. [Osram Sylvania Inc., Salem, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a microwave source generating a spectrally dense power spectrum on the operation of an electrodeless high intensity discharge lamp were measured. Spectrally pure sources operating within ISM bands at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz produce stable capacitively coupled discharges useful for producing flicker-free light for numerous applications. The internal plasma temperature distribution and lamp geometry define acoustic resonance modes within the lamp which can be excited with power sidebands. The operation of lamps with commercially available power sources and custom built generators are discussed. Estimates of the spectral purity required for stable operation are provided.

  5. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Rosenfeld, Scott M.

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Program at the Smithsonain American Art Museum in Washington, DC. LED Lamp samples were tested in the museum workshop, temporarily installed in a gallery for feedback, and ultimately replaced all traditional incandescent lamps in one gallery of modernist art at the American Art Museum and partially replacing lamps in two galleries at the Musesum's Renwick Gallery. This report describes the selection and testing process, technology challenges, perceptions, economics, energy use, and mixed results of usign LED replacement lamps in art galleries housing national treasures.

  6. The Electrodeless Discharge Lamps Coated with the Titania Thin Film for Photocatalysis in a Microwave Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    The Electrodeless Discharge Lamps Coated with the Titania Thin Film for Photocatalysis assisted photocatalysis using TiO2 thin films has been examined. Several factors influencing

  7. Conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps in India and Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Martino Jannuzzi, G. de (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia)

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for managing the rapidly increasing electrical energy and peak demand in India and Brazil. Using very conservative assumptions, we find that the cost of conserved energy using 16 W CFLs is 4 and 6 times less than the long range marginal cost of electricity for the two countries. The cost of avoided peak installed capacity is 6 and 9.5 times less than the cost of new installed capacity for India and Brazil. The analysis is undertaken from the three separate perspectives of the national economies, the consumers, and the utilities. We find that because residential electricity is subsidized, the consumers have little or no incentive to purchase and install the CFLs, unless they too are subsidized. However, the benefits of CFL installation to the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility in almost all cases. As an illustration of a gradual introduction strategy for CFLs, we calculate a scenario where national savings of the order of US $1.2 million per day for India and US $2.5 million per day for Brazil are reached in 10 years by a small and gradual transfer of subsidy from residential electricity to CFLs. We then explore the barriers to immediate large scale introduction of these lamps in the two countries. Specific technical and marketing problems are identified and discussed, which would require solution before such an introduction can be attempted. Lastly, we discuss the range of policy instruments, in addition to a subsidy scheme, that can be used for promoting the diffusion of these lamps in the domestic and commercial sector. 47 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  9. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  10. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, Michael G. (Bethesda, MD); Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Wooten, Robert D. (Rockville, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to a) rotate the bulb and b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooling for providing cooler gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement.

  11. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, M.G.; Turner, B.; Wooten, R.D.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to (a) rotate the bulb and (b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooler for providing cooling gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement. 8 figs.

  12. High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Ibbetson

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency, solid-state lamps based on gallium nitride/silicon carbide light-emitting diodes. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described for a new type of nitride light-emitting diode with the potential for very high efficiency. This work resulted in the demonstration of blue light-emitting diodes in the one watt class that achieved up to 495 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 51% and 45%, respectively. When combined with a phosphor in Cree's 7090 XLamp package, these advanced blue-emitting devices resulted in white light-emitting diodes whose efficacy exceeded 85 lumens per watt. In addition, up to 1040 lumens at greater than 85 lumens per watt was achieved by combining multiple devices to make a compact white lamp module with high optical efficiency.

  13. LED Lamp Project Lights the Way to Flicker-Free Replacement Jade Sky Technologies and UC Davis's California Lighting Technology Center demonstrate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    LED Lamp Project Lights the Way to Flicker-Free Replacement Jade Sky the flicker and dimming requirements set by the Voluntary California Quality LED Lamp for incentivized LED replacement lamps. These criteria go beyond energy efficiency

  14. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  15. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  16. DISSERTATION ELECTRON-REFLECTOR STRATEGY FOR CdTe THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION ELECTRON-REFLECTOR STRATEGY FOR CdTe THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Submitted by Kuo-Jui Hsiao ELECTRON- REFLECTOR STRATEGY FOR CdTe THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS-FILM SOLAR CELLS The CdTe thin-film solar cell has a large absorption coefficient and high theoretical

  17. What is a seismic reflector like? Nathalie Favretto-Cristini1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    What is a seismic reflector like? Nathalie Favretto-Cristini1 , Paul Cristini1 , and Eric de of reflectors from a seismic viewpoint. This region is repre- sented by a volume of integration of medium and syncline type. The maximum vertical extent might be larger than the seismic wavelengths for subcritical

  18. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  19. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  20. CALiPER Report 20.3: Robustness of LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplawski, Michael E.; Royer, Michael P.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three samples of 40 of the Series 20 PAR38 lamps underwent multi-stress testing, whereby samples were subjected to increasing levels of simultaneous thermal, humidity, electrical, and vibrational stress. The results do not explicitly predict expected lifetime or reliability, but they can be compared with one another, as well as with benchmark conventional products, to assess the relative robustness of the product designs. On average, the 32 LED lamp models tested were substantially more robust than the conventional benchmark lamps. As with other performance attributes, however, there was great variability in the robustness and design maturity of the LED lamps. Several LED lamp samples failed within the first one or two levels of the ten-level stress plan, while all three samples of some lamp models completed all ten levels. One potential area of improvement is design maturity, given that more than 25% of the lamp models demonstrated a difference in failure level for the three samples that was greater than or equal to the maximum for the benchmarks. At the same time, the fact that nearly 75% of the lamp models exhibited better design maturity than the benchmarks is noteworthy, given the relative stage of development for the technology.

  1. Low Frequency Architecture for Multi-Lamp CCFL Systemswith Capacitive Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low Frequency Architecture for Multi-Lamp CCFL Systemswith Capacitive Ignition Monm Doshi (I-0425 regan.zane@colorado.edu Absfruci-This paper presents a low frequency architecture for driving parallel to the architecture is a proposed capacitive coupling approach for ac lamp ignition. The system consists of a single

  2. Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

  3. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  4. Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

  5. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  6. CALiPER Report 21.3: Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

  7. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innocenzi, V., E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it; De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliň, F.

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  8. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a “soft” photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  9. Force controlled manipulation is a common technique for compli antly contacting and manipulating uncertain environments. Visual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Force controlled manipulation is a common technique for compli­ antly contacting guide a manipulator simplifies the force control problem by allowing the effective use of low gain force force sensor and a stiff manipulator position control loop. Because the force sensor measures all forces

  10. ISSUANCE 2015-01-26: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

  11. Design and fabrication of highly efficient electrooptic modulators using bragg grating reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -directional coupling that includes an attenuation coefficient. The Bragg grating spectral characteristics are exploited to fabricate distributed Bragg feedback modulators (DBFM) and Bragg reflector Fabry-Perot modulators (BFPM). The sharp cut-off in transmission...

  12. Energy savings with solid-state ballasted high-pressure sodium lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of solid-state ballasts used to operate high-pressure sodium lamps is discussed. Each type of solid-state ballast has been designed to operate an HPS lamp of a different wattage (150, 200, and 400 watts). The performance of these ballasts compared to standard core-coil ballasts operating the same HPS lamps shows that system efficiency improves as much as 17%. The solid-state ballasted HPS system also demonstrates excellent regulation with respect to input voltage and output power. These new ballasts can dim the HPS lamps and reduce flicker from more than 60% to less than 3%. Refitting street lighting with these new HPS systims provides an attractive return on initial capital investment.

  13. LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting: CALiPER Report Series 21

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about CALiPER Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting, featuring interviews with Tracy Beeson and Naomi Miller of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  14. Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Report Series 20 on LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michael Royer, Lighting Engineer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: The CALiPER program looks at typical LED lamp performance attributes. As we've gone through the progression of reports, we...

  15. DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on LED MR16 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a Snapshot Report on MR16 lamps, which utilizes the LED Lighting Facts® program's extensive product database to help industry...

  16. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  17. Photodetector with absorbing region having resonant periodic absorption between reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Brennan, T.M.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A photodetector is disclosed that is responsive to a wavelength or wavelengths of interest which have heretofore been unrealized. The photodetector includes a resonant cavity structure bounded by first and second reflectors, the resonant cavity structure being resonant at the wavelength or wavelengths of interest for containing a plurality of standing waves therein. The photodetector further includes a radiation absorbing region disposed within the resonant cavity structure, the radiation absorbing region including a plurality of radiation absorbing layers spaced apart from one another by a distance substantially equal to a distance between antinodes of adjacent ones of the standing waves. Each of radiation absorbing layers is spatially positioned at a location of one of the antinodes of one of the standing waves such that radiation absorption is enhanced. The radiation absorbing layers may be either bulk layers or quantum wells includes a plurality of layers, each of which is comprised of a strained layer of InGaAs. Individual ones of the InGaAs layers are spaced apart from one another by a GaAs barrier layer. 11 figs.

  18. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

  19. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Multi-faceted reflector (MR) lamps; Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps EISA exempt lamps; Lighting;3 Consumers Electronics Association; Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison

  20. Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy through temperature and pressure to drive the mercury into a vapor phase. Mercury is a heavy metal, and is regulated in drinking water by the EPA through the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). If an on-line lamp break historically the U.S. has been skeptical to implement UV into drinking water systems, many areas of Europe

  1. Developing effective strategies for complying with the oil and gas MACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatt, T.N. [Trinity Consultants, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Ebarb, W. [NorAm Gas Transmission, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), enacted on November 15, 1990, represent landmark legislation which provides the US Environmental Protection Agency with unprecedented authority to promulgate regulations affecting air pollution. Title 3 of the 1990 CAAA focuses on the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the sources of concern. The HAP affected by Title 3 are identified in Section 112(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA). The industry specific regulations promulgated for major industrial source categories under Section 112(d) and Section 112(g) of the CAA are referred to as the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT). In order to maximize operational flexibility and optimize costs of compliance, facilities must develop a plan to identify methods to comply with the area source provisions of the regulations by becoming a minor source/synthetic minor source or to comply with the major source requirements of the regulations in the most cost effective manner. Area source requirements are generally less stringent as compared to the major source requirements. This paper outlines the fundamental aspects of Title 3 as they impact the upstream oil and gas industry. The paper provides guidelines to the potentially affected facilities in determining applicability of the MACT rules based on emission inventories, potential to emit (PTE), and latest guidance from the EPA. The paper finally provides strategies to comply with the requirements of the regulations and discusses the advantages and disadvantages associated with using specific strategies.

  2. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  3. The glass lamps from the 11th-century shipwreck at Serc?e Liman, Turkey: a thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morden, Margaret Elizabeth

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    writ1ng during the 4th century, describes a hanging lamp in the following terms: "From the center of panelled ceil1ngs 1n spac1ous rooms . . . openwork bronze lamps were suspended by cable . like a kind of tree w1th pliant vine-like branches... to the three major forms of lamp development discussed earlier. Paul the S1lentiary, in h1s description of Sancta Soph1a in Constantinople, describes the lighting of the entire church (see Appendix III). In the center of the church a lamp was suspended 37...

  4. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - CEP 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  5. DOE-Sponsored Online Mapping Portal Helps Oil and Gas Producers Comply with New Mexico Compliance Rules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An online mapping portal to help oil and natural gas operators comply with a revised New Mexico waste pit rule has been developed by a team of New Mexico Tech researchers.

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballasts, Light-emitting Diodes, and Multifaceted Reflector Lamps · Water Appliances (Docket #12-AAER-2C

  7. Long-range, full-duplex, modulated-reflector cell phone for voice/data transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-range communications apparatus utilizing modulated-reflector technology is described. The apparatus includes an energy-transmitting base station and remote units that do not emit radiation in order to communicate with the base station since modulated-reflector technology is used whereby information is attached to an RF carrier wave originating from the base station which is reflected by the remote unit back to the base station. Since the remote unit does not emit radiation, only a low-power power source is required for its operation. Information from the base station is transmitted to the remote unit using a transmitter and receiver, respectively. The range of such a communications system is determined by the properties of a modulated-reflector half-duplex link.

  8. An In-Situ Photometric and Energy Analysis of a Sulfur LampLighting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Doug; Gould, Carl; Packer, Michael; Rubinstein,Francis; Siminovitch, Michael

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a photometric and energy analysis that was conducted on a new light guide and sulfur lamp system recently installed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Forrestal Building. This novel system couples two high lumen output, high efficiency sulfur lamps to a single 73 m (240 ft.) hollow light guide lined with a reflective prismatic film. The system lights a large roadway and plaza area that lies beneath a section of the building. It has been designed to completely replace the grid of 280 mercury vapor lamps formerly used to light the space. This paper details the results of a field study that characterizes the significant energy savings and increased illumination levels that have been achieved. Comparisons to modeled HID lighting scenarios are also included.

  9. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  10. Wafer-Bonded Internal Back-Surface Reflectors for Enhanced TPV Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'Brien; D.A. Shiau; A.C. Anderson; Z.L. Liau; D.M. Depoy; G. Nichols

    2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses recent efforts to realize GaInAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR). The cells are fabricated by wafer bonding the GaInAsSb/GaSb device layers to GaAs substrates with a dielectric/Au reflector, and subsequently removing the GaSb substrate. The internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This approach is compatible with monolithic integration of series-connected TPV cells and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control.

  11. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  12. Plasma spectroscopic study of an electrodeless HID lamp containing Tl and Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, Mamoru; Horii, Shigeru; Hochi, Akira [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the electrodeless HID lamps excited by microwaves have been studied intensively. Tl is well known as a material having strong green emission lines. In this study, Tl spectra excited by microwaves were reported in the cases of Tl only and Tl + Zn. Using the Elenbaas`s method of high pressure Hg lamp, the cause of Tl continuous spectrum was examined. From the ratio of radiative intensities of two lines, an average arc temperature in the bulb was estimated. Then excitation level of the continuous emission spectrum near the 600nm wavelength was calculated from the dependence of the radiative intensities on these arc temperatures.

  13. ISSUANCE 2015-06-25: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps, Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps, Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  14. ISSUANCE 2015-06-17: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document

  15. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Clerc; Alain Hébert; Hadrien Leroyer; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Bertrand Bouriquet; Agélique Ponçot

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using reflectors computed with the proposed computational scheme, and the $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operator enables additional improvements.

  16. A SOLAR STILL AUGMENTED WITH A FLAT-PLATE COLLECTOR AND A REFLECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SOLAR STILL AUGMENTED WITH A FLAT-PLATE COLLECTOR AND A REFLECTOR A. Saleh A. Badran Mechanical ­ Jordan Amman ­ Jordan e-mail: asaleh@philadelphia.edu.jo e-mail: badran@ju.edu.jo ABSTRACT A solar distillation system was built and tested to study the effect of increasing the solar radiation incident

  17. DESIGN AND TESTING FOR NOVEL JOINT FOR WAVE REFLECTORS James Tedd1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tests. This is a steel bar reinforced concrete tank with the dimensions 15.7 m long, 8.5 m wide and 1DESIGN AND TESTING FOR NOVEL JOINT FOR WAVE REFLECTORS James Tedd1 , Erik Friis-Madsen2 , and Peter of the Wave Dragon has begun. This paper describes the design and testing process behind this. Tests conducted

  18. Deployable Tensegrity Reflectors for Small Satellites1 A.G. Tibert2 and S. Pellegrino3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, U.K. Abstract Future small satellite missions require low-cost, precision reflector structures with large aperture that can be packaged in a small envelope. Existing that deploys two identical cable nets (front and rear nets) interconnected by tension ties; the reflecting mesh

  19. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  20. Comparison of fixed asymmetrical and symmetrical reflectors for evacuated tube solar receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, D.R.; Monger, A. (Univ. of Sydney (Australia)); Morrison, G.L. (Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer simulation of the relative performance of certain truncated symmetrical and asymmetrical fixed reflector designs for solar energy collection was performed. The comparison was on the basis of annual energy delivered to a circular cylindrical evacuated tube receiver per unit of mirror area, but seasonal load information was also included to determine possible seasonal load matching advantages of one type of collector over another when storage is employed. Circumsolar radiation models based on recent correlations in the literature was included. Major conclusions were that: (1) Annual solar fractions of between 80% and 95% seem to be feasible with a load matching collector used with moderate energy storage, with 80-90% being a likely optimum; (2) CPC reflectors always gave the best annual output performance per unit of mirror area, and the lowest receiver area for situations of constant annual load, regardless of whether the storage is included in the system; (3) Asymmetrical concentrator are more cost-effective for strongly seasonally asymmetrical load patterns; (4) Fixed parabolic systems required much more receiver area than the symmetrical CPC and asymmetrical system investigated; (5) Concentration levels utilizable in fixed systems are higher than previously supposed, with 3.5:1 in an asymmetrical reflector being optimal or nearly optimal for the domestic load pattern used in the study; (6) Using a load matched reflector, the amount of storage required to achieve solar fractions of total thermal energy (space heating, water heating, clothes drying) above 90% in a residence appears to be much lower than previously thought.

