National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for refinery outages futures

  1. Outlook for Refinery Outages and Available Refinery Capacity...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    level of refinery outages outlined in this report. This report does not consider the impacts of refined product logistics and distribution, which could affect the movement of...

  2. Refinery Outages: First-Half 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Outages: First-Half 2016 March 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Refinery Outages: First-Half 2016 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States

  3. Outlook for Refinery Outages and Available Refinery Capacity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of gasoline and distillate, and to include a more detailed consideration of the impact of unexpected outages on product supplies. This report reviews the potential...

  4. Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average values for 2002-2009 excluding months in 2005, 2006, and 2008 affected by hurricanes & refinery closures. Similarly, typical historical values are average planned...

  5. Refinery Outages: Description and Potential Impact on Petroleum Product Prices

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This report responds to a July 13, 2006 request from Chairman Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requested that the Energy Information Administration conduct a study of the impact that refinery shutdowns have had on the price of oil and gasoline.

  6. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline supply in a particular region because pipeline infrastructure, geography and marine shipping regulations constrain the amount of product that can flow among the different...

  7. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    some Libyan crude oil production to the market, and increasing U.S. crude production. Economic growth in 2014 outside of the United States has been slow, and some recent data...

  8. Alternative future environmental regulatory approaches for petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Moses, D. O.; Emerson, D.; Arguerro, R.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Analytical Services, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, many industrial, regulatory, and community leaders have expressed concern that the current environmental regulatory structure disregards multimedia environmental impacts, provides few incentives to develop and use new technologies, and fails to consider site-specific conditions. For the US petroleum refining industry, faced with the need to produce higher-quality fuels from poorer-quality feedstocks, such criticisms are expected to increase. This article offers two alternative environmental regulatory approaches for existing petroleum refineries to use in the future. These alternative approaches are multimedia in scope, provide for new technology development and use, and allow flexibility in the means for meeting environmental goals. They have been reviewed and critiqued by various stakeholders, including industry representatives, regulators, and local and national community and environmental organizations. The integration of stakeholder comments and findings of ongoing national and international regulatory reinvention efforts in the development of these approaches positions them for potential use by other industries in addition to petroleum refineries.

  9. Refinery Outages: First Half 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase by 820,000 bbld in 2015. While global oil supply growth has been strong, economic growth outside of the United States has been slow, particularly in Russia and...

  10. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on the refinery of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report on the Workshop on the Refinery of the Future has been prepared for participants to provide them with a succinct summary of the presentations, deliberations, and discussions. In preparing the summary, we have striven to capture the key findings (conclusions) and highlight the issues and concerns raised during the plenary and breakout sessions. The presentation of the summary of the proceedings follows the final workshop agenda, which is given in Section I; each section is tabbed to facilitate access to specific workshop topics. The material presented relies heavily on the outline summaries prepared and presented by the Plenary Session Chairman and the Facilitators for each breakout group. These summaries are included essentially as presented. In addition, individuals were assigned to take notes during each session; these notes were used to reconstruct critical issues that were discussed in more detail. The key comments made by the participants, which tended to represent the range of views expressed relative to the issues, are presented immediately following the facilitator`s summary outline in order to convey the flavor of the discussions. The comments are not attributed to individuals, since in many instances they represent a composite of several similar views expressed during the discussion. The facilitators were asked to review the writeups describing the outcomes of their sessions for accuracy and content; their suggested changes were incorporated. Every effort has thus been made to reconstruct the views expressed as accurately as possible; however, errors and/or misinterpretations undoubtedly have occurred.

  11. Refinery Outages: First-Half 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly short-term forecasts to 2016 Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related Congressional & other requests International Energy Outlook related Presentations Recurring Short-Term Outlook Related Special outlooks Testimony All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Full report Previous

  12. Improving Outage Performance: Outage Optimization Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaPlatney, Jere J. [AREVA NP (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Planned outage performance is a key measure of how well an Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is operated. Performance during planned outages strongly affects virtually all of a plant's performance metrics. In recognition of this fact, NPP operators worldwide have and continue to focus on improving their outage performance. The process of improving outage performance is commonly referred to as 'Outage Optimization' in the industry. This paper starts with a summary of the principles of Outage Optimization. It then provides an overview of a process in common use in the USA and elsewhere to manage the improvement of planned outages. The program described is comprehensive in that it involves managing improvement in both the Preparation and Execution phases of outage management. (author)

  13. NERSC Scheduled System Outages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Scheduled System Outages NERSC Outages Your browser does not appear to support JavaScript, but this page needs to use JavaScript to display correctly. You can visit the...

  14. Systems Outage Notification Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Outages Systems Outage Notification Policy To be considered a scheduled outage, the user community must be notified of the need for a maintenance event window no less than 24 hours in advance of the outage (emergency fixes). Users will be notified of regularly scheduled maintenance in advance, on a schedule that provides sufficient notification, and no less than 72 hours prior to the event, and preferably as much as seven calendar days prior. If that regularly scheduled maintenance is not

  15. Shopping for outage management systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y.C.; Konneker, L.K.; Watkins, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    Customer service is becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. Outage management is an important part of customer service. Good outage management means quickly responding to outages and keeping customers informed about outages. Each outage equals lost customer satisfaction and lost revenue. Outage management is increasingly important because of new competition among utilities for customers, pressure from regulators, and internal pressure to cut costs. The market has several existing software products for outage management. How does a utility judge whether these products satisfy their specific needs? Technology is changing rapidly to support outage management. Which technology is proven and cost-effective? The purpose of this paper is to outline the procedure for evaluating outage management systems, and to discuss the key features to look for. It also gives our opinion of the features that represent state of the art. This paper will not discuss specific products or list vendors names.

  16. Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2011 November 2010 Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by...

  17. Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fluctuating between 70 and 85 per barrel, but by the beginning of 2011, Brent crude oil was at 95 per barrel. Recent instability in the Middle East and North Africa added...

  18. Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    n s u m p tio n 20.68 19.50 18.77 19.13 19.28 0.8% Note: Gasoline consumption includes ethanol. Source: 2007-2010, EIA Petroleum Supply Monthly; 2011, February 2011 Short Term...

  19. Refinery Capacity Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries by PAD District as of January 1, 2006 PDF 9 Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries by PAD District as of January 1, 2006 PDF 10...

  20. Track NERSC Outages in Google Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outages in Google Calendar Track NERSC Outages in Google Calendar March 22, 2013 by Jack Deslippe Outages are now available in Google calendar form. You can subscribe to this...

  1. Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes

  2. OutageMapURL Phases Energy Services

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OutageMapURL Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn http outages county org A N Electric Coop Virginia AEP Generating Company https www aepaccount com zipr...

  3. Outage management and health physics issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include the following: Planning and scheduling to minimize refueling outage, by Pat McKenna, AmerenUE; Prioritizing safety, quality and schedule, by Tom Sharkey, Dominion; Benchmarking to high standards, by Margie Jepson, Energy Nuclear; Benchmarking against U.S. standards, by Magnox North, United Kingdom; Enabling suppliers for new build activity, by Marcus Harrington, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Identifying, cultivating and qualifying suppliers, by Thomas E. Silva, AREVA NP; Creating new U.S. jobs, by Francois Martineau, Areva NP. Industry innovation articles include: MSL Acoustic source load reduction, by Amir Shahkarami, Exelon Nuclear; Dual Methodology NDE of CRDM nozzles, by Michael Stark, Dominion Nuclear; and Electronic circuit board testing, by James Amundsen, FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company. The plant profile article is titled The future is now, by Julia Milstead, Progress Energy Service Company, LLC.

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2015 | Release Date: June 19, 2015 | Next Release Date: June 24, 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 prior issues Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of

  5. outages | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    outages Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast Hurricane...

  6. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in California | Department of Energy Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California PDF icon refining_roadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California Bandwidth Study U.S.

  7. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 DE-FG02-08ER85135 Hydrogen Generation for Refineries DOE Phase II SBIR Dr. Girish Srinivas P.I. gsrinivas@tda.com 303-940-2321 Dr. Steven Gebhard, P.E. Dr. Robert Copeland Mr. ...

  8. North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Outage Announcement North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement Starting at about 4:11 p.m. EDT, major losses of electric load occurred in the northeastern United States and Canada in the Eastern Interconnection. Although the exact cause is not known at present, the outages are not the result of a terrorist attack. The areas most affected center around the Great Lakes: Michigan, Ohio, New York City, Ontario, Quebec, northern New Jersey, Massachusetts,

  9. RESOLVED: Projectb filesystem outage July 9, 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    filesystem outage July 9, 2012 July 9, 2012 The projectb filesystem had a hardware failure that potentially generated IO errors. The filesystem logs indicate that the...

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 9 9 0 1,268,500 1,236,500 32,000 1,332,000 1,297,000 35,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vacuum State/Refiner/Location Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Barrels per Operating Idle Operating Idle Downstream Charge Capacity Thermal Cracking Delayed Fluid Coking Visbreaking Other/Gas Calendar Day Stream Day Distillation Coking Oil Table 3. Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2015 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 120,100 0 135,000 0 45,000 32,000 0 0 0

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2015 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a ..................................................................... Alabama 0 0 15,000 711 3,500 0 7,120 33 245 0 Hunt Refining Co 0 0 15,000 0 3,500 0 7,120

  13. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE PEER REVIEW MEETING May 5-6, 2014 DE-FG02-08ER85135 Hydrogen Generation for Refineries DOE Phase II SBIR Dr. Girish Srinivas P.I. gsrinivas@tda.com 303-940-2321 Dr. Steven Gebhard, P.E. Dr. Robert Copeland Mr. Jeff Martin TDA Research Inc. 1 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Project Overview *

  14. Assessment of Critical Events Corridors through Multivariate Cascading Outages Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Kumbale, Murali; Chen, Yousu; Singh, Ruchi; Green, Irina; Morgan, Mark P.

    2011-10-17

    Massive blackouts of electrical power systems in North America over the past decade has focused increasing attention upon ways to identify and simulate network events that may potentially lead to widespread network collapse. This paper summarizes a method to simulate power-system vulnerability to cascading failures to a supplied set of initiating events synonymously termed as Extreme Events. The implemented simulation method is currently confined to simulating steady state power-system response to a set of extreme events. The outlined method of simulation is meant to augment and provide a new insight into bulk power transmission network planning that at present remains mainly confined to maintaining power system security for single and double component outages under a number of projected future network operating conditions. Although one of the aims of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of simulating network vulnerability to cascading outages, a more important goal has been to determine vulnerable parts of the network that may potentially be strengthened in practice so as to mitigate system susceptibility to cascading failures. This paper proposes to demonstrate a systematic approach to analyze extreme events and identify vulnerable system elements that may be contributing to cascading outages. The hypothesis of critical events corridors is proposed to represent repeating sequential outages that can occur in the system for multiple initiating events. The new concept helps to identify system reinforcements that planners could engineer in order to 'break' the critical events sequences and therefore lessen the likelihood of cascading outages. This hypothesis has been successfully validated with a California power system model.

  15. Property:OutagePhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OutagePhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OutagePhoneNumber Property Type String Description An outage hotline or 24-hour customer service number Note: uses...

  16. GUIDELINES FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ADVANCED OUTAGE CONTROL CENTER TO IMPROVE OUTAGE COORDINATION, PROBLEM RESOLUTION, AND OUTAGE RISK MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn St; Farris, Ronald; Whaley, April M; Medema, Heather; Gertman, David

    2014-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Managing NPP outages is a complex and difficult task due to the large number of maintenance and repair activities that are accomplished in a short period of time. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information, and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status, and periodic briefings in the OCC. It is a difficult task to maintain current the information related to outage progress and discovered conditions. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across, and out of the OCC. The use of these technologies will allow information to be shared electronically, providing greater amounts of real-time information to the decision makers and allowing OCC coordinators to meet with supporting staff remotely. Passively monitoring status electronically through advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer-based procedures, and automated work packages will reduce the current reliance on manually reporting progress. The use of these technologies will also improve the knowledge capture and management capabilities of the organization. The purpose of this research is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

  17. A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

    2003-11-01

    A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

  18. Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages ... Learn more Certify your electrical systems-If your house sustains flood or wind damage ...

  19. Property:OutageMapURL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Agralite Electric Coop + https:pyxis-oms.comOutageMapAgraliteOutageMap.html + Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc + https:ebill.alfalfaelectric.comwoViewermapviewer.html?config...

  20. Virginia Biodiesel Refinery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Refinery Jump to: navigation, search Name: Virginia Biodiesel Refinery Place: West Point, Virginia Zip: 23180 Product: Biodiesel producer based in Virginia References: Virginia...

  1. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Operable Date of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 11. New, Shutdown and Reactivated Refineries During 2014 a b NEW PAD District II 19,000 Dakota Prairie Refining LLC Dickinson, ND 19,000 01/15 PAD District III 42,000 Kinder Morgan Crude & Condensate Galena Park, TX 42,000 01/15 SHUTDOWN PAD District I 28,000 0 Axeon Specialty Products LLC Savannah, GA 28,000 0 09/12 12/14 PAD District II 12,000 0 Ventura Refining & Transmission LLC Thomas, OK 12,000 0 10/10 12/14 PAD District III 0

  2. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd) New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 12. Refinery Sales During 2014 Lindsay Goldberg LLC/Axeon Speciality Products LLC Nustar Asphalt LLC/Nustar Asphalt Refining LLC 2/14 Savannah, GA 28,000 Lindsay Goldberg LLC/Axeon Specialty Products LLC Nustar Asphalt LLC/Nustar Asphalt Refining LLC 2/14 Paulsboro, NJ 70,000 bbl/cd= Barrels per calendar day Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form

  3. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District and State Production Capacity Alkylates Aromatics Asphalt and Road Oil Isomers Lubricants Marketable Petroleum Coke Sulfur (short tons/day) Hydrogen (MMcfd) Table 2. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2015 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a 83,429 10,111 26,500 87,665 21,045 21,120 69 1,159 PAD District I Delaware 11,729 5,191 0 6,000 0 13,620 40 596 New Jersey 29,200 0 65,000 4,000 12,000 7,500 26 280 Pennsylvania

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation Vacuum Cracking Thermal Catalytic Cracking Fresh Recycled Catalytic Hydro- Cracking Catalytic Reforming Desulfurization Hydrotreating/ Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Downstream Charge Capacity Table 6. Operable Crude Oil and Downstream Charge Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1986 to (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) January 1, 2015 JAN 1, 1986 16,346 6,892 1,880 5,214 463 1,125 3,744 8,791 NA JAN 1, 1987 16,460 6,935

  5. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil and Lubricants Petroleum Coke (MMcfd) Hydrogen Sulfur (short tons/day) Production Capacity Asphalt Isomers Marketable Table 7. Operable Production Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1986 to January 1, 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a JAN 1, 1986 941 276 804 258 246 356 2,357 NA JAN 1, 1987 974 287 788 326 250 364 2,569 23,806 JAN 1, 1988 993 289 788 465 232 368 2,418 27,639 JAN 1, 1989 1,015 290 823 469 230 333 2,501 28,369 JAN

  6. Storage tracking refinery trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, J.

    1996-05-01

    Regulatory and marketplace shakeups have made the refining and petrochemical industries highly competitive. The fight to survive has forced refinery consolidations, upgrades and companywide restructurings. Bulk liquid storage terminals are following suit. This should generate a flurry of engineering and construction by the latter part of 1997. A growing petrochemical industry translates into rising storage needs. Industry followers forecasted flat petrochemical growth in 1996 due to excessive expansion in 1994 and 1995. But expansion is expected to continue throughout this year on the strength of several products.

  7. Managing turbine-generator outages by computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhart, E.R. [Reinhart and Associates, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This article describes software being developed to address the need for computerized planning and documentation programs that can help manage outages. Downsized power-utility companies and the growing demand for independent, competitive engineering and maintenance services have created a need for a computer-assisted planning and technical-direction program for turbine-generator outages. To meet this need, a software tool is now under development that can run on a desktop or laptop personal computer to assist utility personnel and technical directors in outage planning. Total Outage Planning Software (TOPS), which runs on Windows, takes advantage of the mass data storage available with compact-disc technology by archiving the complete outage documentation on CD. Previous outage records can then be indexed, searched, and viewed on a computer with the click of a mouse. Critical-path schedules, parts lists, parts order tracking, work instructions and procedures, custom data sheets, and progress reports can be generated by computer on-site during an outage.

  8. Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

  9. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 10a. Fuel Consumed at Refineries by PAD District, 2014 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 1,348 421 23 513 2,305 Distillate Fuel Oil 0 33 174 0 102 309 Residual Fuel Oil 3 23 28 13 346 413 Still Gas 15,174 48,972 110,958 8,749 46,065 229,918 Marketable Petroleum Coke 0 0 0 493 143 636 Catalyst Petroleum Coke 8,048 16,837 44,599 2,925 12,482 84,891 Natural Gas (million cubic feet)

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 13. Refineries Permanently Shutdown By PAD District Between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 2015 PAD District I 570,450 GNC Energy Corp Greensboro, NC 3,000 0 a Primary Energy Corp Richmond, VA 6,100 0 a Saint Mary's Refining Co Saint Mary's, WV 4,000 4,480 02/93 03/93 Cibro Refining Albany, NY 41,850 27,000 07/93 09/93 Calumet Lubricants Co LP Rouseville, PA 12,800 26,820 03/00 06/00 Young Refining Corp. Douglasville, GA 5,400 0 07/04 07/04 Sunoco Inc

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Table 8. Capacity and Fresh Feed Input to Selected Downstream Units at U.S. Refineries, 2013 - 2015 (Barrels per Calendar Day) Reformers Capacity Inputs 2013 2,596,369 5,681,643 1,887,024 2,302,764 4,810,611 1,669,540 2,600,518 3,405,017 74,900 543,800 41,500 47,537 387,148 33,255 PADD I 162,249 240,550 450,093 1,196,952 303,000 414,732 1,028,003 263,238 PADD II 648,603 818,718 1,459,176 2,928,673 981,114

  13. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) a Pipeline 22,596 1,266,015 1,685,817 168,347 298,886 3,441,661 Domestic 2,632 658,717 1,421,768 82,043 240,522 2,405,682 Foreign 19,964 607,298 264,049 86,304 58,364 1,035,979 Tanker 252,479 0 1,046,008 0 529,319 1,827,806 Domestic 81,055 0 45,006 0 181,307 307,368 Foreign 171,424 0 1,001,002 0 348,012 1,520,438 Barge 39,045 6,360 259,903

  14. Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Methodologies and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

    2012-05-31

    Abstract- This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses different approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies. The second paper summarizes the state of the art in modeling tools for risk assessment of cascading outages.

  15. Potomac River Project Outage Schedule Clarification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    River Project Outage Schedule Clarification Potomac River Project Outage Schedule Clarification Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-07-02: Based on the most current information we have for both circuits, the new outage dates are listed below: Outage Duration Feeder Out April 30, 2007 - June 1, 2007 Circuit 1 June 2, 2007 - July 1, 2007 Circuit 2 PDF icon Potomac River Project Outage Schedule Clarification More Documents & Publications Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy,

  16. Advanced Test Reactor outage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, T.A.; Atkinson, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    Beginning in 1997, risk assessment was performed for each Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) outage aiding the coordination of plant configuration and work activities (maintenance, construction projects, etc.) to minimize the risk of reactor fuel damage and to improve defense-in-depth. The risk assessment activities move beyond simply meeting Technical Safety Requirements to increase the awareness of risk sensitive configurations, to focus increased attention on the higher risk activities, and to seek cost-effective design or operational changes that reduce risk. A detailed probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) had been performed to assess the risk of fuel damage during shutdown operations including heavy load handling. This resulted in several design changes to improve safety; however, evaluation of individual outages had not been performed previously and many risk insights were not being utilized in outage planning. The shutdown PRA provided the necessary framework for assessing relative and absolute risk levels and assessing defense-in-depth. Guidelines were written identifying combinations of equipment outages to avoid. Screening criteria were developed for the selection of work activities to receive review. Tabulation of inherent and work-related initiating events and their relative risk level versus plant mode has aided identification of the risk level the scheduled work involves. Preoutage reviews are conducted and post-outage risk assessment is documented to summarize the positive and negative aspects of the outage with regard to risk. The risk for the outage is compared to the risk level that would result from optimal scheduling of the work to be performed and to baseline or average past performance.

