Sample records for refinery tanks pipeline

  1. Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, Anne

    facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

  2. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  3. Kyrgyzstan starts up its first refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, G. [Petrofac LLC, Tyler, TX (United States)

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan started up its first oil refinery in October 1996. The 10,000 b/d plant is designed to produce gasoline, diesel, and mazut (heavy fuel oil) from local Kyrgyz crude. Before construction of the Jalalabad refinery, all finished petroleum products were imported from neighboring countries. Kyrgyzstan`s demand for finished products is about 40,000 b/d. The new refinery was designed and constructed by Petrofac of Tyler, Texas, on behalf of Kyrgoil Corp., Calgary. Kyrgoil is a partner with the Kyrgyz state oil company, Kyrgyzsneft, in a venture called Kyrzgyz Petroleum Co. (KPC). KPC has undertaken restoration and continued development of the oil fields in Kyrgyzstan`s Fergana basin, in addition to the refinery project. The company also has marketing rights for finished products within Kyrgyzstan. The refinery comprises: a hydroskimming (atmospheric distillation) section, diesel steam stripping, gasoline blending, and utilities and off-sites, including steam generation, power generation, tank farm, truck and rail tank-car loading and unloading facilities, crude inlet pipeline, high-voltage power line, substation, air compression, laboratory, and maintenance facilities.

  4. An experimental investigation of sediment drag forces on offshore pipelines in large scale drag tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Stanley Fuming

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF SEDIMENT DRAG FORCES ON OFFSHORE PIPELINES IN A LARGE SCALE DRAG TANK A Thesis by STANLEY FUMING YIN Approved as to style and content by... An ever increasing demand for petroleum products and energy has led to accelerated exploration and development of oil and gas deposits. Pipelines serve as an effective, efficient and reliable means of trans- porting the oil and gas from offshore...

  5. Analysis Patterns for Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Zhen; Guangzhen Shao

    We present analysis patterns to describe the structure of oil refineries. The Refinery Produc tion Unit Pattern describes the structure of units and unit groups. The Oil Storage Pattern describes the structure of tanks and tank groups. The Oil Delivery Pattern describes the structure of stations for import and export of oil. The Production Process Pattern describes the productionprocess. The audience for this paper includes analysts, designers, and programmers who are involved in developing Refinery Information Systems.

  6. An Initial Evaluation Of Characterization And Closure Options For Underground Pipelines Within A Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badden, Janet W. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Connelly, Michael P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Seeley, Paul N. [Cenibark International, Inc., Kennewick (United States); Hendrickson, Michelle L. [Washington State Univ., Richland (United States). Dept. of Ecology

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site includes 149 single-shell tanks, organized in 12 'tank farms,' with contents managed as high-level mixed waste. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that one tank farm, the Waste Management Area C, be closed by June 30, 2019. A challenge to this project is the disposition and closure of Waste Management Area C underground pipelines. Waste Management Area C contains nearly seven miles of pipelines and 200 separate pipe segments. The pipelines were taken out of service decades ago and contain unknown volumes and concentrations of tank waste residuals from past operations. To understand the scope of activities that may be required for these pipelines, an evaluation was performed. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify what, if any, characterization methods and/or closure actions may be implemented at Waste Management Area C for closure of Waste Management Area C by 2019. Physical and analytical data do not exist for Waste Management Area C pipeline waste residuals. To develop estimates of residual volumes and inventories of contamination, an extensive search of available information on pipelines was conducted. The search included evaluating historical operation and occurrence records, physical attributes, schematics and drawings, and contaminant inventories associated with the process history of plutonium separations facilities and waste separations and stabilization operations. Scoping analyses of impacts to human health and the environment using three separate methodologies were then developed based on the waste residual estimates. All analyses resulted in preliminary assessments, indicating that pipeline waste residuals presented a comparably low long-term impact to groundwater with respect to soil, tank and other ancillary equipment residuals, but exceeded Washington State cleanup requirement values. In addition to performing the impact analyses, the assessment evaluated available sampling technologies and pipeline removal or treatment technologies. The evaluation accounted for the potential high worker risk, high cost, and schedule impacts associated with characterization, removal, or treatment of pipelines within Waste Management Area C for closure. This assessment was compared to the unknown, but estimated low, long-term impacts to groundwater associated with remaining waste residuals should the pipelines be left "as is" and an engineered surface barrier or landfill cap be placed. This study also recommended that no characterization or closure actions be assumed or started for the pipelines within Waste Management Area C, likewise with the premise that a surface barrier or landfill cap be placed over the pipelines.

  7. Pump Jet Mixing and Pipeline Transfer Assessment for High-Activity Radioactive Wastes in Hanford Tank 241-AZ-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y Onishi; KP Recknagle; BE Wells

    2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors evaluated how well two 300-hp mixer pumps would mix solid and liquid radioactive wastes stored in Hanford double-shell Tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) and confirmed the adequacy of a three-inch (7.6-cm) pipeline system to transfer the resulting mixed waste slurry to the AP Tank Farm and a planned waste treatment (vitrification) plant on the Hanford Site. Tank AZ-102 contains 854,000 gallons (3,230 m{sup 3}) of supernatant liquid and 95,000 gallons (360 m{sup 3}) of sludge made up of aging waste (or neutralized current acid waste). The study comprises three assessments: waste chemistry, pump jet mixing, and pipeline transfer. The waste chemical modeling assessment indicates that the sludge, consisting of the solids and interstitial solution, and the supernatant liquid are basically in an equilibrium condition. Thus, pump jet mixing would not cause much solids precipitation and dissolution, only 1.5% or less of the total AZ-102 sludge. The pump jet mixing modeling indicates that two 300-hp mixer pumps would mobilize up to about 23 ft (7.0 m) of the sludge nearest the pump but would not erode the waste within seven inches (0.18 m) of the tank bottom. This results in about half of the sludge being uniformly mixed in the tank and the other half being unmixed (not eroded) at the tank bottom.

  8. Refinery Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Leveraging existing refining infrastructure potentially reduces costs for biofuel production but we first need to understand the impacts Petroleum Refinery Picture courtesy...

  9. Tank Mania!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    (4) In an oil refinery, a storage tank contains 2000 gal of gasoline that initially has 100 ... In preparation for winter weather, gasoline containing 2lb of additive per...

  10. An Initial Evaluation of Characterization and Closure Options for Underground Pipelines within a Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Farm - 13210

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badden, Janet W.; Connelly, Michael P. [Washington River Protection Services, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Services, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Seeley, Paul N. [Cenibark International, Inc., 104318 Nicole Drive, Kennewick, Washington, 99338-7596 (United States)] [Cenibark International, Inc., 104318 Nicole Drive, Kennewick, Washington, 99338-7596 (United States); Hendrickson, Michelle L. [Washington State Department of Ecology, 3100 Port of Benton Blvd, Richland, Washington, 99354 (United States)] [Washington State Department of Ecology, 3100 Port of Benton Blvd, Richland, Washington, 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site includes 149 single-shell tanks, organized in 12 'tank farms,' with contents managed as high-level mixed waste. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that one tank farm, the Waste Management Area C, be closed by June 30, 2019. A challenge to this project is the disposition and closure of Waste Management Area C underground pipelines. Waste Management Area C contains nearly seven miles of pipelines and 200 separate pipe segments. The pipelines were taken out of service decades ago and contain unknown volumes and concentrations of tank waste residuals from past operations. To understand the scope of activities that may be required for these pipelines, an evaluation was performed. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify what, if any, characterization methods and/or closure actions may be implemented at Waste Management Area C for closure of Waste Management Area C by 2019. Physical and analytical data do not exist for Waste Management Area C pipeline waste residuals. To develop estimates of residual volumes and inventories of contamination, an extensive search of available information on pipelines was conducted. The search included evaluating historical operation and occurrence records, physical attributes, schematics and drawings, and contaminant inventories associated with the process history of plutonium separations facilities and waste separations and stabilization operations. Scoping analyses of impacts to human health and the environment using three separate methodologies were then developed based on the waste residual estimates. All analyses resulted in preliminary assessments, indicating that pipeline waste residuals presented a comparably low long-term impact to groundwater with respect to soil, tank and other ancillary equipment residuals, but exceeded Washington State cleanup requirement values. In addition to performing the impact analyses, the assessment evaluated available sampling technologies and pipeline removal or treatment technologies. The evaluation accounted for the potential high worker risk, high cost, and schedule impacts associated with characterization, removal, or treatment of pipelines within Waste Management Area C for closure. This assessment was compared to the unknown, but estimated low, long-term impacts to groundwater associated with remaining waste residuals should the pipelines be left 'as is' and an engineered surface barrier or landfill cap be placed. This study also recommended that no characterization or closure actions be assumed or started for the pipelines within Waste Management Area C, likewise with the premise that a surface barrier or landfill cap be placed over the pipelines. (authors)

  11. Freight pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (US)); Round, G.F. (McMaster University (CA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on slurry pipelines, pneumatic pipelines, capsule pipelines, pipeline education, and pipeline research.

  12. EIS-0020: Crude Oil Transport Alternate From Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Elk Hills/SOHIO Pipeline Connection Conveyance System, Terminal Tank Farm Relocation to Rialto, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves developed this supplemental statement to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with a modified design of a proposed 250,000 barrels per day crude oil conveyance system from Navel Petroleum Reserve No. 1 to connect to the proposed SOHIO West Coast to Midcontinent Pipeline at Rialto, California. This SEIS is a supplement to DOE/EIS-0020, Crude Oil Transport Alternate From Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Elk Hills/SOHIO Pipeline Connection Conveyance System, Terminal Tank Farm Relocation to Rialto, California.

  13. Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization with Nonlinear CDU Models Abdulrahman Alattas, Advisor #12;Refinery Planning Model Development 2 Extension to Multiperiod Planning #12;3 Multiperiod Refinery: refinery configuration Determine · What crude oil to process and in which time period? · The quantities

  14. Final Report For The Erosion And Corrosion Analysis Of Waste Transfer Primary Pipeline Sections From 241-SY Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, J. S.; Wyrwas, R. B.; Cooke, G. A.

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Three sections of primary transfer pipeline removed from the 241-SY Tank Farm in Hanford's 200 West area, labeled as SN-285, SN-286, and SN-278, were analyzed for the presence and amount of corrosion and erosion on the inside surface of the transfer pipe. All three sections of pipe, ranging in length between 6 and 8 in., were received at the 222-S Laboratory still in the pipe-in-pipe assembly. The annular spaces were filled with urethane foam injected into the pipes for as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) purposes. The 3-in. primary transfer pipes were first separated from the outer encasement, 6-in. pipes. The pipes were cut into small sections, or coupons, based upon the results of a non-destructive pipe wall thickness measurement which used an ultrasonic transducer. Following removal of the foam, the coupons were subjected to a series of analytical methods utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to obtain erosion and corrosion information. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of the SN-285 primary pipe did not show any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for the 3-in. schedule 40 pipe of 216 mils. A coupon was cut from the thinnest area on the pipe, and analysis of the inside surface, which was in contact with the tank waste, revealed a continuous layer of corrosion ~ 100 11m (4 mils) thick under a semi-continuous layer of tank waste residue ~ 20 11m (1 mil) thick. This residue layer was composed of an amorphous phase rich in chromium, magnesium, calcium, and chlorine. Small pits were detected throughout the inside pipe surface with depths up to ~ 50 11m (2 mils). Similarly, the SN-286 primary pipe did not show, by the ultrasonic transducer measurements, any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for this pipe. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe section showed the presence of a tank waste layer containing sodium aluminate and phases rich in iron, calcium, and chromium. This layer was removed by a cleaning process that left a pipe surface continuous in iron oxide/hydroxide (corrosion) with pockets of aluminum oxide, possibly gibbsite. The corrosion layer was ~ 50 11m (2 mil) thick over non-continuous pits less than ~ 50 11m deep (2 mils). Small particles of aluminum oxide were also detected under the corrosion layer. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of SN-278, like the previous primary pipes, did not reveal any noticeable thinning of the pipe wall. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe showed that the inside surface had a layer of tank waste residue that was partially detached from the pipe wall. This layer was easily scraped from the surface and was composed of two separate layers. The underlying layer was ~ 350 11m (14 mils) thick and composed of a cementation of small aluminum oxide (probably gibbsite) particles. A thinner layer on top of the aluminum oxide layer was rich in carbon and chlorine. Scattered pitting was observed on the inside pipe surface with one pit as deep as 200 11m (8 mils).

  15. 2:00-2:30 Beverages, 2:30-4 PM Seminar Chevron operates two refineries on the west coast of California. Large parcels of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4/18/2014 2:00-2:30 Beverages, 2:30-4 PM Seminar Abstract Chevron operates two refineries fuel must be moved between the refineries by ship to balance production. The El Segundo Marine Terminal these vapors are returned to the refinery for processing via a vapor return pipeline. El Segundo's terminal

  16. Underground Storage Tank Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects that will require the use and building of pipelines, underground storage of any sorts, and/or electrical equipment. The...

  17. Refinery Energy Profiling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, R. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a four-step procedure developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy for preparing energy profiles for a refinery, for a single unit, or for an individual piece of equipment. The four steps are preparation, data...

  18. Refinery Energy Profiling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, R. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a four-step procedure developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy for preparing energy profiles for a refinery, for a single unit, or for an individual piece of equipment. The four steps are preparation, data...

  19. Tenneco revamps chalmette refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.E.; Ragsdale, R.

    1985-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A major expansion and modernization project has been completed at Tenneco Oil Co.'s Chalmette, La. refinery, which is on the outskirts of New Orleans. The $559 million project, called the Chalmette heavy oil processing program, included revamps and construction of new units. These new and modified facilities have increased the crude oil capacity of the refinery by 30,000 b/d to 127,000 b/d. Gasoline and/or middle distillate output potential has also been lifted by 30,000 b/d. Numerous studies were made and economic cases worked to determine the process configuration and selection for the project. These conclusions varied depending on the raw material chosen as the feedstock (crude source). The configuration finally chosen was driven by the decision to be able to process high metals crudes from around the world.

  20. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06 2.013 1.673Refinery

  1. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - HouseholdshortEIA-782A andS FRecord U.S. oilRefinery1

  2. Hulett's South African Refineries Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Jennings

    The improvement in the quality of raw sugars sent to Hulett's Refinery during the three seasons, 1963164 to 1965166, was the subject of a paper presented to this association last year. (1) These

  3. Encon Motivation in European Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambera, S.; Lockett, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One essential element in a successful energy conservation or Encon program is effective motivation of employees and organizations to conserve energy. Encon motivation in our European refineries is a continuing effort that requires utilization...

  4. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  5. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Carnegie Mellon University EWO Meeting ­ March 2011 1 #12;I t d tiIntroduction Refinery production planning models Optimizing refinery operation C d l ti Crude selection Maximizing profit; minimizing cost

  6. Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Benjamin R.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    the economic performance of fossil-based facilities can be enhanced by retrofitting and incorporation of bio-mass feedstocks. These systems can be regarded as bio-refineries or integrated fossilbio- refineries. This work presents a retrofitting analysis...

  7. A Texas Refinery Success Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kacsur, D.

    A Texas Refinery Success Story Dennis Kacsur Spirax Sarco Common knowledge rules that maintenance is the key to long-lasting machinery performance. Yet steam traps are often left to their own devices, to fail or succeed alone. And without... steam trap programs, plants are certain to experience a high failure rate. An oil refinery in Texas was continuously experiencing a high failure rate on its 4,790-steam trap system. Finally, the steam losses were judged to be too high, and plant...

  8. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Abdulrahman Alattas, Advisor #12;Refinery Planning Model Development Fixed-yieldModels SwingcutsModels LPPlanningModels Aggregate for the CDU #12;Planning Model Example Typical Refinery Configuration (Adapted from Aronofsky, 1978) Cat Ref

  9. Pipelines (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates pipelines that are used to carry natural or synthetic gas at a pressure of more than 90 pounds per square inch, along with pipelines used to carry petroleum products and coal...

  10. Refinery Fuel Balancing with Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passman, K. W.; Taylor, R. I.; Williams, D. E.; Emanuel, D.

    in order to tie-in during a scheduled refinery wide turnaround and to be on line during the summer 1990 operating period. The two gas turbines exhaust to two existing boilers where the oxygen in the turbine exhaust is utilized for combustion. Supplementary...

  11. Fluidized bed controls refinery emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulally, I.F.; Kersey, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1983, two fluidized bed, waste heat boilers entered into service at the Ashland Petroleum Company refinery site in Ashland, Kentucky. These fluidized bed units are coupled to the regeneration end of a newly developed reduced crude conversion (RCC) process and served the purpose of reducing CO, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions while recuperating waste heat from the regenerator process off gases.

  12. Refinery Production Planning: Multiperiod MINLP with Nonlinear CDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Refinery Production Planning: Multiperiod MINLP with Nonlinear CDU Model-Rivera (2011) developed a single-period, nonlinear programing refinery planning model production, distribution, sales and inventory management1,2. The refinery

  13. Monthly Tank Inspection Log Name of Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    of corrosion or pitting) No signs of separation or swelling of tank Bolts, rivets, and/or seams are not damaged Additional Comments Attached TANK PIPELINES Pipe surfaces checked for signs of leakage No signs of corrosion not have signs of leakage Containment area pumps are working properly No visible oil sheen in containment

  14. Chevron Richmond Refinery Pipe Rupture and Fire Animation - Work...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chevron Richmond Refinery Pipe Rupture and Fire Animation - Work Planning and Control is Not Chevron Richmond Refinery Pipe Rupture and Fire Animation - Work Planning and Control...