  1. Analysis of large reflector antennas using CSP fringe formulation and higher-order diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    Analysis of large reflector antennas using CSP fringe formulation and higher-order diffraction- tric conductor (PEC) objects when illuminated by a Complex Source Points (CSP) beam expansion (S of a CSP-expansion illumination. In this work we discuss an application of the CSP fringe formulation

  2. Design and fabrication of highly efficient electrooptic modulators using bragg grating reflectors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bragg grating reflectors etched in amorphous silicon overlay films have been integrated with Ti:LiNbO3 optical waveguides. With a 12.5 mm long grating segment and an etch depth of ~ 93 nm in a 105 nm-thick silicon film, a narrow (0.05 nm) spectral...

  3. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  4. Method for removal of phosgene from boron trichloride. [DOE patent application; mercury arc lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freund, S.M.

    1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective ultraviolet photolysis using an unfiltered mercury arc lamp has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that it is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this method.

  5. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in Recessed Troffers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released Report 21.2, which is part of a series of investigations on linear LED lamps. Report 21.2 focuses on the performance of three linear (T8...

  6. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released Report 21.3, which is part of a series of investigations on linear LED lamps. Report 21.3 details a set of life-cycle cost simulations...

  7. RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes which face each other

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabor, G.; Orr, T.R.; Greene, C.M.; Crawford, D.G.; Berman, S.M.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance. 17 figs.

  8. Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps a poly-diagnostic study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Nimalasuriya, Tanya Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps : a poly-diagnostic study / by Tanya Nimalasuriya. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2007. Proefschrift. ISBN 978 aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van

  9. Method and apparatus for powering an electrodeless lamp with reduced radio frequency interference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless lamp waveguide structure includes tuned absorbers for spurious RF signals. A lamp waveguide with an integral frequency selective attenuation includes resonant absorbers positioned within the waveguide to absorb spurious out-of-band RF energy. The absorbers have a negligible effect on energy at the selected frequency used to excite plasma in the lamp. In a first embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are affixed to the sidewalls of the waveguide at approximately one quarter wavelength of the spurious signal from an end wall of the waveguide. The positioning of the lossy material optimizes absorption of power from the spurious signal. In a second embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are used in conjunction with band rejection waveguide filter elements. In a third embodiment, one or more microstrip filter elements are tuned to the frequency of the spurious signal and positioned within the waveguide to couple and absorb the spurious signal's energy. All three embodiments absorb negligible energy at the selected frequency and so do not significantly diminish the energy efficiency of the lamp.

  10. Method and apparatus for powering an electrodeless lamp with reduced radio frequency interference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, J.E.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless lamp waveguide structure includes tuned absorbers for spurious RF signals. A lamp waveguide with an integral frequency selective attenuation includes resonant absorbers positioned within the waveguide to absorb spurious out-of-band RF energy. The absorbers have a negligible effect on energy at the selected frequency used to excite plasma in the lamp. In a first embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are affixed to the sidewalls of the waveguide at approximately one quarter wavelength of the spurious signal from an end wall of the waveguide. The positioning of the lossy material optimizes absorption of power from the spurious signal. In a second embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are used in conjunction with band rejection waveguide filter elements. In a third embodiment, one or more microstrip filter elements are tuned to the frequency of the spurious signal and positioned within the waveguide to couple and absorb the spurious signal's energy. All three embodiments absorb negligible energy at the selected frequency and so do not significantly diminish the energy efficiency of the lamp. 18 figs.

  11. RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes which face each other

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabor, George (Lafayette, CA); Orr, Thomas Robert (Castro Valley, CA); Greene, Charles Maurice (Oakland, CA); Crawford, Douglas Gordon (Orinda, CA); Berman, Samuel Maurice (San Francisco, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance.

  12. Demonstration Of A Monitoring Lamp To Visualize The Energy Consumption In Houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the sources of consumption. Automated monitoring of the electricity consumption in a house is quite a recent or numbers, but simply alert residents that something relevant to their electricity consumption is chang- ingDemonstration Of A Monitoring Lamp To Visualize The Energy Consumption In Houses Christophe Gisler1

  13. Issues In the Design and Specification of Class Libraries Gregor Kiczales and John Lamping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Object-oriented programming has been praised for many virtues, of which we believe code reuse that require their sort of functionality, we can reuse the library rather than having to code again from; Gregor@parc.xerox.com, Lamping@parc.xerox.com. c 1992 Association of Computing Machinery. Permission

  14. RG: A Case-Study for Aspect-Oriented Programming Anurag Mendhekar, Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be sprinkled throughout the code, resulting in code that tangled the various performance issues along 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. {anurag,gregor,lamping}@parc.xerox.com #12;22 Aspect-cutting issues. In AOP, code relating to cross-cutting issues, called aspects, can be written in a way that need

  15. What A Metaobject Protocol Based Compiler Can Do For Lisp Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping, Anurag Mendhekar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendhekar Xerox PARC Internal Report, December 1993. © Copyright 1993 Xerox Corporation. All rights reserved allows programmers to cleanly, concisely and portably code the following examples, and have them work Hill Rd., Palo Alto, CA 94304; (415)812-4888; Gregor--Lamping@parc.xerox.com. 1 #12;Internal Memo -- c

  16. Predicted Pulsed-Power/Flash-Lamp Performance of the NIF Main Amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, E. Steven; Hammond, Jud; Harjes, Henry C.; Moore, William B.S.; Smith, David L.; Wilson, J. Michael

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser glass for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Main Amplifier system is pumped by a system of 192 pulsed power/flash lamp assemblies. Each of these 192 assemblies consists of a 1.6 MJ (nominal) capacitor bank working with a Pre-Ionization/Lamp Check (PILC) pulser to drive an array of 40 flash lamps. This paper describes the predicted performance of these Power Conditioning System (PCS) modules in concert with flashlamp assemblies in NIF. Each flashlamp assembly consists of 20 parallel sets of lamps in series pairs. The sensitivity of system performance to various design parameters of the PILC pulser and the main capacitor bank is described. Results of circuit models are compared to sub-scale flashlamp tests and to measurements taken in tests of a PCS module driving a flashlamp assembly in the First Article NIF Test Module facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Also included are predictions from a physics-based, semi-empirical amplifier gain code.

  17. Women in Science The Lady with the Lamp 100 years on Prof. Sylvia Draper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    into current (or vice versa) provides us with the capacity to devise efficient solar cells or LightemittingWomen in Science ­ The Lady with the Lamp ­ 100 years on Prof. Sylvia Draper Florence Nightingale was an inspiration to the wounded and the dying in the Crimean war and to future generations of women who wanted

  18. THIN NANOPOROUS TITANIA FILMS ON THE ELECTRODELESS DISCHARGE LAMPS FOR PHOTOCATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    THIN NANOPOROUS TITANIA FILMS ON THE ELECTRODELESS DISCHARGE LAMPS FOR PHOTOCATALYSIS Vladimír: cirkva@icpf.cas.cz, http://home.icpf.cas.cz/cirkva Keywords: Microwave assisted photocatalysis. Introduction Photocatalysis is an efficient, attractive and clean technology for pollution abatement in water

  19. Photovoltaic generator with a spherical imaging lens for use with a paraboloidal solar reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Roger P

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a generator for photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight into electricity. A generator according to the invention incorporates a plurality of photovoltaic cells and is intended for operation near the focus of a large paraboloidal reflector pointed at the sun. Within the generator, the entering concentrated light is relayed by secondary optics to the cells arranged in a compact, concave array. The light is delivered to the cells at high concentration, consistent with high photovoltaic conversion efficiency and low cell cost per unit power output. Light enters the generator, preferably first through a sealing window, and passes through a field lens, preferably in the form of a full sphere or ball lens centered on the paraboloid focus. This lens forms a concentric, concave and wide-angle image of the primary reflector, where the intensity of the concentrated light is stabilized against changes in the position of concentrated light entering the generator. Receiving the stabilized light are flat photovoltaic cells made in different shapes and sizes and configured in a concave array corresponding to the concave image of a given primary reflector. Photovoltaic cells in a generator are also sized and interconnected so as to provide a single electrical output that remains high and stable, despite aberrations in the light delivered to the generator caused by, for example, mispointing or bending of the primary reflector. In some embodiments, the cells are set back from the image formed by the ball lens, and part of the light is reflected onto each cell small secondary reflectors in the form of mirrors set around its perimeter.

  20. Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions of the Philips L Prize entry.

  1. The development of large area saturable Bragg reflectors for the generation of widely-tunable ultra-short pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabanja, Sheila P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the realization of two photonic devices; 1) semiconductor lasers and 2) large area broadband Saturable Bragg Reflectors (SBRs). Semiconductor lasers explore the use of 3D and 2D quantum confinement ...

  2. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, Richard H. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape.

  3. CALiPER Report 20.1: Quality of Beam, Shadow, and Color in LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about CALiPER Report 20.1 which focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality in LED PAR38 lamps.

  4. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than those with a wide distribution (i.e., with a diffuse optic), and all of the linear LED lamps resulted in a higher luminaire efficiency than the fluorescent benchmark. The...

  5. CENTRIFUGAL LABTUBE FOR FULLY AUTOMATED DNA EXTRACTION & LAMP AMPLIFICATION BASED ON AN INTEGRATED, LOW-COST HEATING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehl, Melanie Margarete

    In this paper, we introduce a disposable battery-driven heating system for loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) inside a centrifugally-driven DNA-extraction platform (LabTube). We demonstrate fully automated, ...

  6. Numerical Investigation of Symmetry Breaking and Critical Behavior of the Acoustic Streaming Field in High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Bernd; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For energy efficiency and material cost reduction it is preferred to drive high-intensity discharge lamps at frequencies of approximately 300 kHz. However, operating lamps at these high frequencies bears the risk of stimulating acoustic resonances inside the arc tube, which can result in low frequency light flicker and even lamp destruction. The acoustic streaming effect has been identified as the link between high frequency resonances and low frequency flicker. A highly coupled 3D multiphysics model has been set up to calculate the acoustic streaming velocity field inside the arc tube of high-intensity discharge lamps. It has been found that the velocity field suffers a phase transition to an asymmetrical state at a critical acoustic streaming force. The system behaves similar to a ferromagnet near the Curie point. Furthermore, it is discussed how the model allows to investigate the light flicker phenomenon. Concerning computer resources the procedure is considerably less demanding than a direct approach wit...

  7. Treatability study for removal of leachable mercury in crushed fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Beck, D.E.; Bowser, K.T. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonserviceable fluorescent lamps removed from radiological control areas at the Oak Ridge Department of Energy facilities have been crushed and are currently managed as mixed waste (hazardous and radiologically contaminated). We present proposed treatment flowsheets and supporting treatability study data for conditioning this solid waste residue so that it can qualify for disposal in a sanitary landfill. Mercury in spent fluorescent lamps occurs primarily as condensate on high-surface-area phosphor material. It can be solubilized with excess oxidants (e.g., hypochlorite solution) and stabilized by complexation with halide ions. Soluble mercury in dechlorinated saline solution is effectively removed by cementation with zero-valent iron in the form of steel wool. In packed column dynamic flow testing, soluble mercury was reduced to mercury metal and insoluble calomel, loading > 1.2 g of mercury per grain of steel wool before an appreciable breakthrough of soluble mercury in the effluent.

  8. LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

  9. 6 TRANSPORTATION OF SPECIMENS All samples to be transported should be packaged in heavy-duty containers and should comply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    plastic bags (see Webb 1998). Place samples in a strong insulated container or cardboard box. Addresses-duty containers and should comply with the appropriate local protocol. It is important that all agencies involved with tape and enclosed in sealed plastic bags. Specimens can also be sent wrapped; place tissues in paper

  10. Advanced ultraviolet-resistant silver mirrors for use in solar reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Gee, Randy (Arvada, CO)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A silver mirror construction that maintains a high percentage of hemispherical reflectance throughout the UV and visible spectrum when used in solar reflectors, comprising:a) a pressure sensitive adhesive layer positioned beneath a silver overlay;b) a polymer film disposed on the silver overlay;c) an adhesive layer positioned on the polymer film; andd) a UV screening acrylic film disposed on the adhesive layer.

  11. Transpolarising Trihedral Corner Reflector Characterisation Using a GB-SAR System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrer, Pere J; Aguasca, Albert; Pipia, Luca; Gonzalez-Arbesu, Jose M; Fabregas, Xavier; Romeu, Jordi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a low profile, light weight and easy to fabricate transpolarising surface placed on one side of a trihedral corner reflector (TCR) as polarimetric calibrator is presented in this letter. The transpolarising-TCR (TTCR) presents a high backscattered cross-polar response contrary to standard TCRs. The performance of this device has been tested at X-band using the UPC GB-SAR.

  12. Radar cross section of triangular trihedral reflector with extended bottom plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trihedral corner reflectors are the preferred canonical target for SAR performance evaluation for many radar development programs. The conventional trihedrals have problems with substantially reduced Radar Cross Section (RCS) at low grazing angles, unless they are tilted forward, but in which case other problems arise. Consequently there is a need for better low grazing angle performance for trihedrals. This is facilitated by extending the bottom plate. A relevant analysis of RCS for an infinite ground plate is presented. Practical aspects are also discussed.

  13. Transpolarising Trihedral Corner Reflector Characterisation Using a GB-SAR System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pere J. Ferrer; Carlos Lopez-Martinez; Albert Aguasca; Luca Pipia; Jose M. Gonzalez-Arbesu; Xavier Fabregas; Jordi Romeu

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a low profile, light weight and easy to fabricate transpolarising surface placed on one side of a trihedral corner reflector (TCR) as polarimetric calibrator is presented in this letter. The transpolarising-TCR (TTCR) presents a high backscattered cross-polar response contrary to standard TCRs. The performance of this device has been tested at X-band using the UPC GB-SAR.

  14. 2015-01-28 Issuance: Test Procedure for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Final Rule Correction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule correction regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  15. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  16. Method of manufacturing large dish reflectors for a solar concentrator apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Roger P (Tucson, AZ); Olbert, Blain H (Tucson, AZ)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing monolithic glass reflectors for concentrating sunlight in a solar energy system is disclosed. The method of manufacturing allows large monolithic glass reflectors to be made from float glass in order to realize significant cost savings on the total system cost for a solar energy system. The method of manufacture includes steps of heating a sheet of float glass positioned over a concave mold until the sheet of glass sags and stretches to conform to the shape of the mold. The edges of the dish-shaped glass are rolled for structural stiffening around the periphery. The dish-shaped glass is then silvered to create a dish-shaped mirror that reflects solar radiation to a focus. The surface of the mold that contacts the float glass preferably has a grooved surface profile comprising a plurality of cusps and concave valleys. This grooved profile minimizes the contact area and marring of the specular glass surface, reduces parasitic heat transfer into the mold and increases mold lifetime. The disclosed method of manufacture is capable of high production rates sufficiently fast to accommodate the output of a conventional float glass production line so that monolithic glass reflectors can be produced as quickly as a float glass production can make sheets of float glass to be used in the process.

