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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Process simulation of refinery units including chemical reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process simulation methods for design and operation of refinery units are well established as long as no chemical reactors are included. The feedstocks are divided into pseudo-components which enables calculation of phase equilibria and transport properties. When chemical reactors are present some chemical conversion takes place which obviously affects the nature of the pseudo-components and their properties. The stream leaving the reactor will not only be of a different composition than the stream entering the reactor but in addition, the pseudo-components making up the outlet stream will also have other physical properties than the ones in the inlet stream. These changes affect not only the reactor unit but also the simulation of the whole flow-sheet. The paper presents a detailed model for an adiabatic distillate hydrotreater which takes into account the elemental composition of the feed. A special simulation strategy has been developed to incorporate such reactor units into process simulators. Finally, the simulation strategy is illustrated for a hydrotreating plant.

Jens A. Hansen; Barry H. Cooper

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Present and Future Alkylation Processes in Refineries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Present and Future Alkylation Processes in Refineries ... Second, an accident at a Texas refinery released considerable amounts of gaseous HF. ... In addition, following an accident, it is uncertain whether the sprays would still be operable. ...

Lyle F. Albright

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

3

Comparison of predicted and measured noise levels for refinery units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting noise levels from new refinery units is a vital part of environmental assessment and designing units to meet noise limits. The accuracy of those noise predictions is a very important concern. The simplest way to assess the accuracy of predictions is to compare predicted and measured noise levels. This is usually difficult because measured levels are strongly affected by noise from adjacent units and by atmospheric effects on sound propagation. Further actual noise levels of significant sources often deviate from expected levels used in the noise prediction model. Thus to meaningfully compare predicted and measured levels the actual noise source levels for the major sources atmospheric conditions and noise levels from adjacent units must all be accounted for. Predicted and measured levels are compared for two large refinery units. Measurements were made at locations where noise from adjacent units has little effect and close enough so that atmospheric conditions have little impact on the measured levels. Measured operational noise levels of major sources were used to update the noise prediction model. Accuracy of the predictions is evaluated.

Frank H. Brittain; Mark M. Gmerek

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integration of hydrogen management in refinery planning with rigorous process models and product quality specifications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New trends of increased heavy crude markets and clean-fuel legislation, to produce ultra low-sulphur (ULS) gasoline and diesel fuels, are forcing refineries to increase their consumption of hydrogen. This critical situation raises the need to have a tool for operating refineries with flexibility and profitability. This paper addresses the planning of refinery with consideration to hydrogen availability. A systematic method for integrating a hydrogen management strategy within a rigorous refinery planning model is undertaken. The presented model consists of two main building blocks: a set of non-linear processing units' models and a hydrogen balance framework. The two blocks are integrated to produce a refinery-wide planning model with hydrogen management. The hydrogen management alternatives were determined by economic analysis. The proposed model improves the hidden hydrogen unavailability that prevents refineries from achieving their maximum production and profit. The model is illustrated on representative case studies and the results are discussed. It was found that an additional annual profit equivalent to $7 million could be achieved with a one-time investment of $13 million in a new purification unit.

Ali Elkamel; Ibrahim Alhajri; A. Almansoori; Yousef Saif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING Phuong NGUYEN*, Pier-Paolo SAVIOTTI, refinery processes, variety, niche theory, Weitzman measure. JEL classification : L15 -L93 -O3 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

Advanced refinery process heater. Final report, (October 1983-September 1988)  

SciTech Connect

A prototype refinery process heater was designed, built and successfully tested, demonstrating the improvements available to heater design through the use of Zone-Controlled Pyrocore radiant gas burners. The 10 MMBtu/hr rated heater released 17 ppm NOx (corrected to 3% oxygen) under full load operation, the lowest NOx emissions technically and commercially achieved in this type of equipment without the use of post-combustion flue-gas processing. Operating with 400F combustion air preheat and a 500F process fluid outlet temperature, the heater achieved overall thermal efficiencies of 92.8% on a LHV basis due in part to the significantly improved performance of the radiant heat exchange section. The radiant burners used in the heater have been proven in performance and reliability, and have also been shown to be applicable to both new heater designs and retrofits into existing heaters. The improved radiant performance of the heater and the use of 'flameless' radiant burners eliminates tube burn-out failures in both the radiant and convective tube coils, further improving the reliability of equipment based on this design. Three separate U.S. Patents have been issued covering the heater design and the use of Zone-Controlled Pyrocore burners in this application.

Minden, A.C.; Buckley, G.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act June 8, 2006 - 2:17pm Addthis Statement from Secretary Bodman WASHINGTON, DC - The following is a statement from the Secretary Samuel W. Bodman of the Department of Energy on the passage of House Resolution 5254, The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act: "I commend the House of Representatives for their passage of this important piece of legislation. Expanding our nation's refining capacity is an important part of President Bush's four-point plan to confront high gasoline prices and is a key component to strengthening our nation's energy security. By increasing our nation's domestic refining capacity we can help grow our nation's economy and reduce our reliance on foreign sources

8

Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Waste Heat Recovery in Refineries and Chemical Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A product package and recommended division of responsibilities between purchaser, A&E company and supplier is presented for installations in refineries and process plants. The product package covers the electrical power range from 3/4 to 5 MW...

Meacher, J. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Methods applied to investigate the major VCE that occured in the TOTAL refinery's Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit at La Mede,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

95-35 Methods applied to investigate the major �VCE that occured in the TOTAL refinery's Fluid.V.C.E, occured in the Gas Plant of the TOTAL refinery's Fluid Catalytic Cracking ünit at La Mede, France sources: control room hard copy and electronically stored records: no deviation of process operating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

Integration of light hydrocarbons cryogenic separation process in refinery based on LNG cold energy utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract China depends on naphtha (derived from oil) as the main feedstock for ethylene plants, resulting in margins that are negatively co-related with the price of oil. Clearly, light hydrocarbons provide cost advantages over the conventional naphtha feedstock. Consequently, the recovery of light hydrocarbons from refinery gas has been gathering more and more significance. Nonetheless, the cryogenic separation needs low process temperatures, substantially increasing the refrigeration load requirements and, attendantly, the compression requirements associated with the refrigeration system. In this paper, the cold energy of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is applied to light hydrocarbons cryogenic separation process to replace the compression refrigeration system on the basis of one China refinery. The results show that LNG can provide 14,373 kW cold energy for the separation process, resulting in a direct compression power saving of 7973 kW and making the utilization rate of LNG cold energy as high as 71.9%.

Yajun Li; Hao Luo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 6): Double Eagle Refinery Site, operable unit 2, Oklahoma City, OK, April 19, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Double Eagle Refinery Site (DER site), in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, for the Ground Water Operable Unit. Principal threat wastes include `pools` of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) submerged beneath the ground water or in fractured bedrock. The Ground Water Operable Unit (GOU) addresses the principal threat at the site by monitoring the ground water to ensure that the contaminant levels are reduced with time due to natural attenuation, once the surface contamination is addressed, so that the surface contamination will no longer provide a source of contamination to the ground water.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Associative list processing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Yield Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 PADD 1 4.4 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.1 1993-2013 East Coast 4.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9 2.2 1993-2013

16

PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery  

SciTech Connect

Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiation doses and hazards from processing of crude oil at the Tema oil refinery in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......petroleum products and wastes at the Tema oil refinery...radionuclides in the wastes than the crude oil and...monitoring to establish long-term effect on both public...accumulate at the bottom of storage tanks, tubings and other...uncontrolled release of waste containing TENORM, concentrated......

E. O. Darko; D. O. Kpeglo; E. H. K. Akaho; C. Schandorf; P. A. S. Adu; A. Faanu; E. Abankwah; H. Lawluvi; A. R. Awudu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

19

Feasibility study for the retrofitting of used oil re-refineries to the BETC solvent treatment/distillation process  

SciTech Connect

Federal policy encourages recycle of used oil, but requires that recycling be done in an environmentally sound manner. In order to encourage such recycling the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has developed the DOE/BETA solvent treatment/distillation re-refining process. The feasibility of retrofitting existing used oil re-refineries to the DOE/BETC process has been studied in this work. Twelve potential sites were chosen from almost 300 firms thought to be interested in re-refining technology. Three of these twelve sites have been recommended as prime candidates.

Weinstein, N.J.; Brinkman, D.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The system theoretic accidental analysis of a crude unit refinery fire incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catastrophic chemical process accidents in the past such as Bhopal (India) and Flixborough (UK) have led to a major increase in societal concerns about the safety of these processing facilities. As the petrochemical industry ...

Thammongkol, Pitiporn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Refinery Capacity Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006 Tables 1 Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum...

22

Unit Process Library | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unit Process Library LCA Projects Models-Tools Presentations Unit Process Library A unit process is the smallest building block in a life cycle model. Each unit process contains...

23

unit process | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unit process unit process Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system interconnect regions (ASCC, FRCC, HICC, MRO, NPCC, RFC, SERC, SPP, TRE, WECC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory (LCI) forms (both xls and xml). A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included. Source US Life Cycle Inventory Database Date Released May 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords ASCC FRCC HICC interconnect region LCI life cycle inventory MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE unit process US utilities WECC Data application/zip icon interconnect_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 6.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

24

Energy Efficient Refinery Process Developed with U.S. D.O.E. Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in one column, the exothermic heat of reaction is utilized to supplement distil lation energy requirements. Spent Recycle C4's MeOH MeOH C4's MTBE MeOH Reaction Water recovery column wash column INEL 3 0110 Figure 2. Process Flow Diagram...

Mings, W. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

26

Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Refinery Outages: Fall 2014  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines refinery outages planned for Fall 2014 and the potential implications for available refinery capacity, petroleum product markets and supply of gasoline and middle distillate fuel oil (diesel, jet fuel, and heating oil). EIA believes that dissemination of such analyses can be beneficial to market participants who may otherwise be unable to access such information.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pemex to acquire interest in Shell Texas refinery  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Petroleos Mexicanos and Shell Oil Co. have signed a memorandum of understanding to form a joint refining venture involving Shell's 225,000 b/d Deer Park, Tex., refinery. Under the agreement, Mexico's state owned oil company is to purchase a 50% interest in the refinery, and Shell is to sell Pemex unleaded gasoline on a long term basis. Under the venture, Shell and Pemex plan to add undisclosed conversion and upgrading units tailored to process heavy Mexican crude. The revamp will allow Pemex to place more than 100,000 b/d of Mayan heavy crude on the U.S. market. Mayan accounts for 70% of Mexico's crude oil exports. In turn, Shell will sell Pemex as much as 45,000 b/d of unleaded gasoline to help meet Mexico's rapidly growing demand.

Not Available

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2000. Domestically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistics--United States: 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports fluctuations. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves2 Reserve

30

JANUARY 2007 THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF JANUARY 2007 THE REPORT THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL #12;From left;PANEL STATEMENT The B.P. U.S. Refineries Independent Safety Review Panel i Process safety accidents can be prevented. On March 23, 2005, the BP Texas City refinery experienced a catastrophic process accident

Leveson, Nancy

31

Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGO HGO HFO RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

33

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude Distillation1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

34

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

35

An efficient algorithm for designing reliable large-scale process networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

failures into consideration Photograph of Ras Tanura Refinery from www number and size of redundant units and storage tanks needed for reliable operation Process 1A B E Process

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

36

Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining Capacity Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining Capacity May 18, 2006 - 10:43am Addthis Highlights President Bush's Four-Point Plan to Combat High Energy Prices PORT ARTHUR, TX - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today renewed the call for expanded oil refining capacity in the United States and discussed additional steps the Department of Energy (DOE) is taking to prepare for the upcoming hurricane season. Secretary Bodman made the statements after touring the Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas. "We need a more robust energy sector; and one way to do that is to strengthen and expand our domestic oil refining capacity. We're hopeful that Motiva will continue to work to expand their capacity to 600,000

37

LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Naphthenic acid corrosion in the refinery  

SciTech Connect

Field tests and laboratory studies of refinery process streams are presented. The effects of temperature, velocity and physical state were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is the dominant factor in conferring corrosion resistance. The Naphthenic Acid Corrosion Index (NACI) is useful in assessing the severity of corrosion under a variety of circumstances.

Craig, H.L. Jr. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

K. S. Telang, R. W. Pike, F. C. Knopf, J. R. Hopper, J. Saleh, S. Waghchoure, S. C. Hedge and T. A. Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers and Chemical Engineering, Vol. 23, p. S727-730 (1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for pollution prevention. Keywords: on-line optimization, chemical reactor analysis, pinch analysis, pollution and simultaneously use programs for on-line optimization, chemical reactor analysis, flowsheeting, pinch analysis and refineries for process improvements. The system integrates programs for on-line optimization, chemical

Pike, Ralph W.

40

Encon Motivation in European Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One essential element in a successful energy conservation or Encon program is effective motivation of employees and organizations to conserve energy. Encon motivation in our European refineries is a continuing effort that requires utilization...

Gambera, S.; Lockett, W., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Louisiana Refinery Success Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manager, operations manager and production manager. From 2004 through 2006, the team presented a series of ESG seminars at the refinery site. The numerous models demonstrated quantitative savings with 3- to 12-mo paybacks. For a complete SSI turnkey...

Kacsur, D.

42

Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems)

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Installation of Reverse Osmosis Unit Reduces Refinery Energy Consumption: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Petroleum Technical Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study is the latest in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. The case studies document the activities, savings, and lessons learned on these projects.

U.S. Department of Energy

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

44

Motiva Refinery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refinery Refinery Motiva Refinery May 18, 2006 - 10:45am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Bodman Much of my time lately has been devoted to explaining why the price of gasoline has risen so sharply. President Bush understands the pinch this is creating for American consumers and has come forward with a variety of steps to address the problem. Rapid economic growth in emerging economies like China and India-and the growth here in the U.S.-have pushed up demand. Political unrest in some oil-producing regions has tightened supply. The transition from winter gasoline to summer blends, and the phase out of the additive MTBE in favor of ethanol, have increased the pressure on the market. Most significantly, we have very little spare refining capacity in this

45

Making Refinery Wastewater Clean | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Refinery Wastewater Clean Making Refinery Wastewater Clean Lei Wang 2014.09.23 About four years ago, I visited Ordos, Inner Mongolia, to work on a project. When I arrived,...

46

Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

planning models Optimizing refinery operation C d l ti Crude selection Maximizing profit; minimizing costIntegration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Carnegie Mellon University EWO Meeting ­ March 2011 1 #12;I t d tiIntroduction Refinery production

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

47

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 Introduction On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an

48

Recovery of hydrogen and other components from refinery gas stream by partial condensation using preliminary reflux condensation  

SciTech Connect

A process is disclosed for separating a hydrogen-containing refinery-type gas mixture into various fractions using reflux condensation, drying and partial condensation and phase separation.

Beddome, R.A.; Fenner, G.W.; Saunders, J.B.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

49

EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - EM met a major regulatory milestone at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) by completing construction of enclosures and ventilation systems required for cleanup. The SPRU project at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory reached the milestone last week in a consent order between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act. The Department has now accomplished all the requirements of the consent order.

50

Increased olefins production via recovery of refinery gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

In the process of catalytically cracking heavy petroleum fractions to make gasoline and light fuel oil, by-product waste gases are also generated. The waste gases, normally used as fuel, are themselves rich sources of ethylene, propylene and other light hydrocarbons which can be recovered inexpensively via a cryogenic dephlegmator process. This gas separation technique is exploited in a system, in operation since spring of 1987, which reclaims C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a refinery gas. The reclamation process bolsters production in a nearby ethylene plant. Causing no disruption of ethylene plant operations, the cryogenic hydrocarbon recovery system functions smoothly with existing systems. The dephlegmation unit operation melds distillation and heat transfer processes in a single easily-controlled step which boosts the hydrocarbon purity and recovery above the levels profitably achievable with conventional cryogenic separation techniques. Very attractive operating economics follow from high purity, high recovery, and high energy efficiency. This paper discusses process concepts, economic benefits, plant operation, and early performance results.

Bernhard, D.P.; Rowles, H.C.; Moss, J.A.; Pickering, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

2:00-2:30 Beverages, 2:30-4 PM Seminar Chevron operates two refineries on the west coast of California. Large parcels of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4/18/2014 2:00-2:30 Beverages, 2:30-4 PM Seminar Abstract Chevron operates two refineries fuel must be moved between the refineries by ship to balance production. The El Segundo Marine Terminal these vapors are returned to the refinery for processing via a vapor return pipeline. El Segundo's terminal

52

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1997. Domestically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 73.4 70 for the indium market remains promising. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

53

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Separations Process Research Unit -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separations Process Research Unit - Separations Process Research Unit - 024 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Separations Process Research Unit (024) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This facility was constructed and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission as a pilot plant for developing and testing the chemical processes to extract both uranium and plutonium from irradiated fuel. Through Fiscal Year 1999 the Department of Energy's Office of Naval Reactors performed surveillance and maintenance activities. In Fiscal Year 2000, a contract was initiated to begin the characterization of the facilities. This will be

55

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

56

Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries  

SciTech Connect

a summary of our collaborative 2005 project “Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries” at the Rio Oil and Gas Conference this September.

Holmgren, Jennifer; Arena, Blaise; Marinangelli, Richard; McCall, Michael; Marker, Terry; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Preliminary life-cycle assessment of biomass-derived refinery feedstocks for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions  

SciTech Connect

The US by ratification of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has pledged to emit no higher levels of greenhouse gases in the year 2000 than it did in 1990. Biomass-derived products have been touted as a possible solution to the potential problem of global warming. However, past studies related to the production of liquid fuels, chemicals, gaseous products, or electricity from biomass, have only considered the economics of producing these commodities. The environmental benefits have not been fully quantified and factored into these estimates until recently. Evaluating the environmental impact of various biomass systems has begun using life-cycle assessment. A refinery Linear Programming model previously developed has been modified to examine the effects of CO{sub 2}-capping on the US refining industry and the transportation sector as a whole. By incorporating the results of a CO{sub 2} emissions inventory into the model, the economic impact of emissions reduction strategies can be estimated. Thus, the degree to which global warming can be solved by supplementing fossil fuels with biomass-derived products can be measured, allowing research and development to be concentrated on the most environmentally and economically attractive technology mix. Biomass gasification to produce four different refinery feedstocks was considered in this analysis. These biomass-derived products include power, fuel gas, hydrogen for refinery processing, and Fischer-Tropsch liquids for upgrading and blending into finished transportation fuels.

Marano, J.J. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rogers, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Spath, P.L.; Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

High Performance Flow Simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Flow Simulations on Graphics Processing Units High Performance Flow Simulations on Graphics Processing Units Speaker(s): Wangda Zuo Date: June 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Building design and operation often requires real-time or faster-than-real-time simulations for detailed information on air distributions. However, none of the current flow simulation techniques can satisfy this requirement. To solve this problem, a Fast Fluid Dynamics (FFD) model has been developed. The FFD can solve Navier-Stokes equations at a speed of 50 times faster than Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In addition, the computing speed of the FFD program has been further enhanced up to 30 times by executing in parallel on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) instead of a Central Processing Unit (CPU). As a whole, the FFD on a GPU

59

Utilizing Solar Thermal Energy in Textile Processing Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents the prospects of solar thermal energy utilization in the textile processing units in Pakistan. Various solar thermal technologies suitable for thermal energy production and their application...

Asad Mahmood; Khanji Harijan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Refinery Production Planning: Multiperiod MINLP with Nonlinear CDU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as integrated planning and scheduling refinery operation models are recognized as key 1 Refinery Production Planning: Multiperiod MINLP with Nonlinear CDU Model-Rivera (2011) developed a single-period, nonlinear programing refinery planning model

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low temperature thermal treatment for petroleum refinery waste sludges  

SciTech Connect

Treatment requirements for waste sludges generated by petroleum refinery operations and designated as waste codes K048, K049, K050, K051 and K052 under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) became effective in November, 1990 under the Landban regulations. An experimental program evaluated low temperature thermal treatment of filter cakes produced from these sludges using laboratory and pilot-scale equipment. One set of experiments on waste samples from two different refineries demonstrated the effective removal of organics of concern from the sludges to meet the RCRA Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) treatment standards. Cyanides were also within the acceptable limit. Combined with stabilization of heavy metals in the treatment residues, low temperature thermal treatment therefore provides an effective and efficient means of treating refinery sludges, with most hydrocarbons recovered and recycled to the refinery. A milder thermal treatment was used to remove the bulk of the water from a previously filtered waste sludge, providing effective waste minimization through a 40% decrease in the mass of sludge to be disposed. The heating value of the sludge was increased simultaneously by one-third, thereby producing a residue of greater value in an alternative fuels program. A process based on this approach was successfully designed and commercialized.

Ayen, R.J.; Swanstrom, C.P. (Geneva Research Center, IL (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011 through June 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assessment of Refinery Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011 through June 2011 APRIL 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages / March 2011 - June 2011 ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages /

63

Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply 9302 Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply As a result of the new regulations issued by the U.S. Estimating Components of the Distillate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for ultra-low- Blend Pool sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) the U.S. refining industry faces two major challenges: to meet the more stringent specifi- The initial step of the analysis was to analyze the poten- cations for diesel product, and to keep up with demand tial economics of producing ULSD for each refinery. by producing more diesel product from feedstocks of Using input and output data submitted to the Energy lower quality. Some refineries in the United States and Information Administration (E1A) by refiners, the cur-

64

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

65

Chapter 6 - Alternative valorization routes (refinery, cogeneration, and rerefining residue)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Waste oil valorization in a refinery must be considered only after having done a complete feasibility evaluation. Wherever the waste oil is introduced, it should not modify the properties of the refinery products, or the normal operations or functions of the rerefining units. Most oil refineries are complex industrial sites characterized by a very large treated tonnage, a permanent operation of a continuous flow of products from desalination and atmospheric distillation upstream to the storage of finished products downstream passing through all the intermediate refining steps, and the necessity of adapting the units' operating conditions to the treated crude to maintain a good level of quality for the finished products. Other priorities include the need to increase the severity of operating conditions of hydrotreatment to produce gasoline, kerosene, and diesel oil from direct distillation or from thermal or catalytic cracking to comply with the standards for sulfur and aromatic compounds. These constraints provide a better understanding of the importance of alternative valorization routes.

François Audibert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Regional Refinery Utilization Shows Gulf Coast Pressure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: But there is some room for hope. Refineries generally begin maintenance in February or March, and finish in April. The East Coast was experiencing some lengthy refinery maintenance outages, as shown by the drop in utilization that remained low in most of March and April. In the meantime, the East Coast was drawing on extra supplies from the Gulf Coast and imports. The Midwest refineries seem to have been ramping up in April as they finished what maintenance was needed. But the Midwest no longer has the Blue Island refinery, so it also is pulling more product from the Gulf Coast. The high Gulf Coast prices this spring reflect extra "pull" on product from both the Midwest and the East Coast, and probably from California as well. Inputs into Gulf Coast refineries over the last 4 weeks

67

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Refining and upgrading  

SciTech Connect

The refinery and upgrade process development unit (PDU) is designed to upgrade liquid hydrocarbon products from the direct and indirect liquefaction PDU's to transportation fuels. The refinery will comprise of the following reactor systems: (a) Hydrotreating (b) Hydrocracking (c) Reforming. The three reactor systems will share common feed preparation, product separation and fractionation sections. The refinery is being designed to operate independently of the other PDU's. The use of common feed and product handling systems will permit operation of one process reactor system at a time in the refinery. In addition, the hydrotreater and hydrocracker will be operable in series. The process is designed to utilize intermediate storage and maximize the use of equipment.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Refining and upgrading  

SciTech Connect

The refinery and upgrade process development unit (PDU) is designed to upgrade liquid hydrocarbon products from the direct and indirect liquefaction PDU`s to transportation fuels. The refinery will comprise of the following reactor systems: (a) Hydrotreating (b) Hydrocracking (c) Reforming. The three reactor systems will share common feed preparation, product separation and fractionation sections. The refinery is being designed to operate independently of the other PDU`s. The use of common feed and product handling systems will permit operation of one process reactor system at a time in the refinery. In addition, the hydrotreater and hydrocracker will be operable in series. The process is designed to utilize intermediate storage and maximize the use of equipment.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

70

Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. Tb each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of {open_quotes}present{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}absent{close_quotes} were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refiner&y work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9,95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5,95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). 53 refs., 7 tabs.