  15. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters -...

  16. EIS-0303: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates alternatives for closing 49 high-level radioactive waste tanks and associated equipment such as evaporator systems, transfer pipelines, diversion boxes, and pump pits. DOE...

  17. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  18. Pipeline Setback Ordinance (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the Office of Pipeline Safety to regulate pipelines in Minnesota. Among other duties, the office is responsible for implementing a Model Pipeline Setback Ordinance.

  19. Recent trends in refinery hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitani, A.M.; Siddiqui, M.A.B. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Refiners are experiencing a rise in hydrogen requirements to improve product quality and process heavy sour crudes. Fuel reformulation has disrupted refinery hydrogen balance in two ways: more hydrogen is needed for hydroprocessing and less hydrogen is coproduced from catalytic naphtha reforming. The purpose of this paper is to review trends in maximizing refinery hydrogen production by modifications and alternatives to the conventional steam methane reforming, recovery from refinery off gases and {open_quote}across-the-fence{close_quote} hydrogen supply. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Pipeline ADC Design Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling vs. R. Figure 4.8 Pipeline ADC Structures. Figure2.4 A Pipelined ADC. Figure 3.1 Pipeline ADC Transfer Curve.Modes (b) data latency in pipeline ADC Figure 3.3 Detailed

  1. Stress-free tank cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haimowitz, S.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fall of 1991, sludge buildup in a 690,000-bbl crude-oil storage tank caused measurement and loading problems for the Mobil Oil refinery in Paulsboro, N.J. Four ft of sludge had accumulated at the bottom of the tank, which holds oil prior to refining. Faced with operating and environmental constraints, Mobil cleaned the tank with Nalco 5601, a system made by Nalco Chemical Co., (Sugar Land, Texas). The system, which employs chemicals, water and heat, removed 58,000 bbl of sludge from the tank and recovered 37,500 bbl of oil from it without generating hazardous wastes. This oil contained only trace amounts of sediments and water, and was processed without requiring further treatment. Water was also recovered from the sludge: 11,000 bbl were treated biologically onsite. There were 3,700 bbl of solids remaining, which were left in the tank, as they only took up 4 in. and no longer affected level measurement. The system cleaned the tank in 10 days and recovered 99% of the oil in the sludge without generating hazardous wastes. The value of the recovered oil is $646,000, and Mobil estimates that its return on investment for the project is nearly 300%.

  2. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2DBuilding Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

  3. Upgrade Your Refinery for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnnie, D. H., Jr.; Klooster, H. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upgrading existing refineries for efficient energy utilization imposes strict restraints upon design engineers. Present and future production requirements must be defined. Reliable operating data must be obtained from historical records and test...

  4. Making Refinery Wastewater Clean | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refinery Wastewater Clean Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on...

  5. Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Benjamin R.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    to integrated bio-refineries. Focus is given to the problem of process modification to an existing plant by considering capacity expansion and material substitution with biomass feedstocks. Process integration studies were conducted to determine cost...

  6. Application of Pinch Technology in Refinery Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, W. R.; Siegell, J. H.; Sideropoulos, T.; Robertson, J. L.; Papoulias, S. A.

    APPLICATION OF PINCH TECHNOLOGY IN REFINERY RETROFITS W. R. L. Thomas, J. H. Siegell, T. Sideropoulos, J. L. Robertson, S. A. Papoulias Exxon Research and Engineering Company Florham Park, New Jersey ABSTRACT This paper reviews... the application of pinch technology in the identification of the most attractive retrofit prospects in typical refineries. In the first part of the paper, methodology is described to identify attractive inter-unit heat integration opportunities as well...

  7. Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

    MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT OF REFINERY ENERGY CONSUMPTION Roger O. Pelham Richard D. Moriarty Patrie D. Hudgens Profimatics, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California ABSTRACT Since 1972, the u.s. refining industry has made much progress in reduci... ng energy consumption. Lately, falling energy prices have de-emphasized the need to appropriate new capital for additional energy conservation projects. One area neglected in most refineries is the need to monitor and man age the daily use...

  8. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  9. Praxair extending hydrogen pipeline in Southeast Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Praxair Inc., an independent corporation created by the spinoff of Union Carbide Corp.'s Linde division, is extending its high purity hydrogen pipeline system from Channelview, Tex., to Port Arthur, Tex. The 70 mile, 10 in. extension begins at a new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) purification unit next to Lyondell Petrochemical Co.'s Channelview plant. The PSA unit will upgrade hydrogen offgas from Lyondell's methanol plant to 99.99% purity hydrogen. The new line, advancing at a rate of about 1 mile/day, will reach its first customer, Star Enterprise's 250,000 b/d Port Arthur refinery, in September.

  10. Steam System Management Program Yields Fuel Savings for Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, L. D.; Hagan, K. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phillips refinery at Borger, Texas, determined the need to develop a utility monitoring system. Shortly after this commitment was made, the refinery was introduced to a flowsheet modeling program that could be used to model and optimize steam...

  11. Software communications integrated into refinery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodpaster, R.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1989-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashland Oil Co. is integrating software communications, using real-time data, into the computerized information system at its Catlettsburg, Ky., refinery. The Ashland real-time information system (Artis) was designed to improve timeliness and accuracy of yield accounting to the refinery, and to standardize software communications between applications. With the system, real-time data are collected in a central data server and used to feed normal data reconciliation software for validation. This part of the system has been successfully implemented. Standardization of software communications is still under design, but most of the communication paths have been defined because a highly evolved information system already exists at the refinery. And efforts are under way to integrate information from the process to optimization.

  12. Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha , Kevin C at the front-end of a petroleum refinery. The model relies on a continuous time representation making use-412-268-7139. Email address: grossmann@cmu.edu (I.E. Grossmann) #12;2 Keywords: Refinery scheduling; Nonconvex MINLP

  13. Wireless Critical Process Control in oil and gas refinery plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Wireless Critical Process Control in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1, Sergio Guardiano control in in- dustrial plants and oil/gas refineries. In contrast to wireline communication, wireless of an oil refinery is illustrated in Fig. 1: typical locations of wireless devices used for re- mote control

  14. Gas Pipeline Safety (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes the Pipeline Safety Division within the Utility Regulatory Commission to administer federal pipeline safety standards and establish minimum state safety standards for...

  15. Pipeline Safety (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission has the authority enact regulations pertaining to pipeline safety. These regulations address pipeline monitoring, inspections, enforcement, and penalties.

  16. Intrastate Pipeline Safety (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide standards for gas and liquid pipeline maintenance and operating procedures, per the Federal Hazardous Liquid and Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Acts, and give the...

  17. Pipeline Safety (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The South Dakota Pipeline Safety Program, administered by the Public Utilities Commission, is responsible for regulating hazardous gas intrastate pipelines. Relevant legislation and regulations...

  18. Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

  19. Planned oil pipeline vital to economy of Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Kazakhstan-Kumkol pipeline project is extremely vital to the economy of the Republic of Kazakhstan`s ultimate goal of transporting crude oil produced from the western part of the country eastward to Kumkol, from where it is further transported through existing pipelines to refineries in Chimkent in the south and Pavoldar in the northeast. The two refineries are now mainly supplied with west Siberian crudes imported through a pipeline that approaches Kazakhstan via Omsk. The planned pipeline will allow increased use of local crudes, thereby considerably improving a secure supply for the consumers while also increasing the flexibility of the nation`s overall import/export situation. The importance of this project is stressed by the Kazakh government which has officially classified it as a national priority project. The technical feasibility study of the project was prepared by ILF Consulting Engineers of Germany and Price Waterhouse Financial Consultants is conducting a study to determine the economical viability of the project. The overall cost is estimated at $1.1 billion, with the cost of Phase 1 placed at $600 million.

  20. Determinants of HR Effectiveness and Refinery Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaine Mccormick; Gary C. Mcmahan; W. Scott Sherman; Patrick M. Wright; Patrick M. Wright; Gary C. Mcmahan; Blaine Mccormick; W. Scott Sherman

    This paper has not undergone formal review or approval of the faculty of the ILR School. It is intended to make results of Center research available to others interested in preliminary form to encourage discussion and suggestions. Page 1SHRM and Refinery Performance WP 97-16 Strategy, Core Competence and HR Involvement as

  1. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  2. Wilolud Online Journals, 2008. THE NIGERIAN FUEL ENERGY SUPPLY CRISIS AND THE PROPOSED PRIVATE REFINERIES PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agwom Sani Z

    Dynamism of the world economy has compelled Nigerians to accept the liberalization of its economy to encourage private sector participation and induce managerial efficiency. This has become very imperative most especially, in the downstream sub-sector of the Nigerian oil and gas industry by the establishment and management of private refineries in view of the persistent fuel energy crisis. An attempt is made here at analyzing the prospects and problems of such refineries that are expected to end the fuel energy crisis which started in the 1970s due to increased demand for petroleum products for rehabilitation and reconstruction after the civil war but later metamorphosed into a hydraheaded monster in the 1980s to date. Efforts towards arresting this crisis by the government through the establishment of more refineries, storage depots and network of distribution pipelines etc achieved a short-term solution due to the abysmal low performance of the refineries and facilities in contrast to increasing demand for petroleum products. It is deduced that the low performance resulted from bad and corrupt management by indigenous technocrats and political leaders as well as vandalization of facilities. Prospects for such investments were identified, as well as some of the problems to content with. This is in order to understand the pros and cons of such investments in view of their capital intensiveness and the need to achieve economic goals that must incorporate environmental and social objectives.

  3. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  4. Tank Closure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program Two Tank Farms - F Area and H Area Permitted by SC as Industrial Wastewater Facilities under the Pollution Control Act Three agency Federal Facility...

  5. Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the flow properties for compressor selection? What controls should be incorporated? How much operator and maintenance effort will be required for safe, efficient operation? What kind of process and hardware problems should be watched for? When...? This paper will touch on all these issues. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A schematic of a typical refinery flare gas recovery facility is shown in Figure I. The facilities include the following pieces of equipment: - compressor suction drum - compressor set...

  6. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  7. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

  8. Components in the Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan (Jenny); Yin, Jian

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

  9. Projection and Reaction for Decision Support in Refineries: Combining Multiple Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebsbach, Kurt D.

    Projection and Reaction for Decision Support in Refineries: Combining Multiple Theories Kurt D system to provide decision support for refinery operations personnel (Krebsbach & Musliner 1997; Musliner to provide sufficiently flexible decision support in complex environments. Background: Refinery Control

  10. Pipeline Safety Rule (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Safety Rule simply states, "The Minimum Federal Safety Standards for the transportation of natural and other gas by pipeline (Title 49, Chapter 1, Part 192) as published in the Federal...

  11. Pipeline Construction Guidelines (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Division of Pipeline Safety of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission regulates the construction of any segment of an interstate pipeline on privately owned land in Indiana. The division has...

  12. Keystone XL pipeline update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions have been raised recently about the Keystone XL pipeline project, so we wanted to make some points clear.

  13. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 0.11 0.0949,797.6(MillionRefinery3,028,561- - -

  14. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  15. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  16. Dual Tank Fuel System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  17. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  18. Simulation effectively sites surge-relief facilities on Saudi pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J.J.; Al-Gouhi, A.H. (Saudi Arabian Oil Co., Dhahrain (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipeline hydraulic and surge analysis studies of the Saudi Aramco East-West crude-oil pipeline assisted in expanding the system's capacity by 50%. Surge studies predicted that operational upsets, such as the trip of a pump station, cause excessive surge pressures in the pipeline system at new flow rates. Additional surge studies showed that surge-relief stations must be located downstream from each of six pump stations. The new surge-relief stations and an increase in capacity of existing surge-relief stations protect the pipelines at the higher flow rates. The paper describes modeling the system, the analysis of the hydraulics, surge analysis, acoustic transit times, relief valve simulation, surge-relief protection, surge-relief stations, station locations, simulation results, tank sizing, and valve testing.

  19. Tank 241-S-111: Tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, ORNL, and PNL tank vapor program. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-S-111 (this tank is on the organic and flammable gas watch list). This tank received Redox plant waste, among other wastes.

  20. Nigerian refineries strive for product balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obuasi, P.A.

    1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the growth patterns of the Nigerian refining industry. Production and consumption are expected to follow the pattern of consumption of fuel products by the domestic market, Presently, however, production and consumption are not evenly balanced for most fuel products, and non-fuel products are domestically consumed but not produced. Some progress has been made in the effort to match production and consumption of fuel products. But the progress that would have been made to balance non-fuel products has been nullified by 50% of the Daduna refinery being idle. This is due to problems associated with importation of heavy crude oil into Nigeria and also a weak market for asphalt in Nigeria.

  1. RCC complex now cornerstone of Ashland refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.; Krock, R.P.

    1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of the first grassroots RCC process unit during its initial 1 1/2 years of operation at Ashland's principal refinery at Catlettsburg, Ky., has confirmed the commercial viability and process advantages of this new technology for heavy oil conversion. The unit has successfully processed untreated atmospheric residuum having Ramsbottom carbon content as high as 7.1 wt%, and metals contamination up to 70 ppm nickel plus vanadium into high yields of transportation and distillate fuels and other light products. The startup of this 40,000 b/d facility in March 1983 brought to fruition nearly 8 years of diligent process development and a 3-year accelerated engineering and construction program. The commercial unit was expressly designed and built to exploit process, hardware, and catalyst innovations flowing from the development effort and demonstrated to be especially applicable to converting long resids. The unit has generally met and exceeded technical expectations.

  2. Saber's heavy oil cracking refinery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benefield, C.S.; Glasscock, W.L.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perhaps more than any other industry, petroleum refining has been subjected to the radical swings in business and political climates of the past several decades. Because of the huge investments and long lead times to construct refining facilities, stable government policies, predictable petroleum prices, secure feedstock supplies and markets, and reliable cost estimates are necessary ingredients to effectively plan new refinery projects. However, over the past ten years the political and economic climates have provided anything but these conditions. Yet, refiners have demonstrated a willingness to undertake risks by continuing to expand and modernize their refineries. The refining business -- just as most businesses -- responds to economic incentives. These incentives, when present, result in new technology and capacity additions. In the 1940's, significant technology advances were commercialized to refine higher-octane motor gasolines. Such processes as continuous catalytic cracking (Houdry Process Corporation), fluid catalytic cracking (Standard Oil Development Company), HF alkylation (UOP and Phillips Petroleum Company), and catalytic reforming (UOP) began to supply a growing gasoline market, generated from the war effort and the ever increasing numbers of automobiles on the road. The post-war economy of the 1950's and 1960's further escalated demand for refined products, products which had to meet higher performance specifications and be produced from a wider range of raw materials. The refining industry met the challenge by introducing hydro-processing technology, such as hydrocracking developed in 1960. But, the era must be characterized by the large crude processing capacity additions, required to meet demand from the rapidly expanding U.S. economy. In 1950, refining capacity was 6.2 million BPD. By 1970, capacity had grown to 11.9 million BPD, an increase of 91%.

  3. Pipeline Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania legislature has empowered the Public Utility Commission to direct and enforce safety standards for pipeline facilities and to regulate safety practices of certificated utilities...

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

  5. Natural Gas Pipeline Safety (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states minimum safety standards for the transportation of natural gas by pipeline and reporting requirements for operators of pipelines.

  6. Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to entities seeking to develop and operate natural gas pipelines and provide construction requirements for such pipelines. The regulations describe the authority of the...

  7. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

  8. Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  9. Implementing an Energy Management Strategy for a Houston Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, S. C.; Agrawal, R. K.; Canon, D.

    and maintained energy management program translates to PROFIT added directly to the BOTTOM LINE. Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) recently implemented and energy management program at the Lyondell-Citgo Refinery in Houston, Texas. The basis of the program...

  10. Refinery Energy Conservation Experience with Enhanced Surface Reboilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragi, E. G.; O'Neill, P. S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples of refinery services where existing reboilers were retubed or replaced with enhanced High Flux tubing to better utilize or conserve energy are reported. (1) Retubing an existing toluene column reboiler permitted the use of low cost 115...

  11. Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vari, J.

    Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

  12. Petroleum Refinery Catalytic Reforming -- Cutting High Energy Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viar, W. L.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is essential that the operation and maintenance of these furnaces be optimized to minimize production costs. This paper describes the performance testing and evaluation of a set of ten refinery furnaces used to thermally drive several reforming reactors...

  13. Optimization of Steam Network in Tehran Oil Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodaie, H.; Nasr, M. R. J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dominated energy crisis in the world dictates to reduce energy consumption and identify energy saving opportunities in large and complex industries especially in oil refining industry. In this paper, Tehran oil refinery is considered as a proper...

  14. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  15. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  16. Steps taken at Malelane refinery to improve refined sugar quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Moodley; Pm Schorn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The refinery at Malelane has in the past produced refined sugar for the consumer market. A decision was taken by the management of Transvaal Sugar (TSB) to produce a quality of refined sugar that would also be acceptable to the industrial and the export markets. The processes that were evaluated and implemented at the Malelane refinery during the past three seasons to achieve this objective, are described.