  17. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponçot, Agélique

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

  18. Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas VanOsdell; Karin Foarde

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Germicidal ultraviolet (UVGI) lamps have a long history of use for inactivating microbial aerosols. Most reports have focused on the control of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), in the occupied spaces of medical facilities. Ventilation duct use of UVGI has been increasing. In-duct applications are generally more concerned with controlling environmental organisms than with controlling infections agents. This document reports the results of a project to investigate the ability of UVGI lamps to inactivate representative environmental microbial aerosols in ventilation ducts. During this research, UVGI lamps were experimentally demonstrated to inactivate bioaerosols composed of vegetative bacteria, bacteria spores, or fungal spores to a reproducible degree under conditions of fixed dose. Vegetative bacteria were most susceptible to UVGI, with bacteria and fungal spores being substantially more resistant. The performance equation commonly cited in the literature for UVGI inactivation was found to generally apply, provided its parameters were known. Revision of final report DOE/OR22674/610-40030-01. Revised table 5 on page 33.

  19. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance of the Suntec solar collector with heat-formed glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Suntec solar collector, with heat-formed glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  20. Assessment of Impacts from Updating Iowa's Residential Energy Code to Comply with the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of Iowa currently requires that new buildings comply with the Council of American Building Officials? (CABO) 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (CABO 1992). CABO has been transformed into the International Code Council (ICC) and the MEC has been renamed the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The most recent edition of the code is the 2003 IECC (ICC 2003). Iowa?s Department of Natural Resources requested that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compare the 1992 MEC with the 2003 IECC to estimate impacts from updating Iowa?s residential energy code to comply with the new code. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed an assessment of the impacts from this potential code upgrade, including impacts on construction and energy consumption costs. This report is an update to a similar report completed by PNNL in 2002 (Lucas 2002) that compared the 1992 MEC to the 2000 IECC.

  1. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg.sup.196 enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg.sup.196 isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

  2. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg[sup 196] enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg[sup 196] isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

  3. Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, H.L.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth`s subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

  4. A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

  5. Lamp Divisions

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I2 m.m\ LILTS PlanI9

  6. See-through amorphous silicon solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal back reflectors for building integrated photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yang [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)] [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); O’Brien, Paul G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Ozin, Geoffrey A., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Kherani, Nazir P., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin semi-transparent hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal (STCPC) back-reflectors are demonstrated. Short circuit current density of a 135?nm thick a-Si:H cell with a given STCPC back-reflector is enhanced by as much as 23% in comparison to a reference cell with an ITO film functioning as its rear contact. Concurrently, solar irradiance of 295?W/m{sup 2} and illuminance of 3480 lux are transmitted through the cell with a given STCPC back reflector under AM1.5 Global tilt illumination, indicating its utility as a source of space heating and lighting, respectively, in building integrated photovoltaic applications.

  7. 2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule 2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation...

  8. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Freezers Room air conditioners Televisions Clothes washers Dishwashers Battery chargers Water heaters Fluorescent lamp ballasts Incandescent reflector lamps If your appliance has...

  9. Multiplier, moderator, and reflector materials for lithium-vanadium fusion blankets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has several attractive operational and environmental features. In this concept, liquid lithium works as the tritium breeder and coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because of its superior performance relative to other alloys for this application. However, this concept has poor attenuation characteristics and energy multiplication for the DT neutrons. An advanced self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has been developed to eliminate these drawbacks while maintaining all the attractive features of the conventional concept. An electrical insulator coating for the coolant channels, spectral shifter (multiplier, and moderator) and reflector were utilized in the blanket design to enhance the blanket performance. In addition, the blanket was designed to have the capability to operate at high loading conditions of 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading. This paper assesses the spectral shifter and the reflector materials and it defines the technological requirements of this advanced blanket concept.

  10. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuninetti, G. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy). Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy). Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. (Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  11. University-Wide Requirements for the Ph.D. Dissertation Dissertations must comply with the specifications set by ProQuest/UMI, by the Library, by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    University-Wide Requirements for the Ph.D. Dissertation Dissertations must comply. Dissertation Requirements Doctoral dissertations are original contributions to scholarship. As a condition Dissertation Publishing. The public sharing of original dissertation research is a principle to which

  12. Jade Sky Technologies Partners with CLTC on LED Replacement Lamp Upgrade Project UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Jade Sky Technologies Partners with CLTC on LED Replacement Lamp Upgrade Project UC Davis and power factor. "JST shares our goal of making the transition to LED lamps a satisfying experience of cost-effective, easy-to-use LED lighting solutions Milpitas, Calif. ­ October 15, 2013 ­ Jade Sky

  13. Optical and Durability Evaluation for Silvered Polymeric Mirrors and Reflectors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number, CRD-08-316

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.

  14. INCREASED CELL EFFICIENCY IN InGaAs THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS WITH DIELECTRIC AND METAL BACK REFLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    INCREASED CELL EFFICIENCY IN InGaAs THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS WITH DIELECTRIC AND METAL BACK REFLECTORS solar cells enable very high photovoltaic efficiencies by virtue of employing different band gap materials in series- connected tandem cells to access the full solar spectrum. Researchers focused

  15. Design and performance of a low-cost acrylic reflector for a ~7x concentrating photovoltaic module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    of the prototype. The final design is an asymmetric compound parabolic concentrator mounted to an encapsulated increase in power output over an encapsulated receiver with no reflector. Keywords: compound parabolic push for drastic cost reductions in the deployment of solar electricity production has renewed interest

  16. Tomorrow's cities -the lamp-posts watching every move1 by Jane Wakefield for BBC News2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    the city council is looking to upgrade its23 streetlights to more energy-efficient LED lights - likely in the area. The pilot project will be integrated with the newly built City Operations Centre, where CCTVTomorrow's cities - the lamp-posts watching every move1 by Jane Wakefield for BBC News2 3 Imagine

  17. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released Report 20.2, which is part of a series of investigations on LED PAR38 lamps. Report 20.2 focuses on dimming, flicker, and power quality...

  18. Macros that Reach Out and Touch Somewhere Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping, Luis H. Rodriguez Jr., and Erik Ruf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., and Erik Ruf Xerox PARC Internal Report, December 1991. © Copyright 1991 Xerox Corporation. All rights Xerox Corporation Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping, Luis Rodriguez and Erik Ruf Xerox PARC By providing, and insert the necessary coercions. The code stays clean, and there is no chance of missing a coercion. Both

  19. Ultracold neutron accumulation in a superfluid-helium converter with magnetic multipole reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Zimmer; R. Golub

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze accumulation of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a superfluid-helium converter vessel surrounded by a magnetic multipole reflector. We solved the spin-dependent rate equation, employing formulas valid for adiabatic spin transport of trapped UCN in mechanical equilibrium. Results for saturation UCN densities are obtained in dependence of order and strength of the multipolar field. The addition of magnetic storage to neutron optical potentials can increase the density and energy of the low field seeking UCN produced and serves to mitigate the effects of wall losses on the source performance. It also can provide a highly polarized sample of UCN without need to polarize the neutron beam incident on the converter. This work was performed in preparation of the UCN source project SuperSUN at the ILL.

  20. New Method to Characterize Degradation of First Surface Aluminum Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, F.; Heller, P.; Meyen, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Kennedy, C.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Schmucker, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the development of a new optical instrument capable of characterizing the aging process of enhanced first surface aluminum reflectors for concentrating solar power (CSP) application. Samples were exposed outdoors at different sites and in accelerated exposure tests. All samples exposed outdoors showed localized corrosion spots. Degradation originated from points of damage in the protective coating, but propagated underneath the protective coating. The degraded samples were analyzed with a microscope and with a newly designed space-resolved specular reflectometer (SR)2 that is capable of optically detecting and characterizing the corrosion spots. The device measures the specular reflectance at three acceptance angles and the wavelengths with spatial resolution using a digital camera's CMOS sensor. It can be used to measure the corrosion growth rate during outdoor and accelerated exposure tests. These results will allow a correlation between the degraded mirror surface and its specular reflectance.

  1. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements.

  2. Enhanced absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} with resonant back reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jiang-Tao, E-mail: jtliu@semi.ac.cn; Liu, Nian-Hua [Nanoscale Science and Technology Laboratory, Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Tong-Biao [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Li, Xiao-Jing [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} on top of one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) or metal films with spacer layers is theoretically investigated by extracting the permittivity of monolayer MoS{sub 2} from existing experimental results [K. F. Mak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 136805 (2010)]. The absorption of graphene with 1DPC across a broad spectral range is substantially enhanced because of the photonic localization at the optical micro-cavity on top of the 1DPC or metal films. The absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} can be tuned by varying either the distance between the monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the back reflector or the thickness of the cover layers.

  3. NIST energy related inventions: Electronic starter device for fluorescent lamps. Interim report, August--October, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.A.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the Scope of Work document which accompanied the original proposal, three silicon devices were anticipated for development, simulation, and quality assurance fabrication. The status of these are in the same format as the Scope of Work...Attachment-A-: Task 1--design and simulation; Task 2--prototype tooling; Task 3--test engineering; Task 4--product tooling; Task 5--package tooling/manufacturing design and assembly. It is felt the program will meet it`s stated goals of producing a low cost, high performance fluorescent lamp starter which will lower the acquisition and operating cost of fluorescent technology...thus saving significant amounts of energy. The likelihood of success is even greater, now that the TN22 component has been qualified. The challenges of creating a custom ASIC, while still significant, are within the skill and expertise level or the assigned engineers.

  4. Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  5. DOE CALiPER Program, Report 21.2: Linear (T8) LED Lamp Performance in Five Types of Recessed Troffers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Although lensed troffers are numerous, there are many other types of optical systems as well. This report looked at the performance of three linear (T8) LED lamps chosen primarily based on their luminous intensity distributions (narrow, medium, and wide beam angles) as well as a benchmark fluorescent lamp in five different troffer types. Also included are the results of a subjective evaluation. Results show that linear (T8) LED lamps can improve luminaire efficiency in K12-lensed and parabolic-louvered troffers, effect little change in volumetric and high-performance diffuse-lensed type luminaires, but reduce efficiency in recessed indirect troffers. These changes can be accompanied by visual appearance and visual comfort consequences, especially when LED lamps with clear lenses and narrow distributions are installed. Linear (T8) LED lamps with diffuse apertures exhibited wider beam angles, performed more similarly to fluorescent lamps, and received better ratings from observers. Guidance is provided on which luminaires are the best candidates for retrofitting with linear (T8) LED lamps.

  6. Criticality Safety Analysis on the Mixed Be, Nat-U, and C (Graphite) Reflectors in 55-Gallon Waste Drums and Their Equivalents for HWM Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this analysis is to develop and establish the technical basis on the criticality safety controls for the storage of mixed beryllium (Be), natural uranium (Nat-U), and carbon (C)/graphite reflectors in 55-gallon waste containers and/or their equivalents in Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on the criticality safety limits and controls outlined in Section 3.0, the operations involving the use of mixed-reflector drums satisfy the double-contingency principle as required by DOE Order 420.1 and are therefore criticality safe. The mixed-reflector mass limit is 120 grams for each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent. a reflector waiver of 50 grams is allowed for Be, Nat-U, or C/graphite combined. The waived reflectors may be excluded from the reflector mass calculations when determining if a drum is compliant. The mixed-reflector drums are allowed to mix with the typical 55-gallon one-reflector drums with a Pu mass limit of 120 grams. The fissile mass limit for the mixed-reflector container is 65 grams of Pu equivalent each. The corresponding reflector mass limits are 300 grams of Be, and/or 100 kilograms of Nat-U, and/or 110 kilograms of C/graphite for each container. All other unaffected control parameters for the one-reflector containers remain in effect for the mixed-reflector drums. For instance, Superior moderators, such as TrimSol, Superla white mineral oil No. 9, paraffin, and polyethylene, are allowed in unlimited quantities. Hydrogenous materials with a hydrogen density greater than 0.133 gram/cc are not allowed. Also, an isolation separation of no less than 76.2 cm (30-inch) is required between a mixed array and any other array. Waste containers in the action of being transported are exempted from this 76.2-cm (30-inch) separation requirement. All deviations from the CS controls and mass limits listed in Section 3.0 will require individual criticality safety analyses on a case-by-case basis for each of them to confirm their criticality safety prior to their deployment and implementation.

  7. Reflector Technology Development and System Design for Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Schaut

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcoa began this program in March of 2008 with the goal of developing and validating an advanced CSP trough design to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) as compared to existing glass based, space-frame trough technology. In addition to showing a pathway to a significant LCOE reduction, Alcoa also desired to create US jobs to support the emerging CSP industry. Alcoa's objective during Phase I: Concept Feasibility was to provide the DOE with a design approach that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase I consisted of two major tasks; reflector surface development and system concept development. Two specific reflective surface technologies were investigated, silver metallized lamination, and thin film deposition both applied on an aluminum substrate. Alcoa prepared samples; performed test validation internally; and provided samples to the NREL for full-spectrum reflectivity measurements. The final objective was to report reflectivity at t = 0 and the latest durability results as of the completion of Phase 1. The target criteria for reflectance and durability were as follows: (1) initial (t = 0), hemispherical reflectance >93%, (2) initial spectral reflectance >90% for 25-mrad reading and >87% for 7-mrad reading, and (3) predicted 20 year durability of less than 5% optical performance drop. While the results of the reflective development activities were promising, Alcoa was unable to down-select on a reflective technology that met the target criteria. Given the progress and potential of both silver film and thin film technologies, Alcoa continued reflector surface development activities in Phase II. The Phase I concept development activities began with acquiring baseline CSP system information from both CSP Services and the DOE. This information was used as the basis to develop conceptual designs through ideation sessions. The concepts were evaluated based on estimated cost and high-level structural performance. The target criteria for the concept development was to achieve a solar field cost savings of 25%-50% thereby meeting or exceeding the DOE solar field cost savings target of $350/m2. After evaluating various structural design approaches, Alcoa down-selected to a monocoque, dubbed Wing Box, design that utilizes the reflective surface as a structural, load carrying member. The cost and performance potential of the Wing Box concept was developed via initial finite element analysis (FEA) and cost modeling. The structural members were sized through material utilization modeling when subjected to representative loading conditions including wind loading. Cost modeling was utilized to refine potential manufacturing techniques that could be employed to manufacture the structural members. Alcoa concluded that an aluminum intensive collector design can achieve significant cost savings without sacrificing performance. Based on the cost saving potential of this Concept Feasibility study, Alcoa recommended further validation of this CSP approach through the execution of Phase II: Design and Prototype Development. Alcoa Phase II objective was to provide the DOE with a validated CSP trough design that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase II consisted of three major tasks; Detail System Design, Prototype Build, and System Validation. Additionally, the reflector surface development that began in Phase I was continued in Phase II. After further development work, Alcoa was unable to develop a reflective technology that demonstrated significant performance or cost benefits compared to commercially available CSP reflective products. After considering other commercially available reflective surfaces, Alcoa selected Alano's MIRO-SUN product for use on the full scale prototype. Although MIRO-SUN has a lower specular reflectivity compared to other options, its durability in terms of handling, cleaning, and long-term reflectivity was deemed the most important attribute to successfully validate Alcoa's advanced trough archi

  8. Treatment of exhaust fluorescent lamps to recover yttrium: Experimental and process analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Michelis, Ida, E-mail: ida.demichelis@univaq.it [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials - Ex-Optimes Loc., Campo di Pile, 67100 L'Aquila (Italy); Ferella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.ferella@univaq.it [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials - Ex-Optimes Loc., Campo di Pile, 67100 L'Aquila (Italy); Varelli, Ennio Fioravante [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials - Ex-Optimes Loc., Campo di Pile, 67100 L'Aquila (Italy); Veglio, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.veglio@univaq.it [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials - Ex-Optimes Loc., Campo di Pile, 67100 L'Aquila (Italy)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > Recovery of yttrium from spent fluorescent lamps by sulphuric acid leaching. > The use of sulphuric acid allows to reduce calcium dissolutions. > Main contaminant of fluorescent powder are Si, Pb, Ca and Ba. > Hydrated yttrium oxalate, recovered by selective precipitation, is quite pure (>90%). > We have studied the whole process for the treatment of dangerous waste (plant capability). - Abstract: The paper deals with recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder coming from dismantling of spent fluorescent tubes. Metals are leached by using different acids (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric) and ammonia in different leaching tests. These tests show that ammonia is not suitable to recover yttrium, whereas HNO{sub 3} produces toxic vapours. A full factorial design is carried out with HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to evaluate the influence of operating factors. HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching systems give similar results in terms of yttrium extraction yield, but the last one allows to reduce calcium extraction with subsequent advantage during recovery of yttrium compounds in the downstream. The greatest extraction of yttrium is obtained by 20% w/v S/L ratio, 4 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration and 90 deg. C. Yttrium and calcium yields are nearly 85% and 5%, respectively. The analysis of variance shows that acid concentration alone and interaction between acid and pulp density have a significant positive effect on yttrium solubilization for both HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} medium. Two models are empirically developed to estimate yttrium and calcium concentration during leaching. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is necessary to recover yttrium efficiently and a pure yttrium oxalate n-hydrate can be produced (99% grade). The process is economically feasible if other components of the fluorescent lamps (glass, ferrous and non-ferrous scraps) are recovered after the equipment dismantling and valorized, besides the cost that is usually paid to recycling companies for collection, treatment or final disposal of such fluorescent powders.