Poole, C.; Dreyer, N.A.; Satterfield, M.H. [Epidemiology Resources Inc., Newton Lower Falls, MA (United States); Levin, L. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Case Study in Developing Process Unit Energy Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the 2005 IETC Conference, KBC (Davis and Knight) submitted a paper on Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into a Plant Energy Managemenet System. For the 2006 conference, KBC wishes to submit a paper that details an actual case study where...

Davis, J. L.; Van Atta, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries Â… Past Changes and Future Potential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Potential U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Department of Energy Office of Policy and International Affairs October 2010 Summary World consumption growth for middle distillate fuels (diesel fuel, heating oil, kerosene, and jet fuel) has exceeded the consumption growth for gasoline for some time, and the United States is no exception. Although the decrease in the ratio of total gasoline consumption to consumption for middle distillate fuels has been small in the United States, recent legislation requiring increased use of renewable fuels has resulted in forecasts that project a decline in consumption for petroleum-based gasoline from refineries, which would accelerate the decline in the

73

From the Woods to the Refinery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

74

Esso Chemie to use HTP process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Esso Chemie will be the first licensee of the Hoechst high-temperature pyroly-sis (HTP) acetylene process (see Brief, page 46). The German affiliate of Esso Chemical will build its HTP unit at Esso, A.G.'s refinery at Cologne, West Germany. Capacity will ...

1966-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Restoration of Refinery Heaters Using the Technique of Prefabricated Ceramic Fiber Lined Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery heater fuel requirements often represent 50% of a units operating cost. A one percent change in the efficiency of a heater firing 100 MBtu/hr amounts to more than $25,000 per year. Heater efficiency is influenced by casing hot spots, air...

Sento, H. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

U.S. Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 Finished Motor Gasoline 44.4 44.1 44.4 43.9 43.9 44.9 1993-2013 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 10.0 9.1 9.3 9.4 9.8 9.6 1993-2013 Kerosene 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 1993-2013 Distillate Fuel Oil 28.4 29.4 28.7 29.2 29.3 29.7 1993-2013 Residual Fuel Oil 3.3 2.9 2.8 2.8 2.5 2.6 1993-2013 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.5 1.5 1993-2013 Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1993-2013 Special Naphthas 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.2 1993-2013 Lubricants 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1993-2013 Waxes

77

U.S. Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.3 4.0 4.1 1993-2012 Finished Motor Gasoline 45.5 44.2 46.1 45.7 44.9 45.0 1993-2012 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 9.1 9.7 9.3 9.3 9.4 9.5 1993-2012 Kerosene 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012 Distillate Fuel Oil 26.1 27.8 26.9 27.5 28.9 29.1 1993-2012 Residual Fuel Oil 4.2 4.0 4.0 3.8 3.4 3.2 1993-2012 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.0 1.3 1.4 1.3 1.3 1993-2012 Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.2 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 1993-2012 Special Naphthas 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 1993-2012 Lubricants 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 1993-2012 Waxes 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012

78

,"U.S. Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sulfur Content (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Percent)","U.S. API Gravity (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Degrees)" 31062,0.88,32.64...

79

,"U.S. Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sulfur Content (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Percent)","U.S. API Gravity (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Degrees)" 31228,0.91,32.46...

80

Steam System Management Program Yields Fuel Savings for Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Phillips refinery at Borger, Texas, determined the need to develop a utility monitoring system. Shortly after this commitment was made, the refinery was introduced to a flowsheet modeling program that could be used to model and optimize steam...

Gaines, L. D.; Hagan, K. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A portable measurement system for power profiling of processing units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper deals with the design and the metrologic characterization of a portable power consumption measurement system capable to correlate the average power consumption of a central processing unit to processor performance. A survey of power measurement systems designed for the evaluation of computer energy performance is provided. The design steps for the proposed power measurement system and its comprehensive hardware and software descriptions are reported. Furthermore, a calibration procedure of the power measurement system is described. Five benchmark tests have been executed on an Intel Pentium D processor and the measured power loads are reported and discussed.

F. Picariello; S. Rapuano; U. Villano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Technology Profiles: Gasification and SupportingGasification.to be carried out. 18.5 Gasification Gasification provides

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electrodialysis Treatment of Refinery Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is fundamental in the oil refining process,...3 water being consumed per m3 of oil processed. Water is used in the oil refining process ... general. Industries are having difficulties in obtaining water due...

Mara de Barros Machado; Vânia M. J. Santiago

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fluor to expand Marathon's Detroit refinery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluor Corp will provide integrated engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) for Marathon Oil Corp's projected US$1.9 billion expansion and upgrade of the company's Detroit refinery. The US$1.6 billion EPC contract includes services, the value of procured materials and the construction contracts under Fluor's direct management.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU Crude1, ... Crude2, .... butane Fuel gas Prem. Gasoline Reg. Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum Product Blending 4 #12;Planning Model Example Information Given Refinery

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

87

High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Implementing wide baseline matching algorithms on a graphics processing unit.  

SciTech Connect

Wide baseline matching is the state of the art for object recognition and image registration problems in computer vision. Though effective, the computational expense of these algorithms limits their application to many real-world problems. The performance of wide baseline matching algorithms may be improved by using a graphical processing unit as a fast multithreaded co-processor. In this paper, we present an implementation of the difference of Gaussian feature extractor, based on the CUDA system of GPU programming developed by NVIDIA, and implemented on their hardware. For a 2000x2000 pixel image, the GPU-based method executes nearly thirteen times faster than a comparable CPU-based method, with no significant loss of accuracy.

Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Larson, Kurt W.; Gonzales, Antonio Ignacio; Myers, Daniel S.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Conte, Riccardo [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Ceotto, Michele, E-mail: michele.ceotto@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 & 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT  

SciTech Connect

FINAL INTERIM REPORT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FINAL STATUS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 AND 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT, Niskayuna, New York 0496-SR-03-0. The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) facilities were constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction/oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes that were subsequently used by the Hanford and the Savannah River sites.

M.G. JADICK

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

1994 lubricating oil and wax capacities of U. S. and Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

The paper consists of several tables which list the names of US and Canadian refineries, their location, and their capacity for production of lubricating oil and waxes categorized by finishing operations and primary processing. A separate table lists US and Canadian re-refiners and their capacity for refining waste lubricating oils.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Isom process gets first U. S. application  

SciTech Connect

The National Cooperative Refinery Association (NCRA) is operating the first total isomerization process (TIP) unit in the U.S. at its McPherson, Kan. refinery. The unit is designed to process 8,300 b/d of pentanes and hexanes from a light straight-run (LSR), natural gasoline and light coker naphtha. The total isomerate has an unleaded research octane number (RON) of 89, which is about 17 numbers above the feed. This extra octane has permitted NCRA to reduce its reformer severity and improve reformer yield. TIP is practiced overseas to upgrade the octane of C/sub 5//C/sub 6/ feedstocks. Units have been built in Japan, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, and Norway. But NCRA is the first to operate one in the U.S.

Holcombe, T.C.; Pederson, M.L.

1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

95

Apply process integration to waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a systematic method for identifying process modifications to minimize waste generation. It is based on the hierarchical decision procedure, which provides a framework for identifying process improvement options and evaluating heat and mass integration opportunities. The article deals specifically with an adaptation of the hierarchical decision approach for use in pollution abatement applications. The article also illustrates the use of the technique by applying it to the fluid catalytic cracking unit at Amoco Oil Co.'s Yorktown, VA, refinery.

Rossiter, A.P.; Spriggs, H.D. (Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, VA (United States)); Klee, H. Jr. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

U.S. Refinery Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area: U.S. PADD 1 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 PADD 2 Ind., Ill. and Ky. Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. Okla., Kans., Mo. PADD 3 Texas Inland Texas Gulf Coast La. Gulf Coast N. La., Ark New Mexico PADD 4 PADD 5 Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels Area: U.S. PADD 1 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 PADD 2 Ind., Ill. and Ky. Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. Okla., Kans., Mo. PADD 3 Texas Inland Texas Gulf Coast La. Gulf Coast N. La., Ark New Mexico PADD 4 PADD 5 Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 353,802 345,413 343,062 345,025 342,763 342,727 1993-2013 Crude Oil 97,563 90,880 93,075 97,586 90,778 91,946 1981-2013 Petroleum Products 256,239 254,533 249,987 247,439 251,985 250,781 1993-2013

97

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Operable Date of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 11. New, Shutdown and Reactivated Refineries During 2012 a b REACTIVATED PAD District I 185,000 366,700 Monroe Energy LLC Trainer, PA 185,000 366,700 09/12 c SHUTDOWN PAD District I 80,000 47,000 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District III 16,800 19,500 Western Refining Southwest Inc Bloomfield, NM 16,800 19,500 12/09 11/12 PAD District VI 500,000 1,086,000 Hovensa LLC Kingshill, VI 500,000 1,086,000 02/12 02/12 a b bbl/cd=Barrels per calendar day. bbl/sd=Barrels per stream day. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report" and Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report." c Formerly owned by ConocoPhillips Company.

98

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 83-248-1515, Arco Philadelphia refinery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

A bulk sample of fractionator residue was analyzed for polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds at the catalytic cracking unit of ARCO Philadelphia Refinery (SIC-2911), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in May, 1983. The study was requested by the Atlantic Independent Union to determine if skin rashes and skin irritation occurring among refinery workers were caused by PNA in the fractionators. The authors conclude that a health hazard from exposure to chemicals at the cracking unit may exist. No specific chemical agent can be identified. Dust from the catalyst and oily residues that could contaminate workers shoes and clothing may have contributed to some of the dermatitis cases. Recommendations include laundering workers coveralls by dry cleaning to insure the removal of oily residues, providing workers with oil resistant or oil proof work boots, and repairing the ventilator in the sample preparation room adjacent to the block house.

Lewis, F.A.; Parrish, G.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening June 2, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for (Acting) Deputy Secretary Kupfer Today, Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey Kupfer delivered remarks at the launch of GreenHunter Energy's biodiesel refinery, which will be the nation's single largest biodiesel refinery, producing 105 million gallons of "white-water" B100 biodiesel per year. Thank you Gary. I'm pleased to join with Governor Perry, Congressmen Green and Lampson, and Mayor Garcia in celebrating this important occasion. Today, as we open the nation's largest biodiesel refinery, we reach another milestone in our effort to make America more energy secure. As you know, global energy demand is surging. We must act swiftly and aggressively to

100

FLOCKING-BASED DOCUMENT CLUSTERING ON THE GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT  

SciTech Connect

Analyzing and grouping documents by content is a complex problem. One explored method of solving this problem borrows from nature, imitating the fl ocking behavior of birds. Each bird represents a single document and fl ies toward other documents that are similar to it. One limitation of this method of document clustering is its complexity O(n2). As the number of documents grows, it becomes increasingly diffi cult to receive results in a reasonable amount of time. However, fl ocking behavior, along with most naturally inspired algorithms such as ant colony optimization and particle swarm optimization, are highly parallel and have experienced improved performance on expensive cluster computers. In the last few years, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has received attention for its ability to solve highly-parallel and semi-parallel problems much faster than the traditional sequential processor. Some applications see a huge increase in performance on this new platform. The cost of these high-performance devices is also marginal when compared with the price of cluster machines. In this paper, we have conducted research to exploit this architecture and apply its strengths to the document flocking problem. Our results highlight the potential benefi t the GPU brings to all naturally inspired algorithms. Using the CUDA platform from NVIDIA®, we developed a document fl ocking implementation to be run on the NVIDIA® GEFORCE 8800. Additionally, we developed a similar but sequential implementation of the same algorithm to be run on a desktop CPU. We tested the performance of each on groups of news articles ranging in size from 200 to 3,000 documents. The results of these tests were very signifi cant. Performance gains ranged from three to nearly fi ve times improvement of the GPU over the CPU implementation. This dramatic improvement in runtime makes the GPU a potentially revolutionary platform for document clustering algorithms.

Charles, J.S.; Patton, R.M.; Potok, T.E.; Cui, X.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

serving Philadelphia-area refineries primarily handle crude oil and their docks and tanks are not equipped to offload waterborne products. Figure 1. Petroleum Product Assets in...

102

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

low-emission operation across a broad range of fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas. Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering...

103

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refineries with specific energy and cost savings data whenoperations. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%the potential energy and cost-savings (Frangopoluos et al. ,

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Projection and Reaction for Decision Support in Refineries: Combining Multiple Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system to provide decision support for refinery operations personnel (Krebsbach & Musliner 1997; Musliner) used to optimize control parameters during normal operations. Current Refinery Operations HumanProjection and Reaction for Decision Support in Refineries: Combining Multiple Theories Kurt D

Krebsbach, Kurt D.

105

Real-space calculation of powder diffraction patterns on graphics processing units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows how the power of graphics processing units can be exploited to compute the powder diffraction pattern of nano-sized objects.

Gelisio, L.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)  

SciTech Connect

Pre-extraction–kraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called “near neutral” pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 °C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the “near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the “near-neutral” green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Naphthenic acid corrosion in refinery settings  

SciTech Connect

Naphthenic acid corrosion has been a problem in the refining industry for many years. Recently interest in this problem has grown because crudes that contain naphthenic acid are being recovered from areas which were not known to produce this type of crude, such as china, India, and Africa. New techniques for identifying naphthenic acid corrosion and chemical treatments for preventing this attack are presented. Refinery case studies include stream analysis, failure analysis, and inhibitor use. Laboratory tests to show the effect of hydrogen sulfide and phosphorus-based inhibitors are discussed.

Babaian-Kibala, E. (Nalco Chemical Co., Sugar Land, TX (United States)); Craig, H.L. Jr. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)); Rusk, G.L. (Mobil Oil Co., Torrance, CA (United States)); Blanchard, K.V.; Rose, T.J.; Uehlein, B.L. (Nalco Chemical Co., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)); Quinter, R.C. (Sun Co., Newtown Square, PA (United States)); Summers, M.A. (Sun Co., Marcus Hook, PA (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Gasoline Blending Components Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants...

109

Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts  

SciTech Connect

Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

Hadder, G.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Raman Scattering Sensor for Control of the Acid Alkylation Process in Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

Gasoline refineries utilize a process called acid alkylation to increase the octane rating of blended gasoline, and this is the single most expensive process in the refinery. For process efficiency and safety reasons, the sulfuric acid can only be used while it is in the concentration range of 98 to 86 %. The conventional technique to monitor the acid concentration is time consuming and is typically conducted only a few times per day. This results in running higher acid concentrations than they would like to ensure that the process proceeds uninterrupted. Maintaining an excessively high acid concentration costs the refineries millions of dollars each year. Using SBIR funding, Process Instruments Inc. has developed an inline sensor for real time monitoring of acid concentrations in gasoline refinery alkylation units. Real time data was then collected over time from the instrument and its responses were matched up with the laboratory analysis. A model was then developed to correlate the laboratory acid values to the Raman signal that is transmitted back to the instrument from the process stream. The instrument was then used to demonstrate that it could create real-time predictions of the acid concentrations. The results from this test showed that the instrument could accurately predict the acid concentrations to within ~0.15% acid strength, and this level of prediction proved to be similar or better then the laboratory analysis. By utilizing a sensor for process monitoring the most economic acid concentrations can be maintained. A single smaller refinery (50,000 barrels/day) estimates that they should save over $120,000/year, with larger refineries saving considerably more.

Uibel, Rory, H.; Smith, Lee M.; Benner, Robert, E.

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS ENGINEERING UNIT (PEU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0092 UC-61 ORNIA LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSLBL~l0092 LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSof Energy LBL CONTINUOUS BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION PROCESS

Figueroa, Carlos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages, December 2008 - March 2009 reviews planned U.S. refinery outages from December 2008 though March 2009 in order to identify any regions where outages might create enough supply pressure to impact prices significantly. As required under Section 804 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-140), this report reviews the supply implications of planned refinery outages for December 2008 through March 2009, which covers the winter period when demand for distillate fuels (diesel and heating oil) is high. As a result, emphasis in this report is on distillate rather than gasoline. Refinery outages are the result of planned maintenance and unplanned outages. Maintenance is usually scheduled during the times when demand is lowest - in the first quarter and again in the fall. Unplanned outages, which occur for many reasons including mechanical failures, fires, and flooding, can occur at any time.

113

Energy Input per Unit Length – High Accuracy Kinematic Metrology in Laser Material Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser material processes require constant energy input per unit length. Besides focal z-position, spot size, laser power and other process parameters, the relative travel speed (feed rate) of the laser spot on the work piece has the highest influence on the resulting energy input per unit length. In this paper a new metrology method is introduced, which enables users in industry and research to measure the real travel speed of the laser spot and the resulting contour of the trajectory.

Christoph Franz; Peter Abels; Raphael Rolser; Michael Becker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking December 10, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Bill. It's good to see Congressman Poe, Rob Routs, Mr. Al-Khayyal and Mayor Prince here. Thank you all for inviting me to be part of this occasion. In 1901 Texas wildcatters struck oil near here at a place called Spindletop, setting off the Texas Oil Boom. Like the California Gold Rush some 50 years before, the Texas Oil Boom helped to build America. People moved across the country in search of prosperity. To achieve it, they needed to develop new technologies and build new infrastructure like the original parts of the Port Arthur refinery, which opened here in 1903. As America's need for energy expanded as our demand for oil and gas

115

Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet details a project to improve operating procedures, including physical and chemical methods and the use of high-temperature coatings, to allow refineries to operate equipment below threshold fouling conditions and use the most effective minimization techniques.

116

Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

Vari, J.

117

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A., Rome, Italy ABSTRACT Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NO emissions while also generating electricity ~t an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented..., described in Figure 1, 2. The combustion oxygen is carried by a more I I i I' has been used as a design basis. The heater is based on the actual design of a unit built by KTI SpA. The furnace does not include air preheater or steam generation...

Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

119

U.S. Refinery Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 5,383,494 5,119,100 4,676,865 4,568,301 4,484,600 4,395,128 2005-2012 Liquefied Refinery Gases 238,904 230,431 227,470 240,454 225,992 230,413 2005-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 7,323 6,671 7,069 7,228 7,148 6,597 2005-2012 Ethane 5,145 4,608 5,229 5,200 5,105 4,835 2005-2012 Ethylene 2,178 2,063 1,840 2,028 2,043 1,762 2005-2012 Propane/Propylene 205,179 190,020 196,011 204,223 201,492 202,309 2005-2012 Propane 120,596 114,268 106,177 102,913 98,508 100,933 2005-2012 Propylene 84,583 75,752 89,834 101,310 102,984 101,376 2005-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,285 30,887 24,148 30,281 17,449 20,580 2005-2012 Normal Butane 25,715 33,092 25,825 32,094 19,263 22,965 2005-2012

120

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Last of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 13. Refineries Permanently Shutdown By PAD District Between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 2013 PAD District I 542,450 GNC Energy Corp Greensboro, NC 3,000 0 a Primary Energy Corp Richmond, VA 6,100 0 a Saint Mary's Refining Co Saint Mary's, WV 4,000 4,480 02/93 03/93 Cibro Refining Albany, NY 41,850 27,000 07/93 09/93 Calumet Lubricants Co LP Rouseville, PA 12,800 26,820 03/00 06/00 Young Refining Corp. Douglasville, GA 5,400 0 07/04 07/04 Sunoco Inc Westville, NJ 145,000 263,000 11/09 02/10 Western Refining Yorktown Inc Yorktown, VA 66,300 182,600 09/10 12/11 Sunoco Inc Marcus Hook, PA 178,000 278,000 12/11 12/11 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District II 460,315 Coastal Refining & Mktg El Dorado, KS 0 20,000 b Intercoastal Energy Svcs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of feedstock; and a blender unit which blends feedstock and gasoline stock (at no loss). (Note that "ONA blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production in feedstock (maximum 200,000 bbl/day) and produces gasoline stock with 98 ON at a rate of .5 bbl per bbl

Galvin, David

122

A methodical study of reliability analysis of the crude oil unit in processing heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to analyse the safety and reliability issues on the crude oil unit in processing heavy oil. Based on the discussions of the corrosion mechanism, it uses fault tree analysis to identify the key factors that may lead to failure of crude oil unit when processing heavy oil. It has found that factors such as temperature, consistence, relatively move speed and material, critically affect the corrosion rate of the naphthenic acid. In order to explore the relationships between the identified factors and the corrosion rate of the naphthenic acid, this paper uses artificial neural networks to identify such normally non-linear relationships. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to collect data of the corrosion rate using different materials in different temperatures, consistence and velocity. The analyses show that the proposed research method is sound and can be used in safety and reliability analysis of crude oil unit in processing heavy oil.

Qingyou Liu; Guorong Wang; Yan Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Linkage options between unit process to enhance proliferation resistance of pyroprocessing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pyroprocessing technology has been actively developed at KAERI as one of the options to address the national spent fuel management issue. As much as the unit process development itself, the linkage method between each unit process is also of importance. There may be different linkage options between a set of two process units, or different options caused by different technologies for one of two unit processes connected to each other. The linkage method may affect the loss of nuclear materials and distribution of fission products, which are essential from the safeguards and proliferation resistance points of view. In this study, different technology options for some of the major process steps and possible linkage options were identified, and aspects of their proliferation resistance including the impact on the safeguards are discussed. Several options for decladding and feeding to electro-reduction, dross and the residual salt treatment of reduced materials as well as feeding to electro-refining, and salt transfer from electro-refining to electro-winning were identified and their technical and proliferation resistance aspects were analyzed. This study does not conclude any ranking of each option or suggest which option is the best. It is important to note that the objectives to review the process and linkage options are to give the basic characteristics and technical information related to safeguards measures and proliferation resistance and to suggest a conceptual idea for certain options to investigate further and enhance those aspects.

Seong-Kyu Ahn; Chung-Seok Seo; Eun-ha Kwon; Ho-Dong Kim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Stream Vector Processing Unit: Stream Processing Using SIMD on a General  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of register files, this architecture will use memory bandwidth more efficiently by exploiting locality in data instructions, we believe that we can utilize the memory bandwidth much more efficiently. In the rest architecture gives us the benefits of a vector unit together with a wide-issue superscalar processor

Rixner, Scott

125

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Rare Metals Refinery Inc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rare Metals Refinery Rare Metals Refinery Inc - NY 38 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Rare Metals Refinery, Inc. (NY.38 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Canadian Radium and Uranium Corporation NY.38-1 Location: 69 Kisko Avenue , Mt. Kisko , New York NY.38-1 NY.38-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.38-4 Site Operations: Manufactured and distributed radium and polonium products. NY.38-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Site was a commercial operation not under the jurisdiction of DOE predecessor agencies NY.38-2 NY.38-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radium, Plutonium NY.38-5 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NY.38-1 NY.38-5 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

126

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

127

Process-circuit and layout solutions for steam-turbine units and performance efficiency of thermal power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Criteria for evaluating process-circuit and layout solutions adopted in designing steam-turbine units are presented together with their values for a number of steam-turbine units produced by the Ural Turbine Work...