  17. FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botte, Gerardine G.

    F FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion Issues Related to Carbon Capture, Transportation, and Storage Capture, Transportation, and Storage--Aspects of Corrosion and Materials. "Until these new technologies are developed and applied, corrosion engineers are focusing on how to best design pipelines for CO2 transport

  18. BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efforts were undertaken Conversion took place during a period of less regulation on pipeline activityBP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station Two hydrogen pipelines

  19. Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, Georgia August development · Charge from BPTCS to B31 Standards Committee for Hydrogen Piping/Pipeline code development · B31.12 Status & Structure · Hydrogen Pipeline issues · Research Needs · Where Do We Go From Here? #12;4 Code

  20. Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines Barton Smith, Barbara Frame, Larry Anovitz and Cliff;Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate of pipeline per day. · $190k/mile capital cost for distribution pipelines · Hydrogen delivery cost below $1

  1. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  2. GAS PIPELINE PIGABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Clark; Bruce Nestleroth

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-line inspection equipment is commonly used to examine a large portion of the long distance transmission pipeline system that transports natural gas from well gathering points to local distribution companies. A piece of equipment that is inserted into a pipeline and driven by product flow is called a ''pig''. Using this term as a base, a set of terms has evolved. Pigs that are equipped with sensors and data recording devices are called ''intelligent pigs''. Pipelines that cannot be inspected using intelligent pigs are deemed ''unpigable''. But many factors affect the passage of a pig through a pipeline, or the ''pigability''. The pigability pipeline extend well beyond the basic need for a long round hole with a means to enter and exit. An accurate assessment of pigability includes consideration of pipeline length, attributes, pressure, flow rate, deformation, cleanliness, and other factors as well as the availability of inspection technology. All factors must be considered when assessing the appropriateness of ILI to assess specific pipeline threats.

  3. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

  4. Leaving the Premedical Pipeline at Cal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why students drop out of the pipeline to health professionsLeaving the Premedical Pipeline at Cal By Elizabeth Kwanattrition from the premedical pipeline is appropriate. Not

  5. Capturing Latino Students in the Academic Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gndara, Patricia; Larson, Katherine; Mehan, Hugh; Rumberger, Russell

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Latino Educational Pipeline Why Latino Students are atSTUDENTS IN THE ACADEMIC PIPELINE CAPTURING LATINO STUDENTSIN THE ACADEMIC PIPELINE Patricia Gcindara, Editor Katherine

  6. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURE PULSING PIPELINE UNPLUGGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Servin, M. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Garfield, J. S. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States); Golcar, G. R. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to unplug key waste transfer routes is generally essential for successful tank farms operations. All transfer lines run the risk of plugging but the cross site transfer line poses increased risk due to its longer length. The loss of a transfer route needed to support the waste feed delivery mission impacts the cost and schedule of the Hanford clean up mission. This report addresses the engineering feasibility for two pressure pulse technologies, which are similar in concept, for pipeline unplugging.

  7. Pipeline Carriers (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pipeline carriers transporting crude petroleum, coal, the products of crude petroleum or coal, or carbon dioxide produced in the combustion or gasification of fossil fuels are required to abide by...

  8. Rnnotator Assembly Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jeff [DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jeff Martin of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses a de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from short RNA-Seq reads on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  9. Gas Pipelines (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter applies to any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as any...

  10. Gas Pipeline Securities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes that entities engaged in the transmission of gas by pipelines are not required to obtain the consent of the Utility Regulatory Commission for issuance of stocks,...

  11. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  12. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  13. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  14. VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING Phuong NGUYEN*, Pier-Paolo SAVIOTTI, refinery processes, variety, niche theory, Weitzman measure. JEL classification : L15 -L93 -O3 1

  15. STAMP-Based Analysis of a Refinery Overflow Accident Nancy Leveson, Margaret Stringfellow, and John Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    1 STAMP-Based Analysis of a Refinery Overflow Accident Nancy Leveson, Margaret Stringfellow, and John Thomas As an example of STAMP, we have taken an accident report produced for a real refinery

  16. Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session...

  17. Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization Xueyu Chen, Derya) British Petroleum Applications mainly crude units in refineries and ethylene plants #12;Companies

  18. Mixed reality training application for an oil refinery: user requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjaana Trskbck

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing mixed reality (MR) into safety-critical environment like oil refinery is difficult, since the environment and organization lays demanding restrictions for the application. In order to develop usable and safe MR application, we need to study the context of use and derive user requirements from it. This paper describes the user requirements for an MR based oil refinery training tool. The application is aimed to train employees of a specific process unit in the refinery. Training is currently done mainly in a classroom and on-site only when the process is closed down. On-site training is necessary, but expensive and rarely possible. The use of mixed reality offers a way to train employees on-site while the process is running. Users can virtually see inside the columns and can modify virtually the process..

  19. HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERRIOCHOA MV

    2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  20. Potentials for Fuel Cells in Refineries and Chlor-Alkali Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altseimer, J. H.; Roach, F.

    POTENTIALS FOR FUEL CELLS IN REFINERIES AND CHLOR-ALKALI PLANTS John H. Altseimer and Fred Roach Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico ABSTRACT The market potentials for fuel cell cogenera tion systems in petroleum refineries... in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries...

  1. Ashland outlines $261 million in refinery unit construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Ashland Petroleum Co. has spelled out $261 million in projects completed, under way, or planned to produce cleaner fuel and further reduce emissions at two U.S. refineries. The company: Started up at $13 million pollution control system at its 213,400 b/cd Catlettsburg, Ky., plant. Started construction on six projects at its 67,100 b/cd St. Paul Park, Minn., refinery that will cost about $114 million and enable the plant to produce cleaner burning diesel fuel and further reduce emissions.

  2. GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies HF REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL

  3. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils Aerial deposition of Ni from a refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada has resulted in the enrichment in vegetable crops grown in the vicinity of the refinery. Conversely, dolomitic lime- stone additions resulted

  4. Optimal Industrial Load Control in Smart Grid: A Case Study for Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Optimal Industrial Load Control in Smart Grid: A Case Study for Oil Refineries Armen Gholian, Hamed units finish their operations. Considering an oil refinery industry as an example, we not only identify Terms­Demand response, load management, manufactur- ing industries, oil refineries, optimal scheduling

  5. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Refinery wastewaters were tested as fuels in MECs effective for treatment or pre-treatment of some refinery wastewaters. The best way to start up MECs

  6. Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1 modeling approach is validated by experimental measurements in two oil refinery sites using industry and gas refinery sites are characterized by harsh environments where radio signals are prone to blockage

  7. Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition Sylvain: refinery planning and crude-oil operations scheduling. The proposed approach consists of using Lagrangian-study and a larger refinery problem show that the Lagrangian decomposition algorithm is more robust than the other

  8. Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced 2013 Available online 5 November 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cells Refinery wastewater Biodegradability Separator electrode assembly a b s t r a c t The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW

  9. JANUARY 2007 THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    OF JANUARY 2007 THE REPORT THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL #12;From left;PANEL STATEMENT The B.P. U.S. Refineries Independent Safety Review Panel i Process safety accidents can be prevented. On March 23, 2005, the BP Texas City refinery experienced a catastrophic process accident

  10. Perception of an emergency Situation by operators in an oil refinery L.Pioche&J.RPineau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Perception of an emergency Situation by operators in an oil refinery L.Pioche&J.RPineau Institut de the operators' behaviour during an emergency Situation m an oil refinery. The aim ofthis stage the general objective is to analyse the operators' behaviour during an emergency Situation in an oil refinery

  11. Pipeline Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs prepared by pipeline operators in accordance with Federal pipeline safety regulations, grounding, and interference, environmentally sensitive areas, federal pipeline safety regulationsPipeline Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U

  12. Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

  13. Gas Pipeline Safety (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Pipeline Safety Section of the Engineering Division is responsible for the application and enforcement of pipeline safety regulations under Chapter 24B of the West Virginia Code and 49 U.S...

  14. Programmable Graphics Pipelines Anjul Patney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Programmable Graphics Pipelines By Anjul Patney B.Tech. (Indian Institute of Technology Delhi) 2007 as Abstractions for Computer Graphics 5 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Modern Graphics Pipelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2

  15. CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline: A Line in the Sand? Case Critical is presented by ASU's Global Professor, ASU's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning The Keystone XL Pipeline, a large

  16. Tank Characterization Report for Single Shell Tank 241-C-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank.

  17. PID control of gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltharp, B.; Bergmann, J. [Baker CAC, Kingwood, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of low cost digital controllers for pipeline control is increasing as the reliability and cost improves. In pipeline applications, the proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller algorithm is often used. However, the unique problems associated with pipeline operation have caused manufacturers to modify the basic control algorithms. Features such as set point ramping, built in pressure control, freeze on input error, and high and low output limits help assure safe and predictable pipeline operation.

  18. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  19. Crude Oil Stocks at Tank Farms & Pipelines

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S. DEPARTMENTshort0 U.S.4:4CompanyNov-14 Dec-14

  20. Septic Tanks (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A license from the Department of Environmental Quality is required for cleaning or pumping of septic tanks or holding tanks and disposing of sewage or septage. The rules for the license are...

  1. Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future estimates of hydrogen pipelines. Construction Cost (does this mean for hydrogen pipelines? The objective of thisinto the cost of hydrogen pipelines. To this end I will

  2. Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jungsoo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced pipeline monitoringDesign of mobile pipeline floating sensor SewerSnortIllustration of mobile pipeline floating sensor monitoring

  3. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101.

  4. Tank 241-SX-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-SX-103.

  5. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111.

  6. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107.

  7. DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Gomez

    1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

  8. Data-stationary pipelined machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, I.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the data-stationary control concept of pipelined machines, with emphasis on its application in image processing systems. A parallel array of pipelined machines for image processing is considered, and data-stationary control is compared with time-stationary control. A system is proposed that is a parallel array of pipelined machines. Each pipeline is a multifunctional, statically configured, data-stationary device. The pipelines do not accommodate branching instructions or interrupts, and the design focus on vector processing only. The system can be used in other applications such as signal processing and arithmetic number crunching. 5 references.

  9. Enhancing protection for unusually sensitive ecological areas from pipeline releases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sames, Christina; Fink, Dennis

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECOLOGICAL AREAS FROM PIPELINE RELEASES Christina Sames;Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, DPS-10/ 400 7thof a hazardous liquid pipeline accident. Pipeline operators

  10. The SINFONI pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Modigliani; Wolfgang Hummel; Roberto Abuter; Paola Amico; Pascal Ballester; Richard Davies; Christophe Dumas; Mattew Horrobin; Mark Neeser; Markus Kissler-Patig; Michele Peron; Juha Rehunanen; Juergen Schreiber; Thomas Szeifert

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The SINFONI data reduction pipeline, as part of the ESO-VLT Data Flow System, provides recipes for Paranal Science Operations, and for Data Flow Operations at Garching headquarters. At Paranal, it is used for the quick-look data evaluation. For Data Flow Operations, it fulfills several functions: creating master calibrations; monitoring instrument health and data quality; and reducing science data for delivery to service mode users. The pipeline is available to the science community for reprocessing data with personalised reduction strategies and parameters. The pipeline recipes can be executed either with EsoRex at the command line level or through the Gasgano graphical user interface. The recipes are implemented with the ESO Common Pipeline Library (CPL). SINFONI is the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (1.1-2.45 um) at the ESO-VLT. SINFONI was developed and build by ESO and MPE in collaboration with NOVA. It consists of the SPIFFI integral field spectrograph and an adaptive optics module which allows diffraction limited and seeing limited observations. The image slicer of SPIFFI chops the SINFONI field of view on the sky in 32 slices which are re-arranged to a pseudo slit. The latter is dispersed by one of the four possible gratings (J, H, K, H+K). The detector thus sees a spatial dimension (along the pseudo-slit) and a spectral dimension. We describe in this paper the main data reduction procedures of the SINFONI pipeline, which is based on SPRED - the SPIFFI data reduction software developed by MPE, and the most recent developments after more than a year of SINFONI operations.

  11. Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985.

  12. DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laporte, TX to near Lake Charles, LA. This system has approximately 228 miles of DOT regulated H2 pipeline of DOT regulated H2 pipeline. Portions of this system operating since early 1983. Pipeline sizeDOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 31, 2005 Augusta, Georgia #12;Hydrogen Pipeline

  13. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  14. The MTBE solution: Octanes, technology, and refinery profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, E.P.; Hubbard, J.N.; Smith, L.A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has been developed to provide refiners with business decision insight regarding the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) from refinery - (FCC) produced isobutylene. The driving forces making MTBE an attractive investment are examined with regard to the increasing demand for higher octane unleaded gasolines. The decision to proceed with MTBE production depends on the profitability of such an investment and the refiner's ability to meet market demands using available processing equipment, refinery produced streams and external feedstocks. The factors affecting this decision are analyzed in this paper and include: industry ability to meet rising octane demand; profit potential realized by diverting isobutylene to MTBE; availability of technology for producing MTBE; and investment and operating costs required to produce MTBE. Chemical Research and Licensing and NEOCHEM have developed a simple, low cost process to produce MTBE, reducing the excessive equipment and high operating costs that were associated with conventional MTBE designs. The economics and process benefits of installing a CRandL/NEOCHEM MTBE process are examined within the framework of a generalized medium-sized refinery configuration.

  15. Controlling Silver Dust and Fumes at Mine Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Haney; M. P. Valoski

    ABSTRACT: As part of the refining of gold and silver molten metal, silver dust and fumes are released into the atmosphere. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) enforces an 8-hour, equivalent Time Weighted Average concentration limit for silver dust and fumes of 10 g/m 3. MSHA initiated a program to assess the controls that were being used to control silver dust and fume exposure. Refineries were visited at six mines. The layout of each refinery and the controls used varied at each refinery. At each operation, personal and area silver fume and dust samples were collected to assess worker exposures and to determine sources of fume. Primary source of silver dust and fume exposure was the pouring of molten metal from the furnace. Secondary sources of exposure included: precipitate mixing, bar cooling, and housekeeping. Guidelines were developed addressing housekeeping, exhaust ventilation, general ventilation, administrative controls, and system monitoring. In most cases, housekeeping and general ventilation were adequate; however, the exhaust ventilation systems needed to be improved. 1 INRODUCTION Silver dust and fumes become airborne during the refining step of producing gold and silver. The dust

  16. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  17. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  18. GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL AGO HGO HFO

  19. Hydrodynamic forces on piggyback pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobsen, M.L.; Sayer, P. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of new offshore pipelines have been designed as bundles, mainly because of overall cost reductions. One popular way of combining two pipelines with different diameters is the piggyback configuration, with the smaller pipeline strapped on top of the main pipeline. The external hydrodynamic forces on this combination are at present very roughly estimated; pipeline engineers need more data to support their designs. This paper presents experimental results for the in-line hydrodynamic loading on three different piggyback set-ups. The models comprised a 0.4 m main pipeline, and three piggyback pipelines with diameters of 0.038 m, 0.059 m and 0.099 m. Each small pipeline was separately mounted to the main pipeline, with a gap equal to its own diameter. These model sizes lie approximately between half- and full-scale. Experiments were undertaken for K{sub C} between 5 and 42, and R{sub e} in the range 0.0 * 10{sup 4} to 8.5 * 10{sup 5}. The results based on Morison`s equation indicate that a simple addition of the separate forces acting on each cylinder underestimates the actual force by up to 35% at low K{sub C} (< {approximately} 10) and by as much as 100% in the drag-dominated regime (K{sub C} > {approximately} 20).

  20. RNA-Seq Pipeline in Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Xiandong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assembly in Galaxy RNA-Seq q Pipeline p QC : To find outRNA-Seq Pipeline in Galaxy Xiandong Meng 1 , Jeffrey Martinof California RNA--Seq Pipeline in Galaxy RNA Xiandong Meng

  1. Leaking Pipelines: Doctoral Student Family Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serrano, Christyna M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sari M. Why the Academic Pipeline Leaks: Fewer Men thanone reason the academic pipeline leaks. 31 Blair-Loy, Mary.to leak out of the academic pipeline. The term academic

  2. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems)

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  3. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  4. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

  5. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System`s tank waste retrieval Program.