  9. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Toltec two-axis tracking solar collector with 3M acrylic polyester film reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Toltec solar collector, with acrylic film reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  10. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance of the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  11. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  12. CALiPER Report 20.1: Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This December 3, 2013 webinar explored the findings of CALiPER 20.1: Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps and discussed what attributes to...

  13. Color stable phosphors for LED lamps and methods for preparing them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, James Edward; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Camardello, Samuel Joseph

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp includes a light source configured to emit radiation with a peak intensity at a wavelength between about 250 nm and about 550 nm; and a phosphor composition configured to be radiationally coupled to the light source. The phosphor composition includes particles of a phosphor of formula I, said particles having a coating composition disposed on surfaces thereof; ((Sr.sub.1-zM.sub.z).sub.1-(x+w)A.sub.wCe.sub.x).sub.3(Al.sub.1-ySi.sub.y-)O.sub.4+y+3(x-w)F.sub.1-y-3(x-w) I wherein the coating composition comprises a material selected from aluminum oxide, magnesium oxide, calcium oxide, barium oxide, strontium oxide, zinc oxide, aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide, barium hydroxide, strontium hydroxide, zinc hydroxide, aluminum phosphate, magnesium phosphate, calcium phosphate, barium phosphate, strontium phosphate, and combinations thereof; and A is Li, NA, K, or Rb, or a combination thereof; M is Ca, Ba, Mg, Zn, or a combination thereof; and 0

  14. Monte Carlo analysis of a monolithic interconnected module with a back surface reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, C.T.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States); Murray, C.S. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the photon Monte Carlo code, RACER-X, was modified to include wave-length dependent absorption coefficients and indices of refraction. This work was done in an effort to increase the code`s capabilities to be more applicable to a wider range of problems. These new features make RACER-X useful for analyzing devices like monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs) which have etched surface features and incorporates a back surface reflector (BSR) for spectral control. A series of calculations were performed on various MIM structures to determine the impact that surface features and component reflectivities have on spectral utilization. The traditional concern of cavity photonics is replaced with intra-cell photonics in the MIM design. Like the cavity photonic problems previously discussed, small changes in optical properties and/or geometry can lead to large changes in spectral utilization. The calculations show that seemingly innocuous surface features (e.g., trenches and grid lines) can significantly reduce the spectral utilization due to the non-normal incident photon flux. Photons that enter the device through a trench edge are refracted onto a trajectory where they will not escape. This leads to a reduction in the number of reflected below bandgap photons that return to the radiator and reduce the spectral utilization. In addition, trenches expose a lateral conduction layer in this particular series of calculations which increase the absorption of above bandgap photons in inactive material.

  15. Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred Ludwig (Princeton, NJ); Hill, Kenneth Wayne (Plainsboro, NJ); Scott, Steven Douglas (Wellesley, MA); Feder, Russell (Newton, PA); Ko, Jinseok (Cambridge, MA); Rice, John E. (N. Billerica, MA); Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles (New York, NY); Jones, Frank (Manalapan, NJ)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements for the point-to-point imaging of a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and ultrasound at large angles of incidence employ matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors to eliminate astigmatic imaging errors. Matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or spherically bent multi-layers are used for X-rays and EUV radiation; and matched pairs of spherically bent mirrors that are appropriate for the type of radiation are used with microwaves, infrared and visible light, or ultrasound. The arrangements encompass the two cases, where the Bragg angle--the complement to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystals/mirrors or between 0.degree. and 45.degree. on the first crystal/mirror and between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on the second crystal/mirror, where the angles of convergence and divergence are equal. For x-rays and EUV radiation, also the Bragg condition is satisfied on both spherically bent crystals/multi-layers.

  16. VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector): Line-imaging interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) technique that extends velocity measurements from single points to a line. Single-frequency argon laser light was focused through a cylindrical lens to illuminate a line on a surface. The initially stationary, flat surface was accelerated unevenly during the experiment. Motion produced a Doppler-shift of light reflected from the surface that was proportional to the velocity at each point. The Doppler-shifted image of the illuminated line was focused from the surface through a push-pull VISAR interferometer where the light was split into four quadrature-coded images. When the surface accelerated, the Doppler-shift caused the interference for each point on each line image to oscillate sinusoidally. Coherent fiber optic bundles transmitted images from the interferometer to an electronic streak camera for sweeping in time and recording on film. Data reduction combined the images to yield a continuous velocity and displacement history for all points on the surface that reflected sufficient light. The technique was demonstrated in an experiment where most of the surface was rapidly driven to a saddle shape by an exploding foil. Computer graphics were used to display the measured velocity history and to aid visualization of the surface motion. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

  18. InAlN/GaN Bragg reflectors grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E. [ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hosseini, D.; Peiro, F. [Departament d'Electronica, LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S. [Departament d'Electronica, LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, SCT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of ten-period lattice-matched InAlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with peak reflectivity centered around 400 nm. Thanks to the well tuned ternary alloy composition, crack-free surfaces have been obtained, as confirmed by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their good periodicity and well-defined interfaces have been confirmed by both x-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. Peak reflectivity values as high as 60% with stop bands of 30 nm have been demonstrated. Optical measurements revealed that discrepancy between the obtained (60%) and the theoretically expected ({approx}75%) reflectivity is a consequence of significant residual absorption ({approx}35%). TEM measurements revealed the coexistence of zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, as well as planar defects, mainly in GaN. These defects are suggested as the potential source of the undesired absorption and/or scattering effects that lowered the DBRs' peak reflectivity.

  19. Searching for optimal mitigation geometries for laser-resistant multilayer high-reflector coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, S. Roger; Wolfe, Justin E.; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Feit, Michael D.; Pistor, Thomas V.; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing laser damage sites on multilayer high-reflector coatings can limit mirror performance. One of the strategies to improve laser damage resistance is to replace the growing damage sites with predesigned benign mitigation structures. By mitigating the weakest site on the optic, the large-aperture mirror will have a laser resistance comparable to the intrinsic value of the multilayer coating. To determine the optimal mitigation geometry, the finite-difference time-domain method was used to quantify the electric-field intensification within the multilayer, at the presence of different conical pits. We find that the field intensification induced by the mitigation pit is strongly dependent on the polarization and the angle of incidence (AOI) of the incoming wave. Therefore, the optimal mitigation conical pit geometry is application specific. Furthermore, our simulation also illustrates an alternative means to achieve an optimal mitigation structure by matching the cone angle of the structure with the AOI of the incoming wave, except for the p-polarized wave at a range of incident angles between 30 deg. and 45 deg.

  20. Two-port multimode interference reflectors based on aluminium mirrors in a thick SOI platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fandińo, Javier S; Muńoz, Pascual

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multimode interference reflectors (MIRs) were recently introduced as a new type of photonic integrated devices for on-chip, broadband light reflection. In the original proposal, different MIRs were demonstrated based on total internal reflection mirrors made of two deep-etched facets. Although simpler to fabricate, this approach imposes certain limits on the shape of the field pattern at the reflecting facets, which in turn restricts the types of MIRs that can be implemented. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate the use of aluminium-based mirrors for the design of 2-port MIRs with variable reflectivity. These mirrors do not impose any restrictions on the incident field, and thus give more flexibility at the design stage. Different devices with reflectivities between~0~and~0.5 were fabricated in a 3~um thick SOI platform, and characterization of multiple dies was performed to extract statistical data about their performance. Our measurements show that, on average, losses both in the aluminiu...

  1. WRITTEN INJURY AND ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAM Completion of this form indicates that it is the policy of the employer to fully comply with Labor Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    that it is the policy of the employer to fully comply with Labor Code §6401.7(SB 198) and General Industry Safety Order Industry Safety Orders and other Safety Orders that apply to the operation. Review of industry and general materials, boxes, etc., may be left in walkways, inside or outside of the building. 10. Exposure to heavy

  2. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  3. Conference shapes direction of Doctrine 2015 -Fort Leavenworth, KS -The Fort Leavenworth Lamp http://www.ftleavenworthlamp.com/news/around_the_force/x27456959/Conference-shapes-direction-of-Doctrine-2015[8/18/2011 12:32:27 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Conference shapes direction of Doctrine 2015 - Fort Leavenworth, KS - The Fort Leavenworth Lamp and more accessible. The conference was led by the Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate, a subordinate

  4. 1 5-9.2002 . We report the core and reflector design parameters of reactor PIK needed for neutronic calculations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    PIK, needed for the reactor neutronic calculation. All up-to-date design modifications are taken÷òåíû ïîñëåäíèå èçìåíåíèÿ â êîíñòðóêöèè. Abstract We report the core and reflector design parameters of reactor PIK needed for neutronic calculations. The recent changes are taken into account. Ïðåïðèíò ¹2472, 12

  5. 2014-06-18 Issuance: Test Procedure for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Test Procedures for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on June 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  6. The Spectrum of the Th-Ar Hollow-Cathode Lamp Used with the 2dcoude Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Allende Prieto

    2001-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have produced an atlas of the Th-Ar hollow-cathode lamp used with the 2dcoude spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. The atlas covers from 3611.9 to 10596.4 A at a resolving power of 52,000. We have determined the wavelenghts of 1483 emission lines in the spectrum with a median precision of 0.00023 A. A web-based interface is offered for interactive visualization of segments of the atlas or spectral orders.

  7. Influence of the chlorine concentration on the radiation efficiency of a XeCl exciplex lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avtaeva, S. V., E-mail: s_avtaeva@mail.ru [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan); Sosnin, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Saghi, B. [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria)] [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria); Panarin, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Rahmani, B. [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria)] [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the chlorine concentration on the radiation efficiency of coaxial exciplex lamps (excilamps) excited by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in binary Xe-Cl{sub 2} mixtures at pressures of 240–250 Torr is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments were carried out at Cl{sub 2} concentrations in the range of 0.01–1%. The DBD characteristics were calculated in the framework of a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model at Cl{sub 2} concentrations in the range of 0.1–5%. It is found that the radiation intensities of the emission bands of Xe*{sub 2}(172 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) are comparable when the chlorine concentration in the mixture is in the range of 0.01–0.1%. In this case, in the mixture, the radiation intensity of the Xe*{sub 2} molecule rapidly decreases with increasing Cl{sub 2} concentration and, at a chlorine concentration of ?0.2%, the radiation of the B ? X band of XeCl* molecules with a peak at 308 nm dominates in the discharge radiation. The radiation efficiency of this band reaches its maximum value at chlorine concentrations in the range of 0.4–0.5%. The calculated efficiencies of DBD radiation exceed those obtained experimentally. This is due to limitations of the one-dimensional model, which assumes the discharge to be uniform in the transverse direction, whereas the actual excilamp discharge is highly inhomogeneous. The influence of the chlorine concentration on the properties of the DBD plasma in binary Xe-Cl{sub 2} mixtures is studied numerically. It is shown that an increase in the Cl{sub 2} concentration in the mixture leads to the attachment of electrons to chlorine atoms and a decrease in the electron density and discharge conductivity. As a result, the electric field and the voltage drop across the discharge gap increase, which, in turn, leads to an increase in the average electron energy and the probability of dissociation of Cl{sub 2} molecules and ionization of Xe atoms and Cl{sub 2} molecules. The total energy deposited in the discharge rises with increasing chlorine concentration due to an increase in the power spent on the heating of positive and negative ions. The power dissipated by electrons decreases with increasing chlorine concentration in the working mixture. Recommendations on the choice of the chlorine content in the mixture for reducing the intensity of VUV radiation of the second continuum of the Xe*{sub 2} excimer without a substantial decrease in the excilamp efficiency are formulated.

  8. Broadband absorption enhancement in ultra-thin crystalline Si solar cells by incorporating metallic and dielectric nanostructures in the back reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Samart; Miljkovic, Vladimir D; Dmitriev, Alexamder; Trompoukis, Christos; Gordon, Ivan; van Dorpe, Pol; Daif, Ounsi El

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a back-reflecting scheme in order to enhance the maximum achievable current in one micron thick crystalline silicon solar cells. We perform 3-dimensional numerical investigations of the scattering properties of metallic nanostructures located at the back side, and optimize them for enhancing absorption in the silicon layer. We validate our numerical results experimentally and also compare the absorption enhancement in the solar cell structure, both with quasi-periodic and random metallic nanostructures. We have looked at the interplay between the metallic nanostructures and an integrated back-reflector. We show that the combination of metallic nanoparticles and a metallic reflector results in significant parasitic absorption. We compared this to another implementation based on titanium dioxide nanoparticles which act as a lambertian reflector of light. Our simulation and experimental results show that this proposed configuration results in reduced absorption losses and in broadband enhancement of a...

  9. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  10. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  11. Focusing electrode and coaxial reflector used for reducing the guiding magnetic field of the Ku-band foilless transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Junpu; Zhang, Jiande; He, Juntao, E-mail: hejuntao12@163.com; Wang, Lei; Deng, Bingfang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the theoretical analysis of the intense relativistic electron beam propagation in the coaxial drift-tube, a focusing electrode and a coaxial reflector is proposed to lessen the demand of the coaxial Ku-band foilless transit-time oscillator (TTO) for the guiding magnetic field. Moreover, a Ku-band TTO with the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector is designed and studied by particle in cell simulation. When the diode voltage is 390 kV, the beam current 7.8 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.3 T, the device can output 820 MW microwave pulse at 14.25 GHz by means of the simulation. However, for the device without them, the output power is only 320 MW. The primary experiments are also carried out. When the guiding magnetic field is 0.3 T, the output power of the device with the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector is double that of the one without them. The simulation and experimental results prove that the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector are effective on reducing the guiding magnetic field of the device.

  12. GaN-based two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers with AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    GaN-based two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers with AlN/GaN distributed Bragg 14 December 2007; published online 11 January 2008 GaN-based two-dimensional 2D surface-emitting photonic crystal PC lasers with AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors are fabricated and demonstrated

  13. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

  14. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 739-756, December 2006 Velocity Structure in Marine Sediments with Gas Hydrate Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Sediments with Gas Hydrate Reflectors in Offshore SW Taiwan, from OBS Data Tomography Win-Bin Cheng 1 be considered a result of local shallowing of the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, caused by ascending structure was ob- served and could be associated with the phenomenon of hydrate/gas phase boundary

  15. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed Troffer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released Report 21.1, which is part of a series of investigations on linear LED lamps. Report 21.1 focuses on the performance of 31 types of...