A. A. Gol’dberg; T. L. Shibaev

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

129

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

130

Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units--Radial distribution function histogramming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ulti- mate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four

Southern California, University of

131

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced 2013 Available online 5 November 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cells Refinery wastewater Biodegradability Separator electrode assembly a b s t r a c t The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW

132

Perception of an emergency Situation by operators in an oil refinery L.Pioche&J.RPineau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perception of an emergency Situation by operators in an oil refinery L.Pioche&J.RPineau Institut de the operators' behaviour during an emergency Situation m an oil refinery. The aim ofthis stage the general objective is to analyse the operators' behaviour during an emergency Situation in an oil refinery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

Bio-refinery of Orange peels waste. a New Concept based on Integrated Green and Solvent Free Extraction Processes Using Ultrasound and Microwave Techniques to Obtain Essential Oil, Polyphenols and Pectin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, extraction of essential oil, polyphenols and pectin from orange peel has been optimized using microwave and ultrasound technology without adding any solvent but only “in situ” water which was recycled and used as solvent. The essential oil extraction performed by Microwave Hydrodiffusion and Gravity (MHG) was optimized and compared to steam distillation extraction (SD). No significant changes in yield were noticed: 4.22±0.03% and 4.16±0.05% for MHG and SD respectively. After extraction of essential oil, residual water of plant obtained after MHG extraction was used as solvent for polyphenols and pectin extraction from MHG residues. Polyphenols extraction was performed by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE). Response surface methodology (RSM) using central composite designs (CCD) approach was launched to investigate the influence of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). The statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions of ultrasound power and temperature were 0.956 W/cm2 and 59.83 °C giving a polyphenol yield of 50.02 mg GA/ 100 g dm. Compared with the conventional extraction (CE), the UAE gave an increase of 30% in TPC yield. Pectin was extracted by conventional and Microwave assisted extraction. This technique gives a maximal yield of 24.2% for microwave power of 500 W in only 3 min whereas conventional extraction gives 18.32% in 120 min. Combination of microwave, ultrasound and the recycled “in situ” water of citrus peels allow us to obtain high added values compounds in shorter time and managed to make a closed loop using only natural resources provided by the plant which makes the whole process intensified in term of time and energy saving, cleanliness and reduced waste water.

Meryem Boukroufa; Chahrazed Boutekedjiret; Loïc Petigny; Njara Rakotomanomana; Farid Chemat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery Site, Oklahoma City, OK, September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Fourth Street Refinery Site (FSR site), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, for the Ground Water Operable Unit. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the contamination in the ground water, which includes non-aqueous phase liquids. Principal threat wastes include 'pools' of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) submerged beneath the ground water or in fractured bedrock, or NAPLs floating on water. This Ground Water Operable Unit addresses the principal threat at the site by monitoring the ground water to ensure that the contaminant levels are reduced with time due to natural attenuation, once the surface contamination is removed.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fast, multi-channel real-time processing of signals with microsecond latency using graphics processing units  

SciTech Connect

Fast, digital signal processing (DSP) has many applications. Typical hardware options for performing DSP are field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), application-specific integrated DSP chips, or general purpose personal computer systems. This paper presents a novel DSP platform that has been developed for feedback control on the HBT-EP tokamak device. The system runs all signal processing exclusively on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to achieve real-time performance with latencies below 8 ?s. Signals are transferred into and out of the GPU using PCI Express peer-to-peer direct-memory-access transfers without involvement of the central processing unit or host memory. Tests were performed on the feedback control system of the HBT-EP tokamak using forty 16-bit floating point inputs and outputs each and a sampling rate of up to 250 kHz. Signals were digitized by a D-TACQ ACQ196 module, processing done on an NVIDIA GTX 580 GPU programmed in CUDA, and analog output was generated by D-TACQ AO32CPCI modules.

Rath, N., E-mail: Nikolaus@rath.org; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 500 W 120th St, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 500 W 120th St, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Kato, S. [Department of Information Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Information Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units 15,027 14,659 15,177 15,289 15,373 15,724 1985-2013 Operable Capacity (Calendar...

137

Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Name Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Address P.O. Box 30078 Place Yanbu, Saudi Arabia Sector Oil and Gas Product Crude Oil Refining Phone number (966) (4) 396-4443 Website http://www.samref.com.sa/ Coordinates 24.0866932°, 38.0585527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.0866932,"lon":38.0585527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

18,146 17,882 18,452 18,673 18,564 19,106 1983-2013 Liquefied Refinery Gases 630 623 659 619 630 623 1984-2013 EthaneEthylene 18 19 20 20 18 7 1985-2013 Ethane 13 14 14 14 13 7...

140

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARp?) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution Benjamin Brant Sabine Brueske Donald Erickson Riyaz Papar Planetec Planetec Energy Concepts Company Energy... in Denver, Colorado. The Waste Heat Ammo nia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP?) is based on a patented process and cycle design developed by Energy Concepts Co. (ECC) to cost effectively re cover 73,000 barrels a year of salable LPGs and gasoline...

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Appendix  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix Appendix The preceding report is the most comprehensive report published by the EIA on natural gas processing plants in the United States. The data in the report for the year 2008 were collected on Form EIA-757, Natural Gas Processing Survey Schedule A, which was fielded to EIA respondents in the latter part of 2008 for the first time. This survey was used to collect information on the capacity, status, and operations of natural gas processing plants and to monitor constraints of natural gas processing plants during periods of supply disruption in areas affected by an emergency, such as a hurricane. EIA received authorization to collect information on processing plants from the Office of Management and Budget in early 2008. The form consists of two parts, Schedule A and Schedule B. Schedule A is

142

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

143

Designating marine protected areas in the United States and Ecuador: understanding the decision-making process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are central federal agencies and field bureaucracies, producer interests, consumer interests and occasionally Congress. Examples of producer interests in marine policy would be commercial fisheries, and the hydrocarbon industry. Examples of consumer... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences DESIGNATING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ECUADOR: UNDERSTANDING THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS A Thesis by AMRIT WORK KENDRICK A...

Kendrick, Amrit Work

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced refinery process heater. Annual report, October 1983-September 1984  

SciTech Connect

Activity during the first year of this project has focused on the conceptual design of the prototype heater and on the development of a custom-designed Pyrocore ceramic fiber burner for the heater. Three different concepts for the prototype heater have been produced, one of them modeled after a vertical cylindrical design and the other two resembling box-type heaters. All three concepts take advantage of the Pyrocore burner's flameless characteristic to make the heater more compact. Concerning the development of the burners, two different geometries were considered. Subscale prototypes of each type of burner were fabricated and tested. The more successful burners used actively-cooled edges to maintain the integrity of the gas-tight seals. Work on this project in the second year will include the design and fabrication of the 10 MMBtu/hr prototype heater, using the most feasible heater and burner designs developed during the first year.

Schreiber, R.J.; Gotterba, J.A.; Minden, A.C.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Large-scale simulations on multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for the direct simulation Monte Carlo method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the application of the two-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method using an MPI-CUDA parallelization paradigm on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) clusters is presented. An all-device (i.e. GPU) computational approach is ... Keywords: Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), MPI-CUDA, Parallel direct simulation Monte Carlo, Rarefied gas dynamics, Very large-scale simulation

C. -C. Su; M. R. Smith; F. -A. Kuo; J. -S. Wu; C. -W. Hsieh; K. -C. Tseng

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010 through January 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10)/2 10)/2 Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010 through January 2011 November 2010 Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. E nergy Information Adminis tration Market As s es s ment of P lanned R

147

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2009 through January 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09)/2 09)/2 Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2009 through January 2010 November 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views herein should not be construed as representing those of the Department or the Administration. Preface and Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical

148

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A novel KICA–PCA fault detection model for condition process of hydroelectric generating unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fault detection and diagnosis of hydroelectric generating unit (HGU) have significant importance to the security of hydropower plant and the power system. In recent years, many fault detection methods based on spectral characteristic of vibration signals have been published. However, some faults cannot be effectively recognized just with spectral features for condition process monitoring of HGU. Thus, this study presents a novel fault detection model based on kernel independent component analysis and principal component analysis (KICA–PCA) monitoring model for condition process of HGU. Each of the condition processes is equivalent to a multivariate statistical process monitoring (MSPM). KICA–PCA model of the specific MSPM is trained by normal condition process data at first. Then, confidence limits of two monitoring indices (Hotelling’s T2 statistic and SPE statistic) of the trained KICA–PCA model are used to monitor the same condition process and detect fault online. Moreover, the proposed monitoring model is applied to a real condition process of HGU. Compared to ICA–PCA and PCA monitoring model, the proposed model has superior performance in fault detection.

Wenlong Zhu; Jianzhong Zhou; Xin Xia; Chaoshun Li; Jian Xiao; Han Xiao; Xinxin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Plant Utilization Data collected for 2009 show that the States with the highest total processing capacity are among the States with the highest average utilization rates. This is to be expected as most of the plants are located in production areas that have been prolific for many years. In fact, the five States situated along the Gulf of Mexico accounted for nearly 49 percent of total processing volume in 2009. The total utilization rate in the United States averaged 66 percent of total capacity in 2009 (Table 2). Plants in Alaska ran at 86 percent of total capacity during the year, the highest capacity utilization rate in the country. Texas had significant utilization capacity at 71 percent, for an average of 14 Bcf per day of natural gas in 2009. However, a number of

151

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States The Gulf of Mexico area, which includes the States of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, has in the past accounted for the majority of natural gas production. Processing plants are especially important in this part of the country because of the amount of NGLs in the natural gas produced and existence of numerous petro-chemical plants seeking that feedstock in this area. Consequently, the States along the Gulf of Mexico are home to the largest number of plants and the most processing capacity in the United States. Natural gas produced in this area of the country is typically rich in NGLs and requires processing before it is pipeline-quality dry natural gas. Offshore natural gas production can contain more than 4 gallons of

152

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

SciTech Connect

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Modeling and Multi-objective Optimization of Refinery Hydrogen Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The demand of hydrogen in oil refinery is increasing as market forces and environmental legislation, so hydrogen network management is becoming increasingly important in refineries. Most studies focused on single- objective optimization problem for the hydrogen network, but few account for the multi-objective optimization problem. This paper presents a novel approach for modeling and multi-objective optimization for hydrogen network in refineries. An improved multi-objective optimization model is proposed based on the concept of superstructure. The optimization includes minimization of operating cost and minimization of investment cost of equipment. The proposed methodology for the multi-objective optimization of hydrogen network takes into account flow rate constraints, pressure constraints, purity constraints, impurity constraints, payback period, etc. The method considers all the feasible connections and subjects this to mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP). A deterministic optimization method is applied to solve this multi-objective optimization problem. Finally, a real case study is introduced to illustrate the applicability of the approach.

Yunqiang JIAO; Hongye SU; Zuwei LIAO; Weifeng HOU

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Chapter 5 - Gasification Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary There is a broad range of reactor types that are used in the practical realization of the gasification process. For most purposes, these reactor types can be grouped into one of three categories: moving-bed gasifiers, fluid-bed gasifiers, and entrained-flow gasifiers. Moving-bed processes are the oldest processes, and two processes in particular, the producer gas process and the water gas process, have played an important role in the production of synthesis gas from coal and coke. In moving bed processes, there are the sasol-lurgi dry bottom process, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) slagging gasifier, that are detailed in the chapter along with their applications. Following this, fluid-bed processes are discussed in which the blast has two functions: that of blast as a reactant and that of the fluidizing medium for the bed. The best known fluid-bed gasifiers that have no tar problem are regenerators of catalytic cracking units that often operate under reducing, that is, gasification conditions that can be found in many refineries. HRL process, BHEL gasifier, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) processes, the KBR transport gasifier, agglomerating fluid-bed processes, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) gasifier, the GEE gasification process, the Shell Gasification Process (SGP), Lurgi’ s Multi-Purpose Gasification process (MPG), etc. are the various processes discussed in the chapter.

Christopher Higman; Maarten van der Burgt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Demchik, Vadim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Vadim Demchik

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

MTG process in a fluidized bed with catalyst circulation: Operation and simulation of an experimental unit  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of the MTG process has been studied in a fluidized bed with circulation of the catalyst (prepared based on a HZSM-5 zeolite). The simulation has been carried out by taking into account the activity distribution of the catalyst particles in the bed and by using experimentally determined kinetic models for the reaction at zero time on stream and for the catalyst deactivation. The results of the simulation have been proven in an experimental laboratory unit by operating in the range between 380 and 420 C, with different values of space time and of average residence time of the catalyst.

Ortega, J.M.; Gayubo, A.G.; Aguayo, A.T.; Olazar, M.; Bilbao, J. [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'.... '|le , * f C. '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum · UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a perpetual .ease- ment right to a strip of land, 10 feet wide and 3600 feet long. The area is located in North Tonawanda, New York near the Niagara River. Because of the growth of adjacent industries, this particular piece of property has appreciated in value. During its tenure as responsible property management office, Oak

160

U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units 15,283 15,709 16,327 16,490 16,306 16,162 1985-2013 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 17,814 17,815 17,815 17,815 17,815 17,818 1985-2013 Operating 17,005 17,228 17,239 17,450 17,439 17,623 1985-2013 Idle 809 587 576 365 376 195 1985-2013 Operable Utilization Rate (%) 85.8 88.2 91.7 92.6 91.5 90.7 1985-2013 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table. Release Date: 11/27/2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Application of Graphics Processing Units to Search Pipeline for Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binaries of Compact Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a novel application of graphics processing units (GPUs) for the purpose of accelerating the search pipelines for gravitational waves from coalescing binaries of compact objects. A speed-up of 16 fold has been achieved compared with a single central processing unit (CPU). We show that substantial improvements are possible and discuss the reduction in CPU count required for the detection of inspiral sources afforded by the use of GPUs.

Shin Kee Chung; Linqing Wen; David Blair; Kipp Cannon; Amitava Datta

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Energy Conservation in Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY CONSERVATION IN PROCESS HEATERS Roger l~. Bagge Neste Engineering Porvoo, Finland ABSTRACT OPTIMIZATION OF EMER~Y USE Energy savings in refinery and petrochemical fired heaters can basically be achieved in two ways: Thru optimization...

Bagge, R. W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Bayesian Treed Multivariate Gaussian Process with Adaptive Design: Application to a Carbon Capture Unit  

SciTech Connect

Computer experiments (numerical simulations) are widely used in scientific research to study and predict the behavior of complex systems, which usually have responses consisting of a set of distinct outputs. The computational cost of the simulations at high resolution are often expensive and become impractical for parametric studies at different input values. To overcome these difficulties we develop a Bayesian treed multivariate Gaussian process (BTMGP) as an extension of the Bayesian treed Gaussian process (BTGP) in order to model and evaluate a multivariate process. A suitable choice of covariance function and the prior distributions facilitates the different Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) movements. We utilize this model to sequentially sample the input space for the most informative values, taking into account model uncertainty and expertise gained. A simulation study demonstrates the use of the proposed method and compares it with alternative approaches. We apply the sequential sampling technique and BTMGP to model the multiphase flow in a full scale regenerator of a carbon capture unit. The application presented in this paper is an important tool for research into carbon dioxide emissions from thermal power plants.

Konomi, Bledar A.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Lin, Guang

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Towards a methodology for the systematic analysis and design of efficient chemical processes: Part 1. From unit operations to elementary process functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A successful intensification of a chemical process requires a holistic view of the process and a systematic debottlenecking, which is obtained by identifying and eliminating the main transport resistances that limit the overall process performance and thus can be considered as rate determining steps on the process level. In this paper, we will suggest a new approach that is not based on the classical unit operation concept, but on the analysis of the basic functional principles that are encountered in chemical processes. A review on the history of chemical engineering in general and more specifically on the development of the unit operation concept underlines the outstanding significance of this concept in chemical and process engineering. The unit operation concept is strongly linked with the idea of thinking in terms of apparatuses, using technology off the shelf. The use of such “ready solutions” is of course convenient in the analysis and design of chemical processes; however, it can also be a problem since it inherently reduces the possibilities of process intensification measures. Therefore, we break with the tradition of thinking in terms of “unit apparatuses” and suggest a new, more rigorous function-based approach that focuses on the underlying fundamental physical and chemical processes and fluxes. For this purpose, we decompose the chemical process into so-called functional modules that fulfill specific tasks in the course of the process. The functional modules itself can be further decomposed and represented by a linear combination of elementary process functions. These are basis vectors in thermodynamic state space. Within this theoretical framework we can individually examine possible process routes and identify resistances in individual process steps. This allows us to analyze and propose possible options for the intensification of the considered chemical process.

Hannsjörg Freund; Kai Sundmacher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Average Annual Flows and Utilization Rates for Processing Plants in the United States 2. Average Annual Flows and Utilization Rates for Processing Plants in the United States Average Annual Flows (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Minimum Plant Utilization Rate Maximum Plant Utilization Rate Average Utilization Rate (Percent) 2008 Percent of U.S. Total Texas 14,020 27.3 3 100 71 Louisiana 10,462 20.4 3 100 56 Alaska 8,105 15.8 77 100 86 Wyoming 4,462 8.7 21 100 61 Colorado 2,934 5.7 15 100 77 Oklahoma 2,789 5.4 12 100 75 New Mexico 2,221 4.3 17 95 73 Illinois 1,601 3.1 35 76 76 Kansas 852 1.7 51 84 68 Alabama 746 1.5 32 80 60 Utah 728 1.4 22 100 61 Mississippi 688 1.3 29 67 30 California 557 1.1 2 100 64 West Virginia 382 0.7 70 91 82 Kentucky 217 0.4 40 92 75 Michigan 182 0.4 5 100 19 North Dakota 158 0.3 33 94 80 Montana 89 0.2 27 88 54 Pennsylvania 36 0.1 43 89 70 Arkansas 27 0.1 3 90 4 Florida 20 0.0 22 22 22 Tennessee 16 0.0 64 64 64 TOTAL U.S. 51,289 100.0 2 100 66 Note: Average utilization rates are based on 2008 flows and 2009 capacity,

166

Motor System Upgrades Smooth the Way to Savings of $700,000 at Chevron Refinery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chevron, the largest U.S. refiner operating six gasoline-producing refineries, completed a motor system efficiency improvement project in 1997 at its Richmond, California, refinery that resulted in savings of $700,000 annually. This two-page fact sheet describes how they achieved the savings.

167

Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2005), brewery (Feng et al., 2008), animal (Min et al., 2005) and paper recycling wastewaters (HuangTreatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Refinery wastewaters were tested as fuels in MECs

168

STAMP-Based Analysis of a Refinery Overflow Accident Nancy Leveson, Margaret Stringfellow, and John Thomas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STAMP-Based Analysis of a Refinery Overflow Accident Nancy Leveson, Margaret Stringfellow, and John Thomas As an example of STAMP, we have taken an accident report produced for a real refinery failures and operator actions (or missing actions) related to the loss. But stopping after identifying

Leveson, Nancy

169

Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1 modeling approach is validated by experimental measurements in two oil refinery sites using industry standard ISA SP100.11a compliant commercial devices operating at 2.4GHz. I. INTRODUCTION The adoption

Savazzi, Stefano

170

Parallel Cycle Based Logic Simulation using Graphics Processing Units Alper Sen, Baris Aksanli, Murat Bozkurt, and Melih Mert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel Cycle Based Logic Simulation using Graphics Processing Units Alper Sen, Baris Aksanli-based parallelization of logic simulation algorithm for electronic designs. Logic simulation is a crucial component attempts to speedup the verification process (and logic simulation) results in great savings and shorter

Sen, Alper

171

The Energy Minimization Method: A Multiobjective Fitness Evaluation Technique and Its Application to the Production Scheduling in a Petroleum Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Production Scheduling in a Petroleum Refinery Mayron Rodrigues de Almeida Sílvio Hamacher Industrial applied to production scheduling of a petroleum refinery. The experimental results are presented of the method when applied to the production scheduling in a petroleum refinery. Section 5 discusses

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

172

Eco Logic International gas-phase chemical reduction process: The thermal desorption unit. Applications analysis report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report details the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation of the Eco Logic International`s gas-phase chemical reduction process, with an emphasis on their thermal desorption unit. The Eco Logic process employs a high temperature reactor filled with hydrogen as a means to destroy chlorinated organic wastes. The process is designed around a reduction reaction, which reduces the organic wastes into a high-BTU gas product. The thermal desorption unit is designed to work in conjunction with the Eco Logic Reactor system. It is intended to process soils and sludges, desorbing the organic contaminants into a hydrogen gas stream for subsequent treatment and destruction within the Reactor System. The demonstration program was conducted at the Middleground Island Landfill in Bay City, Michigan during October to December, 1992. The report provides details of the test program, summaries of analytical tests conducted on a variety of process streams, process economics, and case study information.

Sudell, G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

BIO?REFINERIES: BIOPROCESS TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTE?WATER TREATMENT, ENERGY AND PRODUCT VALORIZATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non?GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food fiber and other biology?based products including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific?attribute raw materials for differentiated markets we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio?refineries be seen as part of a ‘new’ agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste?water treatment water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal sustainable energy production and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio?oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar?driven microalgae bio?refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy fuels and other useful materials (valorisation) with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

A. Keith Cowan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

APPENDICES ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 APPENDICES ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Appendix A: Summary of Methodology for Determining Stationary CO 2 Source Emissions DOE's RCSPs have identified 4,245 CO 2 stationary sources with total annual emissions of more than 3,279 million metric tons of CO 2 . These sources include electricity generating plants, ethanol plants, petroleum and natural gas processing facilities, cement plants, agricultural processing facilities, industrial facilities, refineries and chemical plants, fertilizer producing facilities, and unclassified. Estimates were derived using databases and emissions factors, as listed in tables in the methodology. The full methodology lists the documents used to identify each CO 2 stationary source, as well as the practical quantitative method (i.e., emission factors, continuous

175

Process and Pattern in Institutional Reforms: A Case Study of the Police Pacifying Units (UPPs) in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary This paper explores the importance of processes in institutional change and the relationship between processes and patterns of change. Using an ongoing case of police reform in Rio de Janeiro, the police pacification units (Unidades de Polícia Pacificadora) as an illustration, we develop two claims. First, the concept of reflective planning, developed by urban planning scholars, may help development scholars understand processes of institutional change. Second, some patterns, such as the institutional bypass, when combined with particular processes, such as reflective planning, may reinforce each other and further the objectives of reform processes.

Graham Denyer Willis; Mariana Mota Prado

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Density-fitted singles and doubles coupled cluster on graphics processing units  

SciTech Connect

We adapt an algorithm for singles and doubles coupled cluster (CCSD) that uses density fitting (DF) or Cholesky decomposition (CD) in the construction and contraction of all electron repulsion integrals (ERI s) for use on heterogeneous compute nodes consisting of a multicore CPU and at least one graphics processing unit (GPU). The use of approximate 3-index ERI s ameliorates two of the major difficulties in designing scientific algorithms for GPU s: (i) the extremely limited global memory on the devices and (ii) the overhead associated with data motion across the PCI bus. For the benzene trimer described by an aug-cc-pVDZ basis set, the use of a single NVIDIA Tesla C2070 (Fermi) GPU accelerates a CD-CCSD computation by a factor of 2.1, relative to the multicore CPU-only algorithm that uses 6 highly efficient Intel core i7-3930K CPU cores. The use of two Fermis provides an acceleration of 2.89, which is comparable to that observed when using a single NVIDIA Kepler K20c GPU (2.73).

Sherrill, David [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; DePrince, III, A. Eugene [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The application of projected conjugate gradient solvers on graphical processing units  

SciTech Connect

Graphical processing units introduce the capability for large scale computation at the desktop. Presented numerical results verify that efficiencies and accuracies of basic linear algebra subroutines of all levels when implemented in CUDA and Jacket are comparable. But experimental results demonstrate that the basic linear algebra subroutines of level three offer the greatest potential for improving efficiency of basic numerical algorithms. We consider the solution of the multiple right hand side set of linear equations using Krylov subspace-based solvers. Thus, for the multiple right hand side case, it is more efficient to make use of a block implementation of the conjugate gradient algorithm, rather than to solve each system independently. Jacket is used for the implementation. Furthermore, including projection from one system to another improves efficiency. A relevant example, for which simulated results are provided, is the reconstruction of a three dimensional medical image volume acquired from a positron emission tomography scanner. Efficiency of the reconstruction is improved by using projection across nearby slices.

Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Renaut, Rosemary [ARIZONA STATE UNIV.