  6. Qualification of Innovative High Level Waste Pipeline Unplugging Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, D.; Gokaltun, S.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A.; Roelant, D.; Srivastava, R. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, some of the pipelines have plugged during high level waste (HLW) transfers resulting in schedule delays and increased costs. Furthermore, pipeline plugging has been cited by the 'best and brightest' technical review as one of the major issues that can result in unplanned outages at the Waste Treatment Plant causing inconsistent operation. As the DOE moves toward a more active high level waste retrieval, the site engineers will be faced with increasing cross-site pipeline waste slurry transfers that will result in increased probability of a pipeline getting plugged. Hence, availability of a pipeline unplugging tool/technology is crucial to ensure smooth operation of the waste transfers and in ensuring tank farm cleanup milestones are met. FIU had earlier tested and evaluated various unplugging technologies through an industry call. Based on mockup testing, two technologies were identified that could withstand the rigors of operation in a radioactive environment and with the ability to handle sharp 90 elbows. We present results of the second phase of detailed testing and evaluation of pipeline unplugging technologies and the objective is to qualify these pipeline unplugging technologies for subsequent deployment at a DOE facility. The current phase of testing and qualification comprises of a heavily instrumented 3-inch diameter (full-scale) pipeline facilitating extensive data acquisition for design optimization and performance evaluation, as it applies to three types of plugs atypical of the DOE HLW waste. Furthermore, the data from testing at three different lengths of pipe in conjunction with the physics of the process will assist in modeling the unplugging phenomenon that will then be used to scale-up process parameters and system variables for longer and site typical pipe lengths, which can extend as much as up to 19,000 ft. Detailed information resulting from the testing will provide the DOE end-user with sufficient data and understanding of the technology, and its limitations to aid in the benefit-cost analysis for management decision whether to deploy the technology or to abandon the pipeline as has been done in the past. In conclusion: The ultimate objective of this study is to qualify NuVision's unplugging technology for use at Hanford. Experimental testing has been conducted using three pipeline lengths and three types of blockages. Erosion rates have been obtained and pressure data is being analyzed. An amplification of the inlet pressure has been observed along the pipeline and is the key to determining up to what pipe lengths the technology can be used without surpassing the site pressure limit. In addition, we will attempt to establish what the expected unplugging rates will be at the longer pipe lengths for each of the three blockages tested. Detailed information resulting from the testing will provide the DOE end-user with sufficient data and understanding of the technology, and its limitations so that management decisions can be made whether the technology has a reasonable chance to successfully unplug a pipeline, such as a cross site transfer line or process transfer pipeline at the Waste Treatment Plant. (authors)

  7. Detection of the internal corrosion in pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of the internal corrosion in pipeline. Hyeonbae Kang. In this talk I will explain our new methods to detect internal corrosions in pipelines.

  8. Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

  9. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

  10. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  11. The Energy Minimization Method: A Multiobjective Fitness Evaluation Technique and Its Application to the Production Scheduling in a Petroleum Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    to the Production Scheduling in a Petroleum Refinery Mayron Rodrigues de Almeida Slvio Hamacher Industrial applied to production scheduling of a petroleum refinery. The experimental results are presented of the method when applied to the production scheduling in a petroleum refinery. Section 5 discusses

  12. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  13. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  14. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  15. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

  16. Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines: Pipeline Transmission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pipping of GH2 Pipeline. Background: FG 64 built in 50ies, KP added in 70ies, active mining area over total length hpwgwquestissuescampbell.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  17. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) Pipe diameter sizes range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.). The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. An evaluation of potential repair methods clearly indicates that the project should continue to focus on the development of a repair process involving the use of GMAW welding and on the development of a repair process involving the use of fiber-reinforced composite liners.

  18. The LOFAR Transients Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swinbank, John D; Molenaar, Gijs J; Rol, Evert; Rowlinson, Antonia; Scheers, Bart; Spreeuw, Hanno; Bell, Martin E; Broderick, Jess W; Carbone, Dario; van der Horst, Alexander J; Law, Casey J; Wise, Michael; Breton, Rene P; Cendes, Yvette; Corbel, Stphane; Eislffel, Jochen; Falcke, Heino; Fender, Rob; Greimeier, Jean-Mathias; Hessels, Jason W T; Stappers, Benjamin W; Stewart, Adam J; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Wijnands, Rudy; Zarka, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissioned, low-frequency radio interferometer, based in the Netherlands and with stations across Europe. The identification of and response to transients is one of LOFAR's key science goals. However, the large data volumes which LOFAR produces, combined with the scientific requirement for rapid response, make automation essential. To support this, we have developed the LOFAR Transients Pipeline, or TraP. The TraP ingests multi-frequency image data from LOFAR or other instruments and searches it for transients and variables, providing automatic alerts of significant detections and populating a lightcurve database for further analysis by astronomers. Here, we discuss the scientific goals of the TraP and how it has been desig...

  19. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

  20. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

  1. About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This information product provides the interested reader with a broad and non-technical overview of how the U.S. natural gas pipeline network operates, along with some insights into the many individual pipeline systems that make up the network. While the focus of the presentation is the transportation of natural gas over the interstate and intrastate pipeline systems, information on subjects related to pipeline development, such as system design and pipeline expansion, are also included.

  2. Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warren R. U.S. interstate pipelines begin 1993 on upbeat. 66. ? True, Warren R. Current pipeline costs. Oil & GasWarren R. U.S. interstate pipelines ran more efficiently in

  4. Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Presentation by 03-Babu for the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

  5. Latinas Straddling the Prison Pipeline through Gender (Non) Conformity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraves, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the School-to-Prison Pipeline/Building Abolition Futures.rights/school-prison-pipeline Retrieved: September 12, 2014Chicano Educational Pipeline. New York: Routledge ------(

  6. The pipeline and future of drug development in schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, J A; Roth, B L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pipeline and Future of Drug Development in SchizophreniaThe Drug Discovery Pipeline in Schizophrenia Keywords:discuss the current pipeline of drugs for schizophrenia,

  7. Tank 48 - Chemical Destruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A.

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory-scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents.

  8. The Ashland tank collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokop, J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimated 3.9-million-gallon diesel oil spill from a collapsed storage tank at the Floreffe, Pa., terminal of Ashland Oil Co. has received a lot of attention, and for good reason. On Jan. 2, 1988 a 40-year-old, 48-ft-high, 120-ft-in diameter, reassembled tank suddenly ruptured and emptied its contents in a massive inland-water way fuel spill. An EPA-estimated 750,000 gallons washed over the 10-foot-high dike (with a holding capacity 110 percent that of the tank) into a drainage system on adjacent property to storm sewers that eventually empty into the Monongahela River, which runs into the Ohio River. More than 180,000 gal were recovered by cleanup, while 2.5 to 3.1 MMgal were contained by the tank farm's dike system.

  9. Storage Tanks (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters...

  10. PIPELINES AS COMMUNICATION NETWORK LINKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelvin T. Erickson; Ann Miller; E. Keith Stanek; C.H. Wu; Shari Dunn-Norman

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an investigation into two methods of using the natural gas pipeline as a communication medium. The work addressed the need to develop secure system monitoring and control techniques between the field and control centers and to robotic devices in the pipeline. In the first method, the pipeline was treated as a microwave waveguide. In the second method, the pipe was treated as a leaky feeder or a multi-ground neutral and the signal was directly injected onto the metal pipe. These methods were tested on existing pipeline loops at UMR and Batelle. The results reported in this report indicate the feasibility of both methods. In addition, a few suitable communication link protocols for this network were analyzed.

  11. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  12. Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

  13. Common Pipeline Carriers (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any entity that owns, operates, or manages a pipeline for the purpose of transporting crude petroleum, gas, coal, or carbon dioxide within or through the state of North Dakota, or is engaged in the...

  14. Pipeline Processing of VLBI Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Reynolds; Z. Paragi; M. Garrett

    2002-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an on-going effort to simplify the data analysis path for VLBI experiments, a pipeline procedure has been developed at JIVE to carry out much of the data reduction required for EVN experiments in an automated fashion. This pipeline procedure runs entirely within AIPS, the standard data reduction package used in astronomical VLBI, and is used to provide preliminary calibration of EVN experiments correlated at the EVN MkIV data processor. As well as simplifying the analysis for EVN users, the pipeline reduces the delay in providing information on the data quality to participating telescopes, hence improving the overall performance of the array. A description of this pipeline is presented here.

  15. Interstate Natural Gas Pipelines (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute confers upon the Iowa Utilities Board the authority to act as an agent of the federal government in determining pipeline company compliance with federal standards within the boundaries...

  16. Gas Pipelines, County Roads (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A contract with any Board of County Commissioners is required prior to the construction of a pipeline, conduit, or private drain across or along any county highway. The contract will include terms...

  17. Pipelines programming paradigms: Prefab plumbing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boeheim, C.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mastery of CMS Pipelines is a process of learning increasingly sophisticated tools and techniques that can be applied to your problem. This paper presents a compilation of techniques that can be used as a reference for solving similar problems

  18. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  19. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995 producer price, was approximately industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery production Reserves6 Reserve base6 1994

  20. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  1. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larrick, A.P.; Blackburn, L.D.; Brehm, W.F.; Carlos, W.C.; Hauptmann, J.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Danielson, M.J.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States); Foster, G.M. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.

  2. Network Connectivity and Price Convergency: Gas Pipeline Deregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convergence: Gas Pipeline Deregulation Arthur De Vany W.Price Convergence: Gas Pipeline Deregulation Arthur De Vany

  3. CO2 Reduction through Optimization of Steam Network in Petroleum Refineries: Evaluation of New Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K; Khodaie, H.; Amidpour, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam network of petroleum refinery is energy intensive, and consequently contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions. A simple model for the estimation of CO2 emissions associated with operation of steam network as encountered...

  4. SELECTED TOPICS in APPLIED COMPUTER SCIENCE Data Mining and Data Gathering in a Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoud Reza Saybani A; Teh Ying Wah B

    This article handles one of critical steps of data mining, which is data collection. It will show how the researcher could get access to the valuable data of a refinery. And it explains the procedures of refining criteria for data collection. It also briefly explains the oil refining procedures to make the concept of data gathering at the refinery easier to understand. Each manufacturing company has its own specifications and rules that are needed to be considered when collecting data. As such the result of data gathering is almost always different for different manufacturing companies. Key-Words: Data gathering, data collection, data mining, oil refinery Data mining algorithms play an important and successful role in many manufacturing companies including oil refineries. Profit management, quality and process control in

  5. Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NOx emissions while also generating electricity at an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented....

  6. CO2 Reduction through Optimization of Steam Network in Petroleum Refineries: Evaluation of New Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K; Khodaie, H.; Amidpour, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam network of petroleum refinery is energy intensive, and consequently contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions. A simple model for the estimation of CO2 emissions associated with operation of steam network as encountered...

  7. Single shell tank waste characterization for Tank 241-BX-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, K.L.

    1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the characterization information and interprets the data for Double-Shell Tank AP-102.

  8. Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Berthold

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

  9. Exergy Analysis of the Steam Network in Tehran Oil Refinery and Evaluation with New Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodaei, H.; Taheri, R.; Arghandeh, R.

    oil refinery, Exergy Analysis, Steam Network, Retrofit, Optimization 1. INTRODUCTION Refinery steam network is considered as a unit that consumes energy greatly. The main objective of the network is to produce the steam, which is required...) Using heat recovery steam generating systems and gas turbines instead of old boilers and so on. Figure 1 shows the opportunities of optimization in steam networks. in this paper, we complete the lost works such as optimization and estimation...

  10. Energy Efficient Refinery Process Developed with U.S. D.O.E. Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mings, W. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY EFFICIENT REFINERY PROCESS DEVELOPED WITH U.S. D.O.E. SUPPORT Walter J. Mings, P.E. EG&G Idaho, Inc. Idaho Falls, Idaho Abstract The United States Department of Energy histori cally has encouraged private efforts to develop en ergy... with potential for extensive industrial energy savings. INTRODUCTION An innovative energy saving refinery process (also called the catalytic distillation process) for pro ducing MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) was devel oped by two Houston companies...

  11. Affordability analysis of lead emission controls for a smelter-refinery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherer, T.M.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates the affordability and economic impact of additional control measures deemed necessary for a smelter-refinery to meet the lead emission standard. The emphasis in the analysis is on the impact of control costs on the smelter-refinery's profitability. The analysis was performed using control-cost data from two different lead-smelter studies in conjunction with other existing industry data.

  12. Technologies for the separation and recovery of hydrogen from refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcher, F.P.; Miller, G.Q.; Mitariten, M.J. [UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective use and recovery of hydrogen from the major hydrogen-containing streams in the refinery is an important strategy to meet the refining demands of the 1990`s. Hydrogen upgrading in refinery applications can be achieved by pressure swing adsorption (PSA), selective permeation using polymer membranes, and cryogenic separation. Each of these processes has different characteristics which are of advantage in different situations. Process selection and specific application examples are discussed.

  13. Method and system for pipeline communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson; John G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A pipeline communication system and method includes a pipeline having a surface extending along at least a portion of the length of the pipeline. A conductive bus is formed to and extends along a portion of the surface of the pipeline. The conductive bus includes a first conductive trace and a second conductive trace with the first and second conductive traces being adapted to conformally couple with a pipeline at the surface extending along at least a portion of the length of the pipeline. A transmitter for sending information along the conductive bus on the pipeline is coupled thereto and a receiver for receiving the information from the conductive bus on the pipeline is also couple to the conductive bus.

  14. TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

  15. Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil refinery Pipeline Storage Truck distribution Gas stationrefinery Pipeline Terminal storage Truck distribution Gas

  16. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  17. Computer Science and Information Technology Student Pipeline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Pipeline Program Description Los Alamos National Laboratory's High Performance Computing and Information Technology Divisions recruit and hire promising...

  18. NAZ EDUCATION PIPELINE the-naz.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    NAZ EDUCATION PIPELINE the-naz.org 1200 W. Broadway #250 | Minneapolis, MN 55411 | Family Academy is a foundational component of the NAZ "cradle to career" pipeline. NAZ families can enroll in the Family Academy college ready. Families and children move through a "cradle to career" pipeline that provides

  19. Modeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    -on-Chip design process. Many existing approaches employ a bottom-up approach to pipeline validation, where description language (ADL) constructs, and thus allows a powerful top-down approach to pipeline validationModeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications PRABHAT MISHRA and NIKIL DUTT University

  20. Stratification in hot water tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratification in a domestic hot water tank, used to increase system performance by enabling the solar collectors to operate under marginal conditions, is discussed. Data taken in a 120 gallon tank indicate that stratification can be achieved without any special baffling in the tank. (MJF)

  1. International Journal of Chemistry; 2013[02] ISSN 2306-6415 Preservation Ways and Energy Consumption in Oil Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Samimi

    Abstract: Preservation increase and energy return is one of the effective tools in saving. Studies show that energy consumption for each productive crude oil barred is dependence on the refinery complicated in reconfiguration of forge. Energy recovery increase in refinery over time that is due to economic factors like consumption fuel increase, it means that return increase is consistent with fuel price. It developed use of crude oil capability, distillation products in modern refinery. Modern refinery recovery dead to 10 to 15 % saving in energy consumption, Modern refinery.can developed energy return in several ways such as: Thermal exchange increase between processes streams, effective hydro exchange in process units, use of heaters with high thermal return and use of gas turbines with preheated air and produce steam of waste thermal. This paper investigates management ways and energy consumption recovery in different parts of oil refinery.

  2. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil refinery Pipeline Storage Truck distribution Gas stationOil refinery Pipeline Storage Truck distribution Gas stationrefinery Pipeline Terminal storage Truck distribution Gas

  3. Tanks focus area. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

  4. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank T-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remund, K.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Toth, J.J.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Ryan, F.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-T-102 (hereafter referred to as T-102) is a 530,000 gallon single-shell waste tank located in the 200 West T Tank farm at the Hanford Site. In 1993, two cores were taken from this tank and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory. Characterization of the waste in this tank was conducted to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank T-102 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks T-101 and T-103. During its process history, Tank T-102 received mostly Metal Waste (MW) from the Bismuth Phosphate Process and Coating Waste (CW) from the REDOX Process via the cascade from Tank T-101 and in transfers from Tank C-102. In 1956, the MW was removed from T-102 by pumping and sluicing`. This tank was declared inactive and retired from service in 1976. In 1981, intrusion prevention and stabilization measures were taken to isolate the waste in T-102. The tank presently contains approximately 121,100 liters (32,000 gallons) of liquid and sludge-like waste. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1993. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (>0.5 wt%) of the waste are water, aluminum, sodium, iron, and nitrate, ordered from the largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303).

  5. Cathodic protection retrofit of an offshore pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, R.H.; Holk, A.C. [Tenneco Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathodic protection (CP) anodes and corrosion coating on two offshore pipelines were damaged during deep water installation. In-situ methods for deep-water inspection and repair of the pipelines` CP and coating systems were developed and used. High-pressure natural gas Pipeline. A design was 5.6 miles of 8.625 in. OD by 0.406 in. W.T. API SL, Grade X-42, seamless line pipe. Pipeline B design was 0.3 miles of similar specification pipe. Both pipelines were mill-coated with 14 mil of fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) corrosion coating. Girth welds were field-coated with FBE.

  6. Chris Jesshope! 2. Pipelined and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesshope, Chris

    to sequential tasks: Op: A ; B ; C ; D A B C D Pipelined concurrency requires sequences of operations. Given Opi, 0in, we execute sub-tasks concurrently as follows: Opi: Ai+3||Bi+2||Ci+1||Di Ai+3 Bi+2 Ci+1 Di

  7. Overview of pipeline safety legislation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, J. [Caldwell and Associates, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipeline regulation in the US as it has been known since 1968 is being changed. Several major actions are occurring in Government that will redirect the focus of pipeline safety regulation and how it is carried out by government and industry. The Congress is proposing to accept risk management as away of regulation and requiring risk assessment and cost analysis on all regulatory requirements. The DOT/OPS is developing a risk-prioritization program for regulatory activities to be used in evaluating existing regulations to identify those that are obsolete and need modifying or eliminating. The pipeline industry is taking on a proactive role in working with Congress and DOT/OPS to develop this agenda. For the first time in the regulatory history of pipeline safety, Congress, DOT/OPS, and the industry are talking to each other and working toward a common goal of less regulation, more flexible regulation, and placing the responsibility for safety in the hands of the industry.