  16. Mechanistic Evaluation of the Pros and Cons of Digital RT-LAMP for HIV1 Viral Load Quantification on a Microfluidic Device and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    to manipulate many single molecules in parallel through a two-step digital process. In the first step weMechanistic Evaluation of the Pros and Cons of Digital RT-LAMP for HIV1 Viral Load Quantification on a Microfluidic Device and Improved Efficiency via a Two-Step Digital Protocol Bing Sun, Feng Shen, Stephanie E

  17. * Corresponding author. Tel.: #44-1570-424736. E-mail address: walker@lamp.ac.uk (M.J.C. Walker)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlfarth, Barbara

    * Corresponding author. Tel.: #44-1570-424736. E-mail address: walker@lamp.ac.uk (M.J.C. Walker that these approaches were never designed for such "ne-scale resolution of the strati- graphic record. This has led

  18. Efficient directional spontaneous emission from an InGaAs/InP heterostructure with an integral parabolic reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gfroerer, T.H.; Cornell, E.A. [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309-0440 (United States)] [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309-0440 (United States); Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, 80401 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to increase the radiative efficiency and directivity of spontaneous emission from a lattice-matched InGaAs/InP heterostructure, we have polished the substrate into a parabolic reflector. We combine optical and thermal measurements to obtain the absolute external efficiency over a wide range of carrier densities. Using a simple model, the measurement is used to determine interface, radiative, and Auger recombination rates in the active material. At the optimal density, the quantum efficiency exceeds 60{percent} at room temperature. The divergence of the emitted light is less than 20{degree}. In fact, the beam profile is dominated by a 6{degree} wide lobe that can be swept across the field of emission by changing the excitation position. This suggests a way to create an all-electronic scanned light beam. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. One-wave optical time-reversal mirror by actively coupling arbitrary light fields into a single-mode reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, KyeoReh; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomena made possible by the wave property of light. To exploit this phenomenon, many diverse research fields have pursed the realization of an ideal phase conjugation mirror, but the ideal phase conjugation mirror - an optical system that requires a single-input and a single-output beam, like natural conventional mirrors - has never been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical time-reversal mirror using a spatial light modulator and a single-mode reflector. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing unlimited power throughput in the time reversed wave, which have not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput time-reversal full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  20. Electromagnetic modeling of the energy distribution of a metallic cylindrical parabolic reflector covered with a magnetized plasma layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir; Khajehmirzaei, M. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, GC, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoudi-Rahaghi, B.; Rahmani, Z.; Jazi, B.; Abdoli-Arani, A. [Department of Laser and Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy distribution along the focal axis of a long metallic cylindrical parabolic reflector with a plasma layer on its surface in the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. The effects of some physical parameters, such as the plasma frequency, the wave frequency and the thickness of plasma layer on the energy distribution and the reflected and transmitted electromagnetic fields, are simulated. These investigations for both S- and P-polarizations have been done separately. It is found that the maximum value of the reflected intensity increases by increasing the incident wave frequency and by decreasing the plasma layer thickness and the plasma frequency for both polarizations. Furthermore, the results show that the increase of the magnetic field strength can cause an increase in the reflected intensity for S-polarization and a slight decrease for P-polarization.

  1. Optimal design of one-dimensional photonic crystal back reflectors for thin-film silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu, E-mail: gfhou@nankai.edu.cn; Zhang, Jianjun, E-mail: jjzhang@nankai.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying [Institute of Photoelectronics and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photoelectronic Thin-film Devices and Technique, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC), a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) is a good back reflector (BR) because it increases the total internal reflection at the back surface. We used the plane-wave expansion method and the finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm to simulate and analyze the photonic bandgap (PBG), the reflection and the absorption properties of a 1D PC and to further explore the optimal 1D PC design for use in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. With identified refractive index contrast and period thickness, we found that the PBG and the reflection of a 1D PC are strongly influenced by the contrast in bilayer thickness. Additionally, light coupled to the top three periods of the 1D PC and was absorbed if one of the bilayers was absorptive. By decreasing the thickness contrast of the absorptive layer relative to the non-absorptive layer, an average reflectivity of 96.7% was achieved for a 1D PC alternatively stacked with a-Si:H and SiO{sub 2} in five periods. This reflectivity was superior to a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structure with 93.5% and an Ag film with 93.4%. n-i-p a-Si:H solar cells with an optimal 1D PC-based BR offer a higher short-circuit current density than those with a DBR-based BR or an AZO/Ag-based BR. These results provide new design rules for photonic structures in TFSC.

  2. STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  3. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector with 0. 125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector, with 0.125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  4. DOE CALiPER Program, Report 20.1 Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Miller, Naomi J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality. Using a questionnaire that included rank ordering, opinions on 27 of the Report 20 PAR38 lamps were gathered during a demonstration event for members of the local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) chapter. This was not a rigorous scientific experiment, and the data should not be extrapolated beyond the scope of the demonstration. The results suggest that many of the LED products compared favorably to halogen PAR38 benchmarks in all attributes considered. LED lamps using a single-emitter design were generally preferred for their beam quality and shadow quality, and the IES members ranking of color quality did not always match the rank according to the color rendering index (CRI).

  5. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  6. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  7. Polarity dependence of the electrical characteristics of Ag reflectors for high-power GaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jae-Seong; Seong, Tae-Yeon, E-mail: tyseong@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jaecheon [Department of LED Business, Chip Development Group, LG Innotek, Paju 413-901 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jun-Seok [School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the polarity dependence of the electrical properties of Ag reflectors for high-power GaN-based light-emitting diodes. The (0001) c-plane samples become ohmic after annealing in air. However, the (11–22) semi-polar samples are non-ohmic after annealing, although the 300?°C-annealed sample shows the lowest contact resistivity. The X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the Ga 2p core level for the c-plane samples experiences larger shift toward the valence band than that for the semi-polar samples. The XPS depth profile results show that unlike the c-plane samples, the semi-polar samples contain some amounts of oxygen at the Ag/GaN interface regions. The outdiffusion of Ga atoms is far more significant in the c-plane samples than in the semi-polar samples, whereas the outdiffusion of N atoms is relatively less significant in the c-plane samples. On the basis of the electrical and XPS results, the polarity dependence of the electrical properties is described and discussed.

  8. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at an Exhibit of 19th Century Photography at the Getty Museum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Druzik, Jim

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program may have been prescreened for performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products. This report reviews the installation and use of LED PAR38 lamps to light a collection of toned albument photographic prints at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. Research results provided by the Getty Conservation Institute are incorporated and discussed.

  9. Assessment of Impacts from Updating North Dakota’s Residential Energy Code to Comply with the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current North Dakota state energy code is the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) (CABO 1993). Local jurisdictions can choose to adopt this code. CABO has been transformed into the International Code Council (ICC) and the MEC has been renamed the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The most recent edition of the code is the 2003 IECC (ICC 2003). North Dakota's Department of Community Services requested that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compare the 1993 MEC with the 2000 IECC to estimate impacts from updating North Dakota's residential energy code to comply with the new code. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed an assessment of the impacts from this potential code upgrade, including impacts on construction and energy consumption costs.

  10. CX-011406: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conservation Standards DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt...

  12. Westinghouse Lighting: Noncompliance Determination (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation finding that various models of incandescent reflector lamps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  13. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

  14. Phosphors for LED lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, James Edward; Manepalli, Satya Kishore; Kumar, Prasanth Nammalwar

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A phosphor, a phosphor blend including the phosphor, a phosphor prepared by a process, and a lighting apparatus including the phosphor blend are disclosed. The phosphor has the formula (Ca.sub.1-p-qCe.sub.pK.sub.q).sub.xSc.sub.y(Si.sub.1-rGa.sub.r).sub.zO.su- b.12+.delta. or derived from a process followed using disclosed amounts of reactants. In the formula, (0

  15. Silvered polymer reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schissel, P.; Neidlinger, H.H.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal objectives of the Solar Thermal Research Program is to develop silvered polymer films for constructing durable, low-cost, lightweight concentrating collectors for high temperature solar thermal systems. The mirrors are characterized for their solar-weighted (air mass 1.5) reflectance and exposed to environmental degradation. Photodegradation of polymers has also been studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy supplemented with surface analysis characterization. Results are discussed for extruded films, ultraviolet effects, metallization, and the effects of polymer additives. (LEW)

  16. Extreme ultraviolet reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newnam, Brian E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted mirror forms a retroreflector for a resonator loop in a free electron laser (FEL) operating in the XUV (.lambda.=10-100 nm). The number of facets is determined by the angle-of-incidence needed to obtain total external reflectance (TER) from the facet surface and the angle through which the FEL beam is to be turned. Angles-of-incidence greater than the angle for TER may be used to increase the area of the beam incident on the surface and reduce energy absorption density. Suitable surface films having TER in the 10-100 nm range may be formed from a variety of materials, including Al, single-crystal Si, Ag, and Rh. One of the facets is formed as an off-axis conic section to collimate the output beam with minimum astigmatism.

  17. Complying with the OQ Rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cederquist, S.C.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pipeline safety rule requires that all individuals who operate and maintain pipeline facilities in the US be qualified to do so. Pipeline Safety: Qualification of Pipeline Personnel (DOT 49 Code of Federal Regulations 49 CFR Parts 192 and 195)-known as the Operator Qualification Rule or the OQ-Rule-went into effect on October 26, 1999. The US Department of Transportation's (DOT) Research and Special Programs Administration (RSPA) enacted the regulation with the intent of ensuring a qualified workforce by the year 2002. Under the OQ Rule, the natural gas and liquid pipeline industry is required to train, test, and maintain records for its workforce. Operators must develop a written qualification program by April 27, 2001, and complete the qualification of individuals performing covered tasks by October 29, 2002. The written qualification program must evaluate workers' ability to perform covered tasks-activities that directly impact the pipeline facility-and to recognize and be able to react to abnormal operating conditions.

  18. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

  19. ITER's Tokamak Cooling Water System and the the Use of ASME Codes to Comply with French Regulations of Nuclear Pressure Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL; Curd, Warren [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France] [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Dell Orco, Dr. Giovanni [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France] [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France] [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During inductive plasma operation of ITER, fusion power will reach 500 MW with an energy multiplication factor of 10. The heat will be transferred by the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) to the environment using the secondary cooling system. Plasma operations are inherently safe even under the most severe postulated accident condition a large, in-vessel break that results in a loss-of-coolant accident. A functioning cooling water system is not required to ensure safe shutdown. Even though ITER is inherently safe, TCWS equipment (e.g., heat exchangers, piping, pressurizers) are classified as safety important components. This is because the water is predicted to contain low-levels of radionuclides (e.g., activated corrosion products, tritium) with activity levels high enough to require the design of components to be in accordance with French regulations for nuclear pressure equipment, i.e., the French Order dated 12 December 2005 (ESPN). ESPN has extended the practical application of the methodology established by the Pressure Equipment Directive (97/23/EC) to nuclear pressure equipment, under French Decree 99-1046 dated 13 December 1999, and Order dated 21 December 1999 (ESP). ASME codes and supplementary analyses (e.g., Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) will be used to demonstrate that the TCWS equipment meets these essential safety requirements. TCWS is being designed to provide not only cooling, with a capacity of approximately 1 GW energy removal, but also elevated temperature baking of first-wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, and divertor. Additional TCWS functions include chemical control of water, draining and drying for maintenance, and facilitation of leak detection/localization. The TCWS interfaces with the majority of ITER systems, including the secondary cooling system. U.S. ITER is responsible for design, engineering, and procurement of the TCWS with industry support from an Engineering Services Organization (ESO) (AREVA Federal Services, with support from Northrop Grumman, and OneCIS). ITER International Organization (ITER-IO) is responsible for design oversight and equipment installation in Cadarache, France. TCWS equipment will be fabricated using ASME design codes with quality assurance and oversight by an Agreed Notified Body (approved by the French regulator) that will ensure regulatory compliance. This paper describes the TCWS design and how U.S. ITER and fabricators will use ASME codes to comply with EU Directives and French Orders and Decrees.

  20. GaInAsSb/A1GaAsSb/Sb Thermophotovoltaic Devices With an Internal Back-Surface Reflector Formed by Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; R.K. Huang; D.A. Shiau; M.K. Connors; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'brien; A.C. Anderson; D.M. DePoy; G. Nichols; M.N. Palmasiano

    2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel implementation for GAInAsSb/AlGaAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR) formed by wafer bonding to GaAs is demonstrated. The SiO{sub x}/Ti/Au internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device, while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This configuration has the potential to improve TPV device performance; is compatible with monolithic series-interconnection of TPV cells for building voltage; and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control. At a short-circuit density of 0.4 A/cm{sup 2}, the open-circuit voltage of a single TPV cell is 0.2 V, compared to 0.37 and 1.8 V for 2- and 10-junction series-interconnected TPV cells, respectively.

  1. An efficient light trapping scheme based on textured conductive photonic crystal back reflector for performance improvement of amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu, E-mail: gfhou@nankai.edu.cn; Huang, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jianjun, E-mail: jjzhang@nankai.edu.cn; Ni, Jian; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photoelectronic Thin-Film Devices and Technique, Institute of Photoelectronics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Fan, QiHua [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, South Dakota 57007 (United States)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient light trapping scheme named as textured conductive photonic crystal (TCPC) has been proposed and then applied as a back-reflector (BR) in n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell. This TCPC BR combined a flat one-dimensional photonic crystal and a randomly textured surface of chemically etched ZnO:Al. Total efficiency enhancement was obtained thanks to the sufficient conductivity, high reflectivity and strong light scattering of the TCPC BR. Unwanted intrinsic losses of surface plasmon modes are avoided. An initial efficiency of 9.66% for a-Si:H solar cell was obtained with short-circuit current density of 14.74?mA/cm{sup 2}, fill factor of 70.3%, and open-circuit voltage of 0.932?V.

  2. Laser damage study of nodules in electron-beam-evaporated HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Xinbin; Shen Zhengxiang; Jiao Hongfei; Zhang Jinlong; Ma Bin; Ding Tao; Lu Jiangtao; Wang Xiaodong; Wang Zhanshan

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive electron beam evaporation process was used to fabricate 1.064 {mu}mHfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors. The deposition process was optimized to reduce the nodular density. Cross-sectioning of nodular defects by a focused ion-beam milling instrument showed that the nodule seeds were the residual particles on the substrate and the particulates from the silica source ''splitting.'' After optimizing the substrate preparation procedure and the evaporation process, a low nodular density of 2.7/mm{sup 2} was achieved. The laser damage test revealed that the ejection fluences and damage growth behaviors of nodules created from deep or shallow seeds were totally different. A mechanism based on directional plasma scald was proposed to interpret observed damage growth phenomenon.

  3. Table Set-up with equipment Target Audience: Parents of elementary school students (grades 3-6), Middle and High School Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    on significantly different technology (e.g. incandescent, CFL, LED) as an example of information on light bulbs simple reflector lamps (clamp on) for display of bulbs (desk lamp is good because of the length of the support). Table of lamp specifications for a variety of standard bulbs available from national chains (e

  4. Applications of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral particles on ITO glass in photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants under a halogen tungsten lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Wei [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Sun, Fengqiang, E-mail: fqsun@scnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, South China Normal University (China); Exhibition Base of Production, Study and Research on New Polymer Materials and Postgraduate Students’ Innovation Training of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes (China); Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lihe; Min, Zhilin; Li, Weishan [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photocatalytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals on ITO glass was studied. • They showed high abilities in degradation of methylene blue in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount could affect the degradation efficiency. • Such particles could be easily recycled and still kept high activity. • Many dye pollutants and their mixtures could be efficiently degraded. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals were prepared on the ITO glass by galvanostatic electrodeposition in CuSO{sub 4} solution with poly(vinylpryrrolidone) as the surfactant. By controlling the electrodeposition time, the microcrystals could be randomly distributed on the ITO glass and separated from each other, resulting in as many as possible (1 1 1) crystalline planes were exposed. Such microcrystals immobilized on ITO glass were employed in photodegradation of dye pollutants in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under a 150 W halogen tungsten lamp. The photodegradation of methylene blue was taken as an example to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the octahedral Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals. Effects of electrodeposition time and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount on the degradation efficiency was discussed, giving the optimum conditions and the corresponding degradation mechanism. The catalyst showed high ability in degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, eosin B and their mixtures under identical conditions.