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Service extraction from operator procedures in process industries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Procedures are a common knowledge form in process industries such as refineries. A typical refinery captures hundreds of procedures documenting actions that operators must follow. Maintaining the action-knowledge contained in these procedures is important ... Keywords: heuristics, knowledge modules, knowledge representation, service extraction

Jingwen He; Sandeep Purao; Jon Becker; David Strobhar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages March Â… June 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09)/1 09)/1 Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages March - June 2009 March 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

180

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the United States Petroleum in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6292E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Morrow, William R., John Marano, Jayant A. Sathaye, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Tengfang T. Xu Date Published 06/2013 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords industrial energy efficiency Abstract Adoption of efficient process technologies is an important approach to reducing CO2 emissions, in particular those associated with combustion. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among the most cost-effective approaches that any refiner can take, improving productivity while reducing emissions. Therefore, careful analysis of the options and costs associated with efficiency measures is required to establish sound carbon policies addressing global climate change, and is the primary focus of LBNL's current petroleum refining sector analysis for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The analysis is aimed at identifying energy efficiency-related measures and developing energy abatement supply curves and CO2 emissions reduction potential for the U.S. refining industry. A refinery model has been developed for this purpose that is a notional aggregation of the U.S. petroleum refining sector. It consists of twelve processing units and accounts for the additional energy requirements from steam generation, hydrogen production and water utilities required by each of the twelve processing units. The model is carbon and energy balanced such that crude oil inputs and major refinery sector outputs (fuels) are benchmarked to 2010 data. Estimates of the current penetration for the identified energy efficiency measures benchmark the energy requirements to those reported in U.S. DOE 2010 data. The remaining energy efficiency potential for each of the measures is estimated and compared to U.S. DOE fuel prices resulting in estimates of cost-effective energy efficiency opportunities for each of the twelve major processes. A combined cost of conserved energy supply curve is also presented along with the CO2 emissions abatement opportunities that exist in the U.S. petroleum refinery sector. Roughly 1,200 PJ per year of primary fuels savings and close to 500 GWh per year of electricity savings are potentially cost-effective given U.S. DOE fuel price forecasts. This represents roughly 70 million metric tonnes of CO2 emission reductions assuming 2010 emissions factor for grid electricity. Energy efficiency measures resulting in an additional 400 PJ per year of primary fuels savings and close to 1,700 GWh per year of electricity savings, and an associated 24 million metric tonnes of CO2 emission reductions are not cost-effective given the same assumption with respect to fuel prices and electricity emissions factors. Compared to the modeled energy requirements for the U.S. petroleum refining sector, the cost effective potential represents a 40% reduction in fuel consumption and a 2% reduction in electricity consumption. The non-cost-effective potential represents an additional 13% reduction in fuel consumption and an additional 7% reduction in electricity consumption. The relative energy reduction potentials are much higher for fuel consumption than electricity consumption largely in part because fuel is the primary energy consumption type in the refineries. Moreover, many cost effective fuel savings measures would increase electricity consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

,"U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",11,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

182

,"U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",32,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

183

,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

184

,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

185

MTG fluidized bed reactor–regenerator unit with catalyst circulation: process simulation and operation of an experimental setup  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of the MTG process carried out in a fluidized bed reactor–regenerator system with catalyst circulation is studied by using the kinetic results obtained in an experimental unit. Data considered covered a wide range of operating conditions including temperature, space time and average residence times in both reactor and regenerator. This simulation is based on the use of adequate kinetic equations for the main MTG reaction, for the catalyst deactivation and for catalyst regeneration. In addition, a third stage in the process allowing for coke equilibration, prior to its combustion, is also included. Catalyst loss due to attrition has also been taken into account. An objective function based on relative production rate is optimized by changing systematically the process parameters such as temperature, space time and catalyst activity. Results are also validated in the experimental unit and demonstrate the simplicity of the reactor–regenerator system with catalyst circulation and the versatility of this configuration for carrying out the MTG process.

Ana G. Gayubo; Jose M. Ortega; Andres T. Aguayo; Jose M. Arandes; Javier Bilbao

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Vesicular Horizon Distribution, Properties, and Pedogenic Processes in Deserts of the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of interrelated biotic and abiotic processes duringImpacts of interrelated biotic and abiotic processes during

Turk, Judith Katherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Pester Refinery, Butler County, El Dorado, KS. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 10-acre Pester Refinery site is a former petroleum refining facility located in El Dorado, Butler County, Kansas. Petroleum refining operations in the area began in 1917, and from 1958 to 1977, Fina Oil Company operated a petroleum refinery at this site. Process wastes, such as slop-oil emulsion solids, API separator sludge, and heat exchanger bundle cleaning sludge were sent through a pipe to a burn pond. Gaseous waste products were ignited at the end of the pipe, and whatever did not burn was discharged to the pond. The ROD provides a final remedy for the principal source of contamination at the site, the burn pit sludge. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and sludge are VOCs, including ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes; other organics, including PAHs and phenols; and metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure among Oil Refinery Workers at Marathon Petroleum Company in Canton, Ohio.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Air monitoring surveys were conducted during loading operations at three locations inside of Marathon Petroleum Company’s Canton, Ohio oil refinery. These three locations—the sulfur truck… (more)

Beil, Christine A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regulation: EPA sued for undercounting toxic emissions at refineries, chemical plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several community organizations have filed a lawsuit to force the Environmental Protection Agency to review the way it measures toxic air pollution from oil refineries and petrochemical plants along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. ... Recent independent studies at Marathon Oil, Shell, and BP refineries measured actual emissions at levels 10 to 100 times higher than estimates based on the methods facilities currently use to report their releases, the suit says. ...

GLENN HESS

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection  

SciTech Connect

The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

John W. Berthold

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

Goldberg, M.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Energy Conservation Design Features of Retrofit and New Units . . . One Company's Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, hydrotreating, coking, sulfur recovery, and sulfuric acid manufacturing. Residual oil fractions are almost totally upgraded to lighter products via direct processing in the cat crackers or by delayed coking. Like most refineries our main products...

Prothro, B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 526,996 566,851 559,032 581,600 578,456 543,388 1981-2013 Crude Oil 445,937 474,296 474,991 497,241 489,887 468,825 1981-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 12,805 11,759 12,769 13,227 13,760 16,794 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 4,949 4,341 4,752 4,734 5,331 5,666 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 7,856 7,418 8,017 8,493 8,429 11,128 1981-2013 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 2,668 1,880 1,998 2,014 2,083 4,711 1981-2013 Isobutane 5,188 5,538 6,019 6,479 6,346 6,417 1981-2013 Other Liquids 68,254 80,796 71,272 71,132 74,809 57,769 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 32,667 34,665 34,097 35,446 36,356 33,881 1981-2013

195

U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 6,204,500 6,277,893 6,169,893 6,345,372 6,422,710 6,406,693 1981-2012 Crude Oil 5,532,097 5,361,287 5,232,656 5,374,094 5,404,347 5,489,516 1981-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 184,383 177,559 177,194 161,479 178,884 186,270 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 64,603 55,497 59,100 56,686 63,385 63,596 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 119,780 122,062 118,094 104,793 115,499 122,674 1981-2012 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 48,292 50,024 48,509 43,802 47,571 52,246 1981-2012 Isobutane 71,488 72,038 69,585 60,991 67,928 70,428 1981-2012 Other Liquids 488,020 739,047 760,043 809,799 839,479 730,907 1981-2012 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons

196

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 6,567,929 6,641,293 6,527,069 6,735,067 6,815,590 6,794,407 1981-2012 Liquefied Refinery Gases 238,904 230,431 227,470 240,454 225,992 230,413 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 7,323 6,671 7,069 7,228 7,148 6,597 1981-2012 Ethane 5,145 4,608 5,229 5,200 5,105 4,835 1993-2012 Ethylene 2,178 2,063 1,840 2,028 2,043 1,762 1993-2012 Propane/Propylene 205,179 190,020 196,011 204,223 201,492 202,309 1981-2012 Propane 120,596 114,268 106,177 102,913 98,508 100,933 1995-2012 Propylene 84,583 75,752 89,834 101,310 102,984 101,376 1993-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,285 30,887 24,148 30,281 17,449 20,580 1981-2012 Normal Butane 25,715 33,092 25,825 32,094 19,263 22,965 1993-2012

197

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 559,639 599,643 591,916 616,905 613,451 578,101 1981-2013 Liquefied Refinery Gases 24,599 26,928 25,443 26,819 25,951 19,023 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 464 426 407 441 487 379 1981-2013 Ethane 317 277 283 312 332 232 1993-2013 Ethylene 147 149 124 129 155 147 1993-2013 Propane/Propylene 16,840 17,792 16,966 17,839 18,063 17,254 1981-2013 Propane 8,051 8,949 8,756 9,002 9,153 8,816 1995-2013 Propylene 8,789 8,843 8,210 8,837 8,910 8,438 1993-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 7,270 8,876 8,122 8,676 7,664 1,738 1981-2013 Normal Butane 7,447 9,044 8,314 8,832 8,067 1,743 1993-2013 Butylene -177 -168 -192 -156 -403 -5 1993-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene

198

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Modular CSSX Unit (CSSX), and Waste Transfer Line System of Salt Processing Program (U)  

SciTech Connect

All of the waste streams from ARP, MCU, and SWPF processes will be sent to DWPF for vitrification. The impact these new waste streams will have on DWPF's ability to meet its canister production goal and its ability to support the Salt Processing Program (ARP, MCU, and SWPF) throughput needed to be evaluated. DWPF Engineering and Operations requested OBU Systems Engineering to evaluate DWPF operations and determine how the process could be optimized. The ultimate goal will be to evaluate all of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) System by developing process modules to cover all facilities/projects which are relevant to the LRW Program and to link the modules together to: (1) study the interfaces issues, (2) identify bottlenecks, and (3) determine the most cost effective way to eliminate them. The results from the evaluation can be used to assist DWPF in identifying improvement opportunities, to assist CBU in LRW strategic planning/tank space management, and to determine the project completion date for the Salt Processing Program.

CHANG, ROBERT

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Combustion air preheating for refinery heaters using plate-type heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Combustion air preheating by recovering heat from combustion gases is a cost effective method of increasing the overall thermal efficiency of the refining and petrochemical processes. This paper presents the advantages of the plate-type air preheaters made of smooth plates without extended surfaces. These exchangers provide a relatively high heat transfer coefficient at a relatively low pressure drop, resulting in a flexible and compact design. The air preheater design can easily be integrated into the heater design. Top mounting with natural draft becomes possible for many applications, eliminating the need for I.D. fan and expensive ductwork. The economical extent of heat recovery function of the fuel fired is presented based on practical experience. The use of porcelain enameled (glass coated) plates and of stainless steel materials allows the operation of the air preheater below the acidic and water dew point. Finally the paper presents the experience of the Canadian refineries and petrochemical plants with plate-type heat exchangers used for combustion air preheating.

Dinulescu, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Capacity Processing plants are typically clustered close to major producing areas, with a high number of plants close to the Federal Gulf of Mexico offshore and the Rocky Mountain production areas (Figure 1). In terms of both the number of plants and processing capacity, about half of these plants are concentrated in the States along the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf States have been some of the most prolific natural gas producing areas. U.S. natural gas processing capacity showed a net increase of about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009 (not including the State of Alaska), with the largest increase occurring in Texas, where processing capacity rose by more than 4 Bcf per day. In fact, increases in Texas' processing capacity accounted for 57 percent of the total lower 48 States' capacity increase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Alaska Alaska The State of Alaska had the third-largest processing capacity, trailing only Texas and Louisiana. While much of the natural gas processed in Alaska does not enter any transmission system and is instead re-injected into reservoirs, its processing capability is nonetheless significant. At 9.5 Bcf per day of processing capacity, the State of Alaska accounted for about 12 percent of total U.S. capacity. As of 2009, there were a total of 4 plants in the State, with the largest one reporting a capacity of 8.5 Bcf per day. Average plant size of 2.4 Bcf per day far exceeded any other State, with Illinois noting the next largest average plant size of 1.1 Bcf per day. In addition to the significant processing total capacity, plants in

202

,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" 3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Data 2","Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts",1,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:21:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Refinery Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRO_NUS_1","MCRRO_NUS_1","MNGRO_NUS_1","MPPRO_NUS_1","MLPRO_NUS_1","MBNRO_NUS_1","MBIRO_NUS_1","MOLRO_NUS_1","MOHRO_NUS_1","M_EPOOOH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MMTRO_NUS_1","MOORO_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MFERO_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MUORO_NUS_1","MNLRO_NUS_1","MKORO_NUS_1","MH1RO_NUS_1","MRURO_NUS_1","MBCRO_NUS_1","MO1RO_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MO3RO_NUS_1","MO4RO_NUS_1","MO5RO_NUS_1","MO6RO_NUS_1","MO7RO_NUS_1","MO9RO_NUS_1","MBARO_NUS_1"

203

,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" 2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" ,"Data 2","Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1986" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:21:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Refinery Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRO_NUS_1","MCRRO_NUS_1","MNGRO_NUS_1","MPPRO_NUS_1","MLPRO_NUS_1","MBNRO_NUS_1","MBIRO_NUS_1","MOLRO_NUS_1","MOHRO_NUS_1","M_EPOOOH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MMTRO_NUS_1","MOORO_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MFERO_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MUORO_NUS_1","MNLRO_NUS_1","MKORO_NUS_1","MH1RO_NUS_1","MRURO_NUS_1","MBCRO_NUS_1","MO1RO_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MO3RO_NUS_1","MO4RO_NUS_1","MO5RO_NUS_1","MO6RO_NUS_1","MO7RO_NUS_1","MO9RO_NUS_1","MBARO_NUS_1"

204

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States combined accounted for about 13 percent of total U.S. processing capacity in 2009, accounting for the smallest portion of any region in the lower 48 States. The combined processing capacity in these States more than doubled, although a few of the States saw decreased capacity compared with 2004. Processing capacity in Illinois, Kansas, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania fell since 2004, with the highest decrease occurring in Kansas, which saw a 65 percent drop in processing capacity. At the same time, the number of plants in Kansas decreased by four. The decrease was likely the result of falling natural gas proved reserves, which decreased in this State between 1995 and 2005. While the proved reserves have

205

Development of design strategies to support evacuation process of hospital buildings in united states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complete evacuation of hospital facilities is always a difficult and complex process. It has always been considered a last resort during any kind of threat. In recent years, the increasing number of manmade and natural disasters has generated a...

Kader, Sharmin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology to reduce Electric Motor Maintenance Costs.1998. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Marketof steam turbines or electric motors to run compressors. The

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Units. Heat Recovery & CHP Systems 5 8 pp.483-488. Swain,CHP).44. Zollar, J. , 2002. CHP Integration with Fluid Heating

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001. Installation of Reverse Osmosis Unit Reduces Refineryuse of membranes. In reverse osmosis (RO), the pre-filteredsemi- permeable membrane. Reverse osmosis and other membrane

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

,"Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

210

TSNo s02-roberts104537-O Microscopic and Spectroscopic Speciation of Ni in Soils in the Vicinity of a Ni Refinery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Vicinity of a Ni Refinery. abstract Accurately predicting the fate and bioavailability of metals in smelter REFINERY ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings - October 21 - 25, 2001 - Charlotte, NC #12;

Sparks, Donald L.

211

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Rocky Mountain States and California Rocky Mountain States and California The Rocky Mountain States, which include all of the States west of the Great Plains and Texas and those east of California, have seen significant natural gas production increases over the last decade. With the development of new production basins, including the San Juan Basin, Powder River Basin, and Green River Basin, natural gas processing capacity in this region has expanded significantly. In 2009, California and Rocky Mountain States accounted for a total of 16.9 Bcf per day or about 22 percent of total U.S. capacity. Since 2004, only California and New Mexico noted a decrease in overall processing capacity, falling by 17 and 12 percent, respectively. Processing capacity in all of the remaining States (Colorado, Montana, New

212

2011 EL Project Title and Number: Sustainability of Unit Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as energy and material consumption, emissions, waste, and water usage of manufacturing processes. However sustainability performance metrics (such as energy and material consumption, emissions, waste, and water usage efficiency, the US industries need reliable measurement methods to evaluate sustainability performances

Perkins, Richard A.

213

,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:28:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRX_NUS_1","MLPRX_NUS_1","METRX_NUS_1","MENRX_NUS_1","MEYRX_NUS_1","MPRRX_NUS_1","MPARX_NUS_1","MPLRX_NUS_1","MBNRX_NUS_1","MBURX_NUS_1","MBYRX_NUS_1","MBIRX_NUS_1","MIIRX_NUS_1","MIYRX_NUS_1","MGFRX_NUS_1","MGRRX_NUS_1","MG1RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG4RX_NUS_1","MG5RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG6RX_NUS_1","MGARX_NUS_1","MKJRX_NUS_1","M_EPJKC_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPJKM_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MKERX_NUS_1","MDIRX_NUS_1","MD0RX_NUS_1","MD1RX_NUS_1","MDGRX_NUS_1","MRERX_NUS_1","MRXRX_NUS_1","MRMRX_NUS_1","MRGRX_NUS_1","MPCRX_NUS_1","MPNRX_NUS_1","MPORX_NUS_1","MNSRX_NUS_1","MLURX_NUS_1","M_EPPLN_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPLP_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MWXRX_NUS_1","MCKRX_NUS_1","MCMRX_NUS_1","MCORX_NUS_1","MAPRX_NUS_1","MSGRX_NUS_1","MMSRX_NUS_1","MMFRX_NUS_1","MMNRX_NUS_1","MPGRX_NUS_1"

214

,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:28:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRX_NUS_1","MLPRX_NUS_1","METRX_NUS_1","MENRX_NUS_1","MEYRX_NUS_1","MPRRX_NUS_1","MPARX_NUS_1","MPLRX_NUS_1","MBNRX_NUS_1","MBURX_NUS_1","MBYRX_NUS_1","MBIRX_NUS_1","MIIRX_NUS_1","MIYRX_NUS_1","MGFRX_NUS_1","MGRRX_NUS_1","MG1RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG4RX_NUS_1","MG5RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG6RX_NUS_1","MGARX_NUS_1","MKJRX_NUS_1","M_EPJKC_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPJKM_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MKERX_NUS_1","MDIRX_NUS_1","MD0RX_NUS_1","MD1RX_NUS_1","MDGRX_NUS_1","MRERX_NUS_1","MRXRX_NUS_1","MRMRX_NUS_1","MRGRX_NUS_1","MPCRX_NUS_1","MPNRX_NUS_1","MPORX_NUS_1","MNSRX_NUS_1","MLURX_NUS_1","M_EPPLN_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPLP_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MWXRX_NUS_1","MCKRX_NUS_1","MCMRX_NUS_1","MCORX_NUS_1","MAPRX_NUS_1","MSGRX_NUS_1","MMSRX_NUS_1","MMFRX_NUS_1","MMNRX_NUS_1","MPGRX_NUS_1"

215

U.S. Refinery Efficiency: Impacts Analysis and Implications for Fuel Carbon Policy Implementation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rapid influx of domestically sourced tight light oil and relative demand shifts for gasoline and diesel will impose challenges on the ability of the U.S. refining industry to satisfy both demand and quality requirements. ... For this study Jacobs developed these models in a Generalized Refining Transportation Marketing and Planning System (GRTMPS) format (licensed by Haverly Systems) which were combined with Jacobs’ proprietary refinery technology database. ... The product slate was developed based on knowledge of the markets being served by each refinery, making use of EIA data for regional refined product output and product movements between Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs), as well as information on product imports. ...

Grant S. Forman; Vincent B. Divita; Jeongwoo Han; Hao Cai; Amgad Elgowainy; Michael Wang

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) Roadmap, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management Engineering & Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), defines the Department's intent to reduce the technical risk and uncertainty in its cleanup programs. The unique nature of many of the remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve worker and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. The technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleanup program were identified through: (1) project risk assessments, (2) programmatic external technical reviews and technology readiness assessments, and (3) direct site input. In order to address these needs, the technical risks and uncertainties were compiled and divided into the program areas of: Waste Processing, Groundwater and Soil Remediation, and Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D). Strategic initiatives were then developed within each program area to address the technical risks and uncertainties in that program area. These strategic initiatives were subsequently incorporated into the Roadmap, where they form the strategic framework of the EM Engineering & Technology Program. The EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstrations that will lead to a reduction of technical uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The current MYPP summarizes the strategic initiatives and the scope of the activities within each initiative that are proposed for the next five years (FY2008-2012) to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. As a result of the importance of reducing technical risk and uncertainty in the EM Waste Processing programs, EM-21 has focused considerable effort on identifying the key areas of risk in the Waste Processing programs. The resulting summary of technical risks and needs was captured in the Roadmap. The Roadmap identifies key Waste Processing initiative areas where technology development work should be focused. These areas are listed below, along with the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) designation given to each initiative area. The WBS designations will be used throughout this document.

Bush, S

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

Schilling, Anne

219

Conceptual design assessment for the co-firing of bio-refinery supplied lignin project. Quarterly report, June 23--July 1, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Conceptual Design Assessment for the Co-Firing of Bio-Refinery Supplied Lignin Project was successfully kicked off on July 23, 2000 during a meeting at the TVA-PPI facility in Muscle Shoals, AL. An initial timeline for the study was distributed, issues of concern were identified and a priority actions list was developed. Next steps include meeting with NETL to discuss de-watering and lignin fuel testing, the development of the mass balance model and ethanol facility design criteria, providing TVA-Colbert with preliminary lignin fuel analysis and the procurement of representative feed materials for the pilot and bench scale testing of the hydrolysis process.

Berglund, T.; Ranney, J.T.; Babb, C.L.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State 1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State Natural Gas Processing Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Number of Natural Gas Plants Average Plant Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Change Between 2004 and 2009 State 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2004 2009 Capacity (Percent) Number of Plants Texas 19,740 25.5 163 33.1 95 121 24.7 -3 Louisiana 18,535 23.9 60 12.2 271 309 12.3 -1 Wyoming 7,273 9.4 37 7.5 154 197 5.1 -8 Colorado 3,791 4.9 44 8.9 49 86 81.1 1 Oklahoma 3,740 4.8 58 11.8 58 64 8.8 -1 New Mexico 3,022 3.9 24 4.9 137 126 -11.8 -1 Mississippi 2,273 2.9 4 0.8 262 568 44.6 -2 Illinois 2,102 2.7 2 0.4 1101 1,051 -4.6 0 Kansas 1,250 1.6 6 1.2 353 208 -64.6 -4 Alabama 1,248 1.6 12 2.4 87 104 -4.7 -3 Utah 1,185 1.5 12 2.4 61 99 22.2 -4 Michigan 977 1.3 10 2.0 30 98 102.2 -6 California 876 1.1 20 4.1 43 44 -15.5 -4 Arkansas 710 0.9 4 0.8 10 178

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Voltage Sag-Related Upsets of Industrial Process Controls in Petroleum and Chemical Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with PLC controls. The sensitivity of these process controls can stop an essential service motor required for a continuous process such as in a refinery or chemical plant. Typically the controls are sensitive to the common momentary voltage sag caused...

Mansoor, A.; Key, T.; Woinsky, S.

222

Energy Guideline Factors Provide a Better Measure of Refinery Energy Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Company, U.S.A. refineries reduced energy consumption by 25% between 1972 and 1978 compared with an 18% reduction for the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry over the same period. The Exxon approach to conserving energy in petroleum refining...

Libbers, D. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a large number of crude-oils, finished products such as liquified petroleum gas, gasoline, diesel fuel product blending and shipping. Some examples of nonlinear refinery planning problems including pooling, 2010 #12;crude-blends, and CDU feed charging. This problem has been addressed since the late 90s

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

224

Operational planning of oil refineries under uncertainty Special issue: Applied Stochastic Optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......authors developed a general framework for the...aviation kerosene and diesel) or heavy (paraffin, lubricants, light cycle oil, gas oil, coke...1 psc = 1 . The general formulation of the...model for refinery diesel production. Comput...J. (2004) A general modeling framework......