  8. Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

  9. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. REFEREED PAPER PRE-TREATMENT OF REFINERY FINAL RUN-OFF FOR CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh I; Stolz Hnp; Ndhlala T

    In the case of a back-end refinery, the final run-off or return syrup of 92-95 % purity and 75 brix is generally returned to the raw mill to be combined with raw syrup and boiled in the A-pans. Approximately 8 % of the input raw sugar brix into a refinery is returned, consequently locking up A-pan capacity and, in the case of a factory with marginal pan capacity, cane throughput is restricted. In addition, energy consumption is increased and sugar losses in final molasses are elevated. A number of processes have been considered to eliminate recycling refinery run-off, most of which require pre-treatment and/or high capital investment with a high degree of commercial risk. Test work was undertaken at the Tsb Malalane cane sugar refinery to determine the optimal pre-treatment option for decolorising and softening refinery return syrup. The pre-treatment results indicate that chemical softening, followed by the addition of a cationic colour precipitant and pH adjustment with sulphur dioxide, yields appreciable calcium reduction and modest decolourisation. The overall benefit indicates that the treated final run-off is of suitable quality to apply another crystallisation step and/or alternatively consider for further purification by chromatographic separation and/or resin decolourisation.

  11. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  12. Capsule injection system for a hydraulic capsule pipelining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Henry (Columbia, MO)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection system for injecting capsules into a hydraulic capsule pipelining system, the pipelining system comprising a pipeline adapted for flow of a carrier liquid therethrough, and capsules adapted to be transported through the pipeline by the carrier liquid flowing through the pipeline. The injection system comprises a reservoir of carrier liquid, the pipeline extending within the reservoir and extending downstream out of the reservoir, and a magazine in the reservoir for holding capsules in a series, one above another, for injection into the pipeline in the reservoir. The magazine has a lower end in communication with the pipeline in the reservoir for delivery of capsules from the magazine into the pipeline.

  13. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  14. Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Doe Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Meeting August 31, 2005 #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 2 Copyright: Air Liquide Transmission of Hydrogen --- 3 Copyright: #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 4 Copyright: 3. Special

  15. Equivalence Checking for Function Pipelining in Behavioral Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Fei

    on subtle design invariants. Function pipelining (a.k.a. system-level pipelining) is an important, correct-by-construction abstraction of function pipeline; thus, instead of developing pipelineEquivalence Checking for Function Pipelining in Behavioral Synthesis Kecheng Hao, Sandip Ray

  16. TSNo s02-roberts104537-O Microscopic and Spectroscopic Speciation of Ni in Soils in the Vicinity of a Ni Refinery.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    in the Vicinity of a Ni Refinery. abstract Accurately predicting the fate and bioavailability of metals in smelter REFINERY ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings - October 21 - 25, 2001 - Charlotte, NC #12;

  17. Analytic prognostic for petrochemical pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaoude, Abdo Abou; El-Tawil, Khaled; Noura, Hassan; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipelines tubes are part of vital mechanical systems largely used in petrochemical industries. They serve to transport natural gases or liquids. They are cylindrical tubes and are submitted to the risks of corrosion due to high PH concentrations of the transported liquids in addition to fatigue cracks due to the alternation of pressure-depression of gas along the time, initiating therefore in the tubes body micro-cracks that can propagate abruptly to lead to failure. The development of the prognostic process for such systems increases largely their performance and their availability, as well decreases the global cost of their missions. Therefore, this paper deals with a new prognostic approach to improve the performance of these pipelines. Only the first mode of crack, that is, the opening mode, is considered.

  18. Analytic prognostic for petrochemical pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo Abou Jaoude; Seifedine Kadry; Khaled El-Tawil; Hassan Noura; Mustapha Ouladsine

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipelines tubes are part of vital mechanical systems largely used in petrochemical industries. They serve to transport natural gases or liquids. They are cylindrical tubes and are submitted to the risks of corrosion due to high PH concentrations of the transported liquids in addition to fatigue cracks due to the alternation of pressure-depression of gas along the time, initiating therefore in the tubes body micro-cracks that can propagate abruptly to lead to failure. The development of the prognostic process for such systems increases largely their performance and their availability, as well decreases the global cost of their missions. Therefore, this paper deals with a new prognostic approach to improve the performance of these pipelines. Only the first mode of crack, that is, the opening mode, is considered.

  19. Potentials for fuel cells in refineries and chlor-alkali plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. the most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

  20. Flow of suspensions in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Laboratory R& D Center, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slurry pipelines are used in many industrial applications. Several parameters are often needed by the operator, including critical deposit velocity, solids concentration, and particle velocity profiles. This chapter first reviews important formulas used to predict critical deposit velocity both in Newtonian and non-Newtonian (power-law) carrier fluids. Various methods to measure local velocity and solids concentration profiles in slurry pipelines are discussed. Local solids concentration can be measured by sample withdrawal technique. However, the sample should be withdrawn at isokinetic conditions. Sampling downstream of tees and elbows can result in significant errors in measuring solids concentration. Gamma-ray absorption methods can be used; however, two scans are needed to obtain local solids concentration. Bulk velocity of conductive slurries can be obtained using magnetic flow meters mounted on a vertical section of the pipe. Local particle velocity can be obtained using conductivity probes. NMR methods can be used to measure concentration and particle velocity profiles but are limited to small-diameter pipes. Vertical solids concentration of coarse slurries flowing in a horizontal pipeline exhibits a positive gradient near the bottom of the pipe. Traditional models to predict these profiles are given, and new mathematical models and computer software to determine these profiles are introduced. 104 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Exotic drilling: contractor drills pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McReynolds, L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling of pipelines has been technologically developed for applications such as river crossings, tunnelling through tar-sand or oil-shale strata for more effective in situ combustion production projects, and drilling inside rather than through heavy oil pays to create extensive horizontal well bores suitable for steam heating the formation. The horizontal drilling concept for river crossing involves installation of pipelines in an inverted arc 25 to 100 ft below a river bed. The directional control required to produce a curved hole is maintained by rotating the bit without rotating the pipe. When the drill string is activated by a forward thrust, it creates a reactive subsurface pressure against the front surface of the bent sub, thus causing the bend. The bit then deviates in the direction of the bend. Little disruption of the environment occurs, and the directionally drilled crossings offer improved pipeline security, maintenance of year-round construction schedules, easier permitting, no navigational hazards or interruption for waterway traffic, elimination of bank restoration costs and most repair costs, and a maintenance-free crossing section.

  2. Methods applied to investigate the major VCE that occured in the TOTAL refinery's Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit at La Mede,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    95-35 Methods applied to investigate the major ?VCE that occured in the TOTAL refinery's Fluid.V.C.E, occured in the Gas Plant of the TOTAL refinery's Fluid Catalytic Cracking ünit at La Mede, France

  3. DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    948744369 GoalCharter: Identify key issues, including R&D needs, regulations, codes and standards, and a path forward to enable the deployment of hydrogen storage tanks...

  4. Underground Storage Tanks (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule governs the construction, installation, upgrading, use, maintenance, testing, and closure of underground storage tanks, including certification requirements for individuals who install,...

  5. Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and...

  6. The inspection of a radiologically contaminated pipeline using a teleoperated pipe crawler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogle, R.F.; Kuelske, K.; Kellner, R.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1950s, the Savannah River Site built an open, unlined retention basin to temporarily store potentially radionuclide contaminated cooling water from a chemical separations process and storm water drainage from a nearby waste management facility that stored large quantities of nuclear fission byproducts in carbon steel tanks. The retention basin was retired from service in 1972 when a new, lined basin was completed. In 1978, the old retention basin was excavated, backfilled with uncontaminated dirt, and covered with grass. At the same time, much of the underground process pipeline leading to the basin was abandoned. Since the closure of the retention basin, new environmental regulations require that the basin undergo further assessment to determine whether additional remediation is required. A visual and radiological inspection of the pipeline was necessary to aid in the remediation decision making process for the retention basin system. A teleoperated pipe crawler inspection system was developed to survey the abandoned sections of underground pipelines leading to the retired retention basin. This paper will describe the background to this project, the scope of the investigation, the equipment requirements, and the results of the pipeline inspection.

  7. Design Improvements and Analysis of Innovative High-Level Waste Pipeline Unplugging Technologies - 12171

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribanic, Tomas; Awwad, Amer; Crespo, Jairo; McDaniel, Dwayne; Varona, Jose; Gokaltun, Seckin; Roelant, David [Florida International University, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transferring high-level waste (HLW) between storage tanks or to treatment facilities is a common practice performed at the Department of Energy (DoE) sites. Changes in the chemical and/or physical properties of the HLW slurry during the transfer process may lead to the formation of blockages inside the pipelines resulting in schedule delays and increased costs. To improve DoE's capabilities in the event of a pipeline plugging incident, FIU has continued to develop two novel unplugging technologies: an asynchronous pulsing system and a peristaltic crawler. The asynchronous pulsing system uses a hydraulic pulse generator to create pressure disturbances at two opposite inlet locations of the pipeline to dislodge blockages by attacking the plug from both sides remotely. The peristaltic crawler is a pneumatic/hydraulic operated crawler that propels itself by a sequence of pressurization/depressurization of cavities (inner tubes). The crawler includes a frontal attachment that has a hydraulically powered unplugging tool. In this paper, details of the asynchronous pulsing system's ability to unplug a pipeline on a small-scale test-bed and results from the experimental testing of the second generation peristaltic crawler are provided. The paper concludes with future improvements for the third generation crawler and a recommended path forward for the asynchronous pulsing testing. (authors)

  8. EVALUATION OF THE SACCHAROFLEX 2000 REFLECTANCE MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR REFINED SUGAR COLOUR ESTIMATION AT HULETTS REFINERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Moodley; N K Padayachee; V Govender

    Due to the successful use of the Saccharoflex 2000 reflectance measurement instrument on the estimation of refined sugar colour elsewhere in the world, it was decided by Tongaat-Hulett Sugar to evaluate the instrument at the refinery in Durban. Tests were carried out on first, second, third and fourth refined sugars, the results of which showed a good correlation between the ICUMSA colour measurement and the reflectance reading obtained from the Saccharoflex 2000. The instrument offers a number of advantages, the main one being that a refined sugar colour value can be obtained in less than a minute. The refinery has therefore purchased one for process control.

  9. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and Issues: World refinery production of germanium remained steady in 2000. The recycling of scrap continued

  10. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  11. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. The refinery in Oklahoma doubled its production

  12. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refineries in New York and Oklahoma and set up in New York. The refinery in Oklahoma expanded, and a new secondary facility was built in North

  13. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  14. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12;73 GERMANIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: World refinery production

  15. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and chemotherapy), 5%. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production, refinery 13,000 10

  16. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  17. Virginia Natural Gas's Hampton Roads Pipeline Crossing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meetingcovers Virginia Natural Gas's (VNG's) pipeline project at Hampton Roads Crossing (HRX).

  18. Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Siting Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes a centralized and coordinated permitting process for the location of natural gas transmission pipeline corridors and the construction and maintenance of natural gas...

  19. Acoustic system for communication in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, II, Louis Peter (San Ramon, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for communication in a pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid. The system includes an encoding and transmitting sub-system connected to the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes that transmits a signal in the frequency range of 3-100 kHz into the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid, and a receiver and processor sub-system connected to the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid that receives said signal and uses said signal for a desired application.

  20. GLAST (FERMI) Data-Processing Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flath, Daniel L.; Johnson, Tony S.; Turri, Massimiliano; Heidenreich, Karen A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Data Processing Pipeline ('Pipeline') has been developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) which launched June 11, 2008. It generically processes graphs of dependent tasks, maintaining a full record of its state, history and data products. The Pipeline is used to automatically process the data down-linked from the satellite and to deliver science products to the GLAST collaboration and the Science Support Center and has been in continuous use since launch with great success. The pipeline handles up to 2000 concurrent jobs and in reconstructing science data produces approximately 750GB of data products using 1/2 CPU-year of processing time per day.

  1. Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

  2. Illinois Gas Pipeline Safety Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Standards established under this Act may apply to the design, installation, inspection, testing, construction, extension, operation, replacement, and maintenance of pipeline facilities. Whenever...

  3. Pipelines and Underground Gas Storage (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules apply to intrastate transport of natural gas and other substances via pipeline, as well as underground gas storage facilities. The construction and operation of such infrastructure...

  4. Petroleum Pipeline Eminent Domain Permit Procedures (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Petroleum Pipeline Eminent Domain Permit Procedures serve to protect Georgia's natural and environmental resources by requiring permits be issued by the Director of the Environmental Protection...

  5. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Strategic Initiatives, and Infrastructure Technologies Program #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 2 Copyright: Design & Operation development) #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 3 Copyright: Future H2 Infrastructure Wind Powered

  6. A feminist perspective on the school-to-labor pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hextrum, Kirsten

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the School-to-Labor Pipeline Collins, P. (1986) Learningon the School-to-Labor Pipeline Leonardo, Z. (2010).on the School-to-Labor Pipeline Kirsten Hextrum 1 University

  7. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung-Hou

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results Sung-Hou Kim*,~500 genes, respectively). Pipeline: To achieve our mission,determination. Over all pipeline schemes for the single-path

  8. Tank closure reducing grout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  9. Trenches Under The Pipeline: The Educational Trajectories of Chicano Male Continuation High School Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malagon, Maria

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trenches Under The Pipeline: The Educational Trajectories ofnavigate the educational pipeline, continuation high school

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06)Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About

  11. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms- November 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades

  12. Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New underground storage tank construction standards must include at least the following requirements: (1) That an underground storage tank will prevent releases of regulated substances stored...

  13. Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Project Objectives: To gain basic understanding of...

  14. Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study - Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Section 243 Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline...

  15. argentinian pipeline enlargement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 25 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  16. acicular ferrite pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 18 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  17. automatic pipeline monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 67 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  18. alaska gas pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ROW Lower South Carolina Electric and Gas University of South Carolina Praxair Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group 4 A moving horizon solution to the gas pipeline...

  19. alaska pipeline system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 93 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  20. automatic pipeline analysing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 45 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  1. annotation pipelines differences: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 73 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  2. arctic gas pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ROW Lower South Carolina Electric and Gas University of South Carolina Praxair Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group 3 A moving horizon solution to the gas pipeline...

  3. arctic gas pipelines: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ROW Lower South Carolina Electric and Gas University of South Carolina Praxair Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group 3 A moving horizon solution to the gas pipeline...

  4. alaska highway pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 45 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  5. areas osbra pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate 16 Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

  6. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems- Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen. Design and operations standards and materials for hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  7. Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed Gas Service Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed...

  8. Energy Department Moves Forward on Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    guarantee program to encourage the construction of a pipeline that will bring Alaskan natural gas to the continental United States. The pipeline will provide access to Alaska's...

  9. Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

  10. Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science Presentation by 04-Adams to DOE Hydrogen...

  11. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Overview and Links

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Overview and Links About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Regional Overviews and Links to Pipeline...

  12. Harmonic distortion correction in pipelined analog to digital converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panigada, Andrea

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background Correction of Harmonic Distortion in PipelinedBackground Correction of Harmonic Distortion in PipelinedADC with 69dB SNDR Enabled by Digital Harmonic Distortion

  13. Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

  14. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  15. Energy Guideline Factors Provide a Better Measure of Refinery Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libbers, D. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exxon Company, U.S.A. refineries reduced energy consumption by 25% between 1972 and 1978 compared with an 18% reduction for the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry over the same period. The Exxon approach to conserving energy in petroleum refining...

  16. THE NEW GASIFICATION PROJECT AT ENI SANNAZZARO REFINERY AND ITS INTEGRATION WITH A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mwe Power Plant; Guido Collodi; Dario Camozzi; Snamprogetti Italy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the new regulation introduced in Europe in the last years, defining more stringent limits for the emissions to the atmosphere, the necessity to find an alternative use for the fuel oil has created a new challenge for the refineries. At the same time the need to improve the Italian power production has pushed Eni, the Italian energy company, to enter the electricity market.

  17. Getting it right at Catlettsburg: How Ashland Petroleum`s flagship refinery transformed itself

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitt, R.E.; Kennison, R.H.M.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life has its surprises. In the midst of the pain and excitement of a massive organizational overhaul, Ashland Petroleum`s Catlettsburg refinery--a 220,000-b/d facility in Ashland, Ky.,--experienced an unplanned cracker shutdown, a few production mishaps, a two-week employee walk-out, and belt-tightening necessitated by competitive pressures. Yet, despite these adverse circumstances, the Catlettsburg Refinery Initiative (CRI), a 20-month effort that shifted from planning to implementation in October 1995, yielded remarkable results. By 1996, the refinery began achieving record levels of through-put with lower maintenance costs, increasing company profitability by about 15% in the first half of 1996, over the same period in 1995. In a post-initiative survey, refinery employees expressed enthusiam for the changes and their new work-roles. A number of factors converged to give the initiative drive and direction: a pervasive discomfort with the status quo, a determination by top management to make fundamental changes, a commitment to rapid implementation and effective use of an outside consultant. But above all, success at Catlettsburg was a result of a grassroots approach to the process of change.

  18. Application and Operation of a 2-MW Organic Rankine Cycle System on a Refinery FCC Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, R. L.