  17. Grupo Maris Capital ethanol refinery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maris Capital ethanol refinery Jump to: navigation, search Name: Grupo Maris (Capital ethanol refinery) Place: Nuporanga, Brazil Product: 32,000 m3 ethanol refinery owner...

  18. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  19. Outage project productivity improvement of TVA fossil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picard, H.E.; Seay, C.R. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Competition in the utility industry forces management to look closely at the cost effectiveness of power plant outage projects. At TVA Fossil and Hydro Power, innovative work measurement is proving effective as a project management tool to do more with less. Labor-hours to complete outage work scopes are reduced by some 20 to 30%, not by working harder or sacrificing safety, or quality, but by working and managing smarter. Fossil power plant outages and shutdowns are costly. They are labor-intensive construction projects, often with expanding work scope, and executed on a fast track. Outage work is inherently complex and dynamic, and often unpredictable. Many activities and tasks must be integrated, coordinated and completed safely and efficiently by multiple crafts and work groups. As a result, numerous productivity factors can influence the cost and schedule of outage completion. This provides owners, contractors and labor with unique opportunities for competitive advantage--by making radical changes in how they manage labor-hours and time.

  20. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM MCU SOLIDS OUTAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has received several solid and liquid samples from MCU in an effort to understand and recover from the system outage starting on April 6, 2014. SRNL concludes that the presence of solids in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) is the likely root cause for the outage, based upon the following discoveries ? A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the scrub contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? An archived sample from Tank 49H taken last year was shown to contain a fine precipitate of sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 drain pipe from extraction contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium aluminosilicate ? A liquid sample from the SSFT was shown to have elevated levels of oxalate anion compared to the expected concentration in the feed Visual inspection of the SSFT indicated the presence of precipitated or transferred solids, which were likely also in the Salt Solution Receipt Tank (SSRT). The presence of the solids coupled with agitation performed to maintain feed temperature resulted in oxalate solids migration through the MCU system and caused hydraulic issues that resulted in unplanned phase carryover from the extraction into the scrub, and ultimately the strip contactors. Not only did this carryover result in the Strip Effluent (SE) being pushed out of waste acceptance specification, but it resulted in the deposition of solids into several of the contactors. At the same time, extensive deposits of aluminosilicates were found in the drain tube in the extraction contactor #1. However it is not known at this time how the aluminosilicate solids are related to the oxalate solids. The solids were successfully cleaned out of the MCU system. However, future consideration must be given to the exclusion of oxalate solids into the MCU system. There were 53 recommendations for improving operations recently identified. Some additional considerations or additional details are provided below as recommendations. ? From this point on, IC-Anions analyses of the DSSHT should be part of the monthly routine analysis in order to spot negative trends in the oxalate leaving the MCU system. Care must be taken to monitor the oxalate content to watch for sudden precipitation of oxalate salts in the system. ? Conduct a study to optimize the cleaning strategy at ARP-MCU through decreasing the concentration or entirely eliminating the oxalic acid. ? The contents of the SSFT should remain unagitated. Routine visual observation should be maintained to ensure there is not a large buildup of solids. As water with agitation provided sufficient removal of the solids in the feed tank, it should be considered as a good means for dissolving oxalate solids if they are found in the future. ? Conduct a study to improve prediction of oxalate solubility in salt batch feed materials. As titanium and mercury have been found in various solids in this report, evaluate if either element plays a role in oxalate solubility during processing. ? Salt batch characterization focuses primarily on characterization and testing of unaltered Tank 21H material; however, non-typical feeds are developed through cleaning, washing, and/or sump transfers. As these solutions are processed through MCU, they may precipitate solids or reduce performance. Salt batch characterization and testing should be expanded to encompass a broader range of feeds that may be processed through ARPMCU.

  1. Outage management and health physics issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: India: a potential commercial opportunity, a U.S. Department of Commerce Report, by Joe Neuhoff and Justin Rathke; The changing climate for nuclear energy, by Skip Bowman, Nuclear Energy Insitute; Selecting protective clothing, by J. Mark Price, Southern California Edison; and Succssful refurbishment outage, by Sudesh K. Gambhir, Omaha Public Power District. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Containment radiation monitoring spiking, by Michael W. Lantz and Robert Routolo, Arizona Public Service Company; Improved outage performance, by Michael Powell and Troy Wilfong, Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Stop repacking valves and achieve leak-free performance, by Kenneth Hart, PPL Susquehanna LLC; and Head assembly upgrade package, by Timothy Petit, Dominion Nuclear.

  2. RESOLVED: Projectb filesystem outage July 9, 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESOLVED: Projectb filesystem outage July 9, 2012 RESOLVED: Projectb filesystem outage July 9, 2012 July 9, 2012 The projectb filesystem had a hardware failure that potentially generated I/O errors. The filesystem logs indicate that the earliest abnormal event on the filesystem occurred at 9:19AM and the filesystem was taken down for maintenance at 10:42AM. The filesystem returned to service at 11:20AM. Jobs running on the cluster would not have been able to read from or write to the projectb

  3. Outage managment and health physics issue, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include: Outage optimization initiatives, by George B. Beam, AREVA NP, Inc.; New plant based on excellent track records, by Jim Scarola, Progress Energy; Meeting customer needs and providing environmental benefits, by Peter S. Hastings, Duke Energy; Plants with 3-D design, by Jack A. Bailey, Tennessee Valley Authority; and Highest quality with exceptional planning, by Jason A. Walls, Duke Energy. Industry innovation articles include: Integrated exposure reduction plan, by Ed Wolfe, Exelon; Performance-based radiation worker training, by Joe Giuffre and Timothy Vriezerma, American Electric Power.

  4. Benchmark Report on Key Outage Attributes: An Analysis of Outage Improvement Opportunities and Priorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn St.; Farris, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC), is a multi-year pilot project targeted at Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) outage improvement. The purpose of this pilot project is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an AOCC that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report documents the results of a benchmarking effort to evaluate the transferability of technologies demonstrated at Idaho National Laboratory and the primary pilot project partner, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The initial assumption for this pilot project was that NPPs generally do not take advantage of advanced technology to support outage management activities. Several researchers involved in this pilot project have commercial NPP experience and believed that very little technology has been applied towards outage communication and collaboration. To verify that the technology options researched and demonstrated through this pilot project would in fact have broad application for the US commercial nuclear fleet, and to look for additional outage management best practices, LWRS program researchers visited several additional nuclear facilities.

  5. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-04-01

    Through the California State IOF initiative, the California Energy Commission PIER Program developed a petroleum refining roadmap to identify energy issues and priorities unique to the refining industry in California and create a plan for future R&D that could help California refineries implement energy efficient technologies.

  6. ,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11:34:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" ...US1","MMNRXNUS1","MPGRXNUS1" "Date","U.S. Refinery Net Production of Crude Oil and ...

  7. Alternative multimedia regulatory programs for next-generation refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Arguerro, R.; Emerson, D.

    2000-06-22

    The 25-year-old command-and-control environmental regulatory structure in the US has resulted in significant environmental improvements. Recently, however, its limitations (e.g., rigid application regardless of site-specific conditions, disregard of cross-media and multimedia impacts, limited incentives for new technology development and use) have become increasingly apparent. New regulatory approaches that recognize current and anticipated economic constraints, new knowledge of environmental processes and impacts, and the benefits of new technologies are needed. Such approaches could be especially important for the US petroleum refining industry. This industry operates under thin profit margins, releases chemicals that can produce adverse health and environmental impacts, and must meet the technological challenges of producing more highly refined fuels from poorer quality feedstocks. Under a grant from the Environmental Technology Initiative (ETI), Argonne National Laboratory and its subcontractor, Analytical Services, Inc. developed two alternative environmental regulatory programs for next-generation petroleum refineries. (In this report, next-generation refineries refers to the refineries of today as they operate in the next 20 or more years rather than to fully reengineered future refineries.) The objective of the ETI refinery project was to develop future-oriented regulatory programs for next-generation refineries that will expand the use of innovative technologies, encourage pollution prevention, demonstrate environmental responsibility, and maintain refinery economic performance. Rather than suggesting targeted, short-term modifications to existing media-specific command-and-control regulations, the ETI project suggests the use of new approaches that are broader and more flexible. It recognizes that giving refineries flexibility in meeting environmental protection goals can stimulate new technology development and use. Unlike most US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reinvention efforts, which seek results in 12 to 18 months, this ETI effort assumes a time frame of 20 years or more. It also assumes that existing laws and regulations can be changed. An iterative and interactive process was used by the project team to develop the alternative approaches. Information and stakeholder input were integrated to provide for constant revision and improvement. First, guidelines and principles were established to bound the study and set parameters for developing the approaches. Next, existing and projected environmental laws and regulations affecting petroleum refineries were examined to identify areas needing change. Then, to understand future challenges and opportunities, the projected refinery operating environment was described in terms of feedstock, product, technology, and economics. Finally several goals and indicators for assessing and comparing the alternatives were identified. On the basis of this background information, more than 60 options that could efficiently and effectively protect human health and the environment were identified. These options ranged from fundamental changes in program philosophy to procedural improvements. After the options were evaluated against the goals and indicators, many of them were integrated into two separate thematic paradigms: a risk-based paradigm and a goal-based paradigm. Elements common to both approaches include the following: (1) Establish the baseline--In establishing the baseline, the refinery and the regulator jointly identify residuals for which release limits must be established; (2) Set residual release limits--The refinery and the regulator jointly specify release limits on a facility-wide rather than a source-specific basis. A facility-wide permit documents the release limits; and (3) Assure compliance--Incentives provide the basis for assuring compliance, and flexibility in the compliance method is encouraged. Penalties apply if releases exceed the limits, and reporting requirements are streamlined relative to current practices.

  8. Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of...

  9. Motiva Refinery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery Motiva Refinery May 18, 2006 - 10:45am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Bodman Much of my time lately has been devoted to explaining why the price of gasoline has risen so sharply. President Bush understands the pinch this is creating for American consumers and has come forward with a variety of steps to address the problem. Rapid economic growth in emerging economies like China and India-and the growth here in the U.S.-have pushed up demand. Political unrest in some

  10. U.S. Refinery Yield

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 4.3 4.0 4.1 3.9 4.0 3.7 1993-2015 Finished Motor Gasoline 45.7 44.9 45.0 45.0 45.0 45.3 1993-2015 Finished ...

  11. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  12. Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Part I - Overview of Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

    2011-07-31

    This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which will extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses diffeent approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies.

  13. Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Weatherby

    2012-05-01

    The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

  14. How individual traces and interactive timelines could support outage execution - Toward an outage historian concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parfouru, S.; De-Beler, N.

    2012-07-01

    In the context of a project that is designing innovative ICT-based solutions for the organizational concept of outage management, we focus on the informational process of the OCR (Outage Control Room) underlying the execution of the outages. Informational process are based on structured and unstructured documents that have a key role in the collaborative processes and management of the outage. We especially track the structured and unstructured documents, electronically or not, from creation to sharing. Our analysis allows us to consider that the individual traces produced by an individual participant with a specific role could be multi-purpose and support sharing between participants without creating duplication of work. The ultimate goal is to be able to generate an outage historian, that is not just focused on highly structured information, which could be useful to improve the continuity of information between participants. We study the implementation of this approach through web technologies and social media tools to address this issue. We also investigate the issue of data access through interactive visualization timelines coupled with other modality's to assist users in the navigation and exploration of the proposed historian. (authors)

  15. Application of Standard Maintenance Windows in PHWR Outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuming Jiang [Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company, Ltd. (China)

    2006-07-01

    The concept of Standard Maintenance Windows has been widely used in the planned outage of light water reactor in the world. However, due to the specific feature of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), it has not come to a consensus for the PHWR owners to adopt Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage aiming at the optimization of outage duration. Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC), with their experience gained in the previous outages and with reference to other PHWR power plants, has identified a set of Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage. It can be applied to similar PHWR plants and with a few windows that are specific to Qinshan Phase III NPP. The use of these Standard Maintenance Windows in planned outage has been proved to be effective in control shutdown nuclear safety, minimize the unavailability of safety system, improve the efficient utilization of outage duration, and improved the flexibility of outage schedule in the case of emergency issue, which forced the revision of outage schedule. It has also formed a solid foundation for benchmarking. The identification of Standard Maintenance Windows and its application will be discussed with relevant cases for the common improvement of outage duration. (author)

  16. Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Berthold

    2006-02-22

    The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

  17. Application of Hybrid Geo-Spatially Granular Fragility Curves to Improve Power Outage Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Steven J; Allen, Melissa R; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Fragility curves depict the relationship between a weather variable (wind speed, gust speed, ice accumulation, precipitation rate) and the observed outages for a targeted infrastructure network. This paper describes an empirical study of the county by county distribution of power outages and one minute weather variables during Hurricane Irene with the objective of comparing 1) as built fragility curves (statistical approach) to engineering as designed (bottom up) fragility curves for skill in forecasting outages during future hurricanes; 2) county specific fragility curves to find examples of significant deviation from average behavior; and 3) the engineering practices of outlier counties to suggest future engineering studies of robustness. Outages in more than 90% of the impacted counties could be anticipated through an average or generic fragility curve. The remaining counties could be identified and handled as exceptions through geographic data sets. The counties with increased or decreased robustness were characterized by terrain more or less susceptible to persistent flooding in areas where above ground poles located their foundations. Land use characteristics of the area served by the power distribution system can suggest trends in the as built power grid vulnerabilities to extreme weather events that would be subjects for site specific studies.

  18. Plant maintenance and outage management issue, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2005-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on plant maintenance and outage managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Dawn of a new era, by Joe Colvin, Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI); Plant profile: Beloyarsk NPP, Russia, by Nikolai Oshkanov, Beloyarsk NPP, Russia; Improving economic performance, by R. Spiegelberg-Planner, John De Mella, and Marius Condu, IAEA; A model for improving performance, by Pet Karns, MRO Software; ASME codes and standards, by Shannon Burke, ASME International; and, Refurbishment programs, by Craig S. Irish, Nuclear Logistics, Inc.

  19. North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Power Outage Update North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update The bulk electric transmission system in the United States and Canada has been restored and is operating reliably. Many of the generating units that tripped off line during the outage have returned to service and additional generating units are expected to return to service over the weekend. Virtually all customers have been returned to electric service, although some customers will

  20. Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Outages Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages After a disaster, electric utilities and government officials will first work to restore power to critical infrastructure like power plants and transmission lines, water treatment facilities, and telecommunications networks, and also to hospitals, critical care facilities, and emergency response agencies. It may take several days or even weeks to restore power to individual homeowners, but here's what you can

  1. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Arena, Blaise; Marinangelli, Richard; McCall, Michael; Marker, Terry; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

    2006-10-11

    a summary of our collaborative 2005 project Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries at the Rio Oil and Gas Conference this September.

  2. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Marinangelli, Richard; Marker, Terry; McCall, Michael; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

    2007-02-01

    A presentation by UOP based on collaborative work from FY05 using some results from PNNL for upgrading biomass pyrolysis oil to petroleum refinery feedstock

  3. Inorganic Membranes for Refinery Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to push the performance limits of inorganic membranes for large-scale gas separations in refinery applications.

  4. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact ...

  5. Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature andor Reduced Water Availability Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to ...

  6. NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae February 11, 2016 ...

  7. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St Germain, Shawn Walter; Farris, Ronald Keith; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications; Provide real-time requirements monitoring; Maximize their collective situational awareness to improve decision-making; and Leverage macro data to better support resource allocation. INL has partnered with several commercial NPP utilities to develop a number of advanced outage management technologies. These outage management technologies have focused on both collaborative technologies for control centers and developing mobile technologies for NPP field workers. This report describes recent efforts made in developing a suite of outage technologies to support more effective schedule management. Currently, a master outage schedule is created months in advance using the plant’s existing scheduling software (e.g., Primavera P6). Typically, during the outage, the latest version of the schedule is printed at the beginning of each shift. INL and its partners are developing technologies that will have capabilities such as Automatic Schedule Updating, Automatic Pending Support Notifications, and the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis (e.g., outage Micro-Scheduling). The remaining sections of this report describe in more detail the scheduling challenges that occur during outages, how the outage scheduling technologies INL is developing helps address those challenges, and the latest developments on this task (e.g., work accomplished to date and the path forward)

  8. Fermi 2: Independent safety assessment of refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, H.O. [Detroit Edison, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Industry experience and studies conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have shown that plants are susceptible to a variety of events that can challenge safety during shutdowns. While these events have neither posed nor indicated an undue risk to public health and safety, they do serve to underscore the importance of effective outage planning and control. The NUMARC 91-06 guidelines suggest that proper planning and execution of outage activities can reduce the likelihood and consequences of events, which ultimately enhances safety during shutdown. The Fermi 2, Independent Safety Engineering Group (ISEG) is charged with the independent safety review of the refueling outage plan and its implementation. The ISEG is responsible for performing a detailed and critical review of proposed outage plan prior to the start of the outage, maintaining surveillance of the adequacy and consistency of the {open_quotes}defense-in-depth{close_quotes} provided during the outage, reviewing the outage plan changes for potential vulnerabilities that could affect safety functions, and investigating selected events that emerge during the course of the outage.

  9. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  10. Innovative filter polishes oil refinery wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, J.; Finkler, M.

    1982-07-01

    Describes how, after extensive testing of 4 different treatment techniques, a Hydro Clear rapid sand filter was installed at the Sohio oil refinery in Toledo, Ohio. This filtration system has proven to be more cost-effective than conventional approaches. The system handles the refinery's wastewater flow of 10.3 mgd. With the aid of the polishing filter, readily meets the NPDES permit limitations. The Toledo refinery is a highly integrated petroleum processing complex. It processes 127,000 barrels per day of crude oil, including 40,000 barrels per day of sour crude. Tables give dissolved air flotation performance data; biological system performance data; filter performance data; and refinery waste treatment unit compared with NPDES-BPT limitations. Diagram shows the Sohio refinery wastewater treatment facility. Through a separate backwash treatment system complete control is brought to the suspended solids in the effluent which also tends to control chemical oxygen demand and oil/grease levels.

  11. Hoboken Hopes To Reduce Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hoboken Hopes To Reduce Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle

  12. A stochastic model for the measurement of electricity outage costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosfeld-Nir, A.; Tishler, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Analysis of scrams and forced outages at boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, R. T.; Sullivan, W. P.; Miller, K. R.; Schwegman, W. J.

    1980-07-01

    This report documents the results of a study of scrams and forced outages at General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in the United States. This study was conducted for Sandia Laboratories under a Light Water Reactor Safety Program which it manages for the United States Department of Energy. Operating plant data were used to identify the causes of scrams and forced outages. Causes of scrams and forced outages have been summarized as a function of operating plant and plant age and also ranked according to the number of events per year, outage time per year, and outage time per event. From this ranking, identified potential improvement opportunities were evaluated to determine the associated benefits and impact on plant availability.