Gabriela P. Ribas; Adriana Leiras; Silvio Hamacher

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Table 39. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a

226

Waste-to-energy in the United States: Socioeconomic factors and the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion with energy recovery, commonly called waste-to-energy (WTE), was adopted by many US communities during the 1980s to manage their growing quantities of MSW. Although less than one percent of all US MSW was burned to retrieve its heat energy in 1970, WTE grew to account for 16 percent of MSW in 1990, and many experts forecasted that WTE would be used to manage as much as half of all garbage by the turn of the century. However, the growth of WTE has been reduced in recent years by project cancellations. This study takes an in-depth look at the socioeconomic factors that have played a role in the decisions of communities that have considered WTE as a component of their solid waste management strategies. More specifically, a three-pronged approach is adopted to investigate (1) the relationships between a municipality`s decision to consider and accept/reject WTE and key socioeconomic parameters, (2) the potential impacts of recent changes in financial markets on the viability of WTE, and (3) the WTE decision-making process and the socioeconomic parameters that are most important in the municipality`s decision. The first two objectives are met by the collection and analysis of aggregate data on all US WTE initiatives during the 1982 to 1990 time frame. The latter objective is met by way of four in-depth case studies -- two directed at communities that have accepted WTE and two that have cancelled WTE projects.

Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.; Kelsay, M.P.; Feldman, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing potentially significant cost savings compared to off-site disposal. Specific examples of CA MU advantages realized by SNL/NM will be presented along with the above highlighted process improvements, Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) performance, and associated lessons learned.

Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis and section of processes for the disposition of excess fissile material from nuclear weapon dismantlement in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the acceleration of nuclear disarmament efforts by the United States (US) and Russia are generating large quantities of surplus fissile nuclear materials that are no longer needed for military purposes. The safe and secure disposition of this surplus material to prevent theft or reuse in weapons has become a high priority for the US Department of Energy (USDOE). Many options exist for storage and disposition (use or disposal) of these surplus materials. The criteria, which have been developed from the basis for a preliminary ``screening`` of options, to eliminate from further consideration those options that do not meet minimal requirements. Factors, or attributes, contained in the screening and selection criteria include: (1) resistance to theft and diversion by unauthorized parties, (2) resistance to retrieval, extraction, and reuse by the host nation, (3) technical viability, (4) environmental, safety, and health impacts, (5) cost effectiveness, (6) timeliness, (7) fostering of progress and cooperation with Russia and others, (8) public and institutional acceptance, and (9) additional benefits. The evaluation of environmental impacts, in accordance with the US National Environmental Policy Ac (NEPA) process, is an integral part of the overall evaluation process. Because of the variety of physical and chemical forms of the nuclear material inventory, and because of the large number of possible disposition technologies and final forms, several hundred possible pathways to disposition have been defined and have undergone a systematic selection process. Also, because nuclear material disposition will have far ranging impacts, extensive public, in the form of public and stakeholder, input was integral to the selection process.

Myers, B.R.; Armantrout, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Erickson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Development of a General Purpose ARM-based Processing Unit for the ATLAS TileCal sROD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN generates enormous amounts of raw data which present a serious computing challenge. After Phase-II upgrades in 2022, the data output from the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter will increase by 200 times to 41 Tb/s! ARM processors are common in mobile devices due to their low cost, low energy consumption and high performance. It is proposed that a cost-effective, high data throughput Processing Unit (PU) can be developed by using several consumer ARM processors in a cluster configuration to allow aggregated processing performance and data throughput while maintaining minimal software design difficulty for the end-user. This PU could be used for a variety of high-level functions on the high-throughput raw data such as spectral analysis and histograms to detect possible issues in the detector at a low level. High-throughput I/O interfaces are not typical in consumer ARM System on Chips but high data throughput capabilities are feasible via the novel use of PCI-Express as the I/O interface ...

Cox, Mitchell Arij; The ATLAS collaboration; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Parallel map projection of vector-based big spatial data: Coupling cloud computing with graphics processing units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this article is to present a framework that couples cloud and high-performance computing for the parallel map projection of vector-based big spatial data. The past few years have witnessed a tremendous growth of a variety of high-volume spatial data—i.e., big spatial data. Map projection is often needed, for example, when we apply these big spatial data into large-scale spatial analysis and modeling approaches that require a common coordinate system. However, due to the size of these data and algorithmic complexity of map projections, the transformation of big spatial data between alternative projections represents a pressing computational challenge. Recent advancement in cloud computing and high-performance computing offers a potential means of addressing this computational challenge. The parallel map projection framework presented in this study is based on a layered architecture that couples capabilities of cloud computing and high-performance computing accelerated by Graphics Processing Units. We use large LiDAR data as an example of vector-based big spatial data to investigate the utility of the parallel map projection framework. As experimental results reveal, the framework provides considerable acceleration for re-projecting vector-based big spatial data. Coupling high-performance and cloud computing, which complement to each other, is a suggested solution for the efficient processing and analysis of big spatial data.

Wenwu Tang; Wenpeng Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. Hydrocarbon Processing 6cycle gas turbines with an electric efficiency of 32%. 5.The efficiency of the steam turbine is determined by the

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Experiences in the Remediation of Ground Water Contaminated by Petroleum Hydrocarbons in the Vicinity of a Former Refinery Property  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1985, HPC HARRESS PICKEL CONSULT GMBH has conducted a variety of investigations on the property of a former refinery in the German Lower Rhine region, with the purpose of determining the nature and extent o...

Carsten Munk

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reduction of corrosivity of reused water in refinery water circulating systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the problem of controlling scale formation in heat transfer equipment in refinery recirculating water systems. One of the effective methods for reducing the degree of pitting is acidification of the medium to pH 6-6.5, thus suppressing the activity of the sulfide and manganese inclusions in the metal that play the role of pitting centers. The authors investigated the effects of the AOC and TPP on the characteristics of refinery recirculating water and combined treatment to reduce the amount of scaling and lower the corrosivity. The untreated recirculating water was unstable; the water treated with AOC or with AOC+TPP is capable of dissolving carbonate deposits.

Sorochenko, V.F.; Beskorovainaya, N.J.; Shut'ko, A.P.; Slipchenko, O.G.; Zorina, N.E.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Model for Gasification of Residual Fuels from Petroleum Refineries Using the Equation Oriented (EO) Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attractive way to use residual fuels from petroleum refineries (vacuum residue and petcoke) is their gasification to produce syngas, which contains mainly H2, CO and small quantities of CH4, CO2, as well as nitrogen and sulfur compounds. ... Vacuum residue and petroleum coke (petcoke) are, respectively, heavy liquid and solid byproducts from crude oil refining, they are often used as fuel in boilers for power production, natural gas has been more commonly used in the past few years in power generation; reducing the market for both vacuum residue and petcoke. ... Regarding petroleum refinery residuals Uson et al.(1) developed a model for cogasification of coal, petcoke and biomass, based on reaction kinetics. ...

Jorge E. Marin-Sanchez; Miguel A. Rodriguez-Toral

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrogen recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Case Study of Steam System Evaluation in a Petroleum Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Refinery's management's interest, more technical details and accurate savings & investment estimates will be provided during the Development phase that includes Basic Engineering Design & Detailed Engineering Design. ? Armstrong Service Inc. 176 ESL...-IE-03-05-21 Proceedings from theTwenty-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 13-16, 2003 Sio-Data of Presenters: Name: Ven V. Venkatesan, Title: Director of Engineering Services Company: Armstrong Service, Inc., 8545...

Venkatesan, V. V.; Iordanova, N.

239

Decision support for integrated refinery supply chains: Part 1. Dynamic simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supply chain studies are increasingly given top priority in enterprise-wide management. Present-day supply chains involve numerous, heterogeneous, geographically distributed entities with varying dynamics, uncertainties, and complexity. The performance of a supply chain relies on the quality of a multitude of design and operational decisions made by the various entities. In this two-part paper, we demonstrate that a dynamic model of an integrated supply chain can serve as a valuable quantitative tool that aids in such decision-making. In this Part 1, we present a dynamic model of an integrated refinery supply chain. The model explicitly considers the various supply chain activities such as crude oil supply and transportation, along with intra-refinery supply chain activities such as procurement planning, scheduling, and operations management. Discrete supply chain activities are integrated along with continuous production through bridging procurement, production, and demand management activities. Stochastic variations in transportation, yields, prices, and operational problems are considered in the proposed model. The economics of the refinery supply chain includes consideration of different crude slates, product prices, operation costs, transportation, etc. The proposed model has been implemented as a dynamic simulator, called Integrated Refinery In-Silico (IRIS). IRIS allows the user the flexibility to modify not only parameters, but also replace different policies and decision-making algorithms in a plug-and-play manner. It thus allows the user to simulate and analyze different policies, configurations, uncertainties, etc., through an easy-to-use graphical interface. The capabilities of IRIS for strategic and tactical decision support are illustrated using several case studies.

Suresh S. Pitty; Wenkai Li; Arief Adhitya; Rajagopalan Srinivasan; I.A. Karimi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the Westinghouse 15 ton/day Coal Gasification Process Development Unit  

SciTech Connect

Two periods of in-plant exposures of candidate materials in the Westinghouse PDU have been completed. Coupons were exposed in the gasifier, hot-gas cyclone, quench scrubber, and gas cooler vessels. Corrosion monitoring of test materials is currently being conducted in the Westinghouse Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) coal gasification pilot plant. The corrosion data presented are from work during 1981 through 1984. During these two exposure periods, several coals ranging from lignites to bituminous coals and two petroleum cokes were gasified in the steam-oxygen mode. Fouling was observed on most corrosion racks. The effect of this process-related material was to promote corrosion. In the gasifier environment, alloys 6B, IN 671, and 18SR were the best performing alloys. Nickel-base alloys with Ni/Cr ratios >1.5, namely IN-617, IN-825, and alloy X, incurred severe corrosion attack in both exposures. Other alloys, although generally acceptable in corrosion performance, were not immune to solids-induced corrosion around coupon mounting holes. Several refractories such as Brickram 90, Harbison-Walker Ruby, and Chemal 85B showed little degradation in both gasifier exposures. Nitride bonded silicon carbon Refrax 20 had the greatest reduction in abrasion resistance as well as other properties. Single-phase structural ceramics including siliconized SiC, sintered ..cap alpha..-SiC, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ did not suffer any noticeable damage. Materials evaluation in the hot-gas cyclone showed IN-671 and 26-1 to be more resistant than Type 310 and Type 310 aluminized. 18 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

Yurkewycz, R.

1985-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

242

Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit. Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect

This represents the second quarterly progress report on Phase 2 of the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) Program. Phase 1 of this program started in March 1976 and included the design, construction, and initial operation of the PDU. On June 25, 1980, Phase 2 of the program was initiated. It covers a 1-year operations program utilizing the existing PDU and is planned to include five runs with a targeted total operating time of 9 weeks. During this report period, Run 6, the initial run of the Phase 2 program was completed. The gasification system was operated for a total of 95 h at pressures up to 10 atm. Average product gas HHV values of 100 Btu/scf were recorded during 10-atm operation, while gasifying coal at a rate of 1100 lb/h. The run was terminated when the melt overflow system plugged after 60 continuous hours of overflow. Following this run, melt withdrawal system revisions were made, basically by changing the orifice materials from Monofrax to an 80 Cobalt-20 Chromium alloy. By the end of the report period, the PDU was being prepared for Run 7.

Not Available

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

244

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

245

REVISED FINAL REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK – DCN 0496-SR-06-1  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters- Fact Sheet 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet summarizing a project to develop and demonstrate a full-scale fuel handling and combustion system

247

A bio-inspired robust controller for a refinery plant process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......proportional-integral control for improving engine power and speed behavior in a hybrid...the installation, avoiding the consumption of fuel for heating. An economic saving...integral control for improving engine power and speed behavior in a hybrid......

Jose Luis Calvo-Rolle; Emilio Corchado

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A bio-inspired robust controller for a refinery plant process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......control for improving engine power and speed...somewhere between diesel, an important element...fractions towards diesel. [18:19 22...installation, avoiding the consumption of fuel for heating. An...control for improving engine power and speed......

Jose Luis Calvo-Rolle; Emilio Corchado

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A bio-inspired robust controller for a refinery plant process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fraction that is somewhere between diesel, an important element from...the lighter fractions towards diesel. [18:19 22/5/2012 jzr010...of h is recommended for the general method. 6.3 Methodology 6...to implement the hysteresis cycle mentioned in the above explanation......

Jose Luis Calvo-Rolle; Emilio Corchado

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A bio-inspired robust controller for a refinery plant process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......control for improving engine power and speed behavior...are fully familiar. In general, continuous research...is somewhere between diesel, an important element...is recommended for the general method. 6.3 Methodology...control for improving engine power and speed behavior......

Jose Luis Calvo-Rolle; Emilio Corchado

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

BLENDING PROBLEM A refinery blends four petroleum components into three grades of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLENDING PROBLEM A refinery blends four petroleum components into three grades of gasoline/day $/barrel #1 5,000 $9.00 #2 2,400 7.00 #3 4,000 12.00 #4 1,500 6.00 Blending formulas and selling price 4,000 x4R + x4P + x4L 1,500 #12;blending: (1) x1R / (x1R + x2R + x3R + x4R) .40 or x1R .40(x1R

Shier, Douglas R.

252

PAFC fed by biogas produced by the anaerobic fermentation of the waste waters of a beet-sugar refinery  

SciTech Connect

Beet-washing waters of a beet-sugar refinery carry a high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), and their conditioning to meet legal constraints before disposal considerably contributes to the operation costs of the refinery. Their fermentation in an anaerobic digestor could instead produce readily disposable non-polluting waters, fertilizers and biogas, useful to feed a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) heat and power generator system. A real refinery case is considered in this work, where the electrical characteristics V = V(I) of a laboratory PAFC stack, fueled with a dry simulated reforming gas (having the same H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} content as the biogas obtainable by the above said anaerobic digestion), are determined. The encouraging results show that a possible market niche for fuel cells, in the food-industry waste partial recovery and residual disposal, deserves attention.

Ascoli, A.; Elias, G. [Univ. Diegli Studi di Milano (Italy); Bigoni, L. [CISE Tecnologie Innovative S.p.A., Segrate (Italy); Giachero, R. [Du Pont Pharma Italia, Firenze (Italy)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

(Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and two base metal mining operations, one in Tennessee and another in Alaska. Both of these mining

254

(Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995 producer price, was approximately industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and a mining operation in Tennessee. The company in Tennessee exported germanium-bearing residues generated

255

D-A-D structured organic molecules with diketopyrrolopyrrole acceptor unit for solution-processed organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for solution-processed organic solar cells Jing Zhang Chang He Zhi-Guo Zhang...in solution-processed organic solar cells (OSCs). The molecules show broad...illumination of AM1.5, 100cm2. organic solar cells|solution-processable organic...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Forecast of U. S. Refinery Demand for NGL's (natural gas liquids) in 1978-1985  

SciTech Connect

A forecast of U.S. Refinery Demand for NGL's (Natural Gas Liquids) in 1978-1985 is based on a predicted 1.4%/yr decline in motor gasoline consumption from 7.4 to 6.7 million bbl/day (Mbd), including a 2.6%/yr reduction from 5.3 to 4.4 Mbd for automobiles and a 1.3%/yr growth from 2.1 to 2.3 Mbd for trucks, because of slow growth rates in the U.S. automobile fleet (1.1%/yr) and average annual miles driven (0.9%/yr), a 3.9%/yr growth in average mileage from 14.2 to 18.6 mpg, and diesel penetration to the automobile market which should increase from 0.3 to 3.3%. Leaded gasoline's share is expected to decline from 68% of the market (5.1 Mbd, including 0.8 Mbd leaded premium) to 24% (1.7 Mbd, leaded regular only), including a drop from 56 to 6% for automobiles and from approx. 100 to 60% for trucks. This will require increased production of clean-octane reformates and alkylates and reduce the need for straight-run gasolines, but because of the decline in the total gasoline demand, these changes should be minimal. Butane demand from outside-refinery production should decrease by 5-6%/yr, and natural gasoline will be consumed according to available production as an isopentane source.

Laskosky, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Using Relative Risk Analysis to Set Priorities For Pollution Prevention At A Petroleum Refinery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter outlines the development of a detailed refinery release inventory that identifies sources and quantities of releases. It identifies options for preventing releases and minimizing health and environmental risks and discusses a system for evaluating and ranking the options in light of cost, risk, regulatory requirements, and other factors. The chapter also describes the methods of evaluating the incentives and obstacles to implementing the pollution prevention options. The chapter highlights the progress that can occur in identifying creative, cost-effective options for pollution prevention when government, industry, and the public establish partnerships rather than operate as adversaries. Pollution prevention cannot be adequately implemented or monitored for effectiveness unless facility operators and regulators know what is being released from the facility and its origin. Government regulatory systems—such as those established by the Clean Water Act or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)—require refineries and other facilities to monitor and measure releases from a few specific points, such as the end of a discharge pipe, or in specific media, such as groundwater. To bridge the gaps in existing data, a multimedia sample collection and analysis effort needs to be undertaken.

Ronald E. Schmitt; Howard Klee; Debora M. Sparks; Mahesh K. Podar

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at Regional–Local Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperature–moisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and land–atmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Bio-char refineries: an accessible approach for the development of biomass-based industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Being a by-product of the well-established charcoal industry, slow pyrolysis bio-oil can be an excellent, cost-effective and renewable liquid fuel. However, even in Brazil, a country with a very clean energy profile and large-scale charcoal production, bio-oil is not properly utilised yet. A simple upgrade of traditional methods of charcoal production can significantly increase liquid fuel output. The concept of a bio-char-refinery, introduced in this paper, for production of charcoal, activated carbon, liquid fuel and variety of chemicals presents a possible approach for the development of biomass-based industry. Successful implementation of this concept could provide significant amounts of fuel and chemicals able to enhance economic development and reduce the consumption of petroleum derived products.

Venelin Stamatov; Jose Dilcio Rocha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Classification of bacterial isolates of the Jordanian oil refinery petroleum sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to characterise the bacterial isolates of Jordanian oil refinery sludge for the purpose of using microorganisms in treating industrial wastewater effluents that contains hydrocarbons. Morphological, physiological, biochemical, antimicrobial susceptibility tests and 16S-23S rRNA spacer region polymorphism were used to characterise the isolated thermotolerant Bacillus, with specific reference to Bacillus strains. Data were coded and analysed by numerical techniques using the Gower coefficients and by average linkage (UPGMA) analysis. The study resulted in allocation of strains into two areas at 50.0% similarity levels and ten major phenons at 78.0% similarity level. Amplification of 16S-32S rRNA genes divided all strains into two areas at 48.0% similarity level; however, at 78.0% similarity level five taxonomically distinct phenons were evident.

Mohammed N. Battikhi; Bassam Mrayyan; Manar Atoum

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Integrity management of a HIC-damaged pipeline and refinery pressure vessel through hydrogen permeation measurements  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen permeation measurements were used in the successful operation of a sour gas pipeline subsequent to a hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) failure in September 1992. Two joints of HIC-resistant pipe were used to repair the failed section and adjacent cut-outs. The pipeline has been operated for five years with no further instances of HIC failure. Hydrogen permeation monitoring was chosen as an integrity management tool because no techniques are currently available to inspect for HIC damage in a pipeline this size. Self-powered electrochemical devices installed on the pipeline were employed to monitor and control the effectiveness of a batch inhibition program in maintaining diffusing hydrogen atom concentrations below the laboratory-measured threshold for initiation of HIC damage. Permeation monitoring of a HIC-damaged refinery pressure vessel indicated very high hydrogen atom flux, despite attempts to inhibit corrosion with ammonium polysulfide injection. In this instance it was decided that replacement of the vessel was necessary.

Hay, M.G.; Rider, D.W. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Artificial neural network modeling techniques applied to the hydrodesulfurization process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reduction of harmful emissions in the combustion of fossil fuels imposes tighter specifications limiting the sulfur content of fuels. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is a key process in most petroleum refineries in which the sulfur is mostly eliminated. The ... Keywords: Hydrodesulfurization, Neural networks, Pollution, Process modeling

Enrique Arce-Medina; José I. Paz-Paredes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ultra-high CO2 capture efficiency in CFB oxyfuel power plants by calcium looping process for CO2 recovery from purification units vent gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents a new option for the recovery of the CO2 losses from CO2 purification units in oxyfuel plants, by means of the Ca-looping process. The idea is to capture the CO2 in the vent stream from purification units by reaction with CaO sorbent in a carbonator reactor, where CaCO3 is formed. Sorbent is then regenerated in a calciner reactor by oxyfuel combustion of a fraction of the coal fed to the power plant. Since the Ca-looping process requires a continuous purge of exhaust sorbent and make-up of fresh limestone, the system is best coupled with a CFB boiler, where the exhausted Ca-rich sorbent can be used for in-furnace sulfur absorption. In this work, detailed mass and energy balances of the system proposed are reported, including a preliminary sizing of the reactors of the Ca-looping unit. A sensitivity analysis was also performed, by considering two types of coal as feed (mainly differing in sulfur content), two levels of non-condensable gases in the impure CO2 stream to be purified and different behaviors of the exhausted Ca-based sorbent injected in the CFB boiler, where it can experience different levels of recarbonation. Interesting results were obtained for this new system, which can capture about 90% of the CO2 vented from the purification unit in a reasonably compact reactors system, allowing an overall CO2 avoidance of the order of 99% with respect to conventional coal-fired steam plants without capture. As far as energy penalties are concerned, they were evaluated by the specific primary energy consumption for CO2 avoided index (SPECCA). Small differences with respect to reference oxyfuel plants without CO2 recovery were obtained, with either slightly better or slightly worse performances, depending on the sulfur content of the coal used. Penalties are associated to the export of CaO in the final exhausted sulfated sorbent from the CFB boiler, which increases when a higher sulfur coal is used. However, experimental analysis on the recarbonation level which can be attained by the CaL exhaust sorbent in the CFB boiler and further process optimization are needed to correctly account for these penalties and possibly minimize them.

Matteo C. Romano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

Molina, Luisa Tan

268

Analysis of the working process and mechanical losses in a Stirling engine for a solar power unit  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a second level mathematical model for the computational simulation of the working process of a 1-kW Stirling engine has been used and the results obtained are presented. The internal circuit of the engine in the calculation scheme was divided into five chambers, namely, the expansion space, heater, regenerator, cooler and the compression space, and the governing system of ordinary differential equations for the energy and mass conservation were solved in each chamber by Euler`s method. In addition, mechanical losses in the construction of the engine have been determined and the computational results show that the mechanical losses for this particular design of the Stirling engine may be up to 50% of the indicated power of the engine.

Makhkamov, K.K. [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan). Physical and Technical Inst.; Ingham, D.B. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Scientific Trigger Unit for Space-Based Real-Time Gamma Ray Burst Detection, II - Data Processing Model and Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Scientific Trigger Unit (UTS) is a satellite equipment designed to detect Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by the onboard 6400 pixels camera ECLAIRs. It is foreseen to equip the low-Earth orbit French-Chinese satellite SVOM and acts as the GRB trigger unit for the mission. The UTS analyses in real-time and in great details the onboard camera data in order to select the GRBs, to trigger a spacecraft slew re-centering each GRB for the narrow field-of-view instruments, and to alert the ground telescope network for GRB follow-up observations. A few GRBs per week are expected to be observed by the camera; the UTS targets a close to 100% trigger efficiency, while being selective enough to avoid fake alerts. This is achieved by running the complex scientific algorithms on a radiation tolerant hardware, based on a FPGA data pre-processor and a CPU with a Real-Time Operating System. The UTS is a scientific software, firmware and hardware co-development. A Data Processing Model (DPM) has been developed to fully val...