  5. Health Implications of New Lamp Technology Progress with Lamp Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    (185pages) ­ "...no more dangerous than steam radiators" D Sliney 2006 #12;11/9/2013 3 F. H. Verhoeff--a Comprehensive Handbook, New York, Plenum, 1980, 500 pages 2006 UV and Blue-Light Hazards · UV and bl e light

  6. Lamps in the Leaping Over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheidegger, Daniel

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on account of the formation of the physical body.This situation then is compared to the one of the bird called Khyung whichis capable of flying immediately after having left its egg, but whichpossesses this power only potentially as long it stays in its egg13... dbyings kyi sgron ma yi/ /rnal ‘byor nyams kyisa bon ‘debs/ /‘od snang zhing khams nyid du ‘char/ /sgron ma’i mtshan nyid mang bshad kyang//mngon sum mthong ba nyid yin no/ /snang ba yis ni ‘char byed lam/ /rkyen gyis ma bsgribs semscan mig /rgyal mo...

  7. Deployable Synthetic Aperture Radar Reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    ) satellite. The structure consists of four cylindrical surfaces formed from thin sheets of carbon-fibre-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) connected by flexible hinges along the edges. The key to forming a cylindrical surface with any. At full scale the reflective surface will be 7.9 m long by 3.2 m wide, and it has been estimated

  8. Lumiram Electric: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-1014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Lumiram Electric Corporation failed to certify a variety of incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Westinghouse Lighting: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Westinghouse Lighting Corporation failed to certify various flourescent and incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  10. Aero-Tech: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co. failed to certify a variety of incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  11. Aero-Tech: Order (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order and closed this case against Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co., without civil penalty, after DOE found that Aero-Tech manufactured and/or privately labeled incandescent reflector lamps, but did not violate DOE regulations.

  12. Project Summary Report 0-4958-S PROJECTSUMMARYREPORT CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    light source were implemented using halogen lamps, laser line projectors, and LED arrays. As a result with Specially Designed Reflector The researchers chose a 300-watt halogen lamp as a light source and designed lane pavement inspection, two units were required. 3. High-Intensity LED Array An array of LED diodes

  13. Efficient wide-aperture neodymium glass rod amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potemkin, A K; Zhurin, K A; Kirsanov, A V; Kopelovich, E A; Kuznetsov, M V; Kuz'min, A A; Flat, F A; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaikin, A A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplifiers based on neodymium phosphate glass rods 60 - 100 mm in diameter are experimentally studied. The amplifiers are pumped by INP-16/250 tubular flash lamps placed in a universal pump cavity with a two-section mirror reflector. A compact high-voltage capacitive energy storage with a preionisation circuit was developed to supply the lamps. (lasers)

  14. Keystone: Order (2013-CE-2601)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Keystone Technologies, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Keystone had failed to certify that certain models of fluorescent lamp ballasts comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  15. A Study of Contacts and Back-Surface Reflectors for 0.6eV Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 Thermophotovoltaic Monolithically Interconnected Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Carapella, J. J.; Ward, J. S.; Webb, J. D.; Wanlass, M. W.

    1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have recently rekindled a high level of interest for a number of applications. In order to meet the requirement of low-temperature ({approx}1000 C) TPV systems, 0.6-eV Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 TPV monolithically interconnected modules (MIMs) have been developed at the National Renewable energy Laboratory (NREL)[1]. The successful fabrication of Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 MIMs depends on developing and optimizing of several key processes. Some results regarding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiO2 insulating layer, selective chemical etch via sidewall profiles, double-layer antireflection coatings, and metallization via interconnects have previously been given elsewhere [2]. In this paper, we report on the study of contacts and back-surface reflectors. In the first part of this paper, Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contact to n-InAs0.32P0.68and p-Ga0.32In0.68As are investigated. The transfer length method (TLM) was used for measuring of specific contact resistance Rc. The dependence of Rc on different doping levels and different pre-treatment of the two semiconductors will be reported. Also, the adhesion and the thermal stability of Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contacts to n-InAs0.32P0.68and p-Ga0.32In0.68As will be presented. In the second part of this paper, we discuss an optimum back-surface reflector (BSR) that has been developed for 0.6-eV Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 TPV MIM devices. The optimum BSR consists of three layers: {approx}1300{angstrom} MgF2 (or {approx}1300{angstrom} CVD SiO2) dielectric layer, {approx}25{angstrom} Ti adhesion layer, and {approx}1500{angstrom} Au reflection layer. This optimum BSR has high reflectance, good adhesion, and excellent thermal stability.

  16. Effect of the photon lifetime on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors and an oxide current aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrov, M. A.; Blokhin, S. A., E-mail: blokh@mail.ioffe.ru; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Maleev, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Blokhin, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Zadiranov, Yu. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Nikitina, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the photon lifetime in an optical microcavity on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and an oxide current aperture is studied. The photon lifetime in the microcavity is controlled by varying the upper DBR reflectance. It is found that the speed of VCSELs with a current-aperture diameter of 10 ?m is mainly limited by the self-heating effect, despite an increase in the relaxation-oscillation damping coefficient with increasing photon lifetime in the microcavity. At the same time, the higher level of internal optical loss in lasers with a current-aperture diameter of 1.5 ?m leads to dominance of the effect of relaxation-oscillation damping independently of the radiation output loss. In the case of devices with a current-aperture diameter of 5.5 ?m, both mechanisms limiting the speed operate, which allow an increase in the VCSEL effective modulation frequency from 21 to 24 GHz as the photon lifetime decreases from 3.7 to 0.8 ps.

  17. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szyszka, A., E-mail: szyszka@ihp-microelectronics.com, E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Lupina, L.; Lupina, G.; Schubert, M. A.; Zaumseil, P. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B. [Siltronic, Hanns-Seidel-Platz 4, 81737 München (Germany); Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated that—with respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBR—the insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  18. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and a tuning circuit connected to the input of the amplifier, wherein the tuning circuit is continuously variable and consists of solid state electrical components with no mechanically adjustable devices including a pair of diodes connected to each other at their respective cathodes with a control voltage connected at the junction of the diodes. Another oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and transmission lines connected to the input of the amplifier with an input pad and a perpendicular transmission line extending from the input pad and forming a leg of a resonant "T", and wherein the feedback network is coupled to the leg of the resonant "T".

  19. Das Prfzentrum Carsten Lampe, Daniel Eggert,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalibrierlaboratorien" · Qualitätswesen analog den Anforderungen der ISO 9001 z.B. Sensorkalibriersystem / Dokumentation Prüfinstitut (durch DGWK, heute DIN CERTCO) · Seit 2003 ISO/IEC 17025 akkreditiert · Seit 2003 Prüfungen und;4 Was verlangt die Akkreditierung? ISO IEC 17025 ,,Allgemeine Anforderungen an die Kompetenz von Prüf- und

  20. General Service LED Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003Not Measurement SensitiveGeneralGeneral

  1. Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf Flash2010-45.pdfFlash2011-43and Statement ofStrikeFluorescent

  2. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring ourU.S.CALiPER Testing »

  3. DEFINING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF UV LAMPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUM SULFATE: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE W.

  4. Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

  5. Laser having a nonlinear phase conjugating reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, V.; Yariv, A.

    1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser is described which self-corrects for distortions introduced into the laser beam wavefronts by aberrations and time-varying phenomena internal to the laser. The improved laser includes a partially transmissive first reflecting element, an aperture stop, a lasing medium and a nonlinear phase conjugate reflecting device as the second reflecting element. During laser operation, aberrated wavefronts impinging upon the second reflecting element are reflected as the phase conjugate waveform thereof. The aperture stop restricts laser operation to the fundamental mode which allows only corrected, unaberrated waves to pass through the aperture stop and to subsequently exit the laser. Four embodiments are described utilizing stimulated brillouin scattering (Sbs), four-wave mixing, three-wave mixing and photon echo devices as the second reflecting element.

  6. Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston, R.

    1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

  7. Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Luo, Shengnian (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Arlington, VA); Paul, Stephen F. (West Orange, NJ)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

  8. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janecek, Petr Martin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AC02-05CH11231, grant number NNSA LB06-316-PD05 / NN2001000.AC02-05CH11231, grant number NNSA LB06-316-PD05 / NN2001000.

  9. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kardauskas, Michael J. (Billerica, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  10. The Sandia Wave Reflector - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's LowerFacilityTheSandia Hand Features

  11. Help reduce the cost of complying with Sarbanes-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Institute (SEI) · The ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) framework, governed by the United Kingdom

  12. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, anEnergy nepdg_5251_5500.pdf Briefing forprovides LBNL-1470EOperated

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-823 Colloque C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique 11, Vol. 1, septembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    has enabled the production of high performance circuits with gate delays below 30ps. The high emitter to block minority carrier injection and produce high gain. The future production of high speedlhigh gain sides using tungsten-halogen lamps with a total power of 18kW. White ceramic reflector plates

  14. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    savings come primarily from commercial and industrial equipment and residential water heaters. · Savings Ballasts Water Heaters Small Electric Motors Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Clothes Dryers Clothes Incandescent Reflector Lamps Direct Heating Equipment Pool Heaters Clothes Washers, Commercial Dishwashers

  15. A study of contacts and back-surface reflectors for 0.6-eV Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} thermophotovoltaic monolithically interconnected modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Carapella, J.J.; Ward, J.S.; Webb, J.D.; Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have recently rekindled a high level of interest for a number of applications. In order to meet the requirement of low-temperature ({approximately}1000&hthinsp;{degree}C) TPV systems, 0.6-eV Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} TPV monolithically interconnected modules (MIMs) have been developed at the National Renewable energy Laboratory (NREL) [1]. The successful fabrication of Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} MIMs depends on developing and optimizing of several key processes. Some results regarding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiO{sub 2} insulating layer, selective chemical etch via sidewall profiles, double-layer antireflection coatings, and metallization via interconnects have previously been given elsewhere [2]. In this paper, we report on the study of contacts and back-surface reflectors. In the first part of this paper, Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contact to n-InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} and p-Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As are investigated. The transfer length method (TLM) was used for measuring of specific contact resistance R{sub c}. The dependence of R{sub c} on different doping levels and different pre-treatment of the two semiconductors will be reported. Also, the adhesion and the thermal stability of Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contacts to n-InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} and p-Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As will be presented. In the second part of this paper, we discuss an optimum back-surface reflector (BSR) that has been developed for 0.6-eV Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} TPV MIM devices. The optimum BSR consists of three layers: {approximately}1300 {Angstrom} MgF{sub 2} (or {approximately}1300 {Angstrom} CVD SiO{sub 2}) dielectric layer, {approximately}25 {Angstrom} Ti adhesion layer, and {approximately}1500 {Angstrom} Au reflection layer. This optimum BSR has high reflectance, good adhesion, and excellent thermal stability. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  17. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  18. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost of avoided peak installed capacity is 6 and 9.5 timesthe cost of new installed capacity for India and Brazil. Theappear to require an installed capacity of more than 100 GW

  19. Ancient Lamps, Earrings Yield Their Secrets Under Neutron Imaging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Careers Work with ORNL About ORNL Visiting ORNL Events and Conferences Highlights Success Stories Contact Us Index Home | ORNL | Highlights SHARE Neutron imaging gives...

  20. New LED light sources and lamps for general illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Henrik Pedersen and Paul Michael Petersen Risø DTU, Optics and Plasma Research Department, DK-4000

  1. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, W.N.; Thomas, R.J.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast. 4 figs.

  2. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility managed program in an LDC).3r'e split the additionalseems obvious that almost no LDC domestic consumers will buy

  3. arc discharge lamp: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TR, were determined. It was found that there is no local LTE in this arc discharge air plasma during its spacetime evolution, and effects of strong non-izothermality have a...

  4. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, William Newell (Niskayuna, NY); Thomas, Robert James (Rexford, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast.

  5. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1988. The private sector in Brazil owned (in 1986) 40% ofElectricity Conservation in Brazil: Potential and Pro-electricity consumption in Brazil's residential sector was

  6. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energia: 0 Horario de Verao) Proceedings, I Congres- so Brasileiro de Planejamento Energetico (forthcoming), Universidade Es- tadual de Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil,

  7. Transport and equilibrium in molecular plasmas: the sulfur lamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.5.3 Thermal conductivity module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.5.4 Electrical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.4.4 Generation and transport of radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.4.5 Boundary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.6.3 Electric field strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2.6.4 Spectra

  8. Phosphor blends for high-CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Manivannan, Venkatesan (Clifton Park, NY); Beers, William Winder (Chesterland, OH); Toth, Katalin (Pomaz, HU); Balazs, Laszlo D. (Budapest, HU)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A phosphor blend comprises at least two phosphors each selected from one of the groups of phosphors that absorb UV electromagnetic radiation and emit in a region of visible light. The phosphor blend can be applied to a discharge gas radiation source to produce light sources having high color rendering index. A phosphor blend is advantageously includes the phosphor (Tb,Y,LuLa,Gd).sub.x(Al,Ga).sub.yO.sub.12:Ce.sup.3+, wherein x is in the range from about 2.8 to and including 3 and y is in the range from about 4 to and including 5.

  9. Electronic starter device for fluorescent lamps. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to silicon supplier failures to produce the 03/04 triac silicon as specified in the original proposal, the direction of the starter program was migrated to use available off the shelf power semiconductors. This had unexpected positive side effects including a reduction in component price, improved quality, and the refocus of engineering efforts to concentrate on the Super ASIC core technology. The starter program has begun shipments employing this new architecture, and is being well received both in the US and abroad. In its present form, the starter meets original cost projections within 20%. Work is continuing on the 0.8 micron ASIC, which will allow for the starter to sell below $1.00 in volume. Even at the slightly higher price, interest is strong in replacing the low performance glow starter for small fluorescent applications with a high performance alternative.

  10. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential Energy Demand in Brazil and Income Classes:in Brazil: Potential and Pro- gress", ENERGY, vol. 13, no.decreasing energy services in India and Brazil. The initial

  11. Apparatus to facilitate lengthening the life of incandescent lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spissinger, F.H.

    1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An energizing circuit is described for an incandescent bulb comprising a transformer having a primary winding connectable to an AC mains source and first and second secondary windings for producing first and second voltages. The first secondary winding is connected to an input of a first full-wave rectifier means and the second secondary winding is connected to an input of a second full-wave rectifier means, the full-wave rectifier means having outputs connected in parallel across the bulb. The first voltage is sufficient to fully illuminate the bulb and the second voltage is sufficient to maintain the bulb warm but with little or no light output, a first switch being connected between the first secondary winding and the first rectifier means whereby, when the first switch is open, the bulb is energized solely by the second voltage.