  14. Technology Integration Initiative In Support of Outage Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Weatherby; David Gertman

    2012-07-01

    Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Often, command and control during outages is maintained in the outage control center where many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. This research reports on the use of advanced integrating software technologies and hand held mobile devices as a means by which to reduce cycle time, improve accuracy, and enhance transparency among outage team members. This paper reports on the first phase of research supported by the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program that is performed in close collaboration with industry to examine the introduction of newly available technology allowing for safe and efficient outage performance. It is thought that this research will result in: improved resource management among various plant stakeholder groups, reduced paper work, and enhanced overall situation awareness for the outage control center management team. A description of field data collection methods, including personnel interview data, success factors, end-user evaluation and integration of hand held devices in achieving an integrated design are also evaluated. Finally, the necessity of obtaining operations cooperation support in field studies and technology evaluation is acknowledged.

  15. Former Soviet refineries face modernization, restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-29

    A massive modernization and restructuring program is under way in the refining sector of Russia and other former Soviet republics. Economic reforms and resulting economic dislocation following the collapse of the Soviet Union has left refineries in the region grappling with a steep decline and changes in product demand. At the same time, rising oil prices and an aging, dilapidated infrastructure promise a massive shakeout. Even as many refineries in the former Soviet Union (FSU) face possible closure because they are running at a fraction of capacity, a host of revamps, expansions, and grass roots refineries are planned or under way. The paper discusses plans.

  16. ,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"10272015 12:31:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRXNUS1","MLPRXNUS1","METRXNUS1","MENRXNUS1","MEYRXNUS1","...

  17. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

  18. Iran to build new refinery at Arak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports Iranian plans to construct a grassroots 150,000-b/d refinery in Arak. The plant, to be completed in early 1993, will be capable of producing unleaded gasoline and other light products.

  19. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  20. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

  1. Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages In June 2011, President Obama released A Policy Framework for the 21st Century Grid which set out a four-pillared strategy for modernizing the electric grid. The initiative directed billions of dollars toward investments in 21st century smart grid technologies focused at increasing the grid's efficiency, reliability,

  2. Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Future Print Information about the future expansion of research fields for synchrotrons and the growing number of light sources, including free electron lasers (FELs) will...

  3. U.S. Refinery Yield

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 3.5 2.8 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.6 1993-2016 Finished Motor Gasoline 45.4 45.7 46.7 47.3 49.3 47.5 1993-2016 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1 1993-2016 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 9.3 9.8 9.8 10.1 9.8 9.9 1993-2016 Kerosene 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 1993-2016 Distillate Fuel Oil 29.9 30.0 30.3 29.6 27.8 28.9 1993-2016 Residual Fuel Oil 2.5 2.6 2.3 2.2 2.5 2.6 1993-2016 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.3

  4. A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho This report reviews power outages and restoration efforts following the June 29, 2012 Derecho and compares them to outages and restoration efforts following other spring and summer storms in the Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic regions. PDF icon A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho More

  5. Crude oil as refinery feed stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boduszynski, M.M.; Farrell, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper gives a brief overview of the integrated oil refinery. It illustrates that crude oil refining involves {open_quotes}molecular tailoring,{close_quotes} where feed stock molecules are {open_quotes}tailored{close_quotes} through catalytic processing to make products with the most desirable composition. Chemical composition of crude oil as refinery feed stock is discussed. The emphasis is on the understanding of molecular transformations which occur in refinery processes to manufacture light transportation fuels. Diesel fuel manufacturing is used as an example. Recent environmental legislation in the United States has necessitated a significant upgrade in the quality of diesel fuel used for highway transportation. Examples are given to illustrate the impact that petroleum chemistry may have on the industry`s response to government regulations.

  6. Refinery Input by PADD - Petroleum Supply Annual (2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Table showing refinery input of crude oil and petroleum products by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD).

  7. Overview of Common Mode Outages in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Awodele , Kehinde; Billinton, Roy; Dent, Chris; Eager, Dan; Hamoud, Gomaa; Jirutitijaroen, Panida; Kumbale, Murali; Mitra, Joydeep; Samaan, Nader A.; Schneider, Alex; Singh, Chanan

    2012-11-10

    This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Probability Applications for Common Mode Events (PACME) Task Force under the Reliability Risk and Probability Applications (RRPA) Subcommittee. The paper is intended to constitute a valid source of information and references about dealing with common-mode outages in power systems reliability analysis. This effort involves reviewing published literature and presenting state-of-the-art research and practical applications in the area of common-mode outages. Evaluation of available outage statistics show that there is a definite need for collective effort from academia and industry to not only recommended procedures for data collection and monitoring but also to provide appropriate mathematical models to assess such events.

  8. Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of the compilers (except GNU) and the DDT debugger on Hopper will not be available from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm on Wednesday, May 16. If there are any questions or concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April

  9. Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be

  10. HPSS Outage Tue Mar 19 - Fri Mar 22

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Outage Tue Mar 19 - Fri Mar 22 HPSS Outage Tue Mar 19 - Fri Mar 22 March 12, 2013 by Francesca Verdier The NERSC HPSS "User" system (archive.nersc.gov) will be down for four days from Tue Mar 19 07:00 to Fri Mar 22 17:00). The system will be upgraded from HPSS version 6.2 to version 7.3. This new version of the HPSS server software is not compatible with current GridFTP servers. This means the NERSC HPSS systems will not support any grid-based transfer methods (including

  11. Exergoeconomic analysis of a refinery`s utilities plant: Part II-improvement proposals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivero, R.; Hernandez, R.

    1996-12-31

    A crude oil refinery normally consumes a large amount of energy, not only in the form of the combustion of fossil fuels in the process units, but also in the associated Utilities Plant which produces process steam at different pressure levels and electricity. Energy losses of the utilities plant represent some 40 % of the total refinery`s energy losses. It is then extremely important to evaluate the performance of this plant and the costs to be assigned to the production of steam and electricity as a supplier of energy to the process units. This paper presents the improvement proposals generated by the application of an exergoeconomic analysis to the Utilities Plant of an existing 150,000 BPD crude oil refinery. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  13. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    12,813 12,516 12,287 12,009 12,148 11,916 2005-2014 Liquefied Refinery Gases 623 659 619 630 623 653 2005-2014 EthaneEthylene 19 20 20 18 7 6 2005-2014 Ethane 14 14 14 13 7 5...

  14. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil From Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Michael; Marker, Terry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Wangerow, Jim; Swanson, Dan; McLeod, Celeste; Del Paggio, Alan; Urade, Vikrant; Rao, Madhusudhan; Narasimhan, Laxmi; Gephart, John; Starr, Jack; Hahn, John; Stover, Daniel; Parrish, Martin; Maxey, Carl; Shonnard, David; Handler, Robert; Fan, Jiquig

    2015-08-31

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be converted to bio-oils containing less than 10% oxygen by a hydropyrolysis process. Hydropyrolysis is the first step in Gas Technology Institute’s (GTI) integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion IH2®. These intermediate bio-oils can then be converted to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels using existing refinery hydrotreating equipment to make hydrocarbon blending components, which are fully compatible with existing fuels. Alternatively, cellulosic or woody biomass can directly be converted into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels containing less than 0.4% oxygen using the IH2 process located adjacent to a refinery or ethanol production facility. Many US oil refineries are actually located near biomass resources and are a logical location for a biomass to transportation fuel conversion process. The goal of this project was to work directly with an oil refinery partner, to determine the most attractive route and location for conversion of biorenewables to drop in fuels in their refinery and ethanol production network. Valero Energy Company, through its subsidiaries, has 12 US oil refineries and 11 ethanol production facilities, making them an ideal partner for this analysis. Valero is also part of a 50- 50 joint venture with Darling Ingredients called Diamond Green Diesel. Diamond Green Diesel’s production capacity is approximately 11,000 barrels per day of renewable diesel. The plant is located adjacent to Valero’s St Charles, Louisiana Refinery and converts recycled animal fats, used cooking oil, and waste corn oil into renewable diesel. This is the largest renewable diesel plant in the U.S. and has successfully operated for over 2 years For this project, 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oil from wood and 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oils from corn stover were produced. The hydropyrolysis oil produced had 4-10% oxygen. Metallurgical testing of hydropyrolysis liquids was completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (Oak Ridge) and showed the hydropyrolysis oils had low acidity and caused almost no corrosion in comparison to pyrolysis oils, which had high acidity and caused significant levels of corrosion.

  15. Olkiluoto 1 and 2 - Plant efficiency improvement and lifetime extension-project (PELE) implemented during outages 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosonen, M.; Hakola, M.

    2012-07-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) is a non-listed public company founded in 1969 to produce electricity for its stakeholders. TVO is the operator of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. TVO follows the principle of continuous improvement in the operation and maintenance of the Olkiluoto plant units. The PELE project (Plant Efficiency Improvement and Lifetime Extension), mainly completed during the annual outages in 2010 and 2011, and forms one part of the systematic development of Olkiluoto units. TVO maintains a long-term development program that aims at systematically modernizing the plant unit systems and equipment based on the latest technology. According to the program, the Olkiluoto 1 and Olkiluoto 2 plant units are constantly renovated with the intention of keeping them safe and reliable, The aim of the modernization projects is to improve the safety, reliability, and performance of the plant units. PELE project at Olkiluoto 1 was done in 2010 and at Olkiluoto 2 in 2011. The outage length of Olkiluoto 1 was 26 d 12 h 4 min and Olkiluoto 2 outage length was 28 d 23 h 46 min. (Normal service-outage is about 14 days including refueling and refueling-outage length is about seven days. See figure 1) The PELE project consisted of several single projects collected into one for coordinated project management. Some of the main projects were as follows: - Low pressure turbines: rotor, stator vane, casing and turbine instrumentation replacement. - Replacement of Condenser Cooling Water (later called seawater pumps) pumps - Replacement of inner isolation valves on the main steam lines. - Generator and the generator cooling system replacement. - Low voltage switchgear replacement. This project will continue during future outages. PELE was a success. 100 TVO employees and 1500 subcontractor employees participated in the project. The execution of the PELE projects went extremely well during the outages. The replacement of the low pressure turbines and seawater pumps improved the efficiency of the plant units, and a power increase of nearly 20 MW was achieved at both plant units. PELE wonderfully manifests one of the strategic goals of our company; developing the competence of our in-house personnel by working in projects. (authors)

  16. A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho August 7, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a report that reviews power outages and restoration efforts following the June 29, 2012 Derecho and compares them to outages and restoration efforts following other spring and summer storms in the Ohio Valley and

  17. U.S. Refineries Competitive Positions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refineries Competitive Positions 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 Joanne Shore American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers Refiners competitive positions Function of optimizing feedstock costs, operating costs, and revenues through mix of products sold 2 Propane/butane Chemicals Gasoline Jet Fuel Diesel/heating oil Lubes Fuel for ships Asphalt FEEDSTOCKS Qualities: - Heavy/Light - Sweet/Sour Location (Distance) - Domestic - International PROCESSING Size Complexity Treating (sulfur)

  18. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  19. Survey of tools for risk assessment of cascading outages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Dobson, Ian; Fonte, Louis; Haq, Enamul; Hines, Paul; Kirschen, Daniel; Luo, Xiaochuan; Miller, Stephen; Samaan, Nader A.; Vaiman, Marianna; Varghese, Matthew; Zhang, Pei

    2011-10-01

    Abstract-This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers [1, 2] are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the second of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. The first paper reviews the state of the art in methodologies for performing risk assessment of potential cascading outages [3]. This paper describes the state of the art in cascading failure modeling tools, documenting the view of experts representing utilities, universities and consulting companies. The paper is intended to constitute a valid source of information and references about presently available tools that deal with prediction of cascading failure events. This effort involves reviewing published literature and other documentation from vendors, universities and research institutions. The assessment of cascading outages risk evaluation is in continuous evolution. Investigations to gain even better understanding and identification of cascading events are the subject of several research programs underway aimed at solving the complexity of these events that electrical utilities face today. Assessing the risk of cascading failure events in planning and operation for power transmission systems require adequate mathematical tools/software.

  20. Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory PDF icon biomass13_foust_2-d.pdf More Documents & Publications NABC Webinar Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and

  1. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

  2. Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    called on Congress to simplify the approval process for refiners to expand their refineries, which will help reduce America's imports of foreign oil and the price of energy. ...

  3. ,"Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities",16,"Monthly","22016","1151985" ,"Release Date:","4292016" ,"Next Release Date:","5312016" ,"Excel File ...

  4. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    capable of automatic, safe, reliable, efficient, and low-emission operation across a broad range of fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas. ...

  5. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil from Biomass Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil from Biomass March 25,2015 Technology Area Review ... first converting biomass to hydropyrolysis oil and then upgrading the hydropyrolysis oil ...

  6. Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company (SAMREF) Name: Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Address: P.O. Box 30078 Place: Yanbu, Saudi Arabia Sector: Oil and Gas Product: Crude Oil Refining Phone...

  7. Design Concepts for an Outage Control Center Information Dashboard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugo, Jacques Victor; St Germain, Shawn Walter; Thompson, Cheradan Jo; Whitesides, McKenzie Jo; Farris, Ronald Keith

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear industry, and the business world in general, is facing a rapidly increasing amount of data to be dealt with on a daily basis. In the last two decades, the steady improvement of data storage devices and means to create and collect data along the way influenced the manner in which we deal with information. Most data is still stored without filtering and refinement for later use. Many functions at a nuclear power plant generate vast amounts of data, with scheduled and unscheduled outages being a prime example of a source of some of the most complex data sets at the plant. To make matters worse, modern information and communications technology is making it possible to collect and store data faster than our ability to use it for making decisions. However, in most applications, especially outages, raw data has no value in itself; instead, managers, engineers and other specialists want to extract the information contained in it. The complexity and sheer volume of data could lead to information overload, resulting in getting lost in data that may be irrelevant to the task at hand, processed in an inappropriate way, or presented in an ineffective way. To prevent information overload, many data sources are ignored so production opportunities are lost because utilities lack the ability to deal with the enormous data volumes properly. Decision-makers are often confronted with large amounts of disparate, conflicting and dynamic information, which are available from multiple heterogeneous sources. Information and communication technologies alone will not solve this problem. Utilities need effective methods to exploit and use the hidden opportunities and knowledge residing in unexplored data resources. Superior performance before, during and after outages depends upon the right information being available at the right time to the right people. Acquisition of raw data is the easy part; instead, it is the ability to use advanced analytical, data processing and data visualization methods to turn the data into reliable information and comprehensible, actionable information. Techniques like data mining, filtering and analysis only work reliably for well-defined and well-understood problems. The path from data to decision is more complex. The ability to communicate knowledge during outages and emergent issues is crucial. This paper presents an approach to turn the unused data into an opportunity: applying principles from semiotics, human factors and visual analytics to transform the traditional way of processing outage data into media that will improve the collective situation awareness, knowledge, decisions, actions and overall performance of the entire outage team, and also support the reliability, quality and overall effectiveness of maintenance work. The application of the proposed visualization methods will become the medium of a semi-automated analytical process where humans and machines cooperate using their respective, distinct capabilities for the most effective results.

  8. Network Outage 5-14-2016 | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Network Outage 5-14-2016 On Saturday, May 14, 2016, between 6:30 AM and 2:30 PM CST, Ames Lab FES will perform maintenance on the main electrical power in Spedding Hall and Metals Development (see announcement appended below from May 3). Prior to this FES work, Information Systems will shutdown equipment to avoid damage due to either loss of cooling or uncontrolled loss of electrical power. Beginning at 5:30 AM on March 5, 2016, the following services are expected to be unavailable, or may be

  9. Study, outlines why outages go long, short, or on-time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    A recent report by a nuclear industry professional, based on a survey of outage managers at US nuclear power plants, declares that [open quotes]preplanned outage schedules appear to be grossly inaccurate, and the outage management planners and schedulers do not have a grasp of the requirements and/or the resources needed to complete the actual activities on schedule.[close quotes] It declares that [open quotes]the scheduled duration of a planned outage must be realistic.[close quotes] The study identifies personnel, planning and scheduling, and equipment/hardware as [open quotes]the primary reasons why refueling outages and outage activities finished ahead of, right on, or behind schedule.[close quotes

  10. Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages - U.S. Energy Information Administratio...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    < NUCLEAR & URANIUM Data Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages Download Download Link to: Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Power Reactor Status Report

  11. A Study of Outage Management Practices at Selected U.S. Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, James C. [ABSG Consulting Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents insights gained from a study of the outage management practices at a number of U.S. nuclear plants. The objective of the study was to conduct an in-depth review of the current practices of outage management at these selected plants and identify important factors that have contributed to the recent success of their outage performance. Two BWR-4, three BWR-6, and two 3-loop Westinghouse PWR plants were selected for this survey. The results of this study can be used to formulate outage improvement efforts for nuclear plants in other countries. (author)

  12. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total 352,148 350,299 353,077 362,368 337,235 321,406 2005-2016 Liquefied Refinery Gases 17,388 13,536 9,912 10,243 10,719 12,130 2005-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 158 202 196 226 165 114 2005-2016 Ethane 133 173 165 194 142 96 2005-2016 Ethylene 25 29 31 32 23 18 2005-2016 Propane/Propylene 15,869 16,121 16,574 17,905 17,998 16,402 2005-2016 Propane 7,955 7,965 8,303 8,831 8,571 8,208 2005-2016 Propylene 7,914 8,156 8,271 9,074 9,427 8,194

  13. Coal-fired boiler for petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketterman, W.R.; Heinzmann, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    There has been a significant amount of interest in conversion from oil/gas fired boilers to coal-fired equipment since the Arab oil embargo of 1973. The CRA Incorporated Coffeyville Refinery decided in 1977 to proceed with the installation of a 86.183 Kg/h coal fired boiler to generate process steam at 650 psig (4,482 k Pa) 596/sup 0/F (313/sup 0/C). A significant portion of this steam is passed through steam turbines to obtain mechanical power. Building and operating a coal-fired steam plant is a ''Different Kettle of Fish'' from building and operating an oil/gas-fired steam plant. The intention of this paper is to deal with some of the ''Why's and Wherefores'' of the conversion to coal-fired equipment.

  14. Regulatory impact analysis for the petroleum refineries neshap. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The report analyzes the regulatory impacts of the Petroleum Refinery National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which is being promulgated under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CCA). This emission standard would regulate the emissions of certain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from petroleum refineries. The petroleum refineries industry group includes any facility engaged in the production of motor gasoline, naphthas, kerosene, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, or other products made from crude oil or unfinished petroleum derivatives. The report analyzes the impact that regulatory action is likely to have on the petroleum refining industry.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of savings in outage costs by using emergency actions strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, A.; Asuhaimi, A.; Shaibon, H. [Univ. Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bharu (Malaysia); Lo, K.L. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study carried out to assess the savings in consumer outage costs that can be accrued as a result of implementing Emergency Actions Strategy. The use of Emergency Actions Strategy plays a significant role in curtailing the consumer outage costs ensuing from unreliable electric service. In order to calculate the savings in outage costs, the probabilistic framework of the frequency and duration method has been used in conjunction with emergency actions. At first, the outage costs of various consumer sectors are estimated without considering the emergency actions. Secondly, the consumer outage costs are calculated by combining the frequency and duration method, and unserved energy with the emergency actions invoked. The results of the savings in consumer outage costs that can be accrued by utilizing Emergency Actions Strategy are presented for a synthetic system. The results of the study show that substantial savings in consumer outage costs are obtained by devising and implementing emergency actions strategy in situations of capacity outages. The results are of particular relevance and utility to the underdeveloped and developing countries where capacity shortages occur quite frequently. These results also suggest the importance of emergency actions strategy for electric utilities in reducing the consumer economic losses arising from unreliable electric service.