    The nation's largest organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system was started up in July 1984 at a West Coast oil refinery. The system includes two hermetically sealed turbine-generator units, each rated at 1070 kW. Each turbine...

  19. Restoration of Refinery Heaters Using the Technique of Prefabricated Ceramic Fiber Lined Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sento, H. D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refinery heater fuel requirements often represent 50% of a units operating cost. A one percent change in the efficiency of a heater firing 100 MBtu/hr amounts to more than $25,000 per year. Heater efficiency is influenced by casing hot spots, air...

  20. Reducing Power Dissipation in Pipelined Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Reducing Power Dissipation in Pipelined Accumulators Gian Carlo Cardarilli(1), Alberto Nannarelli(2 Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark Abstract-- Fast accumulation is required). Accumulators nec- essary for DDFS are then deeply pipelined down to the bit-level with two main consequences

  1. Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 are representative of hydrogen pipeline costs; 10 percent added to unit hydrogen costs as a contingency Better-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland #12;2 Hydrogen Liquefaction Basic process Compress Cool to temperature

  2. Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K. [Inst. for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

    1997-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

  3. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  4. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  5. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKeen, R.G. [Alliance for Transportation Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option.

  6. Pipeline Decommissioning Trial AWE Berkshire UK - 13619

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, Kieran [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Paper details the implementation of a 'Decommissioning Trial' to assess the feasibility of decommissioning the redundant pipeline operated by AWE located in Berkshire UK. The paper also presents the tool box of decommissioning techniques that were developed during the decommissioning trial. Constructed in the 1950's and operated until 2005, AWE used a pipeline for the authorised discharge of treated effluent. Now redundant, the pipeline is under a care and surveillance regime awaiting decommissioning. The pipeline is some 18.5 km in length and extends from AWE site to the River Thames. Along its route the pipeline passes along and under several major roads, railway lines and rivers as well as travelling through woodland, agricultural land and residential areas. Currently under care and surveillance AWE is considering a number of options for decommissioning the pipeline. One option is to remove the pipeline. In order to assist option evaluation and assess the feasibility of removing the pipeline a decommissioning trial was undertaken and sections of the pipeline were removed within the AWE site. The objectives of the decommissioning trial were to: - Demonstrate to stakeholders that the pipeline can be removed safely, securely and cleanly - Develop a 'tool box' of methods that could be deployed to remove the pipeline - Replicate the conditions and environments encountered along the route of the pipeline The onsite trial was also designed to replicate the physical prevailing conditions and constraints encountered along the remainder of its route i.e. working along a narrow corridor, working in close proximity to roads, working in proximity to above ground and underground services (e.g. Gas, Water, Electricity). By undertaking the decommissioning trial AWE have successfully demonstrated the pipeline can be decommissioned in a safe, secure and clean manor and have developed a tool box of decommissioning techniques. The tool box of includes; - Hot tapping - a method of breaching the pipe while maintaining containment to remove residual liquids, - Crimp and shear - remote crimping, cutting and handling of pipe using the excavator - Pipe jacking - a way of removing pipes avoiding excavations and causing minimal disturbance and disruption. The details of the decommissioning trial design, the techniques employed, their application and effectiveness are discussed and evaluated here in. (authors)

  7. Rotary Pipeline Processors Simon Moore, Peter Robinson, Steve Wilcox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Peter

    to the current range of superscalar designs using multiple instruction issue into parallel pipelines to increase] is designed around a bi-directional pipeline carry- ing instructions and arguments in one direction it will start to execute as soon as the data arrives. 2.2 Basic Pipeline Construction A rotary pipeline

  8. Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A company that has manufactured geared systems for the M1 Abrams tank for more than 20 years is now part of the forces working toward energy security and independence.

  9. Improvement in LNG storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop and produce natural gas fuel tanks for medium duty truck and transit bus end-use to overcome the weight and range problems inherent in current fuel systems.

  10. Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DANNA, M.A.

    2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The TSRs define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), in parallel with the DSA.

  11. Evolving Robocode Tank Jacob Eisenstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Evolving Robocode Tank Fighters Jacob Eisenstein AI Memo 2003-023 October 2003 © 2 0 0 3 m into things hurts. FANTASY · Sensors and actuators are noiseless. · Radar sensor detects velocity, bearing

  12. Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks Dane A. Boysen, PhD Program Director Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, US DOE dane.boysen@doe.gov Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite...

  13. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Refinery Gas Other PetroleumPipelines. All still gas/refinery gas in China is reportedlubricants petroleum coke refinery feedstock still gas/

  14. The Construction and Maintenance Plan for a Grand Banks Multi-Purpose Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Steve

    ;Pipeline Repair Protocol 1 Leak detection and compressor shut down 2 Damage location 3 Excavate pipe 4 Murdoch Gorm Dunkirk Existing Gas Pipeline Proposed Gas Pipeline Existing Oil Pipeline 20" 30" 36" (2) 40 Gas Pipeline Proposed Gas Pipeline Existing Oil Pipeline 20" 30" 36" (2) 40" 40" 28" 42" 36" 40" 30

  15. Cathodic protection retrofit of an offshore pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, R.H.; Holk, A.C. [Tenneco Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cathodic protection anodes and corrosion coating on two 8-inch (203.2 mm) outside diameter (O.D.) offshore pipelines were damaged during deep water ({minus}380 feet, {minus}116 m) installation. In-situ methods for deep water inspection and repair of the pipelines` cathodic protection and coating systems were developed and performed. Methods are described in which underwater anode retrofits were performed and friction welding technology was used to re-attach anode leads. Standard procedures for underwater pipeline coating repair and remediation of damaged line pipe are provided.

  16. New regulatory environment changing pipeline operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, J.H. (Northwest Pipeline Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the effects of deregulation of the natural gas and pipeline industry as a result of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Orders 436, 500, and 636. It describes the changes as they affected Northwest Pipeline's structure and marketing strategies as the company had to move from a gas merchandiser to a gas transporter. It describes the capacity release options of the pipeline which allow the customers to buy, release, and renegotiate prices whenever they need to because of an increase or decrease in demand using current market prices. The paper discusses the natural gas distribution system which has evolved as a result of these regulations.

  17. Regulation changes create opportunities for pipeline manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santon, J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Research and Special Programs Administration (RSPA) is proposing to change its safety standards for the repair of corroded or damaged steel pipe in gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. For pipeline operators, the expected revisions will allow new flexibility in approaches to pipeline repair. Less costly and less disruptive procedures will be acceptable. For manufacturers, the changes will open opportunities for development of corrosion repair technology. A highly competitive market in new repair technology can be expected to arise. Current regulations, new technologies, and proposed safety standards are described.

  18. EIS-0433: Keystone XL Pipeline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The proposed Keystone XL project consists of a 1,700-mile crude oil pipeline and related facilities that would primarily be used to transport Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin crude oil from an oil supply hub in Alberta, Canada to delivery points in Oklahoma and Texas. This EIS, prepared by the Department of State, evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed Keystone XL project. DOEs Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, has jurisdiction over certain proposed transmission facilities (construction and operation of a short 230-kv transmission line and construction of a new substation). The State Department published a notice in the Federal Register on February 3, 2012, regarding the denial of the Keystone XL presidential permit (77 FR 5614).

  19. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  20. Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

    A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver...

  1. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

  2. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of the contract, the focus remains on the RTIEE.

  3. Pipeline Access and Market Integration in the Natural Gas Industry: Evidence from Cointegration Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System for Natural Gas Pipelines." Study prepared underin the Natural Gas Pipeline Industry. Ph.D. dissertation,the remaining barfers to pipeline integration. REFERENCES

  4. Stuck in the Pipeline: A Critical Review of STEM Workforce Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalf, Heather

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and science careers: Leaky pipeline or gender filter? GenderL. (2006). Expanding the pipeline: Transforming the cultureThe incredible shrinking pipeline. Inroads: SIGCE Bulletin,

  5. Applications of the pipeline environment for visual informatics and genomics computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. : Applications of the pipeline environment for visualusing the LONI pipeline. Frontiers in Neuroinformatics 2010,Access Applications of the pipeline environment for visual

  6. BS-Seeker2: a versatile aligning pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RL: MethylCoder: software pipeline for bisulfite-treateda versatile aligning pipeline for bisulfite sequencing dataof BS Seeker, as a full pipeline for mapping bisulfite

  7. A Crack in the Pipeline: Why Female Underrepresented Racial Minority Students Leave Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez-Akim, Jenn

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Espinosa, Lorelle L. (2011). Pipelines and pathways: womenAngeles A Crack in the Pipeline: Why Female UnderrepresentedA Crack in the Pipeline: Why Female Underrepresented Racial

  8. GenePRIMP: A GENE PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Prokaryotic genomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pati, Amrita

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Amrita Pati 1 , NataliaGene Prediction IMprovement Pipeline, http://geneprimp.jgi-based post-processing pipeline that identifies erroneously

  9. Rnnotator: an automated de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from stranded RNA-Seq reads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transcriptome assembly pipeline from stranded RNA-Seq readsRnnotator assembly pipeline. Figure 2. Read dereplicationan automated software pipeline that generates transcript

  10. Applications of the Pipeline Environment for Visual Informatics and Genomics Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. : Applications of the pipeline environment for visualusing the LONI pipeline. Frontiers in Neuroinformatics 2010,Access Applications of the pipeline environment for visual

  11. Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs: Economic Challenges and Returns to Changing Demographics in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, Jon; Brady, Henry

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Multiple Pathways Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs:Jon Stiles & Henry Brady Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs:of the educational pipeline to describe how students

  12. Efficient, distributed and interactive neuroimaging data analysis using the LONI Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. W. (2003). The LONI pipeline process- ing environment.in Neuroinformatics LONI Pipeline Thompson, P. M. (2006).provenance using the LONI pipeline workfl ow environment.

  13. Evaluation of Tank 241-T-111 Level Data and In-Tank Video Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schofield, John S. [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (United States); Feero, Amie J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the status of tank T-111 as of January 1, 2014 and estimates a leak rate and post-1994 leak volume for the tank.

  14. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  15. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  16. 241-AP Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AP tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AP tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AP tank farm, the sixth double-shell tank farm constructed, tank bottom flatness, refractory material quality, post-weld stress relieving, and primary tank bottom weld rejection were improved.

  17. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., t

  18. Experience with pipelined multiple instruction streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordon, H.F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipelining has been used to implement efficient, high-speed vector computers. It is also an effective method for implementing multiprocessors. The Heterogeneous Element Processor (HEP) built by Denelcor Incorporated is the first commercially available computer system to use pipelining to implement multiple processes. This paper introduces the architecture and programming environment of the HEP and surveys a range of scientific applications programs for which parallel versions have been produced, tested, and analyzed on this computer. In all cases, the ideal of one instruction completion every pipeline step time is closely approached. Speed limitations in the parallel programs are more often a result of the extra code necessary to ensure synchronization than of actual synchronization lockout at execution time. The pipelined multiple instruction stream architecture is shown to cover a wide range of applications with good utilization of the parallel hardware.

  19. Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Vikram

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research presents procedures for exploitation of level sensitive latches in wire pipelining. The user gives a Steiner tree, having a signal source and set of destination or sinks, and the location in rectangular plane, capacitive load...

  20. Pipeline Politics: Natural Gas in Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landrum, William W.; Llewellyn, Benjamin B.; Limesand, Craig M.; Miller, Dante J.; Morris, James P.; Nowell, Kathleen S.; Sherman, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    important to US efforts to reduce its reliance on Middle Eastern energy resources. Presently, pipelines in Eurasia stretch across thousands of miles throughout unstable political regions. Disruptions in gas and oil supplies negatively affect the economies...

  1. Natural Pipeline of America Check Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An archaeological investigation of approximately 1000 feet of a proposed 22,000 foot natural gas pipeline in southeastern Orange County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates of Bryan, Texas in August 2001. No archaeological sites...

  2. On-the-fly pipeline parallelism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, I-Ting Angelina

    Pipeline parallelism organizes a parallel program as a linear sequence of s stages. Each stage processes elements of a data stream, passing each processed data element to the next stage, and then taking on a new element ...

  3. A Pipeline for Computational Historical Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;A Pipeline for Computational Historical Linguistics Lydia Steiner Bioinformatics Group of computational methods. In the biological context, computational methods play a dominating role due, Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics, University of Leipzig Peter F. Stadler Bioinformatics Group

  4. Refinery fuel oxygenates in view of the complex model for reformulated gasline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.D.; Haelsig, C.P. [Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final version of the Complex Model for reformulated gasoline (RFG) has now been issued with some surprising features that will significantly affect refinery fuel oxygenates planning. These include the following: (1) The only oxygenates included in the model are MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and Ethanol. (2) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME are significantly more effective for reduction of air toxics emissions than Ethanol and ETBE. (3) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME typically produce about equal reduction in air toxics emissions at the same RFG oxygen content. Although gasoline certification by the Complex Model is optional prior to 1998, after 1998 it will be mandatory for both reformulated and conventional gasolines. This paper considers refinery oxygenates production in view of these features of the Complex Model for RFG, basing the discussion on 2.0 weight percent oxygen content for RFG.

  5. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  6. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  7. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  8. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  9. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

  10. ,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant StocksPetroleum

  11. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Fang Z. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  12. In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

  13. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

  14. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  15. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania Production, refinery 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000 22,000e Total imports 14,700 16,200 27,500 23,700 20

  16. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, refinery 10,000 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000e Total imports 15,000 15,000 16,000 27,000 17,0001 Exports NA

  17. Report of the Committee on oil pipeline regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety, interpretations of FERC Opinion 154-B, and a variation on the theme of oil pipeline deregulation were the significant developments affecting oil pipelines in the year 1991 and early 1992. The introduction of amendments to the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act will result in Department of Transportation Regulations concerning in-depth reporting requirements of pipeline incidents and more frequent testing procedures to insure the safety of the pipeline. In November, 1991, Congressman Synar introduced a bill to streamline Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) procedures concerning oil pipelines.

  18. Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamberd, D.L.

    1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

  19. Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1CFostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility Ryan Haerer, Program Analyst, Alternative Fuels, Office of Underground Storage Tanks, Environmental Protection Agency

  20. TANK SPACE ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TURNER DA; KIRCH NW; WASHENFELDER DJ; SCHAUS PS; WODRICH DD; WIEGMAN SA

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the projected shortfall of double-shell tank (DST) space starting in 2018. Using a multi-variant methodology, a total of eight new-term options and 17 long-term options for recovering DST space were evaluated. These include 11 options that were previously evaluated in RPP-7702, Tank Space Options Report (Rev. 1). Based on the results of this evaluation, two near-term and three long-term options have been identified as being sufficient to overcome the shortfall of DST space projected to occur between 2018 and 2025.

  1. DOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Composite Tank ProgramComposite Tank Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Gas Outlet SolenoidDOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Composite Tank ProgramComposite Tank Program Dr. Neel Sirosh DIRECTOR materials, design, process to improve weight efficiency (5,000 psi tanks) · Develop & validate

  2. The Fuel Tank Consider a cylindrical fuel tank of radius r and length L, that is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Joel

    The Fuel Tank Question Consider a cylindrical fuel tank of radius r and length L, that is lying on its side. Suppose that fuel is being pumped into the tank at a rate q. At what rate is the fuel level rising? r L Solution Here is an end view of the tank. The shaded part of the circle is filled with fuel

  3. Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the definition of HLW from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA). The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act by the disposal regulations; or #12;Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 2 (C) waste that the Nuclear 10, Code of Federal Regulations. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 U.S.C. 10101

  4. Tank Characterization Report for Single Shell Tank 241-U-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-U-103. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-15B.

  5. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration--Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Strickland, Christopher E.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim barrier on the surface. Such a barrier is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. A plan has been prepared to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barrier. Soil water content and water pressure will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests were installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, four heat-dissipation units, and a drain gauge to measure soil water flux. A meteorological station has been installed outside of the fence. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests are planned to be installed beneath the proposed barrier.

  6. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier DemonstrationVadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank of the 241-T Tank Farm in 1973. Five tanks are assumed to have leaked in the TY Farm. Many of the contaminants from those leaks still reside within the vadose zone within the T and TY Tank Farms. The Department of Energys Office of River Protection seeks to minimize the movement of these contaminant plumes by placing interim barriers on the ground surface. Such barriers are expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plumes and moving them further. The soil water regime is monitored to determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barriers. Soil-water content and water pressure are monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. Four instrument nests were installed in the T Farm in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2007; two nests were installed in the TY Farm in FY2010. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, and four heat-dissipation units. A meteorological station has been installed at the north side of the fence of the T Farm. This document summarizes the monitoring methods, the instrument calibration and installation, and the vadose zone monitoring plan for interim barriers in T farm and TY Farm.

  7. Global Intermodal Tank Container Management for the Chemical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erera, Alan

    transport multiple cargoes. Tank containers, also referred to as ISO tanks, intermodal tanks, or IMOGlobal Intermodal Tank Container Management for the Chemical Industry Alan L. Erera, Juan C on asset management problems faced by tank container operators, and formulates an operational tank

  8. Hanford Communities Issue Briefing on Tank Farms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Office of River Protection representatives Stacy Charboneau (Deputy Manager) and Tom Fletcher (Tank Farms Assistant Manager) and Washington State Department of Ecology's Suzanne Dahl (Tank Waste Section Manager) discuss Hanford's complex tank waste retrieval mission with members of the community.