  12. Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /of Energy 3 BTOWebinarSupplies;Ice Machines

  13. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    household income is a strong determinant of household electricity use, analysis for different prices

  14. Candelabra and Intermediate Base Lamps Enforcement Policy Statement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS Letter -SeptemberWorkshop |

  15. LED Performance Specification Series: T8 Replacement Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED LightingOutdoor

  16. LED T8 Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED LightingOutdoorLEDT8

  17. Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex(GC-72)Columbia Government | Department ofProducts

  18. LED T8 Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » MethaneJohnsonKristina Pflanz About UsT8 Replacement

  19. Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 20122Technologies61-2008 JuneMedication List

  20. Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,DepartmentEnergyMetal

  1. Candelabra and Intermediate Base Lamps Enforcement Policy Statement |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergy BushCalifornia Valley Solar RanchAwardFirst Report toDepartment

  2. Ancient Lamps, Earrings Yield Their Secrets Under Neutron Imaging |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARESAnalysis &| Princeton Plasma

  3. Optical and Mechanical Effects of Elastomeric Distributed Bragg Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamita, Gen

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .59) will give the true stress t: t1 = t2 = F A = piR2?P 2piRH = R?P 2H . (2.60) Equation 2.60 can be used to analyse the stress and strain of spherical balloons, or of any thin membrane/wall with a spherical curvature under pressure difference, including boilers...

  4. MODELLING OF CAVITY RECEIVER HEAT TRANSFER COMPACT LINEAR FRESNEL REFLECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This approach allows an affordable entry into renewable energy for existing coal-power producers, and allows them to meet the mandatory renewable energy targets set by the government of New South Wales . (Hu et) linear absorbers, achieving higher ground area efficiency. · Receiver is an inverted, trapezoidal, linear

  5. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  6. Development of Advanced Polymeric Reflector for CSP Applications - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treglio, Richard, T; Boyle, Keith, A; Henderson, Hildie

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project attempted to deposit extremely thick and dense protective barrier onto a mirror film stack with a PET substrate. The target thickness was very high for thin film products; particularly since large areas and long production lengths of film are needed to make the final product economic. The technical investigations in this project centered on maintaining a quality barrier (i.e. dense film) while evaporating alumina with a high deposition rate onto a low cost PET substrate. The project found that the proposed configuration, particularly direct ion bombardment, provides too narrow a solution space to effectively and economically produce the ASRM attempted. The initial project goals were met when depositing on a limited width and at a modest rate. However, expanding to wide deposition at aggressive deposition rates did not produce consistent film quality. Economic viability drives the process to maximize deposition rate. The current system configuration has a limiting upper rate threshold that does not appear economically viable. For future work, alternate approaches seem needed to address the challenges encountered in the scale-up phase of this project.

  7. Enhancing cholesteric liquid crystal laser performance using a cholesteric reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    laser based on a free- standing film of photo polymerized cholesteric liquid crystal," Appl. Phys. Lett as an optic fiber-based temperature sensor," Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2691-2693 (2004). 15. Y. Huang, Y. Zhou

  8. The Effect of Reflectors and Delamping Upon Light Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashkevich, P. A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raging from 52 percent between rows to 80 percent under rows for an average of nearly 70 percent. Light levels in rooms with fixtures on an even grid spacing ranged from 73 percent between fixtures to 86 percent under fixtures for room averages of 75...

  9. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors- FY13 Q1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. Project Profile: Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlantLong IslandDepartment

  11. Project Profile: Advanced Polymeric Reflector for CSP Applications |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlantLong IslandDepartmentDepartment

  12. Project Profile: High Performance Reflector Panels for CSP Assemblies |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergy MITis PVSalts forDepartment

  13. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  14. UNIQUE APPROACH TO COMPLYING WITH VERY LOW NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM PERMIT LIMITS FOR COPPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, B.; Halverson, N.; Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Nichols, R.; Noonkester, J.

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The NPDES permit issued to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 2003 contained copper limits as low as six micrograms per liter. It also contained compliance schedules that provided SRS with anywhere from three to five years to select and implement projects that would enable compliance at several outfalls. Some outfall problems were much more difficult to correct than others. SRS personnel implemented several innovative projects in order to meet compliance schedule deadlines as inexpensively as possible. One innovation, constructing a humic acid feed system to increase effluent dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content, has proven to be very successful.

  15. Comply. Improve. Transform. IBM Rational solutions for compliance-driven development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to: · Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance management · Automate and document improvement · Remain flexible and responsive in a rapidly changing business climate Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance Changes in regulatory policy can have sweeping effects on how your

  16. A wireless sensor-based mobile music environment complied from a graphical language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Robert N. (Robert Nathan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I demonstrate a framework for a wireless sensor-based mobile music environment. Most prior work has not been truly portable. Those that were have focused on external data as opposed to properties of the ...

  17. Estimated costs of ventilation systems complying with the HUD ventilation standard for manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.; Conner, C.C.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory estimated the material, labor, and operating costs for ventilation equipment needed for compliance with HUD`s proposed revision to the ventilation standard for manufactured housing. This was intended to bound the financial impacts of the ventilation standard revision. Researchers evaluated five possible prototype ventilation systems that met the proposed ventilation requirements. Of those five, two systems were determined to be the most likely used by housing manufacturers: System 1 combines a fresh air duct with the existing central forced-air system to supply and circulate fresh air to conditioned spaces. System 2 uses a separate exhaust fan to remove air from the manufactured home. The estimated material and labor costs for these two systems range from $200 to $300 per home. Annual operating costs for the two ventilation systems were estimated for 20 US cities. The estimated operating costs for System 1 ranged from $55/year in Las Vegas, Nevada, to $83/year in Bismarck, North Dakota. Operating costs for System 2 ranged from a low of $35/year in Las Vegas to $63/year in Bismarck. Thus, HUD`s proposed increase in ventilation requirements will add less than $100/year to the energy cost of a manufactured home.

  18. Is China on Track to Comply with Its 2020 Copenhagen Carbon Intensity Commitment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Junjie; Wang, Can

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Energy Outlook (IEO) 2013 forecasts China’s COto forecast energy consumption directly. The China Energy

  19. Rule Proposed to Prohibit Importation of Products that Fail to Comply with

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetailEnergy Role of Modeling

  20. Rule Issued to Prohibit Importation of Products that Fail To Comply with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15Rotary Firing inRotaryRui Liu Rui Liu

  1. Rule Proposed to Prohibit Importation of Products that Fail to Comply with

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy SmallImplementing theFinancing » Financing, 2003RonaldRound

  2. Demonstration of Recessed Downlight Technologies: Power and Illumination Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Steven A.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state lighting (SSL), specifically light-emitting diodes (LED), has been advancing at a rapid pace, and there are presently multiple products available that serve as direct replacements for traditional luminaires. In this demonstration, conventional recessed lights in a conference room were used to compare conventional incandescent A-lamps, incandescent reflector R-lamps, dimming compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), to an LED replacement product. The primary focus during the study was on light delivered to the task plane as provided by the power required by the lighting system. Vertical illuminance, dimming range, and color shift are also important indicators of lighting quality and are discussed in the report. The results clearly showed that LEDs, with dimming-capable drivers, are much more efficient than incandescent and CFLs. Further, LEDs provide much smoother and consistent dimming than dimmable CFLs. On the potential negative side, it is important that the dimming switch be identified as compatible with the LED driver. A wide variety of dimmer switches are capable of dimming LEDs down to 15% of full light output, while select others can be capable of dimming LEDs down to 5%. In addition, LEDs can be intensive light sources, which can result in uncomfortable glare in some applications and to some occupants. Higher ceiling (9-foot or greater) or non-specular reflectors can act to alleviate the potential for glare.

  3. Full Core, Heterogeneous, Time Dependent Neutron Transport Calculations with the 3D Code DeCART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tubes and baffle and radial reflector. Axially, there are 22Mesh c) Baffle and Radial Reflector Mesh d) Axial Reflector

  4. Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as do HID lamps, and an LED lamp includes electronic driverT8, and CFL lamps CFL lamps LED lamp CFL floodlight LightingIncandescent, fluorescent, and LED lamps Electric resistance

  5. High-accuracy measurements of the normal specular reflectance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voarino, Philippe; Piombini, Herve; Sabary, Frederic; Marteau, Daniel; Dubard, Jimmy; Hameury, Jacques; Filtz, Jean Remy

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The French Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is designed and constructed by the French Commissariata l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Its amplifying section needs highly reflective multilayer mirrors for the flash lamps. To monitor and improve the coating process, the reflectors have to be characterized to high accuracy. The described spectrophotometer is designed to measure normal specular reflectance with high repeatability by using a small spot size of 100 {mu}m. Results are compared with ellipsometric measurements. The instrument can also perform spatial characterization to detect coating nonuniformity.

  6. Power Capture (PowCap) Board for Non Intrusive Load Monitoring and Power Line Communication Exploration and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Vikram

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the LED Lamp. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.13 Predictionfor the LED Lamp. . . . . . . . . . . . . Prediction tableappliances, including a) LED lamp, b) incandescent lamp, c)

  7. On a donc ici Soit, par exemple, une lampe de i oo volts, porte la telnpra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    °. Le rapport entre la chaleur due au phénomčne de Peltier et la chaleur totale développée dans le différence entre la densité du liquide et celle du milieu ambiant, et, si Fig. 2. Si l'on considčre seulement

  8. The determination of optimum spacing for infrared lamps to secure desired radiation intensities for chick brooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaska, Robert Clement

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 t 0 S 10 15 RO RS $0 t ' 46 Q f 10 Ro ' RS lS ?50? 18 ?TS' 18 ?TS' 14'? 14 00' 16 AO' XT, QO? 16?50' XT 00' 18?50' XT ?50' XT ?N' 16 TS' leeRB' 16. 60' X4, 60? 8 RS' Q, RS' 5?QQ' 'T 60? 8?50' SAC' 5 ?N? 5 ~ 50...' SAO' e. oo 8 eoo' 8 RS' T. SQ' S?60' e. Oo T eoo' 6?So' 8?56' 8, 00' SAD? 4 50' 4?00' 4eOO' 4 00' $ QQ? 4?00' 6. 80' B. OO' 5?50? 4?50' 5 00' $?00' 4?00' 5 ?SOt $?Nt 4?N? $, 00' R. OO' $00' R. oot R, OO' 1?00' 4?OO' 4...

  9. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PNNL-SA-23984 1 Preface The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CALiPER program has been...

  10. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Budget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for SmallProject includes an Off-Grid Lighting Technology Assessmentand the market success of off-grid lighting solutions for

  11. Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas VanOsdell; Karin Foarde

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet; UV; UVC; UVGI; HVAC; ductwork; mold; fungus; effectiveness; microbial; dose; irradiance; reflectance; bacillis; aspergillis

  12. Facilitating RFID Development with the Accada Prototyping Platform Christian Floerkemeier, Matthias Lampe, and Christof Roduner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an IT infrastructure that provides RFID de- vice and data management and supports application devel- opment by significantly lowering the barrier for large-scale, real-world testing. 1 Introduction Radio Frequency.3454656 by reader 8745653 would thus result in the corresponding busi- ness event that a shipment of razor blades

  13. amplification rt-lamp system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    receiver side over an AWGN channel with an energy Ulukus, Sennur 215 Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin: Numerical BEM simulations vs experimental evidences...

  14. Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

  15. Side-by-Side Testing of Commercial Office Lighting Systems: Two-lamp Fluorescent Fixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Schrum, L.; Sonne, J. K.; Stedman, T. C.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems in commercial office buildings are primary determinants of building energy use. In warmer climates, lighting energy use has important implications for building cooling loads as well as those directly associated with illumination...

  16. antigen-dc-lamp messenger rna-electroporated: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Such Higgs-messenger interactions are strongly motivated by the discovery of a Higgs boson near 125 GeV, but they also raise the specter of the muBmu and AmH2 problems....

  17. NIST energy related inventions - electronic starter device for fluorescent lamps. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to silicon supplier failures to produce the 03/04 triac silicon as specified in the original proposal, the direction of the starter program was migrated to use available off the shelf power semiconductors. This had unexpected positive side effects including a reduction in component price, improved quality, and the refocus of engineering efforts to concentrate on the Super ASIC core technology. The starter program has begun shipments employing this new architecture, and is being well received both in the US and abroad. In its present form, the starter meets the original cost projections within 20%. Work is continuing on the 0.8 micron ASIC, which will allow for the starter to sell below $1.00 in volume. Even at the slightly higher price, interest is strong in replacing the low performance glow starter for small fluorescent applications with a high performance alternative.

  18. Report 20.4: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyasto theandRenewableRenoDepartment

  19. 2014-05-05 Issuance: Test Procedures for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps;

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)Department ofNow4Procedures for Walk-In

  20. 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)DepartmentVery Large Air-Cooled

  1. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-Zero Campus atEnergy New EmployeeEnergy

  2. DOE Publishes CALiPER Application Summary Report on LED MR16 Lamps |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)

  3. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)| Department of Energy Report on

  4. DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on LED A Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)| Department of Energy

  5. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)| Departmentof Energy Long-Term

  6. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)| Departmentof Energy

  7. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)|Publishes Roadmap for

  8. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREof Energy Investigates PortFreezers to SaveEnergy

  9. Report 20.3: Stress Testing of LED PAR38 Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy using Fues Cells Webinar,Verizon and

  10. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. WhiteOptics' Low-Cost Reflector Composite Boosts LED Fixture Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, WhiteOptics has developed a composite coating that can be used to improve efficiency in backlit, indirect, and cavity-mixing LED luminaire designs by maximizing light reflection and output. The highly diffuse coating, which is based on a novel high-reflectance particle technology, allows for uniform distribution of light without exaggerating the point-source nature of the LEDs, and is intended to offer an overall system cost-improving solution for LED optics.

  12. Algorithms for Rapid Characterization and Optimization of Aperture and Reflector Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Arthur Charles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integer z_lda, z_ldb, z_ldc; lapack::doublecomplex * z_a, *b, &z_ldb, z_beta, z_c, & z_ldc ); zgesv_( &z_n, &z_nrhs, z_doublecomplex *c, int *ldc, int transa_len, int transb_len);

  13. Benchmark Evaluation of Uranium Metal Annuli and Cylinders with Beryllium Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive series of delayed critical experiments were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility using enriched uranium metal during the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments were designed to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits of the Y-12 Plant and to provide data for the verification of cross sections and calculation methods utilized in nuclear criticality safety applications. Many of these experiments have already been evaluated and included in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook: unreflected (HEU-MET-FAST-051), graphite-reflected (HEU-MET-FAST-071), and polyethylene-reflected (HEU-MET-FAST-076). Three of the experiments consisted of highly-enriched uranium (HEU, ~93.2% 235U) metal parts reflected by beryllium metal discs. The first evaluated experiment was constructed from a stack of 7-in.-diameter, 4-1/8-in.-high stack of HEU discs top-reflected by a 7-in.-diameter, 5-9/16-in.-high stack of beryllium discs. The other two experiments were formed from stacks of concentric HEU metal annular rings surrounding a 7-in.diameter beryllium core. The nominal outer diameters were 13 and 15 in. with a nominal stack height of 5 and 4 in., respectively. These experiments have been evaluated for inclusion in the ICSBEP Handbook.

  14. Project Profile: Predictive Physico-Chemical Modeling of Intrinsic Degradation Mechanisms for Advanced Reflector Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NREL, under the Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component Technologies in Solar (PREDICTS) Program will be developing a physics-based computational degradation model to assess the kinetic oxidation rates; realistic model light attenuation and transport; and multi-layer treatment with variable properties Simulation based experimental design.

  15. MICROMORPH n-i-p TANDEM CELLS WITH ASYMMETRIC INTERMEDIATE REFLECTORS F.-J. Haug1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    (EPFL), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland 2 now at University of New South Wales, School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering with size of typically 0.25 cm2 . The best cell among an array of 16 devices on the 4x4 cm2 sample area

  16. A Novel Leaky-Wave Retrodirective Reflector Using Short/Matched Terminations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    of heterodyne mixing to reflect the signal to any arbitrary angle by varying the LO frequency of the mixer [6 This section presents mono-static (Rx and Tx antennas collocated) transmission (S21) measurements of the RCS

  17. Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermalDepartment

  18. Project Profile: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy TEES logo TexasEnergy SNL

  19. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurvesSpeedingScientificof ScientificQ LA-UR-RaymondConnect

  20. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 PowerAdvanced ModelingNuclear ReactorIdeally, we

  1. Open Access Publishing of ETD’s: Requirements and Implications of complying with Budapest, Bethesda and Berlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Gail

    presentations and papers shared at these conferences. The importance of open access ETD’s has been discussed in numerous threads on the international ETD-L list, and touted on the web pages of the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD...