  16. Use of collaboration software to improve nuclear power plant outage management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) refueling outages create some of the most challenging activities the utilities face in both tracking and coordinating thousands of activities in a short period of time. Other challenges, including nuclear safety concerns arising from atypical system configurations and resource allocation issues, can create delays and schedule overruns, driving up outage costs. Today the majority of the outage communication is done using processes that do not take advantage of advances in modern technologies that enable enhanced communication, collaboration and information sharing. Some of the common practices include: runners that deliver paper-based requests for approval, radios, telephones, desktop computers, daily schedule printouts, and static whiteboards that are used to display information. Many gains have been made to reduce the challenges facing outage coordinators; however; new opportunities can be realized by utilizing modern technological advancements in communication and information tools that can enhance the collective situational awareness of plant personnel leading to improved decision-making. Ongoing research as part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) has been targeting NPP outage improvement. As part of this research, various applications of collaborative software have been demonstrated through pilot project utility partnerships. Collaboration software can be utilized as part of the larger concept of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Collaborative software can be used for emergent issue resolution, Outage Control Center (OCC) displays, and schedule monitoring. Use of collaboration software enables outage staff and subject matter experts (SMEs) to view and update critical outage information from any location on site or off.

  17. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  18. Combined-cycle cogeneration to power oil refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeker, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    A cogeneration plant now under construction at an oil refinery in Martinez, California, is an example of how the energy industry has been responding to the fundamental economic and technological challenges it has been facing over the past ten years. The industry is re-examining cogeneration as one way of meeting the requirements of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act. The new plant is located at Tosco Corporation's Avon Oil Refinery, 45 miles northeast of San Francisco. It was designed by Foster Wheeler to supply process steam for the refinery as well as for a water-treatment installation that will benefit the Contra Costa Water District. Electric power produced will be used primarily by the refinery, with the balance purchased by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company.

  19. Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking December 10, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Bill. It's good to see Congressman Poe, Rob Routs, Mr. Al-Khayyal and Mayor Prince here. Thank you all for inviting me to be part of this occasion. In 1901 Texas wildcatters struck oil near here at a place called Spindletop, setting off the Texas Oil Boom. Like the California Gold Rush some 50 years before, the

  20. NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Algae | Department of Energy Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae February 11, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has proven to be significantly more effective at

  1. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department’s Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Next up in our Smart Grid Week series -- improving electric grid technologies to adequately prepare for emergencies with power outages.

  2. Notice of Unplanned Outage at the Mirant Potomac River Plant | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Unplanned Outage at the Mirant Potomac River Plant Notice of Unplanned Outage at the Mirant Potomac River Plant Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-05-03: Pursuant to the United States Department of Energy ("DOE") Order No_ 202-05-3, issued December 20, 2005 ("DOE Potomac River Order"), Pepco hereby files this notice of an unplanned outage of one of the 230kV circuits serving the Potomac River Substation, and through that station, the District of Columbia. PDF

  3. Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy In accordance with DOE Order No. 202-05-03 Pepco is required to provide notification of any and all 230kV planned outages at Potomac River Generating Station. On Tuesday February 20, 2007 Potomac Electric Power Company (Pepco) will be taking a planned outage on the 23106 high voltage circuit between the Palmer's Corner Substation and the Potomac River Generating Station. PDF icon Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station More Documents

  4. Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The next planned outage on xxxxx high voltage circuit between Palmers Corner Substation and the Potomac River Generating Station is scheduled for Sunday, June 3, 2007 and will begin at 4:00 AM with a scheduled return date of Saturday, June 9, 2007 at 2:00 PM. PDF icon Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station More Documents & Publications Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station Notification of Planned

  5. Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Order No. 202-07-02: In accordance with DOE Order No. 202-07-02, Pepco is required to provide notification of any and all 230kV planned and unplanned outages at Potomac River Generating Station. PDF icon Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station More Documents & Publications Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy, Case No. EO-05-01: Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) evised plan for transmission outages for the

  6. Docket No. EO-05-01: Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages Docket No. EO-05-01: Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages Docket No. EO-05-01. Pursuant to the United States Department of Energy Order No. 202-05-03, issued December 20, 2005 directing Mirant Potomac River to generate electricity at Potomac River Generating Station, PEPCO hereby files this Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned Outages. PDF icon Docket No. EO-05-01: Further Notice of 230kV Circuit Planned

  7. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  8. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  9. Assistant Secretary Hoffman Speaks to Senate Committee on DOE's Role in Managing Electrical Outages

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman appeared before the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on April 26, 2012 to speak about the Department of Energy's role in managing weather related electrical outages.

  10. Notification of Planned 230kV Outage at Potomac River Generating Station

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Docket No. EO-05-01. The next planned outage on xxxxx high voltage circuit between xxxxx and xxxxx is tentatively scheduled for Saturday May 19, 2007 and will begin at 4:00 AM with a scheduled...

  11. U.S. - Canada Power System Outage Task Force: Final Report on the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Task Force Recommendations | Department of Energy - Canada Power System Outage Task Force: Final Report on the Implementation of Task Force Recommendations U.S. - Canada Power System Outage Task Force: Final Report on the Implementation of Task Force Recommendations On August 14, 2003, the largest power blackout in North American history affected an area with an estimated 50 million people and 61,800 megawatts (MW) of electric load in the states of Ohio, Michigan,

  12. EIA-820, Annual Refinery Report Page 1 U. S. ENERGY INFORMATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crude oil that first traveled 5,000 miles by tanker and then traveled 105 miles by pipeline to the refinery, report pipeline as the method of transportation. * If the refinery...

  13. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Executive summary. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. The volume contains the Executive Summary.

  14. Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 section 313 list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In this volume, detailed procedures recommended for the measurement of selected petroleum refinery emissions in ambient air are presented.

  15. Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This volume identifies publications and databases that address ambient air concentrations measured near petroleum refineries for the selected target chemicals.

  16. Monitoring near refineries for airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study provides an ambient air concentration perspective to the engineering estimates of petroleum refinery emissions required under SARA Title III Section 313. It presents and discusses ambient air concentrations of 25 selected target chemicals measured at and near the perimeter (fenceline) of three refineries. Measurements were made over three consecutive 24-hour sampling periods at each refinery. The extent to which the concentrations of the target chemicals were due to fugitive emissions from the refineries is estimated.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Rare Metals Refinery Inc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - NY 38 Rare Metals Refinery Inc - NY 38 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Rare Metals Refinery, Inc. (NY.38 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Canadian Radium and Uranium Corporation NY.38-1 Location: 69 Kisko Avenue , Mt. Kisko , New York NY.38-1 NY.38-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.38-4 Site Operations: Manufactured and distributed radium and polonium products. NY.38-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Site was a

  18. OTRA-THS MAC to reduce Power Outage Data Collection Latency in a smart meter network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garlapati, Shravan K; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Buehrer, Richard M; Reed, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of advanced metering infrastructure by the electric utilities poses unique communication challenges, particularly as the number of meters per aggregator increases. During a power outage, a smart meter tries to report it instantaneously to the electric utility. In a densely populated residential/industrial locality, it is possible that a large number of smart meters simultaneously try to get access to the communication network to report the power outage. If the number of smart meters is very high of the order of tens of thousands (metropolitan areas), the power outage data flooding can lead to Random Access CHannel (RACH) congestion. Several utilities are considering the use of cellular network for smart meter communications. In 3G/4G cellular networks, RACH congestion not only leads to collisions, retransmissions and increased RACH delays, but also has the potential to disrupt the dedicated traffic flow by increasing the interference levels (3G CDMA). In order to overcome this problem, in this paper we propose a Time Hierarchical Scheme (THS) that reduces the intensity of power outage data flooding and power outage reporting delay by 6/7th, and 17/18th when compared to their respective values without THS. Also, we propose an Optimum Transmission Rate Adaptive (OTRA) MAC to optimize the latency in power outage data collection. The analysis and simulation results presented in this paper show that both the OTRA and THS features of the proposed MAC results in a Power Outage Data Collection Latency (PODCL) that is 1/10th of the 4G LTE PODCL.

  19. U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,794,407 6,973,710 7,173,730 7,260,943 1981-2015 Liquefied Refinery Gases 240,454 225,992 230,413 227,349 238,485 223,448 1981-2015 EthaneEthylene 7,228 7,148 6,597 2,626 ...

  20. U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total 600,775 608,595 595,141 614,837 579,640 560,048 1981-2016 Liquefied Refinery Gases 17,388 13,536 9,912 10,243 10,719 ...

  1. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  2. Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Kenneth Thomas; Ronald Farris; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are optimally deployed with the least amount of delay and unproductive use of resources. The remaining sections of this report describe in more detail the scheduling challenges that occur during outages, how a Micro-Scheduling capability helps address those challenges, and provides a status update on work accomplished to date and the path forward.

  3. Pepco Update on Current Construction Work and Mirant Generation Needs for Pepco's Planned June Line Outage

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May 25, 2007 Kevin Kolevar Director of the Office of Electricity Deliverability and Energy Reliability Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Kolevar, DOE has requested that Pepco provide an update on the current work to install two new 230 kilovolt circuits into Potomac River substation and to evaluate the need for generation from the Potomac River plant to support the anticipated line outage during June, 2007. An outage on one of the 230 kV circuits is

  4. Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

    2006-07-01

    The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

  5. Congested site challenges designers of refinery IPP plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, S.

    1993-09-01

    This article describes a new IPP plant which has successfully met the challenges of an extremely congested site--including overcoming physical space constraints, meeting low air-emissions regulations, and minimizing water consumption--located next to a busy highway and near a major airport. The 650-MW Linden cogeneration plant is located on a 13.5-acre plot within the confines of Bayway Refinery Co's facility near Newark, NJ. Since starting operation one year ago, the plant has been reliably supplying steam for the refinery's process heating and mechanical drive needs and efficiently generating steam and electricity with minimal environmental impact. To achieve these goals, designers chose a combined-cycle configuration/generators, five supplementary-fired heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and three 90-MW steam turbine/generators. Thus far, the facility has operated with an average availability above 90%.

  6. Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55

  7. Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended

  8. Martinez Refinery Completes Plant-Wide Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-11-01

    This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes how the Equilon Enterprises oil refinery in Martinez, California undertook a plant-wide energy assessment that focused on three key areas: waste minimization, process debottlenecking, and operations optimization. The assessment yielded recommendations, which, if implemented, can save more than 6,000,000 MMBtu per year and an estimated $52,000,000 per year, plus improve process control and reduce waste.

  9. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  10. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 | Department of Energy Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 The goal of this research effort was to develop and demonstrate a combustion system capable of automatic, safe, reliable, efficient, and low-emission operation across a broad range of fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery

  11. Bio-Oil Co-Processing: Expanding the Refinery Supply System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bio-Oil Co-Processing: Expanding the Refinery Supply System Bio-Oil Co-Processing: Expanding the Refinery Supply System The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting a workshop on Thursday, April 3, 2014, at the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana. This workshop will explore the resource expansion potential for conventional refineries by considering biomass-derived oils as a supplemental feedstock. BETO wants to identify

  12. Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report, October 3, 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report. In accordance with the mandate of the U.S.-Canada Power Outage Task Force, the...

  13. Aspects of Holly Corporation's Acquisition of Sunoco Inc.'s Tulsa, Oklahoma Refinery

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration has produced a review of aspects of the Holly's acquisition of Sunoco's 85,000-barrels-per-day Tulsa refinery.

  14. Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature and/or Reduced Water Availability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report discusses potential impacts of increased water temperature and reductions in water availability on petroleum refining and presents case studies related to refinery water use. Report...

  15. Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions Freeman, Charles J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Shinn,...

  16. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q.

    2010-12-08

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  17. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  18. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  19. Method for estimating power outages and restoration during natural and man-made events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Fernandez, Steven J.

    2016-01-05

    A method of modeling electric supply and demand with a data processor in combination with a recordable medium, and for estimating spatial distribution of electric power outages and affected populations. A geographic area is divided into cells to form a matrix. Within the matrix, supply cells are identified as containing electric substations and demand cells are identified as including electricity customers. Demand cells of the matrix are associated with the supply cells as a function of the capacity of each of the supply cells and the proximity and/or electricity demand of each of the demand cells. The method includes estimating a power outage by applying disaster event prediction information to the matrix, and estimating power restoration using the supply and demand cell information of the matrix and standardized and historical restoration information.

  20. A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 2012 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about this report may be directed to Alice

  1. Final Remediation Report for the K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (643-1G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morganstern, M.

    2002-06-18

    The K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (K BPOP) Building Number 643-1G, is situated immediately south and outside the K-Reactor fence line and is approximately 400 feet in length and 60 feet in width. For the K BPOP operable unit, the Land Use Control (LUC) objectives are to prevent contact, removal, or excavation of buried waste in the area and to preclude residential use of the area.

  2. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  3. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  4. Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Gary Lunn, today released the final report on the power outage that affected 50...

  5. Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Gary Lunn, today released the final report on the power outage that affected 50 million North Americans in August 2003.

  6. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  7. Outage Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10:00 - 16:50. No user impact was expected. These switches provide connectivity for the meta-data servers for homes, common, project, syscomm, dna and projectb. 111115 9:00...

  8. U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total 570,498 577,057 563,621 580,680 545,351 529,373 1981-2016 Crude Oil 485,221 479,416 494,682 519,726 495,806 460,629 1981-2016 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 16,371 18,692 20,285 20,130 20,717 16,455 1981-2016 Pentanes Plus 4,804 4,844 4,376 4,155 4,878 3,963 1981-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 11,567 13,848 15,909 15,975 15,839 12,492 1981-2016 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 4,707 7,699 9,213 9,410 9,502 6,776

  9. U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total 6,345,372 6,422,710 6,406,693 6,577,077 6,779,342 6,882,105 1981-2015 Crude Oil 5,374,094 5,404,347 5,489,516 5,589,006 5,784,637 5,915,532 1981-2015 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 161,479 178,884 186,270 181,112 186,601 188,270 1981-2015 Pentanes Plus 56,686 63,385 63,596 60,394 56,037 53,404 1981-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 104,793 115,499 122,674 120,718 130,564 134,866 1981-2015 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 43,802

  10. House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act June 8, 2006 - 2:17pm Addthis Statement from Secretary Bodman WASHINGTON, DC - The following is a statement from the Secretary Samuel W. Bodman of the Department of Energy on the passage of House Resolution 5254, The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act: "I commend the House of Representatives for their passage of this important piece

  11. Methodology to predict the number of forced outages due to creep failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, J.V. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    All alloy metals at a temperature above 950 degrees Fahrenheit experience creep damage. Creep failures in boiler tubes usually begin after 25 to 40 years of operation. Since creep damage is irreversible, the only remedy is to replace the tube sections. By predicting the number of failures per year, the utility can make the best economic decision concerning tube replacement. This paper describes a methodology to calculate the number of forced outages per yea due to creep failures. This methodology is particularly useful to utilities that have boilers that have at least 25 years of operation.

  12. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Charles; Wilson, Robert

    2014-04-30

    This project culminated in the demonstration of a full-scale industrial burner which allows a broad range of “opportunity” gaseous fuels to be cost-effectively and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria air pollutants. The burner is capable of maintaining a stable flame when the fuel composition changes rapidly. This enhanced stability will contribute significantly to improving the safety and reliability of burner operation in manufacturing sites. Process heating in the refining and chemicals sectors is the primary application for this burner. The refining and chemical sectors account for more than 40% of total industrial natural gas use. Prior to the completion of this project, an enabling technology did not exist that would allow these energy-intensive industries to take full advantage of opportunity fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gaseous fuels include biogas (from animal and agricultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills) as well as syngas (from the gasification of biomass, municipal solid wastes, construction wastes, and refinery residuals). The primary challenge to using gaseous opportunity fuels is that their composition and combustion performance differ significantly from those of conventional fuels such as natural gas and refinery fuel gas. An effective fuel-flexible burner must accept fuels that range widely in quality and change in composition over time, often rapidly. In Phase 1 of this project, the team applied computational fluid dynamics analysis to optimize the prototype burner’s aerodynamic, combustion, heat transfer, and emissions performance. In Phase 2, full-scale testing and refinement of two prototype burners were conducted in test furnaces at Zeeco’s offices in Broken Arrow, OK. These tests demonstrated that the full range of conventional and opportunity fuels could be utilized by the project’s burner while achieving robust flame stability and very low levels of air pollutant emissions. In Phase 3, the team retrofitted three fuel-flexible burners into a fired heater at a Shell plant and demonstrated the project’s technology over a 6-month period. The project burners performed well during this period. They remain in commercial service at the Shell plant. Through this work, an improved understanding of flame stabilization mechanisms was gained. Also, methods for accommodating a wide range of fuel compositions were developed. This knowledge facilitated the commercialization of a new generation of burners that are suitable for the fuels of the future.

  13. Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Corinne Valkenburg, Staff Engineer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  14. Optimizing Co-Processing of Bio-Oil in Refinery Unit Operations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Co-Processing of Bio-Oil in Refinery Unit Operations Using a Davison Circulating Riser (DCR) 2.4.2.402 March 25, 2015 Bio-Oil Technology Area Alan Zacher Pacific ...

  15. Valero: Houston Refinery Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Develop an Energy Optimization and Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-01

    This Industrial Technologies Program case study describes an energy assessment team's recommendations for saving $5 million in energy, water, and other costs at an oil refinery in Houston, Texas.

  16. Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions ...

  17. Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Oil Insertions (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions This study examines how existing U.S. refining infrastructure matches in geography and processing capability with the needs projected from anticipated biofuels production. Key findings include:  a potential shortfall in

  18. US DOE Refinery Water Study 01-19-16 PublicE_docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature and/or Reduced Water Availability Executive Summary of Final Report Prepared for US Department of Energy January 2016 For Jacobs Consultancy Laura E. Weaver Rob Henderson John Blieszner January 2016 Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature and/or Reduced Water Availability Prepared For US Department of Energy 525 West Monroe Chicago, Illinois 60661 Phone: +312.655.9207

  19. Analytical Tools to Predict Distribution Outage Restoration Load. Final Project Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, John

    1994-11-14

    The main activity of this project has been twofold: (1) development of a computer model to predict CLPU(Cold Load Pickup) and (2) development of a field measurement and analysis method to obtain the input parameters of the CLPU model. The field measurement and analysis method is called the Step-Voltage-Test (STEPV). The Kootenai Electric Cooperative Appleway 51 feeder in Coeur d`Alene was selected for analysis in this project and STEPV tests were performed in winters of 92 and 93. The STEPV data was analyzed (method and results presented within this report) to obtain the Appleway 51 feeder parameters for prediction by the CLPU model. One only CLPU record was obtained in winter 1994. Unfortunately, the actual CLPU was not dramatic (short outage and moderate temperature) and did not display cyclic restoration current. A predicted Appleway 51 feeder CLPU was generated using the parameters obtained via the STEPV measurement/analysis/algorithm method at the same ambient temperature and outage duration as the measured actual CLPU. The predicted CLPU corresponds reasonably well with the single actual CLPU data obtained in winter 1994 on the Appleway 51 feeder.