Provost, Hervé Le; Flouzat, Christophe; Kestener, Pierre; Chaminade, Thomas; Donati, Modeste; Château, Frédéric; Daly, François; Fontignie, Jean

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Economic and European Union Environmental Sustainability Criteria Assesment of Bio-Oil-Based Biofuel Systems: Refinery Integration Cases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between bio-oil gasification and upgrading routes in Figure 2, the former route comprises of proven technologies and “can be commercially deployable by industrial companies with infrastructure and expertise available to produce marketable products”. ... For the scenario with all hydrogen sold by the refinery, (61.5 + 20.67) kmol/t of bio-oil at the market rate of 1200 $/t and stable oil sold by the upgrader to the refinery at the market rate of 490 $/t, 141.8 $/t or 19.8 $/bbl of crude oil of economic incentive from the selling of all the hydrogen and 39.3 $/t or 3.3 $/bbl of crude oil of economic incentive from the replacement of final biodiesel blending by the renewable diesel production from the stable oil coprocessing are obtained. ... Given the volatile and vulnerable petroleum markets, oil companies are under pressure for moving toward a greener future, within which refinery expansion strategy may be a commonplace. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; Kok Siew Ng

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Green ultrasound-assisted extraction of carotenoids based on the bio-refinery concept using sunflower oil as an alternative solvent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A green, inexpensive and easy-to-use method for carotenoids extraction from fresh carrots assisted by ultrasound was designed in this work. Sunflower oil was applied as a substitute to organic solvents in this green ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE): a process which is in line with green extraction and bio-refinery concepts. The processing procedure of this original UAE was first compared with conventional solvent extraction (CSE) using hexane as solvent. Moreover, the UAE optimal conditions for the subsequent comparison were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and ultra performance liquid chromatography – diode array detector – mass spectroscopy (UPLC–DAD–MS). The results showed that the UAE using sunflower as solvent has obtained its highest ?-carotene yield (334.75 mg/l) in 20 min only, while CSE using hexane as solvent obtained a similar yield (321.35 mg/l) in 60 min. The green UAE performed under optimal extraction conditions (carrot to oil ratio of 2:10, ultrasonic intensity of 22.5 W cm?2, temperature of 40 °C and sonication time of 20 min) gave the best yield of ?-carotene.

Ying Li; Anne Sylvie Fabiano-Tixier; Valérie Tomao; Giancarlo Cravotto; Farid Chemat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A High-Resolution Transmission-Type (TT) Phaser Based on Reflection-Type (RT) Units for Radio Analog Signal Processing (R-ASP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high Radio Analog Signal Processing (R-ASP) resolution transmission-type (TT) phaser based on reflection-type (RT) phaser units is introduced, theoretically studied and experimentally demonstrated. It is first shown that RT phasers inherently exhibit higher R-ASP resolution than their TT counterparts because their group delay swing is proportional to the reflection coefficient associated with a resonator coupling mechanism (admittance inverter), easy to maximize towards unity, rather than to a coupled-line coupling coefficient, typically restricted to values will inferior to unity, as in the RT case. Moreover, a detailed sensitivity analysis reveals that the proposed phaser is simultaneously features high R-ASP resolution and low sensitivity to fabrication tolerance, which makes it an ideal solution for R-ASP. The proposed phaser exhibits a 5 ns group delay swing over a fractional bandwidth of about 50% around 4 GHz.

Zou, Lianfeng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

API unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API unit [An arbitrary unit of the American Petroleum Institute for measuring natural radioactivity; used in certain well logging methods] ? API-Einheit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:32:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks" "Sourcekey","MGFSXUS1","MGFSXP11","MGFSXCT1","MGFS3_SDE_1","MGFSXFL1","MGFSXGA1","MGFS3_SME_1","MGFS3_SMD_1","MGFSXMA1","MGFS3_SNH_1","MGFSXNJ1","MGFSXNY1","MGFSXNC1","MGFSXPA1","MGFSXRI1","MGFSXSC1","MGFS3_SVT_1","MGFSXVA1","MGFSXWV1","MGFSXP21","MGFSXIL1","MGFSXIN1","MGFSXIA1","MGFS3_SKS_1","MGFSXKY1","MGFSXMI1","MGFSXMN1","MGFSXMO1","MGFS3_SNE_1","MGFS3_SND_1","MGFSXOH1","MGFSXOK1","MGFS3_SSD_1","MGFSXTN1","MGFSXWI1","MGFSXP31","MGFSXAL1","MGFSXAR1","MGFSXLA1","MGFSXMS1","MGFSXNM1","MGFSXTX1","MGFSXP41","MGFSXCO1","MGFSXID1","MGFSXMT1","MGFSXUT1","MGFSXWY1","MGFSXP51","MGFSXAK1","MGFSXAZ1","MGFSXCA1","MGFSXHI1","MGFSXNV1","MGFSXOR1","MGFSXWA1"

275

,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:32:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks" "Sourcekey","MGFSXUS1","MGFSXP11","MGFSXCT1","MGFS3_SDE_1","MGFSXFL1","MGFSXGA1","MGFS3_SME_1","MGFS3_SMD_1","MGFSXMA1","MGFS3_SNH_1","MGFSXNJ1","MGFSXNY1","MGFSXNC1","MGFSXPA1","MGFSXRI1","MGFSXSC1","MGFS3_SVT_1","MGFSXVA1","MGFSXWV1","MGFSXP21","MGFSXIL1","MGFSXIN1","MGFSXIA1","MGFS3_SKS_1","MGFSXKY1","MGFSXMI1","MGFSXMN1","MGFSXMO1","MGFS3_SNE_1","MGFS3_SND_1","MGFSXOH1","MGFSXOK1","MGFS3_SSD_1","MGFSXTN1","MGFSXWI1","MGFSXP31","MGFSXAL1","MGFSXAR1","MGFSXLA1","MGFSXMS1","MGFSXNM1","MGFSXTX1","MGFSXP41","MGFSXCO1","MGFSXID1","MGFSXMT1","MGFSXUT1","MGFSXWY1","MGFSXP51","MGFSXAK1","MGFSXAZ1","MGFSXCA1","MGFSXHI1","MGFSXNV1","MGFSXOR1","MGFSXWA1"

276

Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on the refinery of the future  

SciTech Connect

This report on the Workshop on the Refinery of the Future has been prepared for participants to provide them with a succinct summary of the presentations, deliberations, and discussions. In preparing the summary, we have striven to capture the key findings (conclusions) and highlight the issues and concerns raised during the plenary and breakout sessions. The presentation of the summary of the proceedings follows the final workshop agenda, which is given in Section I; each section is tabbed to facilitate access to specific workshop topics. The material presented relies heavily on the outline summaries prepared and presented by the Plenary Session Chairman and the Facilitators for each breakout group. These summaries are included essentially as presented. In addition, individuals were assigned to take notes during each session; these notes were used to reconstruct critical issues that were discussed in more detail. The key comments made by the participants, which tended to represent the range of views expressed relative to the issues, are presented immediately following the facilitator`s summary outline in order to convey the flavor of the discussions. The comments are not attributed to individuals, since in many instances they represent a composite of several similar views expressed during the discussion. The facilitators were asked to review the writeups describing the outcomes of their sessions for accuracy and content; their suggested changes were incorporated. Every effort has thus been made to reconstruct the views expressed as accurately as possible; however, errors and/or misinterpretations undoubtedly have occurred.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

IFDM modelling for optimal siting of air quality monitoring stations around five oil refineries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An IFDM modelling study has been conducted to determine the optimal siting of air quality monitoring stations around five oil refineries. The purpose of this immission monitoring network is specified in environmental legislation. The most appropriate output parameter of the IFDM model for this study is the 98th percentile of the moving 24 h averages, P98,m24h. Modelling for the optimal siting of air quality monitoring stations turned out to be different from modelling for permit granting. Of interest is not the peak value of a relevant immission parameter, but the places where this parameter is most likely to have a higher peak value compared with neighbouring places. For this study, modelling has been done for eleven years of hourly meteorological data. The eleven yearly immission fields obtained by modelling are synthesized using the minimum, median and maximum values of the P98,m24h values obtained for each receptor point. This synthesis of the modelling results was complemented with an analysis of the available immission data for the region, so that the resulting air quality monitoring network is expected to monitor the impact of all emissions, not only those emissions that are in the emission inventory used for modelling.

G. Cosemans; G. Dumont; E. Roekens; J.G. Kretzschmar

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz  

SciTech Connect

The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gasification of refinery sludge in an updraft reactor for syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study probes into the investigation on gasification of dry refinery sludge. The details of the study includes; influence of operation time oxidation temperature and equivalence ratios on carbon gas conversion rate gasification efficiency heating value and fuel gas yield are presented. The results show that the oxidation temperature increased sharply up to 858°C as the operating time increased up to 36 min then bridging occurred at 39 min which cause drop in reaction temperature up to 819 °C. This bridging was found to affect also the syngas compositions meanwhile as the temperature decreased the CO H 2 CH 4 compositions are also found to be decreases. Higher temperature catalyzed the reduction reaction ( CO 2 + C ?=?450?2 CO ) and accelerated the carbon conversion and gasification efficiencies resulted in more solid fuel is converted to a high heating value gas fuel. The equivalence ratio of 0.195 was found to be the optimum value for carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies high heating value of gas and fuel gas yield to reach their maximum values of 96.1 % and 53.7 % 5.42 MJ Nm?3 of and 2.5 Nm3 kg?1 respectively.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Different process schemes for converting light straight run and fluid catalytic cracking naphthas in a FCC unit for maximum propylene production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light straight run (LSR) and fluid catalytic cracking (FCCN) naphthas were cracked in a transported bed reactor (MicroDowner) and in a fixed bed reactor (MAT) over a commercial Y zeolite based catalyst, over a commercial ZSM-5 zeolite based additive, and over a mixture of both at selected conditions. Based on the mechanisms through which naphtha hydrocarbons are converted, we evaluated the best alternatives for processing these streams to produce light olefins and/or to reduce olefins content in commercial gasoline. The experimental set-up allowed us to simulate the cracking behaviour of the different naphtha streams in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit by different processing schemes. Results indicate that LSR only cracks at high severity, yielding large amounts of dry gas. Despite its high olefins content, FCCN practically does not crack when it is fed together with gas oil feed. When cracking FCCN alone at typical gas oil cracking conditions, olefins are transformed preferentially into naphtha-range isoparaffins and aromatics, and when cracking FCCN at high severity, olefins are transformed preferentially into propylene and butylenes. Finally, cracking naphtha in the stripper produces some propylene and increases the aromatics in the remaining gasoline.

Avelino Corma; FranciscoV Melo; Laurent Sauvanaud; F.J Ortega

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

COPPER--2003 21.1 By Daniel L. Edelstein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. facilities operated in the United States. The three fire refineries processed scrap to recover unalloyed copper products; one of the refineries operated for only a portion of the year. Scrap was also consumed closed in October 2001. Smelter capacity remained unchanged at about 900,000 t, while refinery capacity

282

Energy Audits in Process Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:$M:.:....-_ Yrs. ---:%:::....__ Plant Dept M 3 Btu/yr $ 1112 Feed Clr Bypass 80 85 40 -0- 0.0 100 80 85 40 -0 1121 Feed Points 180 300 62 -0- 0.0 90 260 385 102 -0 1124 Raw Mtl Hx 500 600 300 20 0.1 50 760 985 402 20 115 Vacuum Pump 3.6 95 1110 200-lb Cond..., There are some key words in this definition; if it is assumed that the members of the audit team the first is "in-depth". An audit of this sort are devoting 30-50% of their time to this responsi is not a superficial review; it does require a bility...

Corwin, J. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy Management in Olefins Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

Wells, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

United Cool Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical.  Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

285

European refiners must seek creative processes to justify heavy-ends projects  

SciTech Connect

There are strong reasons for wanting to upgrade the bottom of the crude oil barrel. But European refiners will not find it easy to get approval and funding for major capital investment projects. In most cases, investment justification will have to be creative and may need to rely on factors traditionally considered to be outside the conventional refinery fence. Examples of such creative upgrading schemes are those employed in four gasification projects planned for refineries in Italy. It is clear that the major obstacles to heavy residue processing are not technical, but economic. A review of these obstacles will set the stage for European investment in bottom-of-the-barrel processing.

Hunt, P. [Chem Systems Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

287

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

288

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality specification, unit refinery energy use will rise.few decades, where unit refinery fuel use increase by 34%the Japanese case, rising refinery energy use was primarily

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Determination of naphthenic acids in California crudes and refinery waste waters by fluoride ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

A method based on negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry using fluoride (F/sup -/) ions produced from NF/sub 3/ reagent gas has been applied to the analysis of naphthenic acids in California crude oils and refinery waste waters. Since complex mixtures of naphthenic acids cannot be separated into individual components, only the determination of relative distribution of acids classified by the hydrogen deficiency was possible. The identities and relative distribution of paraffinic and mono-, di-, tri, and higher polycyclic acids were obtained from the intensities of the carboxylate (RCOO/sup -/) ions.

Dzidic, I.; Somerville, A.C.; Raia, J.C.; Hart, H.V.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

174 10 12 92 UNIT NAME: C-745-K Low Level Storage Area REGULATORY STAU: -AOC LOCATION: Inside Security Fence , South of C-333 Cascade Building. APPROXIMATE...

291

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

292

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 KOW Toluene SDill Area UNIT NAME: REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of plant site APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 800 feet ong FUNCTION: Storage of Toluene...

293

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME C-746-Al REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner of C-746-A APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 4000 gallons FUNCTION: Underground storage tanks OPERATIONAL STATUS:...

294

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Gasoline Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately east of C-61l APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 50 ga on FUNCTION: Gasoline storage OPERATIONAL...

295

210Pb-derived history of PAH and PCB accumulation in sediments of a tropical inner lagoon (Las Matas, Gulf of Mexico) near a major oil refinery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in a sediment core from the tropical freshwater inner lagoon of Las Matas, near the petroleum industrial area of Minatitlán-Coatzacoalcos, in the Gulf of Mexico. A 210Pb-derived chronology was used to reconstruct the historical PAH and PCB accumulation in the site during one century (1906–2005). Both geochemical and sedimentological data indicated that a major change occurred in 1947 ± 4, including a shift to coarser sediments and a significant decrease of Al, Li, Fe, organic C and total N contents. This was likely due to the changes in hydrology caused by the confinement of Las Matas Lagoon due to the construction of the Trans-Isthmus road in 1946. \\{PAHs\\} in these samples show relatively low concentrations (259–1176 ng g?1), and the congener relative abundances indicate the influence of pyrogenic (petroleum combustion) sources. Total PCB concentrations in the sediments ranged from 24 to 77 ng g?1, and are composed by low chlorinated PCBs, with 3- and 4-CB as the prevalent species (51–65% and 29–40%, respectively). \\{PAHs\\} and \\{PCBs\\} were detected at depths corresponding to the early 1900s, when Minatitlán refinery started operations, although their time evolution appears to be influenced by different accumulation processes. The PCB background is most likely produced by the combustion of natural organic matter, and an industrial contribution can be recognized when normalizing with OC contents. We concluded that atmospheric deposition is the most significant source of \\{PAHs\\} and \\{PCBs\\} for this water body. This study also provided evidence of the alteration of the wetlands surrounding this industrial area due to urbanization; the fragmentation and alteration of Las Matas Lagoon hydrology contributes to the gradual loss of the wetlands in the zone.

Ana Carolina Ruiz-Fernández; Mario Sprovieri; Rossano Piazza; Mauro Frignani; Joan-Albert Sanchez-Cabeza; Maria Luisa Feo; Luca Giorgio Bellucci; Marco Vecchiato; Libia Hascibe Pérez-Bernal; Federico Páez-Osuna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

AMO Fuel and Feedstock Flexibility: Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet summarizing a project to develop and demonstrate a full-scale fuel handling and combustion system

297

Final Report - Development of New Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Technology to Recover High Valued Products from Chemical Plant and Refinery Waste Systems  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective was to extend pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology into previously under-exploited applications such as polyolefin production vent gas recovery and H2 recovery from refinery waste gases containing significant amounts of heavy hydrocarbons, aromatics, or H2S.

Keith Ludwig

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former St. Marks Refinery in St. Marks, Florida  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

853 853 September 2010 Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former St. Marks Refinery in St. Marks, Florida A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Lands Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites Lars Lisell and Gail Mosey National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-48853 September 2010 Feasibility Study of Economics

299

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-333 North Side PCB Soil Contamination REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: North side of C-333 Building APPROXIMATE OIMENSIONS: 150 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Dust Palliative...

300

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 KPDES Outfall Ditch 017 Flume- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South of plant on the west side of the access road APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 30 feet wide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 C-617-A Sanitarv Waterline- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Between southeast corner of C-531 Switchyard and C-617-A Water Treatment Facility. 4 feet...

302

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-720 Inactive TCE Oegreaser REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: C-720 Building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Approx. 10 ft by 10 ft by 20 f1: deep FUNCTION: Used for cleaning...

303

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 46 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: 2000 ft southwest of curve on Kentucky Highway 473- near east end of Mitchell Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft...

304

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME Rubble oile 45 REGULATORY STATUS AOC LOCATION: West end of Mitche Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2000 ft long, ft thick 4 ft wide FUNCTION: Control erosion on face of dam...

305

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 43 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West end of Happy Ho ow Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long by 4 ft wide -concrete 4-6 in thickness FUNCTION:...

306

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 UNIT NAME C-740 TCE Soill Site REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner C-740 concrete pad area) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 5 ft by 5 ft spill FUNCTION: Drum storage area...

307

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 C-I00 South Side Berms UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South Side C-IOO APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2 berms approximately 200 ft long by SO ft wide eac FUNCTION:...

308

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 UNIT NAME: C-331 PCB Soil Contamination -West Side REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West side C-331 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 100 feet wide by 420 feet long FUNCTION: Dust...

309

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

310

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-633 PCB So111 Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-633 Transformer area (Mac location 75) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS I Unknown FUNCTION Soill site OPERATIONAL STATUS...

311

Chapter 2. Uranium Mining and Extraction Processes in the United States In 1946, Congress passed the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), establishing the Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is managed. This chapter examines the location and geology of uranium deposits in the United States, the methods used to mine uranium, and the methods used to extract it from ore. Many of the geological, the characteristic geologic forms of uranium ore bodies were small to moderate-sized isolated pods or linear sinuous

312

Second United Nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nations Nations . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

313

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

314

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

315

Process Balances of Vegetable Oil Hydrogenation and Coprocessing Investigations with Middle-Distillates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogenation of vegetable oil is a promising technology for the production of highly valuable diesel components. ... Finding a sustainable energy supplement as well as the need for carbon dioxide reduction leads to the necessity to integrate more and more renewable energy sources into the transportation fuel markets. ... A possibility for introduction of hydrogenated vegetable oils on the market is the coprocessing in conventional hydrotreater and hydrocracker units in a refinery. ...

Matthias Endisch; Thomas Kuchling; Jan Roscher

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Plutonium pit manufacturing unit process separation options for rapid reconstitution, a joint position paper of Lawrence Livemore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document addressed technical issues regarding the manufacturing processes involved in making plutonium pits. It addresses acceptable approaches from a technical standpoint as to how the manufacturing processes can be separated and distributed among different manufacturing sites. Site selections, costs, and intra-site transfers are not addressed in this document.

Hart, M.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wood, W.T.; Olivas, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. PAD District 1 Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Maine Maryland Massachusetts New Hampshire New Jersey New York North Carolina Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Vermont Virginia West Virginia PAD District 2 Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin PAD District 3 Alabama Arkansas Louisiana Mississippi New Mexico Texas PAD District 4 Colorado Idaho Montana Utah Wyoming PAD District 5 Alaska Arizona California Hawaii Nevada Oregon Washington Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

318

The Radio Frequency Identification enabled logistics process for supply chain event management from China to the United States via Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reviews the current logistics processes and issues for container shipments in the supply chain. In particular, the problems associated with container shipments from China to the US, via the Hong Kong Port, ...

Han, Taehee

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

320

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

322

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Reduction in Unit Steam Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001 the company's Arch-Brandenburg facility faced increased steam costs due to high natural gas prices and decreased production due to shutdown of a process. The facility was challenged to reduce unit steam consumption to minimize the effects...

Gombos, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

North Carolina used motor oil re-refining program: site selection, permits, and environmental impact study. [Re-refinery  

SciTech Connect

The State of North Carolina has a used motor oil re-refining program that collects crankcase drainings from various sources, re-refines it in a plant purchased from the Phillips Petroleum Company, and distributes the product to State and other governmental garages. This report describes the steps between the initial decision to establish a used oil re-refining demonstration program and receipt of a final permit to operate a facility. The report covers in some detail those issues faced in obtaining approval to establish the program, select a site, gain permits for construction and operation, prepare an acceptable environmental impact statement, and start re-refining used motor oil. Many of the considerations made during this experience are germaine to other states and to private enterprise, although the details may vary. This is the first in what is expected to be a related series of reports; subsequent numbers will cover the economics of plant acquisition and start-up, technical considerations, and long term operations of the re-refinery.

Griffith, W.C.; Holland, G.M.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment  

SciTech Connect

A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

327

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

328

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

329

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

330

The water footprint of biofuel produced from forest wood residue via a mixed alcohol gasification process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forest residue has been proposed as a feasible candidate for cellulosic biofuels. However, the number of studies assessing its water use remains limited. This work aims to analyze the impacts of forest-based biofuel on water resources and quality by using a water footprint approach. A method established here is tailored to the production system, which includes softwood, hardwood, and short-rotation woody crops. The method is then applied to selected areas in the southeastern region of the United States to quantify the county-level water footprint of the biofuel produced via a mixed alcohol gasification process, under several logistic systems, and at various refinery scales. The results indicate that the blue water sourced from surface or groundwater is minimal, at 2.4 liters per liter of biofuel (l/l). The regional-average green water (rainfall) footprint falls between 400 and 443 l/l. The biofuel pathway appears to have a low nitrogen grey water footprint averaging 25 l/l at the regional level, indicating minimal impacts on water quality. Feedstock mix plays a key role in determining the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the water footprint in these regions. Compared with other potential feedstock, forest wood residue shows promise with its low blue and grey water footprint.

Yi-Wen Chiu; May Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

332

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

333

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

334

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

335

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

336

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

Termination unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN ASSESSMENT FOR THE CO-FIRING OF BIO-REFINERY SUPPLIED LIGNIN PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The major aspects of this project are proceeding toward completion. Prior to this quarter, design criteria, tentative site selection, facility layout, and preliminary facility cost estimates were completed and issued. Processing of bio-solids was completed, providing material for the pilot operations. Pilot facility hydrolysis production has been completed to produce lignin for co-fire testing and the lignin fuel was washed and dewatered. Both the lignin and bio-solids fuel materials for co-fire testing were sent to the co-fire facility (EERC) for evaluation and co-firing. EERC has received coal typical of the fuel to the TVA-Colbert boilers. This material was used at EERC as baseline material and for mixing with the bio-fuel for combustion testing. All the combustion and fuel handling tests at EERC have been completed. During fuel preparation EERC reported no difficulties in fuel blending and handling. Preliminary co-fire test results indicate that the blending of lignin and bio-solids with the Colbert coal blend generally reduces NO{sub x} emissions, increases the reactivity of the coal, and increases the ash deposition rate on superheater surfaces. Deposits produced from the fuel blends, however, are more friable and hence easier to remove from tube surfaces relative to those produced from the baseline Colbert coal blend. The final co-fire testing report is being prepared at EERC and will be completed by the end of the second quarter of 2002. The TVA-Colbert facility has neared completion of the task to evaluate co-location of the Masada facility on the operation of the power generation facility. The TVA-Colbert fossil plant is fully capable of providing a reliable steam supply. The preferred steam supply connection points and steam pipeline routing have been identified. The environmental review of the pipeline routing has been completed and no major impacts have been identified. Detailed assessment of steam export impacts on the Colbert boiler system have been completed and a cost estimate for the steam supply system was completed. The cost estimate and output and heat rate impacts have been used to determine a preliminary price for the exported steam. TVA is further evaluating the impacts of adding lignin to the coal fuel blend and how the steam cost is impacted by proximity of the Masada biomass facility.

Ted Berglund; Jeffrey T. Ranney; Carol L. Babb; Jacqueline G. Broder

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Integrated design of diesel hydrotreating processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents an integrated approach for the design of diesel hydrotreating processes employing a simulated annealing optimisation algorithm. The modelling of reactor, separation and heat recovery system for diesel hydrotreating processes is discussed, and a novel optimisation framework is developed for the design of complex refinery processes. A comparison with conventional approach to process design, i.e. sequential evolution of design, is given to illustrate the ability of proposed approach to obtain overall hydrotreating process designs with minimum total annualised costs. The proposed integrated approach takes into account the trade-offs between capital and operating costs, as well as interactions between the hydrotreater, distillation column, and the associated heat exchanger network.