  2. Why did they comply while others did not? : environmental compliance of small firms and implications for regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eungkyoon

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This doctoral dissertation aims to offer new insights into the environmental compliance behavior of small firms (SFs). Specifically, the dissertation examines the impacts of two categories of factors. The first category ...

  3. opposed to 19,000 to 23,000 years in the insolation record), indicating a more compli-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Pate, in Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, N. G. Pisias, T. R. Janecek, A. Palmer-Julson, T. H. van Andel, Eds. (Ocean Drilling Program, College Station, TX, 1995), vol. 138, pp. Exposing an elongated condensate to a single off-resonant laser beam resulted in the observation of highly

  4. 17414 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 68 / Thursday, April 9, 1998 / Notices who chose to comply under compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Solid Waste; telephone (703) 308­8888; or EPA's Mixed Waste HomePage at ``http:// www.epa.gov/radiation/mixed-waste at Facilities Generating Mixed Radioactive/ Hazardous Waste AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) at facilities that generate ``mixed waste.'' RCRA defines

  5. To comply with Utah State Law we are posting our outside employment policy. University of Utah Department of Public Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    for requesting approval of part time work A. Conflict of Interest Conflict of Interest exists in jobs will not be authorized to work at part time jobs that present a conflict of interest. B. Only Part-Time Permitted outside employment shall be cleared by the Chief prior to actually working the part- time job. Outside

  6. Initial Score: # of workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    My lab has replaced incandescent lamps with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) or Light Emitting Diodes

  7. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  8. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  9. Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidet, Florent

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surrounded by a thin radial reflector followed by a shield –Radial shield Enriched fuel Large radial reflector Radialshield Small radial reflector Radial blanket Enriched fuel

  10. An Assessment of the U.S. Residential Lighting Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Judy; Brown, Rich; Moezzi, Mithra; Mills, Evan; Sardinsky, Robert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    basis by fixture type and lamp wattage. The average lightingusage level, lamp wattage, fixture type, and location withinusage level, lamp wattage, fixture type, and location within

  11. Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jinkyu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high-color-rendering LED lamps using oxyfluoride andin white LED. (a) Typical LED lamp package. (b) Uniformin white LED. (a) Typical LED lamp package. (b) Uniform

  12. Market Trial: Selling Off-Grid Lighting Products in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracy, Jennifer

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    34 Appendix C. LED Lamp Salesthe grid-rechargeable LED lamp at a cheaper price withoutof buyers reported that the LED lamp fully replaced a pre-

  13. Microfluidic advantage : novel techniques for protein folding and oxygen control in cell cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polinkovsky, Mark E.; Polinkovsky, Mark E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a dedicated source (arc lamp or LED in our setup), passesgreen). So, a laser, LED, or mercury lamp outputting lightexcitation. We use LEDs instead of mercury lamps because

  14. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Using the CEUS Database to Benchmark Commercial Buildings in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and two lighting features: lamp power density and lightingbetween lighting energy intensity and lamp power density forlighting energy intensity is positively correlated with lamp power density.

  15. Visible Light Digital Camera --Up to 2.3MP resolution with LED lamps provides sharp images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    electrical and industrial applications · Thumbnail Image Gallery -- Allows quick search of stored images Marker Function · Auto Hot/Cold spot marker function shows a spot within the area that automatically% of reading Image Storage (1GB micro SD card) 1000 Images 1000 Images 1000 Images Emissivity Table 0.1 to 1

  16. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

  17. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at Intercontinental Hotel in San Francisco, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Curry, Ku'Uipo J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program have been prescreened and tested to verify their actual performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products.

  18. Solid-state semiconductors are better alternatives to arc-lamps for efficient and uniform illumination in minimal access surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Lula

    of technical and ergonomic limitations. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are energy-efficient solid- state Illumination Á Light-emitting diode Á Minimal access surgery Á Solid-state semiconductor In the 1950s

  19. Energy Savings and NOx Emissions Reduction Potential from the 2012 Federal Legislation to Phase Out Incandescent Lamps in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Haberl, Jeff; Soman, Rohit

    296042501.6 100% Page 9 Table 5: Annual NOX Emissions A r ea Co u n t y A meri ca n E lec t r ic P o w er - W es t ( E RCO T ) /P CA NO x Redu ctio n s ( lbs) A u stin E n er g y /P CA NO x Redu ctio n s ( lbs) Brow n sv ille P u b... ort h E a s t T e x a s A re a Page 10 Table 6: Ozone Production Period NOx Emissions A r ea Co u n t y A meri ca n E lec t r ic P o w er - W es t ( E RCO T ) /P CA NO x Redu ctio n s ( lbs) A u stin E n er g y /P CA NO x Redu...

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 3, MAY 2007 761 Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps Driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - cations of the thermal operating conditions on such systems. The envelope analysis of the CCFL, which­CCFL system. In this study, we applied the envelope analysis and simula- tion concept to explore thermal Driven by Piezoelectric Transformers: Stability Conditions and Thermal Effect Sam Ben-Yaakov, Member

  1. Bursty Impulse Noise Detection by Compressed University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, lampe@ece.ubc.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampe, Lutz

    wires, no need to purchase spectrum), high penetration of the power distribution grid, and ease of use for data transmission over power lines. For power line communi- cations (PLC) systems with bandwidths application of CS for IN detection. Index Terms--Power line communications (PLC), impulse noise, compressed

  2. Appears in ACM SIGGRAPH 2003 Conference Proceedings iLamps: Geometrically Aware and Self-Configuring Projectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majumder, Aditi

    - ment, rather than a more permanent setup. As for hand-held use, projectors look like a natural fit, in place of monolithic and specific solu- tions. This paper addresses some of these new problems. Our basic

  3. THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

  4. STATE OF UTAH CONTRACT NUMBER: MA049 January 24, 2014 Page 1 of 3 Includes Codale Lamp and Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    @codale.com Reporting Type: Line Item and Summary Brand/trade name: Phillips Advance EFI Hubbell Intermatic Eiko Ushio% Off 15% Off 12% Off Hand Tools 23% Off 25% Off 20% Off 39% Off Plumbing 23% Off 15% Off 15% Off Power 20% Off 39% Off Security 23% Off 20% Off 12% Off 39% Off Welding & Soldering 23% Off 15% Off 12% Off

  5. Exploration of versatile clamping mechanism and brace system for table attachment to lamp posts and poles in urban settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macomber, Bryan A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to explore potential designs for a table that attaches to poles and street signs outside food trucks. A convenient placement of tables could greatly facilitate and improve the eating experience ...

  6. Potential Environmental Impacts from the Metals in Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    the lighting products are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing U.S. federal and California state in lighting products without compromising their performance and useful lifespan. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Energy to increase energy efficiency for general lighting. Therefore, consumers are replacing incandescent light

  7. Integration of Self-Assembled Porous Alumina and Distributed Bragg Reflector for Light Trapping in Si Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Xing

    Light trapping is an important issue for thin film silicon photovoltaic cells due to the limited absorption coefficient for near infrared light. In this letter, we present a photonic structure that combines porous anodic ...

  8. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pitch 30 x Rod Diameter Radial reflectors 2 assembly rows (?mechanical movement of a radial reflector [16]. In the early

  9. Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of light output (in lumen-hours) provided by each lamp type. "Other" includes light-emitting diode (LED) lamps as well as other lamps such as fiber optic lights, induction lamps,...

  10. Data:A4e93655-d3bf-4023-97ee-b613b6acbf93 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft. Steel 7.00 per lamp per month, 30 ft. Aluminum 7.50 per lamp per month, 30 ft. Concrete 7.50 per lamp per month, Ornamental 13.00 per lamp per month. Fixed Monthly Charge...

  11. Data:E0b6754a-fa08-492f-90a2-45945fe623a6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft. Steel 7.00 per lamp per month, 30 ft. Aluminum 7.50 per lamp per month, 30 ft. Concrete 7.50 per lamp per month, Ornamental 13.00 per lamp per month. Fixed Monthly Charge...

  12. Data:F22c4311-4f81-489c-a887-3edd6a4615a7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft. Steel 7.00 per lamp per month, 30 ft. Aluminum 7.50 per lamp per month, 30 ft. Concrete 7.50 per lamp per month, Ornamental 13.00 per lamp per month. Fixed Monthly Charge...

  13. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Cost-Effectiveness of Linear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED lamps. Report 21.3 details a set of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51W total power...

  14. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s kiosk illuminated by her LED lamp [1/2009] “A.N. ” Market:charge at a shop) “The [LED] lamp is very important and mylamp, hurricane lamp, and LED lamp illuminate night market

  15. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent Lamps, and LED Lamps. Published by Osram Optothe embodied energy of the LED lamp was “paid for” in onlyof manufacture for an LED lamp powered by a Ľ watt solar

  16. The Steepest Hurdle in Obtaining a Clean Water Act Section 404 Permit: Complying with EPA's 404 (b)(1) Guidelines' Least Environmentally Damaging Practicable Alternative Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schutz, Jon

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hurdle" in obtaining a 404 permit. Uram, supra note 1, atFindings, Old Cutler Bay Permit 404(q) Elevation (1990) 4 [Army Corps of Engineers, Permit Elevation, Hartz Mountain

  17. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE The University of Michigan, as an equal nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity Coordinator, Office of Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

  19. Trinity College Sports Centre Terms and Conditions 1. As a member of Trinity College's Sports Centre you are agreeing to comply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Trinity College Sports Centre Terms and Conditions 1. As a member of Trinity College's Sports Centre must cease 30 minutes before advertised closing times to allow for showers. 18. Trinity College. If a dispute arises between Trinity College Sports Centre and a member, the decision of the Head of Sport

  20. Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that ballast wattage would track ballast/lamp type accordingaverage wattage for each ballast type and number of lamps

  1. Active Harmonic Filtering Using Current Controlled Grid-Connected DG Units with Closed-Loop Power Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    of nonlinear loads, such as variable speed drives, light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, compact fluorescent lamps

  2. Development of ZnO Based Light Emitting Diodes and Laser Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Jieying

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that UV LED and LD will replace traditional lamps and alsocolored LED as traffic signals instead of traditional lamp.

  3. Understanding mechanisms by which injectable biomaterials affect cardiac function post-myocardial infarction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rane, Aboli Anil

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface was excited by an LED lamp (LEDtronics) at 470excitation of the LED lamps) and the emitted fluorescence

  4. Inverted lVIicroscope DIAPHOT-TMD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    lamp bulb to be used is 12V- 50W. Do not use 12V-l00W halogen lamp bulb. If the lamp bulb of over the lamp is being lighted. o Exchanging the lamp bulb and fuse Before replacing the lamp bulb or fuse, turn as of replacement, do not touch. the lamp bulb with bare hands, immediately after putting out the lamp. 2 Dirt

  5. Optimized flashlamp pumping of disc amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, J.E.; Powell, H.T.; Woods, B.W.

    1986-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disk amplifier design for inertial fusion lasers has evolved with changing fusion-driver requirements from a primary emphasis on gain to a primary emphasis on efficiency. In this paper we compare Shiva and Nova amplifiers to a developmental amplifier (SSA) and show greater than a two-fold improvement in efficiency over past designs under all operating conditions. Experiments to optimize the efficiency of the SSA show that preionization of the flashlamps produces significant benefits and that the packing fraction of lamps is more important than the flashlamp reflector shape. They also show that the optimized flashlamp pulselength and reflector geometry depend on the desired stored energy in the laser medium. We have demonstrated a 7% storage efficiency at a stored fluence per disk of 0.5 J/cm/sup 2/ (stored energy density of 0.06 J/cm/sup 3/) and 4% at 2.0 J/cm/sup 2/ (0.25 J/cm/sup 3/). Comparison of SSA measurements with storage-efficiency calculations show that our flashlamp model accurately predicts the single-pass pumping of disk amplifiers. 24 refs., 22 figs.

  6. Reducing home lighting expenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimone, M.A.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ways to reduce lighting expenses are summarized. These include: turning off lights when not in use; keeping fixtures and lamps clean; replacing lamps with more efficient types; using three-way bulbs; use of daylighting; buying fewer lamps and reducing lamp wattage; consider repainting rooms; replacing recessed fixtures with tracklighting; and using efficient lamps for outdoor use. (MCW)

  7. EPI-FLUORESCENCE ATTACHMENT f o r I n v e r t e d M i c r o s c o p e D I A P H O T -T M D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    . In exchanging the lamp bulb, do not touch the glass part of the lamp bulb with bare hands. Dust, dirt or finger marks on the bulb surface should be wiped with alcohol. For attaching the mercury lamp bulb to the socket, take note of the polarity of the bulb. Before lighting the lamp, confirm that the lamp bulb

  8. All products of the future clothes, household devices, lamps will contain electronic units. Graduates in Electronic Design Engineering will be able

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Graduates in Electronic Design Engineering will be able to design both electronics and system software will also help to reduce carbon emissions. The Electronic Design Engineering programme equips students students to apply skills within real-life company projects. The Electronic Design Engineering programme

  9. Aspect-Oriented Programming of Sparse Matrix Code John Irwin, Jean-Marc Loingtier, John R. Gilbert, Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping, Anurag Mendhekar,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspect-Oriented Programming of Sparse Matrix Code John Irwin, Jean-Marc Loingtier, John R. Gilbert the German Copyright Law. #12;Aspect-Oriented Programming of Sparse Matrix Code John Irwin, Jean and explicitly while preserving the expressiveness of the original functional language. The resulting code

  10. The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

  11. CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER, UC DAVIS PHONE: (530) 747-3838 FAX: (530) 747-3812 CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU DOES YOUR LAMP MEET THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    : NICOLE GRAEBER Senior Development Engineer (530) 747-3847 negraeber@ucdavis.edu LED Performance Database

  12. CALiPER Report 20.4: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6 (2-91)A (04-86)

  13. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. (Contains a minimum of 109 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Midtemperature solar systems test faclity predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  15. Interest in phased array technology, well suited for tracking satellites, has grown in recent years. However, electronically steered arrays are expensive compared to reflector antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iqbal, Sheikh Sharif

    are investigated in this article. The proposed magnetized semiconductor phase shifter is a potential low cost extraordinary wave resonance of the magnetized semiconductor material. The losses in these regions in the propagating plane. Finally, the phase shift per unit length of a magnetized semiconductor phase shifter

  16. Experimental demonstration of a broadband all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflector Parikshit Moitra, Brian A. Slovick, Zhi Gang Yu, S. Krishnamurthy, and Jason Valentine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    -silicon metamaterial with hyperbolic transition in near infrared Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 021905 (2013); 10 a correlation between the degree of disorder and the reduction in reflectance. It is shown that near-unity reflection is preserved as long as resonator interaction is avoided. Realization of near-unity reflection

  17. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 55, NO. 6 (JUNE 1990); P. 67Ck.681, 11 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Physical properties of deep crustal reflectors in southern California from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is made to invert for the individual modulus or density contrasts. By examining only gross amplitude a constant noise level at large time then corrected for spherical diver- gence. Gross AVO trends gas would produce a remarkable decrease in Poisson's ratio in compar- ison to surrounding unproductive

  18. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: AAI solar collector with pressure-formed glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhance oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the AAI solar line-focusing slat-type collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  19. Lighting Market Sourcebook for the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorsatz, D.; Shown, L.; Koomey, J.; Moezzi, M.; Denver, A.; Atkinson, B.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1.4. Residential Lamp Types 2.1.5. Wattage, Hours of Use,all lamp types (mostly incandescent) in all other wattageWattage Category Energy Use (hours per day) lamp types)

  20. East Central Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Used fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps are also eligible for $0.50/lamp recycling rebate offered in conjunction with participating hardware stores. Additional information and...