  20. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  1. Emission factors for leaks in refinery components in heavy liquid service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taback, H.; Godec, M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this program was to provide sufficient screening data so that EPA can develop an official set of emission factors (expressed in lb/hr/component) for refinery components (valves, flanged connectors, non-flanged connectors, pumps, open-ended lines, and other) in heavy liquid (BL) service. To accomplish this, 211,000 existing HL screening values from Southern California refineries were compiled and compared with 2,500 new HL screening measurements taken at two refineries in the state of Washington. Since Southern California is an area in extreme non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore has tight emission control regulations, it was felt that its screening data may not be representative of refineries without tight emission controls. Thus, the Southern California screening data were compared to screening measurements at refineries in an area that is in attainment of the NAAQS and without emissions control, which is the case for those refineries in Washington. It was found that statistically there was no significant difference in emission factors between the two areas and, therefore, there appears to be no difference in emissions from heavy liquid components in areas with and without leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. The new emission factors range from 1/7 to 1/3 times the current EPA emission factors. This program was sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and an API report will soon be released providing complete details.

  2. Intermediate future forecasting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gass, S.I.; Murphy, F.H.; Shaw, S.H.

    1983-12-01

    The purposes of the Symposium on the Department of Energy's Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) were: (1) to present to the energy community details of DOE's new energy market model IFFS; and (2) to have an open forum in which IFFS and its major elements could be reviewed and critiqued by external experts. DOE speakers discussed the total system, its software design, and the modeling aspects of oil and gas supply, refineries, electric utilities, coal, and the energy economy. Invited experts critiqued each of these topics and offered suggestions for modifications and improvement. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the Symposium. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  3. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H.

    2008-07-01

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Reducing Duration of Refueling Outage by Optimizing Core Design and Shuffling Sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakker, P.H.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Bloois, J.T. van; Sutton, W.R. III

    2005-07-15

    Reducing the duration of refueling outage is possible by optimizing the core design and the shuffling sequence. For both options software tools have been developed that have been applied to the three most recent cycles of the Borssele plant in the Netherlands. Applicability of the shuffling sequence optimization to boiling water reactors has been demonstrated by a comparison to a recent shuffle plan used in the Hatch plant located in the United States. Their uses have shown that both core design and shuffling sequence optimization can be exploited to reduce the time needed for reloading a core with an in-core shuffling scheme. Ex-core shuffling schemes for pressurized water reactors can still have substantial benefit from a core design using a minimized number of insert shuffles.

  5. Understanding the Benefits of Dispersed Grid-Connected Photovoltaics: From Avoiding the Next Major Outage to Taming Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letendre, Steven E.; Perez, Richard

    2006-07-15

    Thanks to new solar resource assessment techniques using cloud cover data available from geostationary satellites, it is apparent that grid-connected PV installations can serve to enhance electric grid reliability, preventing or hastening recovery from major power outages and serving to mitigate extreme price spikes in wholesale energy markets. (author)

  6. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  7. Table 5.9 Refinery Capacity and Utilization, 1949-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Refinery Capacity and Utilization, 1949-2011 Year Operable Refineries 1 Operable Refineries Capacity Gross Input to Distillation Units 3 Utilization 4 On January 1 Annual Average 2 Number Thousand Barrels per Calendar Day Thousand Barrels Percent 1949 336 6,231 NA 2,027,928 89.2 1950 320 6,223 NA 2,182,828 92.5 1951 325 6,702 NA 2,467,445 97.5 1952 327 7,161 NA 2,536,142 93.8 1953 315 7,620 NA 2,651,068 93.1 1954 308 7,984 NA 2,651,992 88.8 1955 296 8,386 NA 2,854,137 92.2 1956 317 8,583 NA

  8. Correcting systematic bias and instrument measurement drift with mzRefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, Bryson C.; Chambers, Matthew C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tabb, David L.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2015-12-01

    MOTIVATION: Systematic bias in mass measurement adversely affects data quality and negates the advantages of high precision instruments. RESULTS: We introduce the mzRefinery tool into the ProteoWizard package for calibration of mass spectrometry data files. Using confident peptide spectrum matches, three different calibration methods are explored and the optimal transform function is chosen. After calibration, systematic bias is removed and the mass measurement errors are centered at zero ppm. Because it is part of the ProteoWizard package, mzRefinery can read and write a wide variety of file formats. AVAILABILITY: The mzRefinery tool is part of msConvert, available with the ProteoWizard open source package at http://proteowizard.sourceforge.net/

  9. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 2. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 2 of the study.

  10. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 3. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 3 of the study.

  11. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 1 of the study.

  12. ,"U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",32,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","6/30/2016"

  13. ,"U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","6/30/2016" ,"Excel

  14. ,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","6/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. ,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","6/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  16. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ENVIRON International Corporation, in collaboration with Callidus Technologies by Honeywell and Shell Global Solutions, Inc., will develop and demonstrate a full-scale fuel blending and combustion system. This system will allow a broad range of opportunity fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas, to be safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria pollutants. The project will develop a commercial technology for application in refinery and chemical plant process heaters where opportunity fuels are used.

  17. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T.; Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.

    1992-12-31

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  18. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. ); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. )

    1992-01-01

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  19. Plant Outage Time Savings Provided by Subcritical Physics Testing at Vogtle Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cupp, Philip [Southern Nuclear Company (United States); Heibel, M.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The most recent core reload design verification physics testing done at Southern Nuclear Company's (SNC) Vogtle Unit 2, performed prior to initial power operations in operating cycle 12, was successfully completed while the reactor was at least 1% {delta}K/K subcritical. The testing program used was the first application of the Subcritical Physics Testing (SPT) program developed by the Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. The SPT program centers on the application of the Westinghouse Subcritical Rod Worth Measurement (SRWM) methodology that was developed in cooperation with the Vogtle Reactor Engineering staff. The SRWM methodology received U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval in August of 2005. The first application of the SPT program occurred at Vogtle Unit 2 in October of 2005. The results of the core design verification measurements obtained during the SPT program demonstrated excellent agreement with prediction, demonstrating that the predicted core characteristics were in excellent agreement with the actual operating characteristics of the core. This paper presents an overview of the SPT Program used at Vogtle Unit 2 during operating cycle 12, and a discussion of the critical path outage time savings the SPT program is capable of providing. (authors)

  20. Allocation of energy use in petroleum refineries to petroleum products : implications for life-cycle energy use and emission inventory of petroleum transportation fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Lee, H.; Molburg, J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products go through different processes within a refinery. Allocation at the subprocess level (i.e., the refining process level) instead of at the aggregate process level (i.e., the refinery level) is advocated by the International Standard Organization. In this study, we seek a means of allocating total refinery energy use among various refinery products at the level of individual refinery processes. We present a petroleum refinery-process-based approach to allocating energy use in a petroleum refinery to petroleum refinery products according to mass, energy content, and market value share of final and intermediate petroleum products as they flow through refining processes within a refinery. The results from this study reveal that product-specific energy use based on the refinery process-level allocation differs considerably from that based on the refinery-level allocation. We calculated well-to-pump total energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for gasoline, diesel, LPG, and naphtha with the refinery process-based allocation approach. For gasoline, the efficiency estimated from the refinery-level allocation underestimates gasoline energy use, relative to the process-level based gasoline efficiency. For diesel fuel, the well-to-pump energy use for the process-level allocations with the mass- and energy-content-based weighting factors is smaller than that predicted with the refinery-level allocations. However, the process-level allocation with the market-value-based weighting factors has results very close to those obtained by using the refinery-level allocations. For LPG, the refinery-level allocation significantly overestimates LPG energy use. For naphtha, the refinery-level allocation overestimates naphtha energy use. The GHG emission patterns for each of the fuels are similar to those of energy use.We presented a refining-process-level-based method that can be used to allocate energy use of individual refining processes to refinery products. The process-level-based method captures process-dependent characteristics of fuel production within a petroleum refinery. The method starts with the mass and energy flow chart of a refinery, tracks energy use by individual refining processes, and distributes energy use of a given refining process to products from the process. In allocating energy use to refinery products, the allocation method could rely on product mass, product energy contents, or product market values as weighting factors. While the mass- and energy-content-based allocation methods provide an engineering perspective of energy allocation within a refinery, the market-value-ased allocation method provides an economic perspective. The results from this study show that energy allocations at the aggregate refinery level and at the refining process level could make a difference in evaluating the energy use and emissions associated with individual petroleum products. Furthermore, for the refining-process-level allocation method, use of mass -- energy content- or market value share-based weighting factors could lead to different results for diesel fuels, LPG, and naphtha. We suggest that, when possible, energy use allocations should be made at the lowest subprocess level

  1. Improving energy usage at the Borger Refinery and NGL Process Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haage, P.R.

    1982-05-01

    The Phillips Petroleum Company's Borger Refinery and NGL Process Center energy conservation program began prior to the 1973 oil embargo and was greatly intensified after that event. This paper describes recent progress made in the reduction of energy use at the facility, with emphasis on the furnace and boiler efficiency control program, computer control of fractionation columns, and the steam-trap survey program.

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2014 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2014 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  3. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Ecuador). Refinery equipment, parts, and accessories, March 1991. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The petroleum sector in Ecuador brings in about 65 percent of the country's revenue. Three of the refineries are located in the coastal region. The other two, plus the Liquified Petroleum Gas Plant (LPG), are located in the Oriente region (Amazon jungle). The refineries operate at about 85% of their installation capacity. The Petroindustrial and Petropeninsula investment plan for 1991 comtemplates the expansion of the Esmeraldas refinery to 110,000 barrels a day, and the up-grading of the Shushufindi and Libertad refineries located near the city of Guayaquil. The United States is by far the largest supplier of refinery equipment, parts and accessories, controlling about 90% of the total market.

  4. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blunting the potential impacts of both planned and unplanned refinery outages. The economic downturn this year resulted in decreased petroleum demand and low refinery...

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10,243 11,231 12,001 12,021 8,782 13,405 12,734 14,373 14,999 14,661 1990's 14,973 18,055 16,732 16,724 8,935 7,568 9,354 9,746 10,900 6,781 2000's 8,684 13,085 3,817 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  6. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  7. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  8. LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

    1998-07-01

    A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

  9. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  10. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

  11. Evaluating electric-resistance-welded tubing for refinery and chemical plant applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C.J.; Hotaling, A.C. )

    1993-02-01

    A laboratory technique was developed to assess the potential for preferential attack along the longitudinal seam of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) carbon steel tubing exposed to refinery and chemical plant process streams. Used in conjunction with an evaluation of mill fabrication practices, the test procedure can identify high-quality ERW products that can be used in many applications in place of seamless components at significant cost savings.

  12. Renewable Fuels from Algae Boosted by NREL Refinery Process - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Renewable Fuels from Algae Boosted by NREL Refinery Process February 9, 2016 A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has proven to be significantly more effective at producing ethanol from algae than previous research. The process, dubbed Combined Algal Processing (CAP), is detailed in a new paper by NREL's Tao Dong, Eric Knoshaug, Ryan Davis, Lieve Laurens, Stefanie Van Wychen, Philip Pienkos, and Nick

  13. The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K.

    2008-10-15

    In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

  14. Who lives near coke plants and oil refineries An exploration of the environmental inequity hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, J.D.; Beaulieu, N.D.; Sussman, D.; Sadowitz, M.; Li, Y.C. )

    1999-04-01

    Facility-specific information on pollution was obtained for 36 coke plants and 46 oil refineries in the US and matched with information on populations surrounding these 82 facilities. These data were analyzed to determine whether environmental inequities were present, whether they were more economic or racial in nature, and whether the racial composition of nearby communities has changed significantly since plants began operations. The Census tracts near coke plants have a disproportionate share of poor and nonwhite residents. Multivariate analyses suggest that existing inequities are primarily economic in nature. The findings for oil refineries are not strongly supportive of the environmental inequity hypothesis. Rank ordering of facilities by race, poverty, and pollution produces limited (although not consistent) evidence that the more risky facilities tend to be operating in communities with above-median proportions of nonwhite residents (near coke plants) and Hispanic residents (near oil refineries). Over time, the radical makeup of many communities near facilities has changed significantly, particularly in the case of coke plants sited in the early 1900s. Further risk-oriented studies of multiple manufacturing facilities in various industrial sectors of the economy are recommended.

  15. ,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products",13,"Monthly","2/2016","1/15/1993" ,"Release

  16. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W.

    2012-05-15

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  17. Refinery Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Define and use models (HCK PNNL primary focus; FCC NREL primary focus) to collect sustainability metrics (e.g. GHG emissions, net fossil energy consumption) that are relevant to ...

  18. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

  19. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

  20. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

  1. Energy for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy for the Future

  2. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two different co-processed fuel oils were tested: one that had been partially hydrotreated, and the other a product of fractionation before hydrotreating. Task 5 focused on examining refining methods that would utilize coal and produce thermally stable jet fuel, included delayed coking and solvent extraction. Delayed coking was done on blends of decant oil and coal, with the goal to produce a premium carbon product and liquid fuels. Coking was done on bench scale and large laboratory scale cokers. Two coals were examined for co-coking, using Pittsburgh seam coal and Marfork coal product. Reactions in the large, laboratory scaled coker were reproducible in yields of products and in quality of products. While the co-coke produced from both coals was of sponge coke quality, minerals left in the coke made it unacceptable for use as anode or graphite grade filler.

  3. Fuels and energy for the future: The role of catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R.; Nielsen, R.

    2004-07-01

    There are many reasons to decrease the dependency on oil and to increase the use of other energy sources than fossil fuels. The wish for energy security is balanced by a wish for sustainable growth. Catalysis plays an important role in creating new routes and flexibility in the network of energy sources, energy carriers, and energy conversion. The process technologies resemble those applied in the large scale manufacture of commodities. This is illustrated by examples from refinery fuels, synfuels, and hydrogen and the future role of fossil fuels is discussed.

  4. The impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposures at nuclear power plants: Case study, PWR (pressurized-water reactor) during an outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    This report is the second in a series of case studies designed to evaluate the magnitude of increase in occupational radiation exposures at commercial US nuclear power plants resulting from small incidents or abnormal events. The event evaluated is fuel cladding failure, which can result in elevated primary coolant activity and increased radiation exposure rates within a plant. For this case study, radiation measurements were made at a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) during a maintenance and refueling outage. The PWR had been operating for 22 months with fuel cladding failure characterized as 105 pin-hole leakers, the equivalent of 0.21% failed fuel. Gamma spectroscopy measurements, radiation exposure rate determinations, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) assessments, and air sample analyses were made in the plant's radwaste, pipe penetration, and containment buildings. Based on the data collected, evaluations indicate that the relative contributions of activation products and fission products to the total exposure rates were constant over the duration of the outage. This constancy is due to the significant contribution from the longer-lived isotopes of cesium (a fission product) and cobalt (an activation product). For this reason, fuel cladding failure events remain as significant to occupational radiation exposure during an outage as during routine operations. As documented in the previous case study (NUREG/CR-4485 Vol. 1), fuel cladding failure events increased radiation exposure rates an estimated 540% at some locations of the plant during routine operations. Consequently, such events can result in significantly greater radiation exposure rates in many areas of the plant during the maintenance and refueling outages than would have been present under normal fuel conditions.

  5. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  6. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2008-03-15

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Proposed Plan for the R-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pits (643-8G, -9G, -10G) and R-Area Unknown Pits No.1, No.2, No.3 (RUNK-1, -2, -3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundy, S.

    2002-07-31

    The purpose of this proposed plan is to describe the preferred remedial alternative for the R-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pits (R BPOPs) and the R-Area Unknowns (RUNKs) operable unit (OU) and to provide for public involvement in the decision-making process.

  8. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    with oil wells, effectively stopping crude oil production in certain offshore areas. Electricity outages at ports, refineries, along pipelines, or at terminals can stop the...

  9. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    North America and Saudi Arabia, seasonally lower demand in October due to refinery maintenance, outages, and slower global economic growth. In its November Short-Term Energy...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have tightened over the last several weeks is the reduction in gasoline production stemming from refinery maintenance and unplanned outages. Crude oil inputs have started to...

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    seasons that were routinely plagued with holiday price spikes andor elevated prices stemming from infrastructure problems, such as occasional refinery outages. Between Memorial...

  12. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 38 million barrels at its peak in August. While low refinery utilization rates stemming from outages and fall maintenance have combined with low light product imports to...

  13. Carbon Capture and Sequestration (via Enhanced Oil Recovery) from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart Mehlman

    2010-06-16

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE’s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  14. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

  15. Assessment of the potential for refinery applications of inorganic membrane technology: An identification and screening analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, H.E.; Schulman, B.L.

    1993-05-01

    Commercial application of membrane technology in the separation of gas, liquid, and solid streams has grown to a business with worldwide revenues exceeding $1 billion annually. Use of organic membranes for industrial gas separation, particularly in the refining industry, is one of the major growth areas. However, organic membranes based on polymeric separation barriers, are susceptible to damage by liquids, and careful precautions must be taken to retain the system integrity. Researchers are currently developing small pore sized inorganic membranes which may substantially increase the efficiency and economics in selected refinery separation applications. Expected advantages of these advanced inorganic membranes include high permeability, high selectivity, and low manufacturing cost. SFA Pacific conducted a screening analysis to identify applications for inorganic membrane technology in the petroleum refining industry and their potential cost advantages over competing separation systems. Two meetings were held in connection with this project. Copies of Viewgraphs presented by SFA Pacific at these meetings are attached in Appendices A and C. Potential high priority applications and market impacts of advanced inorganic membrane technology in the refining industry are addressed in this report, and include the following areas: Competitive separation technologies; application of those technologies; incentives for inorganic membranes; market benefits and impacts of inorganic membranes.

  16. Influence of a combustion-driven oscillation on global mixing in the flame from a refinery flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langman, A.S.; Nathan, G.J.

    2011-01-15

    An assessment of the influence of strong combustion-driven oscillations on mixing rates and visible radiation in the flame from a full-scale refinery flare is reported. Importantly, the oscillations were generated naturally, with no external forcing, and at a high Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6}. These conditions differentiate this study from those of previous investigations, which all involved some external forcing and were at a Re too low to ensure fully turbulent flow within the flame. A frame-by-frame analysis of video footage, providing good resolution of the instantaneous edge of each flame, was used to assess flame dimensions, and so to determine a global residence time. Since the flames are in the fast-chemistry regime, the visual imagers can be used to determine a global mixing rate. The analysis reveals a consistent picture that the combustion-driven oscillations do not result in a significant change to the global mixing rate, but do increase the visible radiation. This is in contrast to previous investigations, using externally forced jets, where forcing at the preferred mode has been found to increase mixing rates and reduce radiation. (author)

  17. Strategic planning for and implementation of reclaimed municipal waste water as make-up to a refinery cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, W.R.; Mazur, J.J.; Rao, N.M.

    1996-08-01

    This paper discusses the successful use of treated municipal plant waste water effluent (Title 22) in a refinery cooling water system. Conversion from well water to this make-up water source was preceded by developing a carefully crafted transition plan. Steps were taken to identify key system performance indicators, establish desired performance goals, and implement stringent monitoring and control protocols. In addition, all possible contingencies were considered and solutions developed. Treating Title 22 waters is very challenging and entails risks not associated with normal makeup waters. Several novel on-line monitoring and control tools are available which help minimize these risks while enhancing tower operation. Performance monitoring of critical system parameters is essential in order to provide early warning of problems so that corrective measures can be implemented. In addition, a high level of system automation enhances reliable operation. Corrosion, scaling and microbiological performance of the system with Title 22 water is discussed in comparison to previous well water make-up.