Muhammad Imran Ahmad; Nan Zhang; Megan Jobson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Standard practice for evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in high-pressure, high-temperature refinery hydrogen service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in refinery high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) gaseous hydrogen service. It includes procedures to (1) produce suitable laboratory test specimens, (2) obtain hydrogen charging conditions in the laboratory that are similar to those found in refinery HP/HT hydrogen gas service for evaluation of bimetallic specimens exposed to these environments, and (3) perform analysis of the test data. The purpose of this practice is to allow for comparison of data among test laboratories on the resistance of bimetallic stainless alloy/steels to hydrogen-induced disbonding (HID). 1.2 This practice applies primarily to bimetallic products fabricated by weld overlay of stainless alloy onto a steel substrate. Most of the information developed using this practice has been obtained for such materials. The procedures described herein, may also be appropriate for evaluation of hot roll bonded, explosive bonded...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Corrective Action Management Units and Temporary Units. RCRA Information Brief  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, 1993 the EPA published a final rule that allows either the EPA Regional Administrator or the authorized State to designate areas as corrective action management units (CAMUs) at hazardous waste management facilities for the specific purpose of managing remediation waste that has been generated as part of the facility`s corrective action activities. According to the rule, placement of remediation wastes into or within a CAMU does not constitute land disposal of hazardous waste and is not subject to RCRA land disposal restrictions. In addition, waste disposal units located within CAMUs are not required to be designed in accordance with RCRA minimum technological requirements applicable to land disposal units. This Information Brief explains the advantages of a CAMU designation, defines a Temporary Unit (TU) and explains the advantages of a TU designation. The process for initiating a CAMU or TU designation is described for DOE sites and interim status facilities.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

U.S. Refinery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 354,918 353,802 345,413 343,062 345,025 342,763 1993-2013 Crude Oil 98,082 97,563 90,880 93,075 97,586 90,778 1981-2013 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 256,836 256,239 254,533 249,987 247,439 251,985 1993-2013 Pentanes Plus 947 867 828 805 708 856 1993-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 12,896 14,096 15,761 16,662 18,296 18,683 1993-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 281 321 261 242 205 171 1993-2013 Propane/Propylene 2,692 2,994 3,569 3,518 4,099 4,104 1993-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 7,627 8,451 9,511 10,757 11,921 12,147 1993-2013 Isobutane/Butylene 2,296 2,330 2,420 2,145 2,071 2,261 1993-2013 Other Hydrocarbons 19 43 49 33 26 21 2009-2013 Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) 116 99 100 82 71 78 2009-2013

346

U.S. Refinery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 346,915 338,782 331,615 339,907 336,327 341,211 1993-2012 Crude Oil 89,070 86,598 90,944 88,982 90,640 88,781 1981-2012 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 257,845 252,184 240,671 250,925 245,687 252,430 1993-2012 Pentanes Plus 949 997 1,006 971 895 884 1993-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,161 12,456 12,611 14,896 14,429 15,934 1993-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 31 185 118 220 223 214 1993-2012 Propane/Propylene 4,120 3,293 3,577 4,278 4,087 4,574 1993-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 6,320 6,482 6,478 7,818 7,794 8,774 1993-2012 Isobutane/Butylene 2,690 2,496 2,438 2,580 2,325 2,372 1993-2012 Other Hydrocarbons 29 20 41 42 2009-2012 Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) 47 24 58 112 2009-2012

347

Refinery Capacity Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 120,100 0 130,000 0 48,000 32,000 0 0 0 Goodway Refining LLC 4,100 0 5,000 0 0 0 0 0 ............................................................................................................................... 0 Atmore Hunt Refining Co 36,000 0 40,000 0 18,000 32,000 0 0 ............................................................................................................................... 0 Tuscaloosa Shell Chemical LP 80,000 0 85,000 0 30,000 0 0 0 ............................................................................................................................... 0 Saraland .........................................................

348

Refinery Energy Profiling Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coolers Steam System Petroleum Coke Electrical System '" Cf) .Po Feed Streams Radiation and Convection Exothermic Reaction Products and Wastes Endothermic Reactions Oil Charge Losa 2 Oil and Gas Losses Subtotal Imbalance TOTAL TOTAL 560...

Maier, R. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Refinery Outages: Fall 2014  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

well- supplied with middle distillate fuel oil, not only from Europe but also from Russia, India and the Middle East. As a result, planned maintenance this fall at Eastern...

350

Hydrogen Generation for Refineries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

bottoms (VTB), vacuum resid) * Dilbit (tar sand bitumen diluted with 30% condensate) * Biomass fast pyrolysis oil (whole raw oil) * Norpar 12 (C 11 C 12 paraffinic solvent -...

351

Refinery Planning under Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The planning/scheduling of the supply chain under uncertainty is important in light of the ever-changing market conditions. ... Examples of the open-shop mode, such as the news vendor model26 in which the sales of holiday lights disappear after Christmas, for instance, can be found in the real world. ...

Wenkai Li; Chi-Wai Hui; Pu Li; An-Xue Li

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;7 Example 1: 5 crudes, 4 weeks Produce fuel gas, regular gasoline, premium gasoline, distillate, fuel oil seconds (94% NLP, 6% MIP) #12;8 Example 2: 8 crudes, 6 weeks Produce fuel gas, regular gasoline, premium gasoline, distillate, fuel oil and treated residu Optimal solution ($1000's) Profit 3641.3 Sales 33790

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

353

Systems Engineering and Innovation in Control--anSystems Engineering and Innovation in Control an Industry Perspective and an Application to Automotive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, about 55% of sales outside of U.S. · More than 130,000 employees, operating in more than 100 countriesHoneywell Presence in Advanced Controls Industry Example Applications Realized Benefits Oil Refining Refinery, Gas Processing, LNG/LPG · Refinery: ~$1/Barrel for advanced control · 5-20% less energy/unit product

Shapiro, Benjamin

354

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

355

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

356

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,5.8,6.2,2.8,2.8,1.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

357

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

358

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,9.6,5,2.2,1.5,0.8 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

359

New extraction-based re-refining process saves money  

SciTech Connect

A novel re-refining process uses solvent extraction and distillation to process used oil at lower cost and much smaller volumes than existing technology will allow. Current technology typically requires minimum processing volumes of 40,000 gpd for economically viable operation. The new process, developed by Interline Resources Corp., Alpine, Utah, can operate economically on volumes as small as 5,000 gpd. The new process has eliminated the need for thin-film evaporators, as well as the very expensive hydrofinishing step. The elimination of this capital-intensive equipment is made possible by the patented Mellon Process. In this process, the water, additives, and solids are removed at ambient conditions, thus allowing the resulting oil to be handled in traditional distillation equipment. The paper describes the process, yields, costs, and operating experience of the commercial-scale re-refinery at Draper, Utah.

Not Available

1994-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

United States Government Departmen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Departmen of Energy memorandum DATE: December 20, 2005 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-03 REPLY TO A1TN OF; IG-36 (A05SR025) SUBJECT: Audit of "Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site" TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site stores approximately 36 million gallons of liquid, high-level radioactive waste in 49 underground waste storage tanks. The contents of the waste tanks are broadly characterized as either "sludge waste" or "salt waste". Sludge waste is insoluble and settles to the bottom of a waste tank, beneath a layer of liquid supernate. Salt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.l± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.l± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u O000DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: March 31,2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A05TG028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-10 SUBJECT: Report on Audit of "The Department's Information Technology Capital Planning and Investment Control Process" TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Federal guidance requires that Agencies develop and implement capital planning and investment control (CPIC) processes to help ensure that their major information technology investments achieve intended outcomes, represent the best allocation of resources, and reach strategic goals and objectives. The Department of Energy

362

Analysis of power generation processes using petcoke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Petroleum coke or petcoke, a refinery byproduct, has generally been considered as an unusable byproduct because of its high sulfur content. However energy industries now… (more)

Jayakumar, Ramkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Federal Regulatory Development Process Robert Morehouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and conducts federal advocacy for chemical, refinery, and distribution operations. Individually he focuses on air toxics and operating and construction permitting issues

Walter, M.Todd

364

Training Units and Developing Leaders Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2011 edition of (Field Manual) FM 7-0 reflected the Army’s unit training and leader development concepts borne from a decade of persistent combat operations. Army Doctrine Publication (ADP) 7-0, Training Units and Developing Leaders, re-establishes fundamental training and leader development concepts and processes for the U.S. Army. Training doctrine is again based on the Army’s operations and planning processes, now defined by ADP 3-0, Unified Land Operations, and ADP 5-0, The Operations Process. Mission command makes the commander responsible for unit readiness and leader development. Unit commanders must be the subject matter experts. Commanders cannot delegate oversight of unit training and leader development to subordinates. The commander’s physical presence at training sends a clear message to subordinates—unit training and leader development are the most important things the unit does when it is not actively engaged in operations. Unit training and leader development are inextricably linked. Good training supports leader development and good leaders develop good training programs for

Raymond T. Odierno

365

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,1,0.5,0.5,3.4,2.4,0.6,0.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

366

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2.3,16.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N",2.3,16.8,"N","N" "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

367

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2,0.7,1.3,2.6,4.1,3.5,2.5,2.4 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

368

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,6.2,3.5,0.5,0.5,1.1,0.6,"Q",0.7,0.4,0.2,2,1.4,0.6 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

369

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.7,0.9,0.4,0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4,"Q",3.8,2.9,0.9 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

370

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,3.7,2.7,0.9,0.6,0.3,0.9,1,0.2,0.6,0.2 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

371

Unit Testing Discussion C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

372

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

373

Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commodity Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 10a. Fuel Consumed at Refineries by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 464 490 49 518 1,521 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 89 236 1 209 539 Residual Fuel Oil 26 18 11 16 469 540 Still Gas 13,838 50,328 108,359 8,694 38,875 220,094 Marketable Petroleum Coke 0 0 0 528 166 694 Catalyst Petroleum Coke 9,003 17,611 42,614 2,852 12,416 84,496 Natural Gas (million cubic feet) 38,347 143,702 474,359 26,971 159,849 843,228 Coal (thousand short tons) 30 0 0 0 0 30 Purchased Electricity (million kWh) 2,355 11,892 23,255 2,003 5,130 44,635 Purchased Steam (million pounds) 3,849 12,723 88,922 1,439 14,426 121,359 Other Products 40 47 677 67 1,141 1,972

374

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Electrolytic Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electrolysis is the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. This reaction takes place in a unit called an electrolyzer. Electrolyzers can be small, appliance-size equipment and well-suited for small-scale distributed hydrogen production. Research is also under way to examine larger-scale electrolysis that could be tied directly to renewable or other non-greenhouse gas emitting electricity production. Hydrogen production at a wind farm generating electricity is an example of this.

376

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green’ with FCC Expander Technology,” Chemical EngineeringCONCAWE 2008, “Refinery Technology Support Group, Impact ofEnergy, Industrial Technologies Program, Nov. 2007.

Morrow III, William R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2/04 THU 14:52 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -**- HQ l015 2/04 THU 14:52 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -**- HQ l015 ol: Fi 13 5.8 (8-09) £1*G (in'mi^)) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: April. 22, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: T -36 (A04RL018) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-15 SUBJECT: Audit of Disposition of Excess Facilities at the Hanford Site TO: Keith A. Klein, Manager, Richland Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Hanford Site (Hanford) is the largest of the three original defense production sites founded during World War II. Between 1943 and 1963, nine plutonium production reactors were built along the Columbia River and five processing facilities were built on the site's Central Plateau, with about 1,000 support facilities. Currently, Hanford has a total of 1,500 facilities of which an estimated 1,000 are excess to current and future mission

378

Electrolytic Processes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Research Center in Arcata, California. Electrolysis is the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. This reaction takes place in a unit called...

379

Transmission Business Unit Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

(See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Transmission Services, (J7300) Transmission Busiess Unit 615...

380

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

382

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

383

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

384

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

385

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

386

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

387

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

388

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

389

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

390

(Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1995. Domestic indium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, refinery NA NA NA NA -- Imports for consumption 36.3 36.3 73.4 70.2 73.0 Exports NA NA NA NA NA marketed through a U.S. company. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

391

Second United Nations International Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Confidential until official release during Conference Confidential until official release during Conference A/CONF 15/P/729 Abstract (USA) 7 March 1958 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS WITH HYDROGEN BUBBLE CHAMBERS~ Prepared by Abstract , _ - - ' ~ u i s W. Akvarez . I e - 4 - - a c bubble chambers in high-energy physics experiments. This paper @.scusses recent experience with liquid hydrogen # - . . . 1 sify of California, Berkeley, California / This document is DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

392

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

393

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

394

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

395

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

396

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

397

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

398

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

399

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

400

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

402

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a typical wind energy production facility, the results warrant further research on the use of acoustic;1 INTRODUCTION Over the past decade, wind energy production capacity in the United States has increased

403

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Proceedings Research Station. 130 p. Declinesinhabitatofgreatersage, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil

404

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Best Buys and Unit Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

Anding, Jenna

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

The HYSULF{sup SM} process: A valuable hydrogen resource from hydrogen sulfide  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for hydrogen to reduce the sulfur content in standard refinery fuels is a very familiar problem to everyone in the industry. This problem could be partially offset by the continuous recycling of the hydrogen portion of hydrogen sulfide. In this regard, Marathon has been developing the HYSULF process. This process uses Redox chemistry under mild operating conditions to convert hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur. The process employs two basic steps, i.e., a sulfur production and recovery step and a hydrogen production step. All chemicals and the catalyst used in the HYSULF process are either commercially available or are slight modifications of available materials. Also, the chemistry used in the HYSULF process is similar to that used in commercial desulfurization and gas sweetening processes.

Plummer, M.A. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microsystem process networks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various aspects and applications of microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having exergetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Microsystem process networks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various aspects and applications or microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having energetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Whyatt, Greg A [West Richland, WA

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Microsystem process networks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various aspects and applications of microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of Microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having energetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Membrane Technology and Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR), based in Menlo Park, CA, is a privately- owned developer, manufacturer, and supplier of customized membrane process solutions. Currently, the company's principal membrane products are * VaporSep® systems to remove organic vapors from air and nitrogen * NitroSep TM and fuel gas conditioning systems for natural gas treatment * Hydrogen recovery systems for refinery and other applications MTR's current R&D is extending use of membranes to carbon sequestration and biofuels separations. www.mtrinc.com New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes Challenge Membrane technology was first commercialized in the 1960s and 1970s for well-known applications such as water filtration

411

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG .2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ . 001 United States Government Department of Energy Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 9, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-07 REPLY TO ATTN OF; IG-32 (A050R014) SUBJECT: Audit of "The Department's Management of United States Enrichment Corporation Site Services" TO: Manager, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office INTRODUCTTON AND OBJECTIVE The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), located in western Kentucky, was constructed by the Department of Energy (Department) in the early 1950s to enrich uranium for use in various military and commercial applications. The Department operated the plant until the Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a Government-owned

412

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has become a potential energy and cost saver for refineries.Refrigeration System Reduces Energy Costs - September - GRIbe implemented rapidly About 8% energy cost reductions in CA

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Naphthenic acid corrosion in crude distillation units  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes corrosion experience in crude distillation units processing highly naphthenic California crude oils. Correlations have been developed relating corrosion rates to temperature and total acid number. There is a threshold acid number in the range of 1.5 to 2 mg KOH/g below which corrosion is minimal. High concentrations of hydrogen sulfide may raise this threshold value.

Piehl, R.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Effective Energy Conservation in the Operating Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can odcur. At that point, positive steps need to be takerl to rejuvenate the process. Suci, a step might weIll in clude a energy brainstorming session(s} where Ithe interaction between people can jar out some i~eas. that the unit coordinator has a...

Korich, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

Standiford, Richard B.

416

Ignacio E. Grossmann Center for Advanced Process Decision-making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.E. Grossmann, "Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations," in preparation (2007). Crude Continuous Variables Boolean Variables Logic Propositions OR operator Disjunction Fixed Charges Constraints

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

417

2. Unit Operation Dynamic simulation Unit operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= 1.5 x 2.85 = 4.28 3.28 kg/cm2G . 2.4 2 Adiabatic efficiency Isentropic efficiency compressor . adiabatic efficiency mechanical efficiency adiabatic efficiency compressor . 2.4.3 Performance map process compressor pump performance curve performance area, performance map . turbine

Hong, Deog Ki

418

Outlook for Refinery Outages and Available Refinery Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PADD 3 are moving farther into the global market. For example, U.S. gasoline exports to Africa averaged a record 32,000 bbld year-to-date 2013 through November, up from 9,000...

419

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

420

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution Forest, New Hampshire, began in 1932. One of the studies, still maintained today, consisted of severalUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station Research Paper NRS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station at Durham, New Hampshire. The computer program described in this publication was created usingUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station General Technical://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200

422

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

423

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copies: USDA FOREST SERVICE USDA Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution at Durham, New Hampshire; JENNIFER C. JENKINS, jjenkins@fs.fed.us, is a research foresterUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General

424

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1973 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 67 Prepared by STATISTICS a review of the fishery statistics for the year 1973 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment 1n the fish- eries, quantity of gear operated, number

425

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1971 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 65 Prepared by STATISTICS ry statistics for the year 1971 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment in the fishe ries, quantity of gear operated, number of fishing craft e

426

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

play an important role in a national program for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The conversion potential through conversion of nonforest land to forest land and through the management of forest lands and sinks in the United States can be identified. International treaties on greenhouse gas reduction require

427

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an offset, or for registering carbon dioxide reductions using the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b. Brown Richard A. Birdsey #12;Visit our homepage at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by forestry companies and managers of utility company lands, within the United States who are interested

428

United Nations Development Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Development Policy Energy and Atmosphere Programme Development Programme with support from the Government of Norway #12;The views expressed in this volume. #12;5 Acknowledgements 6 Notes on Authors 7 Foreword 9 Executive Summary 27 Introduction: Energy

429

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; preventionUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry/R-02/008 January 2002 Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry, and Assessment of Nitrogen

430

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hills National Forest uses such a habitat capability model (HABCAP), but its accuracy is largely unknown, Wildlife Biologist with Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD 2 South Dakota State UniversityUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment

431

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Managing Habitats for White-tailed DeerForest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Fort Collins, Colorado 80526 General Technical Report RM-GTR-274 Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming Carolyn Hull Sieg and Kieth E

432

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 25 p. Estimates of forest of California's legislatively mandated green- house gas inventory. Reliable estimates of live-tree carbon stores

Fried, Jeremy S.

433

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family...

434

Optimizing hydrocarbon recoveries in nitrogen rejection units  

SciTech Connect

In order to address conceptual questions such as process selection and natural gas liquids plant integration, an understanding of the effects of several additional factors on nitrogen rejection unit design is important. These factors, which may influence optimum hydrocarbon recovery, installed compression, etc., include current and forecast values for natural gas and utilities, project life, plant size, feed gas composition and product specifications, feed pressure, and process variations. Prices, project life, and plant size are analyzed in detail and presented in terms of methane recoveries as a function of nitrogen content in the feed for both double and single column processes. Trends are qualitatively discussed for the remaining factors. 13 references.

Chesney, J.D.; Davis, R.A.; Hilton, M.F.; Vines, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chapter 26 - The Oxyfuel Baseline: Revamping Heaters and Boilers to Oxyfiring by Cryogenic Air Separation and Flue Gas Recycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This feasibility study involves the potential application of oxyfuel technology on a refinery-wide basis at the BP Grangemouth unit in Scotland. A total of seven boilers and 13 process heaters of various types, burning a mixture of refinery fuel gas and fuel oil resulting in the production of approximately 2.0 million tonnes per annum of CO2, form the basis of this study.

Rodney Allam; Vince White; Neil Ivens; Mark Simmonds

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . 'A4 .. ± OO, I U444 flmI I.j102 ' -f- $I)002 EP<.1 (o-.vu) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 30, 2004 REP.YTO: IG-35 (A03DN039) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-10 SUBJECT: Audit of the Safeguards and Security Program at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site To: Frazer Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Because of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy (Department) instituted additional security requirements beyond those already in place for normal security operations. These "Security Conditions" requirements were established by Department Notice 473.8 (Notice). The requirements are based on

437

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

438

l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT lb 15 SUBJECT: THORFJM PROCURENENT PMF'N:TBU Jesse C. Johnson, Gtnager of IRaw Materials Operations3s.Office 3 R. W. Cook, Director of Production ~',LL:::+ I--- DATE: MAR ! 9 1951 The following list of suppliers of thorium and the amounts of materials procured from them by the Mew York Operations Office during calendar year 1950 is being supplied in accordance with Mr. Spelmanls telephone request of March 19. Thorium Lannett Bleachery iinde Air Products Co. Lindsey Light & Chemical Co. lliscellaneous NY0 Liscensing Division Rare Earths, Inc. Wolff-Alport Total - (kilograms) 179 38,2;2 -3 4,210 /vyeoi 4 -q- 2 : i ' \ iti 1 i 0 ;;\I:' --' I F 10 i;;;?/ \ --' L & ;:I :,- :,j( EZi 5 1 :' -I I ri _ I ' R i; .- . )- .i

439

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ng ng United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: APR 18 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PR010) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-15 SUBJECT: Audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program TO: Director, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, EE-2K The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Weatherization Assistance Program (Program) was established to increase energy efficiency in dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons to reduce their residential energy expenditures and improve their health and safety. Since its inception in 1976, the Program has reported that approximately 5 million dwelling units owned or occupied by low-income individuals have been weatherized.

440

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE r 1325.0 OE r 1325.0 (01.93) United States Government Department of memorandum DATE: March 23, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A060R040) SUBJECT: Audit of"The Department of Energy's Management of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve" TO, Deputy Assistant Secrctary for Petroleum Reserves INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Energy Act of 2000 authorized the Secretary of Energy to create a Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (Reserve). The Reserve was established as an "emergency buffer" to supplement commercial supplies should a severe supply disruption occur in the heavily heating oil-dependent northeast United States. The Reserve consists of 2 million barrels of emergency home heating oil, enough to provide Northeast consumers adequate supplies for approximately

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Government United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 29, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A05HQ002) Audit Report No. OAS-L-05-10 SUBJECT: Agreed-Upon Procedures for Federal Payroll TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget, and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin No. 01-02, "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statement," dated October 16, 2000, requires an annual audit of civilian payroll of executive departments and other Government agencies. Auditors are required to follow the agreed-upon procedures in Appendix I-1 of OMB Bulletin No. 01-02, to assess the reasonableness of life insurance, health benefits, and retirement withholdings and contributions.

442

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Menxmmhmz 9 Menxmmhmz 9 1 / UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo ,sYmOL: DH:ARP . . : OnJuly 8,&g the uriterattendedameeting at the Navy Oxdnce Depot at Farle, Ii. J. for the purpose of advising the navy on i-adlatlon hazards involved In the dmping of contadnated AEC wastes at /?ea. " Presint were: J. Cook - Traffic & Transportation, AEC ~J.Moren- Utilifation, AEC ..J. Ccnmigl.io - Chief of Middlesex Operaticns A. PIhot -~Hadiation Section, AEC Captain Blossoin - Navy Captain hall - Navy ThefoSkndngwas agreedupcmby AFC andthe l&v. 1. 2. 3. 4. Contaminatedmaterial dnmied, I (loose in case of large contaminated units) loaded on truck&and lsonltored at'

443

Integrated solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an integral solar heating unit with an integral solar collector and hot water storage system, the unit comprising: (a) a housing; (b) a flat plate solar collector panel mounted in the housing and having a generally horizontal upper edge and an uninsulated, open back surface; (c) a cylindrical hot water tank operatively connected to the solar collector panel and mounted in the housing generally parallel to and adjacent to the upper edge; (d) the housing comprising a hood around the tank a pair of side skirts extending down at the sides of the panel. The hood and side skirts terminate at lower edges which together substantially define a plane such that upon placing the heating unit on a generally planar surface, the housing substantially encapsulates the collector panel and hot water tank in a substantially enclosed air space; (e) the collector including longitudinally extended U-shaped collector tubes and a glazed window to pass radiation through to the collector tubes, and a first cold water manifold connected to the tubes for delivering fresh water thereto and a second hot water manifold connected to the tubes to remove heated water therefrom. The manifolds are adjacent and at least somewhat above and in direct thermal contact with the tank; and, (f) the skirts and hood lapping around the collector panel, exposing only the glazed window, such that everything else in the heating unit is enclosed by the housing such that heat emanating from the uninsulated, open back face of the collector and tank is captured and retained by the housing to warm the manifolds.