  9. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

  10. A Cheap Levitating Gas/Load Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of new cheap aerial pipelines, a large flexible tube deployed at high altitude, for delivery of natural (fuel) gas, water and other payload over a long distance is delineated. The main component of the natural gas is methane which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg (1 pound). The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in air at high altitude and, as such, does not damage the environment. Using the lift force of this pipeline and wing devices payloads of oil, water, or other fluids, or even solids such as coal, cargo, passengers can be delivered cheaply at long distance. This aerial pipeline dramatically decreases the cost and the time of construction relative to conventional pipelines of steel which saves energy and greatly lowers the capital cost of construction. The article contains a computed project for delivery 24 billion cubic meters of gas and tens of million tons of oil, water or other payload per year.

  11. A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healey, Christopher G.

    A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

  12. api pipeline conference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of both pipelining methods. We applied our method to 1-bit and 2-bit adder Ha, Dong S. 7 Hydrogen Pipeline Material Testing We provide critical data, measurement methods and...

  13. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2015 1:45:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9102CN2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

  14. Some applications of pipelining techniques in parallel scientific computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Yuanhua

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study the applicability of pipelining techniques to the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. General principles for pipelining techniques are discussed and two applications, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization...

  15. Statistical Modeling of Corrosion Failures in Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobanoglu, Mustafa Murat

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas pipelines are a critical component of the U.S. energy infrastructure. The safety of these pipelines plays a key role for the gas industry. Therefore, the understanding of failure characteristics and their consequences are very important...

  16. Statistical Modeling of Corrosion Failures in Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobanoglu, Mustafa Murat

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and deterioration processes in pipeline networks. Therefore, pipeline operators need to rethink their corrosion prevention strategies. These results of corrosion failures are forcing the companies to develop accurate maintenance models based on failure frequency...

  17. Some applications of pipelining techniques in parallel scientific computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Yuanhua

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study the applicability of pipelining techniques to the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. General principles for pipelining techniques are discussed and two applications, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization...

  18. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues The United States has 11...

  19. Altamont gas pipeline project delayed 1 year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Altamont Gas Transmission Co. will delay laying a 30 in., 620 mile pipeline to deliver Canadian gas to California until markets become more responsive. This paper reports that the decision will delay until November 1994 completion of the proposed 719 MMcfd, $612 million line. The original schedule called for construction to begin in spring 1993 with an in-service date of late 1993. Altamont pipeline is to transport gas from the US-Canadian border at Port of Wild Horse, Mont., to Opal, Wyo., where it will interconnect with the Kern River Transmission Co. pipeline to California. Altamont has obtained all regulatory approvals for its project. Altamont the project sponsors Tenneco Gas, Amoco Corp., and Entech Inc. support the decision to delay the start of construction.

  20. Coal-log pipeline system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project tasks include: (1) Perform the necessary testing and development to demonstrate that the amount of binder in coal logs can be reduced to 8% or lower to produce logs with adequate strength to eliminate breakage during pipeline transportation, under conditions experienced in long distance pipeline systems. Prior to conducting any testing and demonstration, grantee shall perform an information search and make full determination of all previous attempts to extrude or briquette coal, upon which the testing and demonstration shall be based. (2) Perform the necessary development to demonstrate a small model of the most promising injection system for coal-logs, and tests the logs produced. (3) Conduct economic analysis of coal-log pipeline, based upon the work to date. Refine and complete the economic model. (VC)

  1. Design of a model pipeline for testing of piezoelectric micro power generator for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lah, Mike M. (Mike Myoung)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a reliable corrosion detection system for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), a distributed wireless self-powered sensor array is needed to monitor the entire length of the pipeline at all times. ...

  2. Sedimentation in Coal-Water Slurry Pipelining Fabio Rosso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Fabio

    Sedimentation in Coal-Water Slurry Pipelining Fabio Rosso Dipartimento di Matematica `Ulisse Dini related to the pipelin- ing of a Coal-Water Slurry. The main aspects of the problem are both with experiments finding a remarkable agreement with the available data. 1 #12;1 Slurry handling and pipeline

  3. Evolution of Graphics Pipelines 1 Understanding the Graphics Heritage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Evolution of Graphics Pipelines 1 Understanding the Graphics Heritage the era of fixed-function graphics pipelines the stages to render triangles 2 Programmable Real-Time Graphics programmable vertex and fragment processors an example of a programmable pipeline unified graphics and computing processors GPU

  4. Sensor and transmitter system for communication in pipelines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F.; Burnham, Alan K.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for sensing and communicating in a pipeline that contains a fluid. An acoustic signal containing information about a property of the fluid is produced in the pipeline. The signal is transmitted through the pipeline. The signal is received with the information and used by a control.

  5. Architectural Considerations for Application-Specific Counterflow Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childers, Bruce

    a new pipeline organization called the Counterflow Pipeline (CFP). This paper evaluates CFP design to an application can be constructed automatically. Third, we present measurements that evaluate CFP design tradeArchitectural Considerations for Application-Specific Counterflow Pipelines Bruce R. Childers, Jack

  6. Method for route selection of transcontinental natural gas pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    1 Method for route selection of transcontinental natural gas pipelines Fotios G. Thomaidis1@kepa.uoa.gr Abstract. The route of transcontinental natural gas pipelines is characterized by complexity, compared choices. Keywords: Optimum route method, natural gas, transcontinental pipelines, Caspian Region E

  7. Experience with pipelined multiple instruction streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, H.F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors introduces the architecture and programming environment of the heterogeneous element processor (HEP) and surveys a range of scientific applications programs for which parallel versions have been produced, tested, and analyzed on this computer. In all cases, the ideal of one instruction completion every pipeline step time is closely approached. Speed limitations in the parallel programs are more often a result of the extra code necessary to ensure synchronization than of actual synchronization lockout at execution time. The pipelined multiple instruction stream architecture is shown to cover a wide range of applications with good utilization of the parallel hardware. 35 references.

  8. Pipeline inspection using an autonomous underwater vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egeskov, P.; Bech, M. [Maridan Aps., Hoersholm (Denmark); Bowley, R. [TSS Ltd., Weston-on-the-Green (United Kingdom); Aage, C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Ocean Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipeline inspection can be carried out by means of small Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), operating either with a control link to a surface vessel, or totally independently. The AUV offers an attractive alternative to conventional inspection methods where Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) or paravanes are used. A flatfish type AUV ``MARTIN`` (Marine Tool for Inspection) has been developed for this purpose. The paper describes the proposed types of inspection jobs to be carried out by ``MARTIN``. The design and construction of the vessel, its hydrodynamic properties, its propulsion and control systems are discussed. The pipeline tracking and survey systems, as well as the launch and recovery systems are described.

  9. Software design for panoramic astronomical pipeline processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior Shamir; Robert J. Nemiroff; David O. Torrey; Wellesley E. Pereira

    2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the software requirement and design specifications for all-sky panoramic astronomical pipelines. The described software aims to meet the specific needs of super-wide angle optics, and includes cosmic-ray hit rejection, image compression, star recognition, sky opacity analysis, transient detection and a web server allowing access to real-time and archived data. The presented software is being regularly used for the pipeline processing of 11 all-sky cameras located in some of the world's premier observatories. We encourage all-sky camera operators to use our software and/or our hosting services and become part of the global Night Sky Live network.

  10. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, D.D. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes` bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating.

  11. ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed.

  12. Test plan: the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, D.J.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation strategies that will be applied at the Czechowice Oil Refinery waste lagoon in Czechowice, Poland are designed, managed, and implemented under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). WSRC will be assisted in the demonstration by The Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU). This collaboration between IETU and DOE will provide the basis for international technology transfer of new and innovative remediation technologies that can be applied in Poland and the Eastern European Region as well.

  13. Morbidity And Sulfur Dioxide: Evidence From French Strikes At Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Neidell; Emmanuelle Lavaine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the impact of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in France on health outcomes at a census track level. To do so, we use recent strikes affecting oil refineries in France, in October 2010, as a natural experiment. Our work offers several contributions. We first show that a temporal shut down in the refining process leads to a reduction in sulfur dioxide concentration. We then use this narrow time frame exogenous shock to assess the impact of a change in air pollution concentration on respiratory outcomes. Our estimates suggest that daily variation in SO2 air pollution has economically significant health effects at levels below the current standard. 0

  14. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. ,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S. Underground NaturalWorking

  16. Legislation pertaining to underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goth, W. (Ventura County Environmental Health Division, CA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statutory authority in California for cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater to protect water quality is the Porter Cologne Water Quality Control Act (Water Code 1967). Two state laws regulating underground hazardous material storage tanks, passed in late 1983 and effective on January 1, 1984, were AB-2013 (Cortese) and AB-1362 (Sher). Both require specific actions by the tank owners. AB-2013 requires all tank owners to register them with the state Water Resources Control Board (SWCB) and to pay a registration fee. AB-1362, Health and Safety Code Section 25280 et seq., requires tank owners to obtain a Permit to Operate, pay a fee to the local agency, and to install a leak detection system on all existing tanks. New tanks installation requires a Permit to install and provide provide secondary containment for the tank and piping. For tank closures, a permit must be obtained from the local agency to clean out the tank, remove it from the ground, and collect samples from beneath the tank for evidence of contamination. In 1988, state law AB-853 appropriated state funds to be combined with federal EPA money to allow SWRCB to initiate rapid cleanups of leaks from underground tank sites by contracting with local agencies to oversee assessment and cleanup of underground tank releases. Locally, in Ventura County, there are more than 400 leaking underground tank sites in which petroleum products have entered the groundwater. To date, no public water supplies have been contaminated; however, action in necessary to prevent any future contamination to our water supply. Over 250 leaking tank sites have completed cleanup.

  17. Analysis of tank deformation from fire induced ruptures and BLEVEs of 400 l propane tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kielec, D.J.; Birk, A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of fire tests were conducted to study the thermal rupture of propane tanks. The tests involved 400 liter ASME automotive propane tanks filled to 80% capacity with commercial propane. The tanks were brought to failure using torches and pool fires. the resulting thermal ruptures varied in severity from minor fissures, measuring a few centimeters in length, to catastrophic failures where the tank was flattened on the ground. The catastrophic failures would typically be called Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapour Explosions (BLEVE). The objective of this work was to develop a correlation between the failure severity and the tank condition at failure. The deformed propane tanks were measured in detail and the extent of deformation was quantified. The tank failure severity was found to be a complex function of a number of tank and lading properties at failure. this paper presents the measured data from the tanks and a step by step description of how the correlation was determined.

  18. Innovative Electromagnetic Sensors for Pipeline Crawlers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bruce Nestleroth

    2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal inspection of pipelines is an important tool for ensuring safe and reliable delivery of fossil energy products. Current inspection systems that are propelled through the pipeline by the product flow cannot be used to inspect all pipelines because of the various physical barriers they encounter. Recent development efforts include a new generation of powered inspection platforms that crawl slowly inside a pipeline and are able to maneuver past the physical barriers that can limit inspection. At Battelle, innovative electromagnetic sensors are being designed and tested for these new pipeline crawlers. The various sensor types can be used to assess a wide range of pipeline anomalies including corrosion, mechanical damage, and cracks. Battelle is in the final year on a projected three-year development effort. In the first year, two innovative electromagnetic inspection technologies were designed and tested. Both were based on moving high-strength permanent magnets to generate inspection energy. One system involved translating permanent magnets towards the pipe. A pulse of electric current would be induced in the pipe to oppose the magnetization according to Lenz's Law. The decay of this pulse would indicate the presence of defects in the pipe wall. This inspection method is similar to pulsed eddy current inspection methods, with the fundamental difference being the manner in which the current is generated. Details of this development effort were reported in the first semiannual report on this project. The second inspection methodology is based on rotating permanent magnets. The rotating exciter unit produces strong eddy currents in the pipe wall. At distances of a pipe diameter or more from the rotating exciter, the currents flow circumferentially. These circumferential currents are deflected by pipeline defects such as corrosion and axially aligned cracks. Simple sensors are used to detect the change in current densities in the pipe wall. The second semiannual report on this project reported on experimental and modeling results. The results showed that the rotating system was more adaptable to pipeline inspection and therefore only this system will be carried into the second year of the sensor development. In the third reporting period, the rotating system inspection was further developed. Since this is a new inspection modality without published fundamentals to build upon, basic analytical and experimental investigations were performed. A closed form equation for designing rotating exciters and positioning sensors was derived from fundamental principles. Also signal processing methods were investigated for detection and assessment of pipeline anomalies. A lock in amplifier approach was chosen as the method for detecting the signals. Finally, mechanical implementations for passing tight restrictions such as plug valves were investigated. This inspection concept is new and unique; a United States patent application has been submitted. In this reporting period, a general design of the rotating permanent magnet inspection system is presented. The rotating permanent magnet inspection system is feasible for pipes ranging in diameter from 8 to 18 inches using a two pole configuration. Experimental results and theoretical calculations provide the basis for selection of the critical design parameters. The parameters include a significant magnet to pipe separation that will facilitate the passage of pipeline features. With the basic values of critical components established, the next step is a detailed mechanical design of a pipeline ready inspection system.

  19. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  20. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  1. Energy Reduction in California Pipeline Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies that can help California's industrial sectors reduce their energy consumption, their water use. In addition to significant baseline energy consumption, more energy is often required by pipelines Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Industrial/Agriculture/Water EndUse Phone

  2. New system pinpoints leaks in ethylene pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamande, A. [Solvay et Cie, Jemeppe sur Sambre (Belgium); Condacse, V.; Modisette, J. [Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model-based leak detection, PLDS, developed by Modisette Associates, Inc., Houston has been operating on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline since 1989. The 6-in. pipeline extends from Antwerp to Jemeppe sur Sambre, a distance of 73.5 miles and is buried at a depth of 3 ft. with no insulation. Except for outlets to flares, located every 6 miles for test purposes, there are no injections or deliveries along the pipeline. Also, there are block valves, which are normally open, at each flare location. This paper reviews the design and testing procedures used to determine the system performance. These tests showed that the leak system was fully operational and no false alarms were caused by abrupt changes in inlet/outlet flows of the pipeline. It was confirmed that leaks larger than 2 tonnes/hr. (40 bbl/hr) are quickly detected and accurately located. Also, maximum leak detection sensitivity is 1 tonne/hr. (20 bbl/hr) with a detection time of one hour. Significant operational, configuration, and programming issues also were found during the testing program. Data showed that temperature simulations needed re-examining for improvement since accurate temperature measurements are important. This is especially true for ethylene since its density depends largely on temperature. Another finding showed the averaging period of 4 hrs. was too long and a 1 to 2 hr. interval was better.

  3. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM - 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2011 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2011 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2011-00026, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2011, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2011 met the requirements of C-ESR-G-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 25, 26 and 34 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00495, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2011, Waste Tanks 25, 26, 34 and 41. A total of 5813 photographs were made and 835 visual and video inspections were performed during 2011. A potential leaksite was discovered at Tank 4 during routine annual inspections performed in 2011. The new crack, which is above the allowable fill level, resulted in no release to the environment or tank annulus. The location of the crack is documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.6.

  4. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  5. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-130

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1), consisted of a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipelines that received sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office via the 100-F-26:8 pipelines. The septic tank required remedial action based on confirmatory sampling. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  6. Refinery Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18,new2004_v1.3_5.0.zipFlorida4 U.S. Manufacturing Energy UseMary

  7. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

  8. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

  9. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigley, K.D. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Butterworth, St.W. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lockie, K.A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that associated tank valve boxes and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

  10. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockie, K.A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Suttora, L.C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Quigley, K.D. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stanisich, N. [Portage Environmental, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to clean and close emptied radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste and cleaned in preparation of final closure. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. In November 2006, three of the 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that all seven cleaned 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks, as well as the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks and all associated tank vaults and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

  11. Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpvnewhouse.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Tank Manufacturing, Testing,...

  12. Tank farm backlog soil sample analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlers, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the measures to collect samples, perform testing on samples, and make decisions to obtain a Contained- in Determination for tank farms backlog soil.

  13. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  14. Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks (USTs) of regulated substances other than...

  15. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  16. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure.

  17. 45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many different situations, from the storage of cryogenic liquids, to fuel tanks. Under the influence of gravity, or acceleration, the liquid then be designed to measure where the surface of the liquid is, and from this derive h. Problem 1 - Slice the fluid

  18. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY-Tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  19. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A-Tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on A-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  20. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AX-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  1. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BX-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  2. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for C-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on C-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  3. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B-Tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on B-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  4. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BY-112. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-10. (This tank has been designated a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank.)

  5. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the B Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  6. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the BY Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices contain data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  7. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  8. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the SX-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on SX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

  9. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the S-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on S-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

  10. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  11. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AP-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AP-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  12. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AN-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AN-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  13. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AY-tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford, Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  14. BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

  15. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo [Snamprogetti-Saipem, Via Toniolo, 1, 61032 Fano (Italy); Strom, Alexander [Institute of Geospheres Dynamics, Leninskiy Avenue, 38, Building 1, 119334, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  16. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  17. Kern River natural gas pipeline commissioned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Kern River Gas Transmission Co., the biggest gas pipeline built in the U.S. in the last decade, has been commissioned. The system was dedicated Mar. 6 at a meter station in an oil field near Bakersfield, Calif. The $984 million, 904 mile pipeline is a 50-50 venture of Tenneco Inc. and Williams Cos. Planning for the project began about 7 years ago. Current operating capacity of the line is 700 MMcfd. Plans call for boosting capacity by 452 MMcfd with added compression. Most of the gas will go to thermal enhanced oil recovery projects in heavy oil fields in California. This paper reports that other customers include utilities, independent electrical power producers, and cogeneration projects.