  18. FutureGen.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erik Turner Summer 2004 Technical Career Intern Program The Pennsylvania State University FutureGen And the importance of project management Outline * FutureGen technologies * ...

  19. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through...

  20. OSCARS-Future-Tech

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers...

  1. Nuclear and Particle Futures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear and Particle Futures Nuclear and Particle Futures The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar ...

  2. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  3. Chevron: Refinery Identifies $4.4 Million in Annual Savings by Using Process Simulation Models to Perform Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-05-01

    In an energy-efficiency study at its refinery near Salt Lake City, Utah, Chevron focused on light hydrocarbons processing. The company found it could recover hydrocarbons from its fuel gas system and sell them. By using process simulation models of special distillation columns and associated reboilers and condensers, Chevron could predict the performance of potential equipment configuration changes and process modifications. More than 25,000 MMBtu in natural gas could be saved annually if a debutanizer upgrade project and a new saturated gas plant project were completed. Together, these projects would save $4.4 million annually.

  4. Conceptual design assessment for the co-firing of bio-refinery supplied lignin project. Quarterly report, June 23--July 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglund, T.; Ranney, J.T.; Babb, C.L.

    2000-07-27

    The Conceptual Design Assessment for the Co-Firing of Bio-Refinery Supplied Lignin Project was successfully kicked off on July 23, 2000 during a meeting at the TVA-PPI facility in Muscle Shoals, AL. An initial timeline for the study was distributed, issues of concern were identified and a priority actions list was developed. Next steps include meeting with NETL to discuss de-watering and lignin fuel testing, the development of the mass balance model and ethanol facility design criteria, providing TVA-Colbert with preliminary lignin fuel analysis and the procurement of representative feed materials for the pilot and bench scale testing of the hydrolysis process.

  5. Planning for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesh, Pamela

    2009-06-15

    Four changes to integrated resource planning could significantly improve alignment between future utility spending and the forces and changes that are upending past preconceptions of how to predict future load. (author)

  6. Keck Futures Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Complex Systems Conference, November 12 - 15, 2008 Challa Kumar(second from left) was invited to attend 1st National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Complex Systems Conference

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  11. Create a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Image of river edge with text overlay of 'How does LANL accomplish future stewardship of the natural and historical resources?' We sample to detect any...

  12. Create a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Image of river edge with text overlay of 'How does LANL accomplish future stewardship of the natural and historical resources?' We sample to detect any release of materials to the environment. We manage environmental concerns by eco region. We evaluate our impact on the environment. We consult with experts and stakeholders. We fund projects that reduce environmental effects. Create a Sustainable Future Home Planning for Years to Come Living a Sustainable Future

  13. U.S. Refinery

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 354,511 354,703 353,837 349,090 356,014 363,339 1993-2016 Crude Oil 102,678 105,923 101,530 100,805 101,947 108,660 1981-2016 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 251,833 248,780 252,307 248,285 254,067 254,679 1993-2016 Pentanes Plus 778 711 1,018 718 571 835 1993-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 18,650 18,308 16,631 14,329 12,498 11,825 1993-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 190 215 135 86 94 78 1993-2016 Propane/Propylene 4,567 4,837 5,033 4,107 3,074 2,847 1993-2016 Normal

  14. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity Report June 2015 With Data as of January 1, 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be

  15. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2015 Calendar Day Barrels per CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Calendar Day Barrels per Companies with Capacity Over 100,000 bbl/cd .............................................................................................................................. VALERO ENERGY CORP 1,964,300 Valero Refining Co Texas LP

  16. U.S. Refinery

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 339,907 336,327 341,211 326,400 343,792 349,090 1993-2015 Crude Oil 88,982 90,640 88,781 85,114 95,794 100,805 1981-2015 All Oils (Excluding Crude ...

  17. The ultimate biomass refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bungay, H.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Bits and pieces of refining schemes and both old and new technology have been integrated into a complete biomass harvesting, processing, waste recycle, and marketing complex. These choices are justified with economic estimates and technology assessments.

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... PAD District V 6 6 0 389,980 295,034 94,946 419,700 323,700 96,000 ......605,600 2,510,400 96,000 PAD District V 31,500 0 0 0 12,500 14,200 24,500 0 ...

  19. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    process to validate respondent control information and resolve any discrepancies. ... Quality control procedures are employed in the collection and editing operations to ...

  20. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition The New Mexico Regional Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to...

  1. Energy for our Future

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... gallons of diesel per year "Stronger Together for the Next 100 Years" Looking into The Future... (Traditional Athabascan Solar Array?) "Stronger Together for the Next 100 Years"

  2. My Amazing Future 2012

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

  3. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  4. Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session IA—Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Growing the Future Bioeconomy Joel Velasco, Senior Vice President, Amyris, Inc

  5. The Hanford Story: Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Future Chapter of the Hanford Story illustrates the potential and possibilities offered by a post-cleanup Hanford. From land use plans and preservation at Hanford to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic, cultural and environmental perspectives.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  12. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakle, J.; Darby, J.; Whitehead, D.; Staple, B.

    1994-06-01

    This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

  13. Future Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Physics March 5, 2009 In late January, we held a meeting of our Physics Advisory Committee, PAC34 to be precise. We had two primary goals for the PAC, one related to the ...

  14. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  15. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition The New Mexico Regional Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to create a vision for the future. Exercising your imagination and sharing your ideas are not only fun but essential for ensuring sustainable growth for our communities. Students work as a team with an educator and engineer mentor to plan cities using SimCity(tm) software: research and write solutions to an engineering

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  17. Future of Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation In the coming decades, transportation in the U.S. is expected to change radically in response to environmental constraints, fluctuating oil availability and economic factors. Future Decision-Makers The transportation systems that emerge in the 21 st century will be defined largely by the choices, skills and imaginations of today's youth. Future Workforce As scientists and engineers, they will develop new vehicle and fuel technologies. As citizens, they will make decisions

  18. Full-scale demonstration of low-NO{sub x} cell{trademark} burner retrofit: Addendum to long-term testing report, September 1994 outage: Examination of corrosion test panel and UT survey in DP&L Unit {number_sign}4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, S.C.; Kleisley, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    As part of this DOE`s demonstration program, a corrosion test panel was installed on the west sidewall of Dayton Power & Light Unit no.4 at the J. M. Stuart Station (JMSS4) during the burner retrofit outage in November 1991. The test panel consisted of four sections of commercial coatings separated by bare SA213-T2 tubing. During the retrofit outage, a UT survey was performed to document the baseline wall thicknesses of the test panel, as well as several furnace wall areas outside the test panel. The purpose of the UT survey was to generate the baseline data so that the corrosion wastage associated with the operation of Low NO{sub x} Cell Burners (LNCB{trademark} burner) could be quantitatively determined. The corrosion test panel in JMSS4 was examined in April 1993 after the first 15-month operation of the LNCB{trademark} burners. Details of the corrosion analysis and UT data were documented in the Long-Term Testing Report. The second JMSS4 outage following the LNCB{trademark} burner retrofit took place in September 1944. Up to this point, the test panel in JMSS4 had been exposed to the corrosive combustion environment for approximately 31 months under normal boiler operation of JMSS4. This test period excluded the down time for the April 1993 outage. During the September 1994 outage, 70 tube samples of approximately one-foot length were cut from the bottom of the test panel. These samples were evaluated by the Alliance Research Center of B&W using the same metallurgical techniques as those employed for the previous outage. In addition, UT measurements were taken on the same locations of the lower furnace walls in JMSS4 as those during the prior outages. Results of the metallurgical analyses and UT surveys from different exposure times were compared, and the long-term performance of waterwall materials was analyzed. The corrosion data obtained from the long-term field study at JMSS4 after 32 months of LNCB{trademark} burner operation are summarized in this report.

  19. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  20. DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckman, Todd J.; Hertzel, Ali K.; Lane, James J.

    2013-11-07

    In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, located in Washington State, funded an update to the critical network infrastructure supporting the Hanford Federal Cloud (HFC). The project, called ET-50, was the final step in a plan that was initiated five years ago called "Hanford's IT Vision, 2015 and Beyond." The ET-50 project upgraded Hanford's core data center switches and routers along with a majority of the distribution layer switches. The upgrades allowed HFC the network intelligence to provide Hanford with a more reliable and resilient network architecture. The culmination of the five year plan improved network intelligence and high performance computing as well as helped to provide 10 Gbps capable links between core backbone devices (10 times the previous bandwidth). These improvements allow Hanford the ability to further support bandwidth intense applications, such as video teleconferencing. The ET-50 switch upgrade, along with other upgrades implemented from the five year plan, have prepared Hanford's network for the next evolution of technology in voice, video, and data. Hand-in-hand with ET-50's major data center outage, Mission Support Alliance's (MSA) Information Management (IM) organization executed a disaster recovery (DR) exercise to perform a true integration test and capability study. The DR scope was planned within the constraints of ET-50's 14 hour datacenter outage window. This DR exercise tested Hanford's Continuity of Operations (COOP) capability and failover plans for safety and business critical Hanford Federal Cloud applications. The planned suite of services to be tested was identified prior to the outage and plans were prepared to test the services ability to failover from the primary Hanford data center to the backup data center. The services tested were: Core Network (backbone, firewall, load balancers); Voicemail; Voice over IP (VoIP); Emergency Notification; Virtual desktops; and, Select set of production applications and data. The primary objective of the exercise was to test COOP around the emergency operations at Hanford to provide information on capabilities and dependencies of the current system to insure improved focus of emergency, safety and security capacity in a disaster situation. The integration of the DR test into the ET-50 project allowed the testing of COOP at Hanford and allowed the lessons learned to be defined. These lessons learned have helped improve the understanding of Hanford's COOP capabilities and will be critical for future planning. With the completion of the Hanford Federal Cloud network upgrades and the disaster recovery exercise, the MSA has a clearer path forward for future technology implementations as well as network improvements to help shape the usability and reliability of the Hanford network in support of the cleanup mission.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  2. Energy futures-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the Symposium on Energy Futures II. Topics covered include: The National Energy Strategy; The Gas and petroleum industry; energy use in the paper industry; solar energy technology; hydroelectric power; biomass/waste utilization; engine emissions testing laboratories; integrated coal gassification-combined-cycle power plants.

  3. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments ...

  4. Espanola Incubator Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the current and future state of the electrical power system, we can now discuss some of the ... the geographic extent of outages. * Improving the recovery time from outages. ...

  5. RHIC progress and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.

    2009-05-04

    The talk reviews RHIC performance, including unprecedented manipulations of polarized beams and recent low energy operations. Achievements and limiting factors of RHIC operation are discussed, such as intrabeam scattering, electron cloud, beam-beam effects, magnet vibrations, and the efficiency of novel countermeasures such as bunched beam stochastic cooling, beam scrubbing and chamber coatings. Future upgrade plans and the pertinent R&D program will also be presented.

  6. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    if they are used to replace lost production from refinery outages. Given the planned nature of the work, its price impact may be limited. But the region bears watching as planned...

  7. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    outage and was forced to reduce production. The BP Whiting refinery has a crude oil distillation unit (CDU) capacity of 413,500 barrels per calendar day (bd), and it is an...

  8. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    refinery. The outage at Whiting, caused by leaks within the larger of two crude distillation units, has since ended, and PADD 2 retail gasoline prices fell to 2.28gal on...

  9. Insights into Spring 2008 Gasoline Prices

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Gasoline prices rose rapidly in spring 2007 due a variety of factors, including refinery outages and lower than expected imports. This report explores those factors and looks at the implications for 2008.

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, D.; Darby, J.; Yakle, J.

    1994-06-01

    This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

  11. Future water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergevin, Marc

    2015-05-15

    In these proceedings a review of the current proposed large-scale Warer Cherenkov experiments is given. An argument is made that future water Cherenkov detectors would benefit in the investment in neutron detection technology. A brief overview will be given of proposed water Cherenkov experiments such as HYPER-K and MEMPHYS and other R and D experiments to demonstrate neutron capture in water Cherenkov detectors. Finally, innovation developed in the context of the now defunct LBNE Water R and D option to improve Water Cherenkov technology will be described.

  12. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-08-12

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  13. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  14. Future Communications Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Communications Needs Future Communications Needs Chart of Oncor Electric Delivery's Future Communications Needs PDF icon Future Communications Needs More Documents & ...

  15. New Mexico Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico Future City Competition New Mexico Future City Competition WHEN: Jan 24, 2015 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM WHERE: National Museum of Nuclear Science and History 601 Eubank,...

  16. Future Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Use Future Use Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their future use vision. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their future use vision. Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their

  17. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  18. The future of methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L.; Forester, J.; Johnson, J.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

  20. FutureGen: Stepping-Stone to Sustainable Fossil-Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2006-11-01

    This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's FutureGen Initiative. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project is a stepping-stone toward future coal-fired power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. The initiative is a response to a presidential directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. The FutureGen plant will be based on cutting-edge power generation technology as well as advanced carbon capture and sequestration systems. The centerpiece of the project will be coal gasification technology that can eliminate common air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides and convert them to useable by-products. Gasification will convert coal into a highly enriched hydrogen gas, which can be burned much more cleanly than directly burning the coal itself. Alternatively, the hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell to produce ultra-clean electricity, or fed to a refinery to help upgrade petroleum products. Carbon sequestration will also be a key feature that will set the Futuregen plant apart from other electric power plant projects. The initial goal will be to capture 90 percent of the plant's carbon dioxide, but capture of nearly 100 percent may be possible with advanced technologies. Once captured, the carbon dioxide will be injected as a compressed fluid deep underground, perhaps into saline reservoirs. It could even be injected into oil or gas reservoirs, or into unmineable coal seams, to enhance petroleum or coalbed methane recovery. The ultimate goal for the FutureGen plant is to show how new technology can eliminate environmental concerns over the future use of coal--the most abundant fossil fuel in the United States with supplies projected to last 250 years. FutureGen's co-production of power and hydrogen will also serve as a stepping-stone to an environmentally sustainable energy future.

  1. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  2. This document is to provide input for a probable future state...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... With SAIDI and SAIFI (outage duration and frequency indices) increasing 3-4% per year, ... Scenario Reliability continues to worsen; SAIFI at 1.7 and SAIDI above 200 minutesyr. ...

  3. Track NERSC Outages in Google Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracey A. LeBeau About Us Tracey A. LeBeau - Former Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs Tracey A. LeBeau Tracey A. LeBeau (Cheyenne River Sioux) is the Former Director for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs. She was appointed in January 2011 to establish this new Office which is authorized by statute to manage, coordinate, create and facilitate programs and initiatives to encourage tribal energy and energy infrastructure development.

  4. August 14, 2003 Power Outages … Announcement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a thorough investigation into this event in conjunction with the regional reliability councils and their member utilities, and in coordination with federal, state, and ...

  5. Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey of Remediation at Building 31, Former Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawanda, New York (LI001V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, S.P.; Uziel, M.S.

    1998-11-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Progmq a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological veriihtion survey of Building 31 at the former Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawau& New York. The purpose of the survey was to ver@ that remedial action completed by the project management contractor had reduced contamination levels to within authorized limits. Prior to remediatioq tied radioactive material was prevalent throughout the building and in some of the ductwork Decontaminadon consisted of removing surfhce contamination from floors, baseboards, and overhead areas; removing some air ducts; and vacuuming dust. Building 31 at the former Linde site in TonawandA New Yorlq was thoroughly investigated inside and outside for radionuclide residues. The verification team discovered previously undetected contaminadon beneath the concrete pad on the first floor and underneath floor tiles on the second floor. All suspect floor tiles were removed and any contamination beneath them cleaned to below guideline levels. The verification team also discovered elevated radiation levels associated with overhead air lines that led to the eventual removal of the entire air lige and a complete investigation of the history of all process piping in the building. Final verification surveys showed that residual surface beta-gamma activity levels were slightly elevated in some places but below U.S. Department of Energy applicable guidelines for protection against radiation (Table 1). Similarly, removable radioactive contamination was also below applicable guidelines. Exposure rates within the building were at typical background levels, and no consistently elevated indoor radon concentrations were measured. However, radionuclide analysis of subsurface soil from beneath the concrete floor on the ground level showed concentrations of `*U and'% that exceeded applicable guidelines. At the time of this survey, there was no measured exposure pathway for this subslab contamination under current use scenarios, and there was low risk associated with this contaminadon if the conaete slab is not cracked or penetrated. However, any penetration of the concrete slab caused by renovations, repairs, demolitio% or a naturally-occurring craclq would require further investigation and evaluation. Analysis of the project management contractor's post-remedial action data and results of this independent radiological vaification survey by ORNL confirm that all radiological measurements inside the building, on the exterior walls, and on the roof are below the limits prescribed by applicable guidelines for protection against radiation.

  6. Biomass 2009: Fueling Our Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We would like to thank everyone who attended Biomass 2009: Fueling Our Future, including the speakers, moderators, sponsors, and exhibitors who helped make the conference a great success.

  7. The Future of Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab scientist Haimei Zheng discusses the future of electron microscopy and her breakthrough research into examining liquids using an electron microscope.

  8. GDF Future Energies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Future Energies Jump to: navigation, search Name: GDF Future Energies Place: France Product: Clean energy subsidiary of Gaz de France. References: GDF Future Energies1 This...

  9. U.S. Refinery Stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area: U.S. PADD 1 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 PADD 2 Ind., Ill. and Ky. Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. Okla., Kans., Mo. PADD 3 Texas Inland Texas Gulf Coast La. Gulf Coast N. La., Ark New Mexico PADD 4 PADD 5 Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum

  10. PSM implementation at a refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahale, T.

    1995-12-31

    Prior to the promulgation of the OSHA Standard on Process Safety Management (PSM), the petroleum industry had a precursor developed by the American Petroleum Institute titled Recommended Practice 750, Management of Process Hazards. This Recommended Practice, though not identical with the OSHA regulation, provided the industry with a voluntary standard prior to May, 1992, when PSM went into effect. In formulating a PSM implementation strategy, one of the first decisions encountered at a facility is whether to utilize a separate group dedicated full-time to PSM issues, or to develop the program using key individuals who continue to perform their regulator job duties. Although a PSM manager may prefer one strategy over the other, this staffing decisions is normally made by senior management at the facility.

  11. U.S. Refinery Yield

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Special Naphthas 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 1993-2015 Lubricants 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 1993-2015 Waxes 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 1993-2015 Petroleum Coke 5.3 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.3 ...

  12. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (BSD) ...

  13. Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2010-05-29

    Pre-extraction–kraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called “near neutral” pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 °C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the “near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the “near-neutral” green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid from the extract. When operating the facility will produce 1.5 million gallons per year of butanol and create 16 new “green collar” jobs. Previously, a spare pulp digester was converted to a new extractor, and in 2009 it was demonstrated that a good hemicellulose extract could be produced, while simultaneously producing market pulp. Since then more than 250 hours of operational experience has been acquired by the mill generating a hemicellulose extract while simultaneously producing market pulp at a scale of 1000 tonnes (OD)/day of mixed northern hardwood chips.