Larkin, W.J.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

445

Analysis of power generation processes using petcoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum coke or petcoke, a refinery byproduct, has generally been considered as an unusable byproduct because of its high sulfur content. However energy industries now view petcoke as a potential feedstock for power generation because it has...

Jayakumar, Ramkumar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Energy Recovery System for Fluid Catalytic Cracking Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the power and heat recovery processes and equipment for modern fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) units made possible by improvements in catalyst fines removal technology and the availability of erosion resistant high temperature...

Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Research on Performance of Wastewater Purification Unit and Recycling of Wastewater and sludge Dewatering of In-Site in Feng Shan Wate Treatment Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the water treatment process, each processing unit releases the sludge from the sedimentation process, and the wastewater from the rapid sand wash and filtration… (more)

Chen, Hsin-hung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Glossary * Appendix Two Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary * Appendix Two Glossary * Appendix Two Glossary Barrel (Oil): A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Barrels per Day (Operable Refinery Capacity): The maximum number of barrels of in- put that can be processed during a 24-hour period after making allowances for the following limitations: the capability of downstream facilities to absorb the output of crude oil process- ing facilities of a given refinery (no reduction is made when a planned distribution of inter- mediate streams through other than downstream facilities is part of a refinery's normal op- eration); the types and grades of inputs to be processed; the types and grades of products to be manufactured; the environmental constraints associated with refinery operations; the re- duction of capacity for scheduled downtime, such as routine inspection, mechanical prob-

449

United States Science Offices Abroad  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... PLANS for United States Science ...Offices at A home and abroad are proposed in the extensive report entitled " ...

C. E. SUNDERLIN

1950-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum  

SciTech Connect

During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry. Since oil is of biological origin, some biochemical reactions started at the beginning of its formation are still continuing in reservoirs on a geological time scale. Although these rates are very slow, many reactions can proceed readily under optimal conditions. This article will address some of the reactions that may be useful for processing heavy oils and refinery residuum. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Inspection effectiveness and risk in process industries  

SciTech Connect

Failures occasionally occur in refinery and petrochemical process equipment due to in-service damage such as internal corrosion, external corrosion, or stress corrosion cracking. Many of these failures should be preventable by detection of the damage prior to failure. However, selection of an inspection method for detection of damage has not always been based upon an evaluation of the required inspection effectiveness. Resources can be wasted by using an inspection method that is incapable of detecting damage, or is so unlikely to detect damage that it may be considered to be ineffective. Another waste of resources is excessive inspection, where the amount of inspection effort is not matched to the benefit. This paper outlines an approach to quantify the effectiveness of the complete inspection method, here defined as all of the elements that determine the mechanical integrity of an equipment item. This paper demonstrates the use of simple statistical tools or experimental techniques for estimating the effectiveness of an inspection method, and using this estimate in a risk evaluation. The approach is used to update the estimated severity of damage in process equipment after an inspection has been performed. The result of the analysis can be used in a risk assessment to estimate the risk associated with equipment failure before and after an inspection, thus providing a powerful tool to realistically set priorities for inspection planning.

Conley, M.J.; Tallin, A.G. [DNV, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012, Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries 2010 data,Washington DC EIA 2013, Petroleum and Other Liquids, EnergyDC, http://www.eia.gov/petroleum/ Energetics, 2007, Energy

Morrow III, William R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: March 21, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-321 (A07LV042) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Accountability of Sensitive and High Risk Property at the Nevada Site Office" TO: Acting Manager, Nevada Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE and control over sensitive and high risk property because of the vulnerability to loss, theft or misuse and its potential impact on national security interests or proliferation concerns. Items such as portable and desktop computers, ammunition. and firearms are examples of sensitive property. In addition, federal regulations require that Departmental organizations and designated contractors account for and control govemroent-owned high risk property, such as body armor and gas masks,

454

United States Government DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 United States Government DATE: MAR 0 8 1994 REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authority Determination -- Former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co., Hamilton, Ohio TO: The File The attached review documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co. facility in Hamilton, Ohio, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The facility was used for the shaping and machining of uranium metal by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) during the Second World War. The following factors are significant in reaching a decision and are discussed in more detail in the attached authority review:

455

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' z United States Government &mtrne&' of Energy DATE: &uG 3, 9 394 REPLY TO AITN OF: EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Toukay and Ms. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

456

Unite2 States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

+39J +39J t% (3740~ - Unite2 States Government m e m o randuin L3 DATE: AU6 3, 9 %g4 REPLY TO All-N OF: m -421 (U. A. W illiams, 427-1719) -. - >' SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Toukay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recouwndations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

457

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LICE F 137: r.e Electr LICE F 137: r.e Electr onic Form App roved by CllR - 1010fJI2002 i/JI~~I United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Admi istration memorandum DATE : REPLY TO AnN OF : KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Stephen Duncan Project Manager - TERS-3 Proposed Action: Removal of de-stabilized and downed trees resulting from a December 200 8 wind storm on the de-energized Lyons Ultra High Voltage Test Line NO.1. PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1309 Budget Information: Work Order # 184006 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart 0, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B 1.3 Routine maintenance/custodial services for buildings, structures, infrastructures, equipment. Location: Fee-owned ROW on the de-energized Lyons UHV Te st Line No .1 to the south of

458

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B.89) B.89) EFO (07-90) United States Government Department of Energ Memorandum SEP 24 20t DATE: REPLY TO: IG-34 (A04TG032) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-21 SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program - 2004" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our annual evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's unclassified cyber security program. This evaluation was initiated in June 2004 and our field work was conducted through September 2004. The evaluation methodology is described in the attachment to this report. Introduction and Objective The Commission's increasing reliance on information technology (IT) is consistent with satisfying the President's Management Agenda initiative of expanding electronic

459

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- /18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- + HQ 1002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: March 17, 2004 Audit Report No. OAS-L-04-1 1 REPLY TO IG-36 (A04DN003) ATTN OF: SUBJECT; Audit of "Requests for Equitable Adjustment at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site" TO: Frazer R. Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Project Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Effective February 1, 2000, the Department of Energy's (Department) Rocky Flats Project Office (RFPO) and Kaiser-Hill Co., LLC (Kaiser-Hill), entered into a cost- plus-incentive-fee contract to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by December 15, 2006. Under the contract terms, Kaiser-Hlill's final incentive fee earned will be based on how well it meets established cost targets. For

460

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . .... ...... ..... .. . .. . . .. . , . . . . ..- - --. -- -. , . . DOEF 1325,8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 1 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-21 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06PR047) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Selected National Nuclear Security Administration Sites TO: Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed fourN* Lti nai-.AL 4 ... :.. ,._*i Amiinistration (NiNSA)SsitCe. Speuiiiu-~l we reviewed executive cormpeisation costs incurred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories, and the Y-12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "refinery processing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. v-w. . v-w. ' ;H; (07.901 United States Government 0' ; Td 2, <.<~ Department of Energy ' m e m o randum DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Alba Craft Laboratory in Oxford, Ohio L. Price, OR TO: The former Alba Craft Laboratory site at lo-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Dr. and M rs. Gilbert Pacey, of Oxford, Ohio, own the site. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey letter report and the authority review are provided for your information.

462

UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT By application dated ;!ay 11, 1959, as a~zen:ii:d Hay 25, 1959, the a--T+- I-r-- cant requests that its license SW-33 be amend,ed to authorizt? proced- ures for t>e CCLl-ect conversion of LT6 to '3$ and by applicaticn datzci June 29, 1959, a.3 n:odifizd July 15, 1059, the shipment of uranium rdioxide pellets. Based on our rexiew of the information finished by the applicant, it is hereby determined that the applicant is qualified, by training and experience, to use special nuclear material for the pwpose requested and that the ap@icant's procedures, facilities and equip- ment are adequate to protect health and minimize danger to life and property. It is, therefore, determined that ~NM-33 may be amended to

463

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ocy F 1325.8 ocy F 1325.8 rcro1 . 6Fo0?-001 w 2 3-q United States Government Department of Energ) ~mc DATE: AUG 3,9 1994 y$Jf EH-421 (W. A. Yllliams, 427-1719) MA. \tQ SUBJECT: _ Elirinrtion of the Sites froa the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program TQ The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Hr. Nlchelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Forwrly Utilized Sites Remedial A&Ion Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites l hd to ratify and confim the

464

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:)£ F 13 :)£ F 13 ;' 5 H e Etectroou: Form Approved by CGJR - 01120195 (n·/w! United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum DATE: 0 I. 7 20D 9 REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO : Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Perform routine access road maintenance to the Rockdale Microwave site . Budget Information: Work Order #180709 PP&A Project No.: 1389 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective .... are required to maintain ... infrastructures . ..in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

465

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE:F 1325.8 7 DOE:F 1325.8 7 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05AL045) Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-12 SUBJECT: Audit of Sandia National Laboratories' Safeguards and Security Path Forward Management Plan TO: Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE From 2001 to 2003, approximately 500 security-related findings and observations were identified at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA), the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Sandia Site Office (SSO), and Sandia's self assessments. Sandia senior management acknowledged the significance of the numerous findings and, in

466

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: January 26, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-05 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT035) SUBJECT: Report on "The Department of Energy's Implementation of Revised OMB Circular No. A-123" TO: Acting Chief Financial Officer, CF-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management arid Budget's (OMB) revised Circular No. A-123 (Circular) requires Federal agencies to assess the adequacy of their internal controls. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Circular requires agencies to strengthen their assessment, documentation and testing of internal controls over financial reporting and prepare an annual assurance statement on the operating effectiveness of those controls. In August 2005, the Department of Energy's

467

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 23, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-16 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A04YT023) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Modernization Activities at the Y-12 National Security Complex" TO: Richard Speidel, Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) performs critical roles in strengthening national security and reducing the global threat from weapons of mass destruction. The Y-12 modernization plan (plan) seeks to foster the development of a physical plant that is efficient and effective in serving its national security missions. The

468

. United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,:n5.5.8 ,:n5.5.8 ,849, EfG pw, . United States Government DATE: AUG 2 i994 y#J;; EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sUBJECT: -Elimination of the Robbins & Myers Site, Springfield, Ohio 11179 I The File TO: I have reviewed the attached elimination recommendation and the original historical records for the Myers & Robbins facility in Springfield, Ohio. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at these sites. The only record of activity at this site by Department of Energy predecessors is an equipment test of a pump in March 1975. This test involved limited amounts of radioactive materials and there was a serious effort to decontaminate the equipment at the conclusion of the tests. Based on the above, the Myers & Robbins site in Springfield, Ohio, is

469

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F 1325.8 DOE F 1325.8 E&M&& +\A .wz United States Government Department of Energy DATE: RUG 3, 9 %g4 y;;;; EM-421 (W. A. W illiaas, 427-1719) "; :+ 1 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tohkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate then from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

470

Uniter+ States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFG (07-90) EFG (07-90) Uniter+ States Government ~L.aQ-i; Department of Energy inemorandum DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at the Former Dow Chemical Company Facility in M a d ison, Illinois TO: L. Price, OR The site of the Former Dow Chemical Company in M a d ison, Illinois, which is currently owned and operated by the Spectrulite Consortium, is designated for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based upon the results of a preliminary radiological survey and other information described in the attached Designation Summary. The authority determination and preliminary survey report also are attached for information. The site has been assigned a low priority under the FUSRAP protocol, as

471

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

# Xx i' # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoumendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

472

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFS (07-W EFS (07-W United States Government memorandukn Department of Energy j ; I.-- ' -i;: /J DATE: j.gjG 2 9 1994 REPLY TO En-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) AlTN OF: h p)\;--/ ;,;' J ( SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Ur. Doug Tonkay and Us. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoPraendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

473

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nUnited States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Access road improvement and bridge replacement for the Raver-Paul No. transmission line structure 18/1. Budget Information: Work Order # 00220048 PP&A Project No.: 954 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective ....are required to

474

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION * 002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: August 15, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-22 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT006) SUBJECT: Report on "Hazardous Chemicals Inventory Management at the Savannah River Site" TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site (Savannah River) maintains large inventories of hazardous chemicals for its scientific, environmental cleanup and production operations. Many of these chemicals are known carcinogens; some are corrosive, while others are highly flammable. As such, these chemicals can pose serious health and safety risks to workers and members of the public, the environment, and to emergency first responders if not properly managed and controlled.

475

,. United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i. 001 i. 001 DOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) ,. United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: September 11, 2003 REPLYTO: IG-34 (A03NE045) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-20 SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement Administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our survey of procurement administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Laboratory). This review was initiated in May 2003 and fieldwork was conducted through August 2003. Our review methodology is described in an attachment to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In Fiscal Year (FY) 2002, the Department of Energy's (Department) management contractors procured approximately $6.4 billion worth of goods and services from

476

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 00 DOE F 1325.8 (08&93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 31, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-13 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07RL048) SUBJECT: Audit of Safety Allegations Related to the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford Site TO: Manager, Office of River Protection INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Hanford Site is responsible for treating and preparing 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste for disposal. Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) is designing, building and commissioning the Waste Treatment Plant (Plant), a category II nuclear facility, which is comprised of a complex of treatment facilities to vitrify and immobilize radioactive waste into a

477

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OEF 1325.8 OEF 1325.8 (U8-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 11, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-I1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07DN056) SUSJECT: Audit of the Department of Energy's Community and Regulatory Support Funding at the Richland Operations Office TO: Manager, Richland Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management provided $60.1 million in Community and Regulatory Support funding in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 to a number of Departm- nt sites. The funding is intended to be used for activities indirectly related to nuclear and hazardous waste cleanup, such as agreements with state regulatory agencies and transportation departments. During FY 2005, the Department's Richland

478

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a . a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (iNEEL) subsurface disposal area was established in 1952 for disposal of solid radioactive waste and now encompasses an area of approximately 88 acres. Wastes from the INEEL and other Department of Energy (Department) sites, rmost notably Rocky Flats, were buried in

479

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vu & . vu & . ,I / v a L U ; .8 " ',X v &..'*. "o uu V"x Ijo tf J ,*- , , i 4 w i tiJ U U 1 OEF S.a 135 (0B93) United States Government - Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 27, 2007 REPLY TO Audit Repor Number: OAS-L-07-08 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06ID015) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Design of the Engineered Barrier System at the Yucca Mountain Site" TO: Principal Deputy Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTrVE In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for designing, licensing, constructing, and operating a repository, known as Yucca Mountain, for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level -

480

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 . . Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07PR061) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory TO: Manager, Brookhaven Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed executive compensation at the Office of Science's Brookhaven National La --- _ .r . . tc. av .... n . Ou audit covered executive cuupoci'A ;is in curred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, operated Brookhaven under Department of Energy (Department) contract number DE-AC02-98CH10886. The amount of executive compensation that can be reimbursed to Department

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481

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG ')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 1o001 ,O " F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-11 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05ID043) SUBJECT: Audit of "Contract Transition Activities at the Idaho Operations Office" TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office has ongoing missions focused primarily in the areas of nuclear energy and environmental cleanup. From October 1, 1999 to February 1, 2005, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC (Bechtel) managed facility operations for both of these missions. In Fiscal Year 2005, two separate contracts began in order to add focus and clarity to each respective mission. First, the Idaho National

482

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-93) -93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: July 12, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-15 REPLY TO ATnN OF: IG-32 (A07ID055) SUBJECr: Audit of the Idaho National Laboratory Facility Footprint Reduction TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTTVE On February 1, 2005, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) assumed responsibility for managing and operating the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (Department) under a new 10 year contract. ThI m.ion for ,the L s to nntance the Nation's energy security by becoming the preeminent, internationally recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory.. To accomplish this mission, BEA proposed aggressive infrastructure initiatives

483

* United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- DE;$r,e /q f-j * I3 - I * United States Government memorandum MAY 21 I991 DATE: REPLY TO Al-fN OF: 4ih55YhL Department of Energy JT:,i 5, f&A 0 ' - j4.~, ' -/ jl.a' \ A t -3 __..-_-. EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the American Potash and Chemical Site The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the American Potash and Chemical Company Site in West Hanover, Massachusetts. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on the above, the American Potash and Chemical Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager

484

United States Goveinment  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,325.B ,325.B jO8.93) United States Goveinment ~~~rntir-andu~rvi Depr?rtnient of Energy \L, IO' " 1' !ATE:' MAY i o 1995 ,' Kzb9. ":cz$ EM-421 (W.,A. Williams, 301-903-8149) SUBJECT: Records for the West Chicago Site .The File TO: After review.of the available r&rds concerning the former 'Lindsay Light and Chemical.Corhpany site in West Chicago, Illinois. I have determined that it is not necessary to transmit Department of Energy (DOE) records to the municipa,llty to inform public officials of the activities at this ~ site. This site has been licgnsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for many.years, and the nature of the. rare'earth and thorium production at the site, are well known. Remediation of this faci'lity ii~ being addressed by the current owner, 'the NRC, the U.S; Environmental

485

; United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Don F 1328.8 Don F 1328.8 . . .449J ' Em wm ; United States Government , % - memorandum L c*m Al.)G 2 9 a34 yz;; EM-421 (If. A. Willlams, 427-1719) lq,iMAL Department of Energy m5 MA, \i& SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utllized Sites Remedial A&Ion Prograa ' a The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Htchelle L&is, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald faclllty as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoarwndations were ude to eliainate thm from further consideratton under Formerly Utilized Sites Reaedial Actlon Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or revlewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

486

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OOE F 1325.8 OOE F 1325.8 - EFgzk3) United States Government tiemorandum 0 wt;? -J Department of Energy DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Diamond Magnesium Site in Painesville, Ohio TO: L. Price, OR The former Diamond Magnesium Company site located at 720 Fairport-Nursery Road in Painesville, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The site is owned by Uniroyal Chemical Company and by Lonza Chemical, Incorporated. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey reports and the authority

487

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Z&Et,? y-p . c' Z&Et,? y-p . c' )7q/ I cuq,~ United States Government Department of Energy memoranduin I " . : I ;/ ,I DATE: hufi 2 9 1594 \ ' - y:oTFq M-421 (W. A. Ylllius, 427-1719) ' ii Y - SIJWECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilfzed Sites Remedial Actjon Progru TO The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. reviewed a number of sites that had services to the Fernald facility as sites, recommendations were made to ___ _- _ consideration under Formerly Utiltzed Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the prior elimination of each site froa FUSRAP.

488

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F t325.8 DOE F t325.8 (s8s) Dl? l 36-z EFG (07-90) United States Government m e m o randum Department of Energy DATE: LUG 2 ' 3 1394 ",cl,'," EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoamnendations were aade to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

489

- United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 my EFG (07.90) . - United States Government . * Department of. Energy * inemorandum DATE: DEC :! ;j 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W.'A. W illiams, 903-8149) : NY 41 I .' 41 G I? SUBJECT: Elimination of the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Co., Niagara Falls, New York TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site. summary and elimination recommendation for the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Company. I have determined that the potential for radiological contamination is low because of the lim ited duration of the activities at the site. Further, at least some of the contractual activities at the site were licensed under the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensed activities are thereby disqualified from further consideration under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites

490

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UOEF 1325.8 UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action which in and of itself will have a clearly insignificant impact on the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. The Conference Report accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act

491

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I8 891 I8 891 EFG (07.90) United States Government m e m o randum bepartrne% of Energy -P ' ; N. A *I Pi id : DATE: AUG 3, 9 1994 REPLY TO Al-iN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) r, )' \, ! c ' d, ' t ' 3 ' 2 -L SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonlsay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a nmber of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

492

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

81278 81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical Exclusion for Removal Actions at Elza Gate, Tennessee TO: Lester K. Price, OR Attached is a copy of the approved Categorical Exclusion (CX) for removal of contaminated material at the Elza Gate site in Tennessee. The removal action involves the removal of radioactive contaminated soil and concrete as well as the removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) contaminated soil. This CX was approved by Carol Borgstrom, Office of National Environmental Policy Act Oversight (EH-25), September 9, 1991. Paul F. Blom Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

493

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 .*. United States Government . memorandum DATE: JUNZO 1994 -... REPLY TO A?TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) Authority Determination -- Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, SUBJECT: Connecticut To' The File The attached review, documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the Combustion Engineering (CE) Site in Windsor, Connecticut, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CE was a prime contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and performed high-enriched uranium fuel fabrication work from 1955 to 1967. The services furnished at the CE site included some experimental work; however, it primarily consisted of fabrication of high-enriched uranium

494

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-360) directed the Department of Energy "...to take the necessary steps to consolidate and dispose of the waste material from the Latty Avenue site and nearby St. Louis Airport vicinity properties locally, by reacquiring, stabilizing, and using the old 21.7

495

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ooc F r325.8 ooc F r325.8 imo, EFO ,ww United States Government memorandum Department of Energy -fw?w 81ua DATE: FEB 1 5 1991 l+Ks6 sUsJECT: Elimination of the Buflovak Company Site from FUSRAP ho: The File I have reiiewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Buflovak Company site in Buffalo, New York. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Buflovak Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams Designation and Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration Attachment - I . b e e : W e s to n E M - 4 0 ( 3 ) E M - 4 2 ( 2 ) W illiams r

496

United States Attorney General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) 93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) United States Attorney General ***1 *293 January 16, 1981 **1 The President The White House Washington, D.C. 20500 MY DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: You have asked my opinion concerning the scope of currently existing legal and constitutional authorities for the continuance of government functions during a temporary lapse in appropriations, such as the Government sustained on October 1, 1980. As you know, some initial determination concerning the extent of these authorities had to be made in the waning hours of the last fiscal year in order to avoid extreme administrative confusion that might have arisen from Congress' failure timely to enact 11 of the 13 anticipated regular appropriations bills, FN;B1[FN1]FN;F1 or a

497

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 DOE F 132,.8 W.I: ((07.9u) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 2, 2002 REPLY TO REPLY TO -36 (A02SR013) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-07 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Subcontracting Practices at the Savannah River Site TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Acting Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) has contracted with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, LLC (Westinghouse) to manage and operate the Savannah River Site (Savannah River) through September 30, 2006. As of August 2, 2002, Westinghouse had 534 open and active service procurements worth $100,000 or more each, with a total value of about $518 million, that it had awarded since October 1996.

498

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 DOE-F 1325.8 (68-93) Depament of Energy United States Goverment Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF .NSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: February 26, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02CG004) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-11 SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Science Infrastructure Modernization Initiatives TO: Acting Associate Director, Office of Laboratory Operations and Environment, Safety and Health, SC-80 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Office of Science's infrastructure modernization initiatives. The audit was performed between May and September 2002 at Departmental Headquarters, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. The audit methodology is described in

499

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

w w f.b wr w f k--w .^^- - w w f.b wr w f k--w .^^- - - r - T- - * -* p -ldt - f f - - -J -vv- A n JV DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government ------- Department of Energy memorandum DATE: June 15, 2006 REPLY TO Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-15 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05SR029) SUBJECT Audit of "Storage Capacity of the Iligh Level Waste Tanks at the Savannah River TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Savannah River Site in South Carolina currently stores about 36 million gallons of waste in 49 active underground storag,* .ks. Twenty-two of these .anks do not meet Environmcntal Protection A&-.y (EPA) requirements ybr full secondary containment and must be emptied and closed by 2022 in accordance with a closure schedule approved by the EPA and the 5oith Carolina Department

500

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG 0/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -.- +-+ HQ ]002 rFG (07-;1) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: October 29, 2002 REPLY TO 1G-36 (A02DN028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-01 ATTN OF; SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site TO: Eugene Schmitt, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office ' INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) and its site contractor, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser-Hill), contracted in January 2000 to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by a target date of December'15, 2006. As of May 2002, Kaiser-Hill had awarded 784 procurements worth more than $25,000 each, with a total value of about $368.6 million, to support the complex activities required for site closure.