  18. The e-MERLIN Data Reduction Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argo, Megan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Written in Python and utilising ParselTongue to interface with the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS), the e-MERLIN data reduction pipeline is intended to automate the procedures required in processing and calibrating radio astronomy data from the e-MERLIN correlator. Driven by a plain text file of input parameters, the pipeline is modular and can be run in stages by the user, depending on requirements. The software includes options to load raw data, average in time and/or frequency, flag known sources of interference, flag more comprehensively with SERPent, carry out some or all of the calibration procedures including self-calibration), and image in either normal or wide-field mode. It also optionally produces a number of useful diagnostic plots at various stages so that the quality of the data can be assessed. The software is available for download from the e-MERLIN website or via Github.

  19. Tank Waste Remediation System Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robershotte, M.A.; Dirks, L.L.; Seaver, D.A.; Bothers, A.J.; Madden, M.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope, number and complexity of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) decisions require an integrated, consistent, and logical approach to decision making. TWRS has adopted a seven-step decision process applicable to all decisions. Not all decisions, however, require the same degree of rigor/detail. The decision impact will dictate the appropriate required detail. In the entire process, values, both from the public as well as from the decision makers, play a key role. This document concludes with a general discussion of the implementation process that includes the roles of concerned parties.

  20. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford`s nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list.

  1. AN EVALUATION OF PYROLYSIS OIL PROPERTIES AND CHEMISTRY AS RELATED TO PROCESS AND UPGRADE CONDITIONS WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION TO PIPELINE SHIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL; Boyd, Alison C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One factor limiting the development of commercial biomass pyrolysis is challenges related to the transportation of the produced pyrolysis oil. The oil has different chemical and physical properties than crude oil, including more water and oxygen and has lower H/C ratio, higher specific gravity and density, higher acidity, and lower energy content. These differences could limit its ability to be transported by existing petroleum pipelines. Pyrolysis oil can also be treated, normally by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, and approaches crude oil and petroleum condensates at higher severity levels. This improvement also results in lower liquid yield and high hydrogen consumption. Biomass resources for pyrolysis are expected to become plentiful and widely distributed in the future, mainly through the use of crop residuals and growing of energy crops such as perennial grasses, annual grasses, and woody crops. Crude oil pipelines are less well distributed and, when evaluated on a county level, could access about 18% of the total biomass supply. States with high potential include Texas, Oklahoma, California, and Louisiana. In this study, published data on pyrolysis oil was compiled into a data set along with bio-source source material, pyrolysis reactor conditions, and upgrading conditions for comparison to typical crude oils. Data of this type is expected to be useful in understanding the properties and chemistry and shipment of pyrolysis oil to refineries, where it can be further processed to fuel or used as a source of process heat.

  2. Pipeline safety joint eliminates need for divers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sea-Hook coupling is a diverless pressure-compensated pipeline safety joint designed to protect the pipe from damage by excessive physical loads. The coupling provides a predetermined weak point in the line that will cause a controlled separation when the line is exposed to strong wave action or dragging anchors. Moreover, it offers prepressurized remote lockout protection, metal seal integrity, no hand-up separation, enclosed bolting, optimal manual lockout, and no springs or shear rings.

  3. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

  4. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

  5. Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

  6. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

  7. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Jeremy M. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor.

  8. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - March...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10-12, 2014, at the Hanford Tank Farms. The activity consisted of HSS staff observing Hanford Tank Farm operations and a Department of Energy Facility Representative training...

  9. Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol (4 Activities) Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol (4 Activities)...

  10. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications...

  11. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical report...

  12. actual tank 48h: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the THINK TANK Ziurys, Lucy M. 36 Department of Energy Workshop High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Department of Energy Workshop...

  13. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

  14. Permitting plan for Hanford Tanks Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, J.W.

    1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes all the permitting actions that have been identified as required to implement the Hanford Tanks Initiative. It reflects changes in the scope to the Hanford Tanks Initiative since the Rev. 0 plan was issued. The cost and schedule for the permitting actions are included.

  15. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1996 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report.

  16. Annual Radioactive Waste Tank Inspection Program - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1998 to evaluate these vessels and auxiliary appurtenances, along with evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report.

  17. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, C.J.

    2000-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1999 to evaluate these vessels and auxiliary appurtenances along with evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report.

  18. Battelle determines cause of Ashland tank failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesloh, R.E.; Marschall, C.W.; Buchheit, R.D.; Kiefner, J.F. (Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (US))

    1988-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An existing flaw, combined with embrittled steel and residual stresses, led to the catastrophic failure of the fuel oil tank at Ashland Petroleum Co., Floreffe, Pa., last January. Here is a look at the tank's background, events surrounding its rupture, and Battelle's methods for investigating the incident.

  19. Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Krumhansl

    2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

  20. Tips For Residential Heating Oil Tank Owners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Tips For Residential Heating Oil Tank Owners Source: DEP Fact Sheet Residential heating oil tanks are used to store fuel for furnaces or boilers to heat

  1. Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program How To's Petroleum Bulk&S' Website: http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/Inspect_GD.pdf What is Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program? Cornell University

  2. Coal slurry pipeline based midwest fuel hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huettenhain, H. [Bechtel Technology & Consulting San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is a sought after fuel to comply with the year 2000 emission regulation for utility boilers. PRB coal is presently not competitive East of the Mississippi mainly because of railroad switching requirements and boiler designs not compatible with the PRB fuel characteristics. The use of the Lakes for transportation is an exception. The Lakes shipping lanes however, are only open part of the year. It is proposed to construct a coal slurry pipeline from the center of Wyoming coalfields to a hub near Detroit with access to low cost waste energy from power generation stations. The coal slurry pipeline will transport up to 25 million tons per year of fine PRB coal which has been removed from the conventionally transported coal, namely coal transported by rail. The rail delivered coal will have less dust. The system fits the DOE Vision 21 concept to mine and utilize coal in highly efficient systems and with the least environmental impact. The PRB coal is of subbituminous rank and not directly compatible with the boilers in Michigan/Indiana/Ohio area, which are designed to burn bituminous coal. Upgrading of the PRB coal using the hydrothermal slurry upgrading process can transform the PRB coal into a higher Btu content fuel by removing a large portion of the inherent moisture. Such upgraded PRB coal has proven an excellent reactive fuel when burned conventionally as PC fuel, or even when burned in slurry form as Coal Water Fuel (CWF). The cost of the process can be recovered when the process is combined with a coal slurry pipeline transport system. The result is an upgraded competitive fuel or fuels, which can be used for co-firing or re-burning applications to reduce SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions of utility boilers. The fuels can be powdered for direct fuel injection into boilers or blast furnaces as well as CWF. Depending on the stability of the upgraded PRB coal, the pipeline product could also be dewatered and prepared for export. This paper describes the concept and preliminary cost information. It also reports on reactions of the industries, which could be involved in the complex system, namely, coal mining companies, railroads, pipeline operators, fuel suppliers, and utilities.

  3. Hydrogen pipeline compressors annual progress report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) develop advanced materials and coatings for hydrogen pipeline compressors; (2) achieve greater reliability, greater efficiency, and lower capital in vestment and maintenance costs in hydrogen pipeline compressors; and (3) research existing and novel hydrogen compression technologies that can improve reliability, eliminate contamination, and reduce cost. Compressors are critical components used in the production and delivery of hydrogen. Current reciprocating compressors used for pipeline delivery of hydrogen are costly, are subject to excessive wear, have poor reliability, and often require the use of lubricants that can contaminate the hydrogen (used in fuel cells). Duplicate compressors may be required to assure availability. The primary objective of this project is to identify, and develop as required, advanced materials and coatings that can achieve the friction, wear, and reliability requirements for dynamically loaded components (seal and bearings) in high-temperature, high-pressure hydrogen environments prototypical of pipeline and forecourt compressor systems. The DOE Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop identified critical needs in the development of advanced hydrogen compressors - notably, the need to minimize moving parts and to address wear through new designs (centrifugal, linear, guided rotor, and electrochemical) and improved compressor materials. The DOE is supporting several compressor design studies on hydrogen pipeline compression specifically addressing oil-free designs that demonstrate compression in the 0-500 psig to 800-1200 psig range with significant improvements in efficiency, contamination, and reliability/durability. One of the designs by Mohawk Innovative Technologies Inc. (MiTi{reg_sign}) involves using oil-free foil bearings and seals in a centrifual compressor, and MiTi{reg_sign} identified the development of bearings, seals, and oil-free tribological coatings as crucial to the successful development of an advanced compressor. MiTi{reg_sign} and ANL have developed potential coatings for these rigorous applications; however, the performance of these coatings (as well as the nickel-alloy substrates) in high-temperature, high-speed hydrogen environments is unknown at this point.

  4. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  5. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program -- 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1993 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report. The 1993 inspection program revealed that the condition of the Savannah River Site waste tanks had not changed significantly from that reported in the previous annual report. No new leaksites were observed. No evidence of corrosion or materials degradation was observed in the waste tanks. However, degradation was observed on covers of the concrete encasements for the out-of-service transfer lines to Tanks 1 through 8.

  6. Virtual Pipeline System Testbed to Optimize the U.S. Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Prakash Krishniswami; Virg Wallentine; Mohammed Abbaspour; Revathi Ranganathan; Ravi Addanki; Jeet Sengupta; Liubo Chen

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a Virtual Pipeline System Testbed (VPST) for natural gas transmission. This study uses a fully implicit finite difference method to analyze transient, nonisothermal compressible gas flow through a gas pipeline system. The inertia term of the momentum equation is included in the analysis. The testbed simulate compressor stations, the pipe that connects these compressor stations, the supply sources, and the end-user demand markets. The compressor station is described by identifying the make, model, and number of engines, gas turbines, and compressors. System operators and engineers can analyze the impact of system changes on the dynamic deliverability of gas and on the environment.

  7. api x80 pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Fortran API 3. c 1959 Information Processing Society of Japan 3 Kasahara, Hironori 9 Hydrogen Pipeline Material Testing We provide critical data, measurement methods and...

  8. alaska oil pipeline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography 1998-01-01 24 Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Our goal is to establish the codes and standards necessary...

  9. Enter the Post-Doc: The Untapped Sourcing Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boscow, Ryan B.

    2011-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article addresses the potential formulation and utilization of an industry-based Post-Doc program in order to create workforce candidate pipelines with targeted universities.

  10. ,"International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  11. ,"Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","L...

  12. ,"Corsby, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corsby, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  13. ,"Sault St Marie, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sault St Marie, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  14. ,"Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  15. ,"North Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  16. ,"Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  17. ,"Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  18. ,"Portal, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Portal, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  19. ,"New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  20. Panel 2, Hydrogen Delivery in the Natural Gas Pipeline Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Natural Gas Pipeline Network DOE'S HYDROGEN ENERGY STORAGE FOR GRID AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WORKSHOP Sacramento, CA May 14, 2014 Brian Weeks Gas Technology Institute 2 2...

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers: Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) hpwgwembrittlementsteelssofronis.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: I2CNER: An...

  2. Sequencing Technologies and Computational pipelines at the JGI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequencing Technologies and Computational pipelines at the JGI September 17, 2013 JGI logo 2 James Han, JGI sequencing QAQC group lead Tuesday, Sep. 17, 2003 OSF Room 238...

  3. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage...

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production Reservoir Underground...

  5. Comparing Existing Pipeline Networks with the Potential Scale of Future U.S. CO2 Pipeline Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest regarding the potential size of a future U.S. dedicated CO2 pipeline infrastructure if carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies are commercially deployed on a large scale. In trying to understand the potential scale of a future national CO2 pipeline network, comparisons are often made to the existing pipeline networks used to deliver natural gas and liquid hydrocarbons to markets within the U.S. This paper assesses the potential scale of the CO2 pipeline system needed under two hypothetical climate policies and compares this to the extant U.S. pipeline infrastructures used to deliver CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and to move natural gas and liquid hydrocarbons from areas of production and importation to markets. The data presented here suggest that the need to increase the size of the existing dedicated CO2 pipeline system should not be seen as a significant obstacle for the commercial deployment of CCS technologies.

  6. A Dredging Knowledge-Base Expert System for Pipeline Dredges with Comparison to Field Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Derek Alan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pipeline Analytical Program and Dredging Knowledge{Base Expert{System (DKBES) determines a pipeline dredge's production and resulting cost and schedule. Pipeline dredge engineering presents a complex and dynamic process necessary to maintain...

  7. Analysis of oil-pipeline distribution of multiple products subject to delivery time-windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jittamai, Phongchai

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation defines the operational problems of, and develops solution methodologies for, a distribution of multiple products into oil pipeline subject to delivery time-windows constraints. A multiple-product oil pipeline is a pipeline system...

  8. Tool Path Planning Generation For Finish Machining of Freeform Surfaces in the Cybercut Process Planning Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Paul K; Dornfeld, David; Sundararajan, V.; Misra, Debananda

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CYBERCUT PROCESS PLANNING PIPELINE Paul K. Wright, David A.describes part of a "Pipeline of De- sign and Manufacturingversus surface finish. 2.5D PIPELINE AND 3D SURFACES Figure

  9. Black Radicals Make for Bad Citizens: Undoing the Myth of the School to Prison Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sojoyner, Damien M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 13). Prison pipeline hits Black students harder,http://politic365.com/2012/12/13/prison-pipeline-hits-black-The school-to-prison pipeline: Structuring legal reform. New

  10. MetAMOS: a modular and open source metagenomic assembly and analysis pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assembly and analysis pipeline. Genome Biology 2013 14:R2.assembly and analysis pipeline Todd J Treangen 1,2 , Sergeyassembly and analysis pipeline. MetAMOS represents an

  11. Analysis of oil-pipeline distribution of multiple products subject to delivery time-windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jittamai, Phongchai

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation defines the operational problems of, and develops solution methodologies for, a distribution of multiple products into oil pipeline subject to delivery time-windows constraints. A multiple-product oil pipeline is a pipeline system...

  12. Beyond Myopic Inference in Big Data Pipelines Karthik Raman, Adith Swaminathan, Johannes Gehrke, Thorsten Joachims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachims, Thorsten

    ]: Learning General Terms Algorithms, Experimentation, Theory Keywords Big Data Pipelines, Modular Design Detection & Recognition pipeline. creation, model construction, testing, and visualization. In orderBeyond Myopic Inference in Big Data Pipelines Karthik Raman, Adith Swaminathan, Johannes Gehrke

  13. The Oil Network in US:The Oil Network in US: A Closer Look at PipelinesA Closer Look at Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    The Oil Network in US:The Oil Network in US: A Closer Look at PipelinesA Closer Look at Pipelines of Oil Network in USHistory of Oil Network in US Origin of pipelines:Origin of pipelines: WWII: Relied of transportationtransportation Need for a complex network:Need for a complex network: Move the raw materials (crude oils), from

  14. Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks applies to any project that will install, alter or remove...

  15. Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, Luisa Tan

    This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

  16. Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of how the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR Kelly Patrick U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kelly...

  17. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank 241-T-107

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, B.D.; Jensen, L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single shell tank 241-T-107 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank most recently sampled in March 1993. Analyses of materials obtained from tank T-107 were conducted to support the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-06 as well as Milestones M-44-05 and M-44-07. Characterization of the tank waste T-107 will support the ferrocyanide safety issue in order to classify the tank as safe, conditionally safe, or unsafe. This tank characterization report expands on the data found in Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Data Interpretation Report for Tank 241-T-107 Core Samples. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank T-107 strongly indicate the cyanide and oxidizer (nitrate/nitrite) concentrations in the tank waste are not significant enough to support a self-sustaining exothermic reaction. Therefore, the contents of tank T-107 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment. Because the possibility of an exothermic reaction is remote, the consequences of an accident scenario, as proposed by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  18. Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: U Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE-GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides that are distributed in the vadose zone sediments beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources when possible, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information regarding vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. This information is presently limited to detection of gamma-emitting radionuclides from both natural and man-made sources. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank in a tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the U Tank Farm. Logging operations used high-purity germanium detection systems to acquire laboratory-quality assays of the gamma-emitting radionuclides in the sediments around and below the tanks. These assays were acquired in 59 boreholes that surround the U Tank Farm tanks. Logging of all boreholes was completed in December 1995, and the last Tank Summary Data Report for the U Tank Farm was issued in September 1996.

  19. Panel: The Intersections of the IDEA and the School-to-Prison Pipeline (Audio file)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterstone, Julie; Cannon, Yael; Rivera, Anna; Dudakia, Kunti

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as the School-to-Prison Pipeline-occurs, and will explorein the School-to-Prison Pipeline discourse will help the

  20. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPRIETARY INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May... Improvements ? Cost-savings initiatives ? Increasing environmental awareness ? Increasing throughput by debottlenecking processes ? Increasing government mandates 2May 2013 Energy Costs for a 200kBPD Complex refinery Typically, energy efficiency programs...