  14. Vehicular fuels and additives for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Interest in automotive fuel is resurging. Automobile fuels must increasingly deal with clean air regulations and ozone problems. Furthermore, feedstocks become heavier,as refinery production changes, as more unleaded is produced, and as an increasing number of pollution regulations must be satisfied greater attention will be paid to better mixtures, solvents, additives, and neat methanol. BCC report analyzes developments technologies, markets, players and the political/regulations aspects of this important market. Study also assesses the advantages and drawbacks of methanol, ethanol, MTBE and other additives which have their place as octane enhancers and fuel substitutes-all now deeply involved in the gasoline modification battle. Other issues addressed are subsidies, farm lobbying, imports, pricing, economics, Detroit's response, neat fuel testing projects, volatility problems vs. fewer ozone-forming hydrocarbon species, and emission ratings.

  15. Section 25: Future State Assumptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future State Assumptions (40 CFR § 194.25) United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Future State Assumptions (40 CFR § 194.25) Table of Contents 25.0 Future State Assumptions (40 CFR § 194.25) 25.1 Requirements 25.2 Background 25.3 1998 Certification Decision 25.4 Changes in the CRA-2004 25.5 EPA's Evaluation of Compliance for the 2004 Recertification 25.5.1 40 CFR § 194.25(a) 25.5.2

  16. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powertrain Trends and Future Potential * Global Trends - Fighting Global Warming * Clean Diesel - Neglected in the U.S. for Too Long Agenda DSNE-NA | August 4, 2009 | Robert ...

  17. The Future of Home Heating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lowest oil for oil replacement cost Ideal for high bio fraction future Best for existing oil customer value Advanced Liquid Fuel PM 2.5 emissions same as ULS CO2e emissions same as ...

  18. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-02

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  19. Energy and Infrastructure Future Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rush Robinett Energy &Infrastructure Future Group Sandia National Laboratories rdrobin@sandia.gov Energy & Infrastructure Future Overview 2 Sandia's Core Purpose "Helping our Nation Secure a Peaceful and Free World through Technology" * National Security Laboratory * Broad mission in developing science and technology applications to meet our rapidly changing, complex national security challenges * Safety, security and reliability of our nation's nuclear weapon stockpile 3

  20. FutureGen Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for dry-fed gasifier configuration • Full capital cost report and cost category analysis (CAPEX) • Full operating cost report and assumptions (OPEX) Comparative technology evaluations, value engineering exercises, and initial air permitting activities are also provided; the report concludes with schedule, risk, and cost mitigation activities as well as lessons learned such that the products of this report can be used to support future investments in utility scale gasification and carbon capture and sequestration. Collectively, the FutureGen project enabled the comprehensive site specific evaluation and determination of the economic viability of IGCC-CCS. The project report is bound at that determination when DOE formally proposed the FutureGen 2.0 project which focuses on repowering a pulverized coal power plant with oxy-combustion technology including CCS.

  1. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments along a half-kilometer route that tell a complex story about the gradual desiccation of the Red Planet. September 26, 2013 This image shows two areas on Mars in a location named Rocknest that were scooped out by the Curiosity Rover last year. Researchers took samples of the areas to determine whether they were wetter

  2. Problems of future energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaya, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the key issues in the present energy system and to discuss possible future visions of the system. The first part of this paper deals with the progress in energy conservation since the oil embargo in 1973. Assuming the prospect that the petroleum supply will peak within this century and then will go down, and that the limit of energy conservation of the present energy systems will be achieved during the same period, the possible and desirable image is discussed of the future energy system. 5 refs.

  3. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    093015 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 2.62 2.62 2.60 2.66 2.57 1997-2015 Futures Prices Contract 1 2.569 2.591 2.564 2.563 2.586 2.524 1994-2015 Contract 2 2.638 2.674 2.631...

  4. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 2.84 2.77 2.66 2.34 2.09 1.93 1997-2015 NGPL Composite 4.73 4.42 4.89 4.95 2009-2015 Futures Prices...

  5. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energys (DOEs) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentuckys most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealths economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentuckys electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  6. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    051016 051116 051216 051316 051616 051716 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 2.01 2.01 2.01 1.96 1.91 1997-2016 Futures Prices Contract 1 2.158 2.173 2.155 2.096 2.029 ...

  7. Future Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Solutions Place: Didcot, United Kingdom Zip: OX11 0QR Product: Future Energy Solutions is a sustainable energy...

  8. Future Energy Assets LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assets LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Assets LP Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Product: String representation "Future Energy A ... S and in China." is too...

  9. Hydrogen & Our Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Future Hydrogen & Our Energy Future DOE overview of hydrogen fuel initiative and hydrogen production, delivery and storate hydrogenenergyfutureweb.pdf More Documents &...

  10. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in ...

  11. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transportation Energy Futures ...

  12. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Authors: Brady, Patrick V....

  13. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 2.75 2.69 2.69 2.70 2.70 2.61 1997-2015 Futures Prices Contract 1 2.72 2.68 2.68 2.68 2.68 2.57 1994-2015 Contract 2 2.75 2.70 2.76 2.76 2.75...

  14. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.75 3.73 1997-2013 NGPL Composite 8.99 11.83 15.12 10.98 9.94 9.56 2007-2014 Futures Prices Contract 1 4.159 4.382 4.03 2.83 3.73 1994-2013 Contract 2 4.428 4.471 4.09 2.93 3.77...

  15. Choices for a Brighter Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Choices for a Brighter Future For more information contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 e:mail: George Douglas Golden, Colo., Nov. 12, 1999 - More and more Americans are getting the power to choose electricity suppliers as the utility industry is deregulated and reorganized. Those energy choices can affect health and well-being for many decades to come. Renewable energy sources—solar, wind, biomass, geothermal and hydropower—can provide reliable electricity while reducing environmental

  16. Future City The Right Stuff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City The Right Stuff NvE steps up for future technology. Marty Glasser takes over the security force. NSTec's Intellectual Property getting kudos. See page 6. See pages 4. New NNSS Weather Website Puts Site Conditions Center Stage On Jan. 7, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) weather organization, ARL/SORD, launched its new website, www.sord.nv.doe.gov. ARL/SORD is a Department of Commerce organization under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Office of Oceanic and

  17. Drivers of Future Energy Demand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Drivers of Future Energy Demand in China Asian Energy Demand Outlook 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 Valerie J. Karplus MIT Sloan School of Management 2 www.china.org.cn www.flickr.com www.wikimedia.org globalchange.mit.edu Global Climate Change Human Development Local Pollution Industrial Development & Resource Needs How to balance? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 1981 1991 2001 2011 Non-material Sectors/Other Construction Commercial consumption Residential consumption

  18. Status and Future of TRANSCOM | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Future of TRANSCOM Status and Future of TRANSCOM Current Program Status Upcoming Changes Glimpse at Future Options DOE Commitments PDF icon Status and Future of TRANSCOM More...

  19. Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer Future Power Systems 21 - The Smart Customer: From Future Power Systems (FPS) articles 18...

  20. Coal: Energy for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  1. Toward an energy surety future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III

    2005-10-01

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  2. Noncommercial Trading in the Energy Futures Market

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    How do futures markets affect spot market prices? This is one of the most pervasive questions surrounding futures markets, and it has been analyzed in numerous ways for many commodities.

  3. Science and Our Future | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Our Future Science and Our Future March 3, 2013 Yesterday morning, it was my pleasure to give a welcome to the 2013 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl. As you know, we ...

  4. Keynote Address: Future Vision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Future Vision Keynote Address: Future Vision May 20, 2014 1:00PM to 1:30PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Tuesday's keynote address by Raffi Garabedian, Chief Technology Officer, First Solar

  5. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 4.37 4.0 2.75 3.73 4.37 2.62 1997-2015 NGPL Composite 11.83 15.12 10.98 9.94 9.56 4.97 2007-2015 Futures Prices Contract 1 4.382 4.03 2.83 3.73 4.262 2.627 1994-2015 Contract 2 4.471 4.09 2.93 3.77 4.236 2.684 1994-2015 Contract 3 4.564 4.16 3.02 3.82 4.227 2.739 1994-2015 Contract 4 4.658 4.23 3.11 3.85 4.218 2.792 1993-2015

  6. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 2.09 1.93 2.28 1.99 1.73 1.92 1997-2016 NGPL Composite 4.72 4.23 3.69 3.89 2009-2016 Futures Prices Contract 1 2.28 2.04 2.23 1.93 1.81 2.01 1994-2016 Contract 2 2.43 2.10 2.24 2.0 1.91 2.12 1994-2016 Contract 3 2.46 2.16 2.30 2.07 2.01 2.23 1994-2016 Contract 4 2.47 2.22 2.35 2.13 2.11 2.29

  7. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    04/15/16 04/22/16 04/29/16 05/06/16 05/13/16 05/20/16 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 1.90 1.90 1.92 1.96 2.0 1.89 1997-2016 Futures Prices Contract 1 1.96 2.06 2.07 2.09 2.14 2.04 1994-2016 Contract 2 2.05 2.18 2.21 2.25 2.27 2.18 1994-2016 Contract 3 2.15 2.29 2.34 2.34 2.35 2.25 1994-2016 Contract 4 2.22 2.35 2.40 2.39 2.38 2.30

  8. Hanford Story: Future - Questions - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Hanford Story Hanford Story: Future - Questions The Hanford Story Hanford Story: Future - Questions Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size What possibilities do you see for future uses of the Hanford Site? What potential uses do the community surrounding Hanford envision for areas of land on the site? Why is land on the Hanford Site important to the local tribes? How much of the site is potentially available for future uses? What were some of the

  9. The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Bioenergy Technologies Office background Feedstock assessment, production and logistics Biomass yield improvements Sustainable feedstock production Future...

  10. Portsmouth Future Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Use Portsmouth Future Use Portsmouth Site current state Portsmouth Site current state Portsmouth Site future conceptual illustration Portsmouth Site future conceptual illustration Integrated Approach Through a multifaceted community outreach program at Portsmouth, DOE worked diligently with stakeholders to understand the community's end-state vision for the Portsmouth site. With the assistance of the PORTSFuture Project and interaction with the Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board,

  11. European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    A workshop to discuss the possibilities for future neutrino investigations in Europe and the links to CERN.

  12. National Engineers Week: Future City Competition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    2011 Future Cities Competition inspires students all across South Carolina to pursue careers in environmental protection and engineering.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  14. Economics and regulation of petroleum futures markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Because the futures market in petroleum products is a relatively recent phenomenon, the implications of public policies formulated for that market have not yet been fully explored. To provide the Office of Competition of the Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to assess policy alternatives, Resource Planning Associates, Inc. (RPA) was asked to analyze the development of the futures market in No. 2 oil, assess the potential for futures markets in other petroleum products, and identify policy alternatives available to DOE. To perform this analysis, the criteria for a viable futures market was established first. Then, the experience to date with the 18-month-old futures market in No. 2 oil was examined, and the potential for viable futures markets in No. 6 oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and crude oil was assessed. Finally, how existing DOE regulations and prospective actions might affect petroleum futures market development was investigated.

  15. The house of the future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    Learn what it will take to create tomorrow's net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems. The net-zero energy home: Scientists are working to make tomorrow's homes more than just energy efficient -- they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab's Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation. Talking back to the grid: Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab's building technology department and director of the Lab's Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices. The networked (and energy efficient) house: In the future, your home's lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it's plugged in, it'll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

  16. The future of energy gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO {sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO {sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce each 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions stemming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane is known to exist in the mantle and lower crust. Near the Earth`s surface, methane occurs in enormous oil and/or gas reservoirs in rock, and is absorbed in coal, dissolved in water, and trapped in a latticework of ice-like material called gas hydrate. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, methane accounts for roughly 25 percent of current U.S. consumption, but its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  17. The future of FRMAC assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laiche, Thomas P.

    2010-03-01

    FRMAC was born out of circumstances 25 years ago when 17 federal agencies descended on the states with good intention during the Three-Mile Island nuclear power plant incident. At that time it quickly became evident that a better way was needed to support state and local governments in their time of emergency and recovery process. FRMAC's single voice of Federal support coordinates the multiple agencies that respond to a radiological event. Over the years, FRMAC has exercised, evaluated, and honed its ability to quickly respond to the needs of our communities. As the times have changed, FRMAC has expanded its focus from nuclear power plant incidents, to threats of a terrorist radiological dispersal device (RDD), to the unthinkable - an Improvised nuclear device (IND). And just as having the right tools are part of any trade, FRMAC's tool set has and is evolving to meet contemporary challenges - not just to improve the time it takes to collect data and assess the situation, but to provide a quality and comprehensive product that supports a stressed decision maker, responsible for the protection of the public. Innovations in the movement of data and information have changed our everyday lives. So too, FRMAC is capitalizing on industry innovations to improve the flow of information: from the early predictive models, to streamlining the process of getting data out of the field; to improving the time it takes to get assessed products in to the hands of the decision makers. FRMAC is focusing on the future through the digital age of electronic data processing. Public protective action and dose avoidance is the challenge.

  18. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future Bioenergy: America's Energy Future Addthis Description Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. Text Version Below is the text version for the Bioenergy:

  19. Growing America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growing America's Energy Future Growing America's Energy Future The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts from a range of biomass resources. Abundant, renewable bioenergy can help secure America's energy future, reducing our dependence on foreign oil and ensuring American prosperity while protecting the environment. Bioenergy can also help mitigate growing concerns about climate change by having an impact in

  20. Forming the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forming the Future Forming the Future This feature article from the April 2014 edition of the Fabricating and Forming Journal (FFJournal) describes how Ford Motor Co.'s sheet metal freeforming technology accelerates prototyping, taking stamping tool costs and lead time out of the equation. Reprinted with permission of FFJournal PDF icon Forming the Future, FFJournal (April 2014) More Documents & Publications RAPID FREEFORM SHEET METAL FORMING: TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND SYSTEM VERIFICATION

  1. Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Latest ASTM fuel specifications on biodiesel blends are summarized as well as future needs for improved fuel quality, process quality controls, and new performance testing procedures.

  2. Present and Future Computing Requirements for PETSc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Future Computing Requirements for PETSc Jed Brown jedbrown@mcs.anl.gov Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Department of Computer Science, ...

  3. Buildings of the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings of the Future Buildings of the Future Imagine buildings of the future. What will they look like and how will they interact with us-their occupants-to improve our lives and the Earth? Click to view the fact sheet. Click to view the fact sheet. Future Buildings: A Call for Collaboration, Vision Click to view the fact sheet. Lead Performer: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Richland, WA
 DOE Funding: $200,000 Project Term: 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 Project Website:

  4. Driving the Future | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Driving the Future At Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Research, our goal is to accelerate the development and deployment of vehicle technologies that help...

  5. Future Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Pty Ltd Place: Victoria, Australia Zip: 3121 Sector: Wind energy Product: Victoria based community wind project developer....

  6. Future Energy Yorkshire | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yorkshire Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Yorkshire Place: Leeds, United Kingdom Zip: LS11 5AE Sector: Services Product: Leeds-based, wholly owned subsidiary of...

  7. ICFA: International Committee for Future Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ICFA - International Committee for Future Accelerators Membership Secretary What, Why, Who is ICFA? ICFA Meetings Panels Recent Linear Collider Activities Statements Related...

  8. Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Multifamily Peer Exchange Call Featuring: Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future, call slides and discussion summary, April 7, 2011.

  9. CP-1: The Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Schriesheim; Dr. Mark Peters; Dr. Robert Rosner

    2013-01-28

    Lecture presented by C2ST and Argonne National Laboratory on CP1 and the current and future state of nuclear energy.

  10. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in ... diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. ...

  11. Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Aviation Sector EU Emissions Trading Scheme Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Future Perfect Partnering...

  12. NYMEX Coal Futures - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    providing companies in the electric power industry with secure and reliable risk management tools by creating a series of electricity futures contracts fashioned to meet the...

  13. Future Energy Enterprises | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enterprises Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Enterprises Place: Wilmette, IL Website: futureenergyenterprises.biz References: Partnership for Advanced Residential...

  14. AERI - What, Where, How, and Future Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI - What, Where, How, and Future Plans Demirgian, Jack Argonne National Laboratory Category: Instruments The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) measures the...

  15. Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENERGY FUTURES Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions Significant Energy Consumption - and Opportunities for Reduction Transportation is...

  16. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases...

  17. Paducah Site Future Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for remediation based on risk in future use Provides a ... by developing an Environmental Assessment of the Paducah Site to ... The potential for environmental impact is assessed to ...

  18. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman,...

  19. Long-Term Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems (II&C) Modernization Future Vision and Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Thomas; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-02-01

    Life extension beyond 60 years for the U.S operating nuclear fleet requires that instrumentation and control (I&C) systems be upgraded to address aging and reliability concerns. It is impractical for the legacy systems based on 1970’s vintage technology operate over this extended time period. Indeed, utilities have successfully engaged in such replacements when dictated by these operational concerns. However, the replacements have been approached in a like-for-like manner, meaning that they do not take advantage of the inherent capabilities of digital technology to improve business functions. And so, the improvement in I&C system performance has not translated to bottom-line performance improvement for the fleet. Therefore, wide-scale modernization of the legacy I&C systems could prove to be cost-prohibitive unless the technology is implemented in a manner to enable significant business innovation as a means of off-setting the cost of upgrades. A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. DOE’s program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security . The Advanced II&C research pathway is being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a seamless digital environment to enhance nuclear safety, increase productivity, and improve overall plant performance. The long-term goal is to transform the operating model of the nuclear power plants (NPP)s from one that is highly reliant on a large staff performing mostly manual activities to an operating model based on highly integrated technology with a smaller staff. This digital transformation is critical to addressing an array of issues facing the plants, including aging of legacy analog systems, potential shortage of technical workers, ever-increasing expectations for nuclear safety improvement, and relentless pressure to reduce cost. The Future Vision is based on research is being conducted in the following major areas of plant function: 1. Highly integrated control rooms 2. Highly automated plant 3. Integrated operations 4. Human performance improvement for field workers 5. Outage safety and efficiency. Pilot projects will be conducted in each of these areas as the means for industry to collectively integrate these new technologies into nuclear plant work activities. The pilot projects introduce new digital technologies into the nuclear plant operating environment at host operating plants to demonstrate and validate them for production usage. In turn, the pilot project technologies serve as the stepping stones to the eventual seamless digital environment as described in the Future Vision.

  20. Long-Term Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems (II&C) Modernization Future Vision and Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Life extension beyond 60 years for the U.S operating nuclear fleet requires that instrumentation and control (I&C) systems be upgraded to address aging and reliability concerns. It is impractical for the legacy systems based on 1970's vintage technology operate over this extended time period. Indeed, utilities have successfully engaged in such replacements when dictated by these operational concerns. However, the replacements have been approached in a like-for-like manner, meaning that they do not take advantage of the inherent capabilities of digital technology to improve business functions. And so, the improvement in I&C system performance has not translated to bottom-line performance improvement for the fleet. Therefore, wide-scale modernization of the legacy I&C systems could prove to be cost-prohibitive unless the technology is implemented in a manner to enable significant business innovation as a means of off-setting the cost of upgrades. A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. DOE's program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security . The Advanced II&C research pathway is being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a seamless digital environment to enhance nuclear safety, increase productivity, and improve overall plant performance. The long-term goal is to transform the operating model of the nuclear power plants (NPP)s from one that is highly reliant on a large staff performing mostly manual activities to an operating model based on highly integrated technology with a smaller staff. This digital transformation is critical to addressing an array of issues facing the plants, including aging of legacy analog systems, potential shortage of technical workers, ever-increasing expectations for nuclear safety improvement, and relentless pressure to reduce cost. The Future Vision is based on research is being conducted in the following major areas of plant function: (1) Highly integrated control rooms; (2) Highly automated plant; (3) Integrated operations; (4) Human performance improvement for field workers; and (5) Outage safety and efficiency. Pilot projects will be conducted in each of these areas as the means for industry to collectively integrate these new technologies into nuclear plant work activities. The pilot projects introduce new digital technologies into the nuclear plant operating environment at host operating plants to demonstrate and validate them for production usage. In turn, the pilot project technologies serve as the stepping stones to the eventual seamless digital environment as described in the Future Vision.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1. Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Baldwin, S.; DeMeo, E.; Reilly, J. M.; Mai, T.; Arent, D.; Porro, G.; Meshek, M.; Sandor, D.

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  4. Webinar: Buildings of the Future: The Role of Nature in our Future Built Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first spring Buildings of the Future webinar will be on Wednesday, March, 18 - The Role of Nature in our Future Built Environment.In the webinar, the DOE and PNNL project team will host a...

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  6. NERSC_FutureDirections_SPXXLCanHelp.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Directions and How SPXXL Can Help May 2 1, 2 015 Storage workloads at a user facility Centerwide S torage Petascale fi le s ystems ( NGF), a nd archival s torage ( HPSS)...

  7. future grid | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dc(266) Contributor 31 October, 2014 - 10:58 What do you know about the grid? black out brown out bulk power system electricity grid future grid grid history security Smart Grid...

  8. Better Buildings for a Brighter Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary, U.S. Energy Department Better Buildings for a Better Future Homes and commercial buildings consume 40% of our energy in the United States and are ...

  9. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register for Biomass 2014 today and don’t miss your chance to take part in this important event that will help move the nation to a more secure, sustainable, and economically sound future.

  10. Enterprise SRS Future Initiatives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Initiatives Enterprise SRS Future Initiatives SRS has a sound heritage based on innovation and expertise with a willingness to take on complex challenges to improve and enhance the security of our nation. The expertise and technical capabilities of SRNL, combined with the SRS infrastructure, facilities, and safety culture, make SRS a prime location for the deployment of innovative solutions to address the nation's most pressing issues in clean energy, national security and environmental

  11. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function.

  12. Growing Americas Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growing America's Energy Future The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts from a range of biomass resources. Abundant, renewable bioenergy can help secure America's energy future, reducing our dependence on foreign oil and ensur- ing American prosperity while protecting the environment. Bioenergy can also help mitigate growing concerns about climate change by having an impact in decreasing green- house gas

  13. Powering the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powering the Future Powering the Future Below is information about the student activity/lesson plan from your search. Grades 5-8 Subject Energy Efficiency and Conservation Summary Using the Environmental Protection Agency's climate change website, students will learn about our climate and sources of climate change. Curriculum Environmental Science, Science Plan Time 90 minutes Materials Handouts and other materials needed detailed within curriculum guide. Standards MS-PS3-1: Construct and

  14. EIS-0394: FutureGen Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIS provides information about the potential environmental impacts of the DOE's proposal to provide federal funding to FutureGen Alliance, Inc. for the FutureGen Project. The project would include the planning, design, construction, and operation by the Alliance of a coal-fueled electric power and hydrogen gas production plant integrated with carbon dioxide capture and geologic sequestration of the captured gas.

  15. Future Computing Needs for Innovative Confinement Concepts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Plasma Science and Innovation Center Current Computing Utilization and Resources Near Term Needs Concluding Comments Future Computing Needs for Innovative Confinement Concepts Charlson C. Kim charlson@aa.washington.edu Plasma Science and Innovation Center University of Washington, Seattle August 3, 2010 Large Scale Computing Needs for Fusion Energy Science Workshop Rockville, MD Charlson C. Kim, PSI-Center Future Computing Needs of ICC's Introduction of Plasma Science and Innovation Center

  16. Primer on electricity futures and other derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoft, S.; Belden, T.; Goldman, C.; Pickle, S.

    1998-01-01

    Increased competition in bulk power and retail electricity markets is likely to lower electricity prices, but will also result in greater price volatility as the industry moves away from administratively determined, cost-based rates and encourages market-driven prices. Price volatility introduces new risks for generators, consumers, and marketers. Electricity futures and other derivatives can help each of these market participants manage, or hedge, price risks in a competitive electricity market. Futures contracts are legally binding and negotiable contracts that call for the future delivery of a commodity. In most cases, physical delivery does not take place, and the futures contract is closed by buying or selling a futures contract on or near the delivery date. Other electric rate derivatives include options, price swaps, basis swaps, and forward contracts. This report is intended as a primer for public utility commissioners and their staff on futures and other financial instruments used to manage price risks. The report also explores some of the difficult choices facing regulators as they attempt to develop policies in this area.

  17. U.S. Refinery Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total 321,878 318,765 321,561 328,213 302,955 290,718 2005-2016 Crude Oil 485,221 479,416 494,682 519,726 495,806 460,629 2005-2016 Natural Gas Plant Liquids 14,690 15,903 17,686 18,057 18,673 14,924 2005-2016 Pentanes Plus 4,693 4,431 3,897 3,932 4,389 3,616 2005-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 9,997 11,472 13,789 14,125 14,284 11,308 2005-2016 Normal Butane 3,144 5,323 7,093 7,560 7,947 5,592 2005-2016 Isobutane 6,853 6,149 6,696 6,565

  18. Refinery Net Input of Renewable Diesel Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    670 564 582 488 476 355 2009-2016 PADD 1 23 15 89 9 14 11 2010-2016 East Coast 80 2014-2015 Appalachian No. 1 23 15 9 9 14 11 2010-2016 PADD 2 139 114 94 109 101 109 2009-2016 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 92 75 72 88 85 94 2011-2016 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 35 24 17 13 11 11 2009-2016 Okla., Kans., Mo. 12 15 5 8 5 4 2011-2016 PADD 3 290 253 224 170 185 95 2011-2016 Texas Inland 68 61 57 28 25 26 2011-2016 Texas Gulf Coast 11 14 12 12 11 12 2012-2016 La. Gulf Coast 151 134 121 111 126 39 2012-2016 N.

  19. ,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File Name:","petpnpinpt2dcnusmbblm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetpnpinpt2dcnusmbblm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  20. U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16,394 15,690 16,673 16,848 16,365 16,167 1985-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 18,125 18,125 18,172 18,186 18,315 18,317 1985-2016 Operating 18,015 17,932 17,846 18,044 ...

  1. U.S. Fuel Consumed at Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) 713,532 756,062 791,753 843,228 897,049 893,203 1985-2014 Coal (Thousand Short Tons) 34 29 31 30 20 16 1985-2014 Purchased Electricity (Million ...

  2. U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15,177 15,289 15,373 15,724 16,156 16,433 1985-2015 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 17,575 17,736 17,328 17,818 17,873 18,026 1985-2015 Operating 16,911 16,991 16,656 17,282 ...

  3. Myriant Succinic Acid BioRefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -based Succinic Acid * Life Cycle Analysis of Bio-succinic acid production using the IPCC 2007 (GWP) method 5 MySAB Quad Chart Overview * Project start date BP1 - 3...

  4. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Petrochemical Feedstocks 119,344 112,263 110,319 123,577 114,001 106,153 2005-2015 Naphtha For Petrochemical Feedstock Use 76,367 75,347 75,054 87,357 74,553 69,214 2005-2015 Other ...

  5. Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky Refinery Yield

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Miscellaneous Products 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2015 Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) -6.0 -6.0 -5.5 -5.9 -5.8 -5.6 1993-2015 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable;...

  6. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 1 MJ biofuel from unmanaged hardwood -3E-16 -2E-16 -1E-16 0 1E-16 2E-16 3E-16 4E-16 5E-16 0 100 200 300 400 500 GWI inst W.m -2 Years Plant at zero Cut at zero Where do we go ...

  7. Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Hydrogen

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,351 6,405 6,834 6,276 6,172 6,399 2009-2015 PADD 1 132 134 117 119 128 125 2009-2015 East Coast 106 112 96 99 103 100 2009-2015 Appalachian No. 1 26 22 21 20 25 25 2009-2015 PADD...

  8. U.S. Refinery Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total 4,178,588 4,091,601 4,007,375 4,037,265 3,954,862 3,894,471 2005-2015 Crude Oil 5,374,094 5,404,347 5,489,516 5,589,006 5,784,637 5,915,532 2005-2015 Natural Gas Plant Liquids 154,941 171,074 175,607 168,808 172,563 171,936 2005-2015 Pentanes Plus 54,697 61,059 59,432 56,153 52,853 50,850 2005-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 100,244 110,015 116,175 112,655 119,710 121,086 2005-2015 Normal Butane 39,253 42,087 45,747 42,461 45,916 47,870 2005-2015

  9. Texas Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residual 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 75,000 2004-2015 Catalytic Reforming 993,290 995,290 996,890 1,078,390 1,076,290 1,076,880 1982-2015 Low Pressure 801,600 804,600 ...

  10. Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w ... Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB with Alcohol, and Reformulated GTAB Motor Gasoline Blending ...

  11. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. |

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  12. Microsoft Word - 112706 Final Outage Letter PUBLIC.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRITICAL ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE INFORMATION REMOVED FOR PRIVILEGED TREATMENT November 27, 2006 Lawrence Mansueti Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Rm. 8H-033 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy Case No. EO-05-01 Dear Mr. Mansueti: Potomac Electric Power Company ("Pepco"), on behalf of itself and PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. ("PJM"), is providing you with

  13. Power Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Sandy: DOE Situation Reports Satellite image of Tropical Storm Isaac. | ... This satellite image was taken 16 to 18 hours before Sandy's landfall on the New Jersey ...

  14. Preparing for a Power Outage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Have extra batteries and a car charger for your mobile devices. This will allow you to stay up-to-date on news reports and use your phone to stay in touch with friends and family. ...

  15. Survey of Tools for Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Dobson, Ian; Fonte, Louis; Haq, Enamul; Hines, Paul; Kirschen, Daniel; Luo, Xiaochuan; Miller, Stephen; Samaan, Nader A.; Vaiman, Marianna; Varghese, Matthew; Zhang, Pei

    2011-10-17

    Cascading failure can cause large blackouts, and a variety of methods are emerging to study this challenging topic. In parts 1 and 2 of this paper, the IEEE task force on cascading failure seeks to consolidate and review the progress of the field towards methods and tools of assessing the risk of cascading failure. Part 2 summarizes and discusses the state of the art in the available cascading failure modeling tools. The discussion integrates industry and research perspectives from a variety of institutions. Strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in current approaches are indicated.

  16. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Cullen, Daniel; Hibbett, David; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Jeffries, Thomas W.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Kuske, Cheryl; Magnuson, Jon K.; Martin, Francis; Spatafora, Joey; Tsang, Adrian; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-04-29

    Fungi play important roles across the range of current and future biofuel production processes. From crop/feedstock health to plant biomass saccharification, enzyme production to bioprocesses for producing ethanol, higher alcohols or future hydrocarbon biofuels, fungi are involved. Research and development are underway to understand the underlying biological processes and improve them to make bioenergy production efficient on an industrial scale. Genomics is the foundation of the systems biology approach that is being used to accelerate the research and development efforts across the spectrum of topic areas that impact biofuels production. In this review, we discuss past, current and future advances made possible by genomic analyses of the fungi that impact plant/feedstock health, degradation of lignocellulosic biomass and fermentation of sugars to ethanol, hydrocarbon biofuels and renewable chemicals.

  17. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  18. Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Draft Report to the Secretary of Energy July 29, 2011 Draft Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission ii July 2011 PREAMBLE The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) was formed by the Secretary of Energy at the request of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new plan. It is co-chaired by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton and Gen. Brent Scowcroft. Other

  19. NREL: Speeches - Nation's Energy Future at Risk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Future at Risk, National Lab Director Says For more information contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 e:mail: George Douglas Washington, D.C., July 27, 1999 — America must invest in its energy future now, Richard Truly, director of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory said today. Otherwise, he said, the nation could face supply shortages and fall behind foreign competitors. Truly, speaking at the National Press Club's Newsmakers program, said that U.S.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures Study: Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T.

  1. Gluons in our future | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gluons in our future Gluons in our future July 30, 2014 If one were to eavesdrop on the conversations that we have with our visitors - students of all kinds, politicians or the general public - one might come to the conclusion that we here at Jefferson Lab are crazy about glue/must run a glue factory. It is, indeed, the goal of one of the major experiments that we are to pursue following the upgrade to attempt to measure particles that can tell us more about glue. But what sort of glue are we

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Travel to the Future with Bioenergy

  3. Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Image icon Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications ...

  4. FutureGen Industrial Alliance Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FutureGen Industrial Alliance Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: FutureGen Industrial Alliance Inc Place: Washington, Washington, DC Zip: 20006 Product: The FutureGen Industrial...

  5. Powering the Future - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 28, 2013, Videos Powering the Future powering_the_future_video Deputy Director of Development and Demonstration Jeff Chamberlain discusses the future of energy storage with CBS News in this video.

  6. Sustainability protects resources for future generations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This publication by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses the steps necessary to provide livable urban centers for future generations through sustainable development, or sustainability. To illustrate this concept, nonsustainable cities and sustainable cities are compared. Sustainable city projects for several major US cites are reviewed.

  7. Union Training Future Electricians in Solar Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Electricians in Indiana believe solar power is the future, and they are preparing for it. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 725 (IBEW 725) in Terre Haute, Ind., purchased 60 solar panels and plans to train its members in solar installation.

  8. HVDC transmission: a path to the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teichler, Stephen L.; Levitine, Ilia

    2010-05-15

    Direct current transmission has been the poor stepchild of the U.S. electric industry. Although early-generation plants were based on DC technology, it was soon deemed uneconomical to transmit electricity over long distances, but it now appears poised for a change. Both the increasing technical potential and changing economics of HVDC lines promise a growing role in the future. (author)

  9. Wind Integration Program: Balancing the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Integration Program: Balancing the Future Initial Discussions 3072012 2 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Background BPA has implemented a number...

  10. Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale ...

  11. Winning the Future Through Innovation and "Better Buildings"...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winning the Future Through Innovation and "Better Buildings" Winning the Future Through ... energy efficiency upgrades at hospitals, schools, and other commercial buildings. "Race to ...

  12. Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future August 2009 This document provides historical information about the ...

  13. Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System...

  14. Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors (ORNL Perspectives...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors (ORNL Perspectives) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Needs and Requirements for Future Research ...

  15. ,"Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future ... 12:18:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future ...

  16. ,"West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future ... PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future ...

  17. The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP) and Innovation, June 2000 The Future of Absorption ...

  18. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  19. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  20. Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  1. Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  2. Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future Better Buildings Multifamily Peer Exchange Call Featuring: Stewards of Affordable...

  3. Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  4. Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  5. Miscellaneous States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  6. Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  7. New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. ...

  8. Securing America's Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Securing America's Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Securing America's Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency & Renewable ...

  9. Illustrating the future prediction of performance based on computer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Illustrating the future prediction of performance based on computer code, physical ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Illustrating the future prediction of ...

  10. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a Sustainable 21st Century Chemical Industry ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New ...

  11. Promising future of quantum dots explored in conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Promising future of quantum dots explored Promising future of quantum dots explored in conference Researchers are gathering to reflect on two decades of quantum dot research at a...

  12. Harvesting Solar Energy for the Future | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Harvesting Solar Energy for the Future Harvesting Solar Energy for the Future In this video, we detail the vision and goals of PARC's research in a broader context.

  13. Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  14. Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future ... Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry ...

  15. Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  16. Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  17. Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework (Redirected from CDKN-Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework) Jump to: navigation, search...

  18. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  19. Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology Unveiled in California Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology Unveiled in ...

  20. DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple Clean Coal Plants DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple ...

  1. The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Title The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  2. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  3. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap PDF icon mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & ...

  4. H Canyon's 60th Anniversary Event Honors Past, Celebrates Future...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H Canyon's 60th Anniversary Event Honors Past, Celebrates Future at Savannah River Site H Canyon's 60th Anniversary Event Honors Past, Celebrates Future at Savannah River Site...

  5. Discovery of Weyl Semimetals May Lead to Novel Future Spintronic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery of Weyl Semimetals May Lead to Novel Future Spintronic Applications Discovery of Weyl Semimetals May Lead to Novel Future Spintronic Applications Print Wednesday, 09 ...

  6. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, ...

  7. Particle Physics and America's Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Particle Physics and America's Future Particle Physics and America's Future September 14, 2010 - 6:42pm Addthis Dennis Kovar Former Associate Director, High Energy Physics in the ...

  8. Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u) (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u) ...

  9. Mining Industry of the Future Vision: The Future Begins with Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-09-01

    The Mining Industry of the Future was started in June 1998 when the Chairman of the National Mining Association and the Secretary of Energy entered into a Compact to pursue a collaborative technology research partnership. After the Compact signing, the mining industry developed its vision document, The Future Begins with Mining, A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future, in September 1998. This vision document lists long-term goals for the mining industry. Stemming from this vision document, targeted technology roadmaps were developed that describe pathways of research to achieve the vision goals.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  11. Future challenges of NEPA: A panel discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    One portion of a plenary session during the conference was a forum on The Future Challenges of NEPA.'' The session was a panel discussion. Each of the panelists was to spent 10 to 15 minutes talking about their observations on how NEPA is operating, some of the trends they observed, and how they thought NEPA might change in the future. Topics discussed in this forum included Congressional proposals to amend NEPA; possible changes at the CEQ; post-decision monitoring, mitigation, and follow-up studies; applicability of NEPA to international actions of the US government; assessment of global change impacts; and the relationship between NEPA and state little NEPA'' laws. The individual presentations and the subsequent discussion are described in this paper. 5 refs.

  12. Validating Solar Innovation to Power Our Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Innovation to Power Our Future The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established five Regional Test Centers (RTCs) in New Mexico, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, and Vermont to demonstrate the bankability of new technologies. Funded by DOE's SunShot Initiative, the RTCs are part of a broad national effort to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of electricity by 2020. The RTCs validate new solar technologies and systems configurations, demonstrating performance and reliability

  13. Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) Data and Sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) National Renewable Energy Laboratory Build 241 search keywords clear search show bibliography show instructions ^(sprawl|density|population density|census|ppsm|metro area|single-family|weighted density|population center|populations?|mix|american housing survey|schools?|population-serving|density gradient|metropolitan|msas?|psas?|urban|blocks?)$ ^(co2|emissions?|rates?|transient|smooth|driving|gallons per mile|g/mile|average speed|speeds?|moves|miles per

  14. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  15. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  16. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  17. WATER POWER FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WATER POWER FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE March 2016 WATER POWER PROGRAM WATER POWER PROGRAM Building a Clean Energy Economy Leading the world in clean energy is critical to strengthening the American economy. Targeted investments in clean en- ergy research and development jumpstart private sector innovation critical to our long-term economic growth, energy security, and international competitiveness. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program (the Pro- gram) is strengthening the

  18. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  19. A Renewable Energy Future: Innovation and Beyond

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the 2012 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum during a plenary session by Dr. Dan E. Arvizu, director of NREL. Entitled "A Renewable Energy Future: Innovation and Beyond," the presentation demonstrates the transformation needed in the energy sector to achieve a clean energy vision and identifies innovation as what is needed to make it happen. The presentation also includes a discussion of the integration challenges that affect solar energy systems.

  20. Shaping Future Supercomputing Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 1 1 a n n u a l r e p o r t Shaping Future Supercomputing Argonne Leadership Computing Facility ANL-12/22 Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2 0 1 1 a l c f a n n u a l r e p o r t w w w . a l c f . a n l . g o v Contents Overview .......................................2 Mira ..............................................4 Science Highlights ...........................8 Computing Resources ..................... 26 2011 ALCF Publications .................. 28 2012 INCITE Projects