National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for refinery bulk terminal

  1. Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Reportthe Growing American AutoStocks 2009 2010

  2. Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6 Weekly5Data

  3. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR DRY BULK TERMINALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR DRY BULK TERMINALS IN THE LOWER FRASER BASIN DOE FRAP 1996-19 Prepared for: Enviromnent Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement North's report was fůnded by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through its Fraser Pollution

  4. Storage tracking refinery trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, J.

    1996-05-01

    Regulatory and marketplace shakeups have made the refining and petrochemical industries highly competitive. The fight to survive has forced refinery consolidations, upgrades and companywide restructurings. Bulk liquid storage terminals are following suit. This should generate a flurry of engineering and construction by the latter part of 1997. A growing petrochemical industry translates into rising storage needs. Industry followers forecasted flat petrochemical growth in 1996 due to excessive expansion in 1994 and 1995. But expansion is expected to continue throughout this year on the strength of several products.

  5. ,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional37Annual* j

  6. ,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeMonthly","10/2015" ,"Release Date:","12/31/2015" ,"Next ReleaseTotalA. Comparison

  7. Distillate Fuel Oil Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table272/S The National Interim714 b Weekly

  8. U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Global CrudeWhat'sMay-15 Jun-15

  9. ,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015" ,"ReleaseMonthly","10/2015"Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

  10. Refinery Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    per 112014 MYPP: "The market potential of bio-oils as a feedstock for petroleum refineries is largely unknown. There is a need to gather information to understand the...

  11. Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick, P.E., M.ASCE and Lynn E. Brown2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Page 1 Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick, P.E., M: Railway transportation is playing a key role in the development of many new shale oil and gas reserves in North America. In the rush to develop new shale oil and gas plays, sites for railway transload terminals

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    refinery as of January 1, 2006 Tables 1 Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2006 PDF 2 Production Capacity of...

  13. Terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    and angular positions of the cylinders as a function of time. The experimental error encountered due to video resolution was studied and minimized through the use of a proper data sampling rate The terminal velocities of the cylinders are found to increase...

  14. Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

  15. Refinery Energy Profiling Procedure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    PLANT ENERGY US.E) 6 \\ , \\ \\ \\ \\ 5 .... 4 ~ .... en CJ z > c( 3 en > CJ a: w z W 2 r r---o 1 STACK TEMPERATURE FOR ALL HEATERS (OF) fi49 ESL-IE-81-04-110 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference... stream_source_info ESL-IE-81-04-110.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 15712 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-81-04-110.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 REFINERY ENERGY...

  16. Refinery Fuel Balancing with Cogeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passman, K. W.; Taylor, R. I.; Williams, D. E.; Emanuel, D.

    1990-01-01

    Placid is starting up a 7.6 MW cogeneration system in their Port Allen, Louisiana Refinery. The project was justified on efficiency improvement, reduced flaring and improved power reliability. The project was implemented on a fast track schedule...

  17. Encon Motivation in European Refineries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambera, S.; Lockett, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    for maintaining a continuing program. Energy utilization efficiency in Esso Europe's refineries improved about 16% in the mid 70's, due primarily to Encon motivation. Experience has since demonstrated that additional improvements can be achieved through...

  18. Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arthur refinery, which opened here in 1903. As America's need for energy expanded as our demand for oil and gas grew in tandem with our economy and our mobility this refinery...

  19. Hydrocracking options for today's refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, M.E.; Pedersen, B.S.; Olson, R.K. (UOP, Des Plaines, IL (US))

    1989-01-01

    Over the 30-year history of hydrocracking, the role of the process has changed to meet shifting product demands. Originally applied as a naphtha producer, hydrocracking is now a chief source of high quality middle distillates and hydrogen-rich VGO. Because of the wide range of possible hydrocracking feedstocks and operating modes, refiners can apply hydrocracking to many different processing schemes to optimize refinery flexibility and profitability. This paper describes the overall refinery product slate for each of four hydrocracking schemes. All four hydrocracking examples are compared to the product slate of an FCC-based refinery processing Light Arabian Crude. As the examples show, hydrocracking technology enhances the ability to make high quality distillate, either as a complement to existing FCC capacity, or as a stand-alone conversion unit.

  20. Biocrude suitability for petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Gaines, L.L.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Snider, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Technologies are now being developed that could produce crude oil from biomass, making available an alternative fuel source as petroleum supplies dwindle and prices rise. If the existing infrastructure for transporting and refining petroleum could be used for biocrude, the transition from petroleum would be smoother and less costly. This report examines the suitability of the existing systems for transporting biocrude and processing it into gasoline. Available biomass production areas were identified and potential production was estimated. Production areas with the potential to supply conversion plants were then matched with transportation paths and refinery locations to minimize transportation costs. Technical requirements for treating biocrude were examined, based on its expected chemical composition and physical properties, and compared to existing refinery equipment and capacity. Environmental constraints were taken into account at each step. Although biomass-derived oils could be transported to refineries the existing refinery equipment is not optimal for upgrading these oils to a gasoline-grade product. Furthermore, existing hydrogen production capacity is grossly inadequate for upgrading substantial volumes of biocrude. Partial or total upgrading at conversion facilities or regional upgrading facilities is discussed briefly, but in-depth evaluation of such options is beyond the scope of this study. 82 refs., 26 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Marinangelli, Richard; Marker, Terry; McCall, Michael; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

    2007-02-01

    A presentation by UOP based on collaborative work from FY05 using some results from PNNL for upgrading biomass pyrolysis oil to petroleum refinery feedstock

  2. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Arena, Blaise; Marinangelli, Richard; McCall, Michael; Marker, Terry; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

    2006-10-11

    a summary of our collaborative 2005 project “Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries” at the Rio Oil and Gas Conference this September.

  3. Inorganic Membranes for Refinery Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to push the performance limits of inorganic membranes for large-scale gas separations in refinery applications.

  4. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact...

  5. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  6. Former Soviet refineries face modernization, restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-29

    A massive modernization and restructuring program is under way in the refining sector of Russia and other former Soviet republics. Economic reforms and resulting economic dislocation following the collapse of the Soviet Union has left refineries in the region grappling with a steep decline and changes in product demand. At the same time, rising oil prices and an aging, dilapidated infrastructure promise a massive shakeout. Even as many refineries in the former Soviet Union (FSU) face possible closure because they are running at a fraction of capacity, a host of revamps, expansions, and grass roots refineries are planned or under way. The paper discusses plans.

  7. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

  8. Dutch refinery nears completion of major renovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1997-03-17

    Shell Nederland Raffinaderij B.V. has completed construction of a major upgrade at its refinery in Pernis, The Netherlands. The project, called PER+, centers around the addition of Shell Gasification Hydrogen Process (SGHP) and hydrocracking units. The expansion will increase the complexity of Shell`s Dutch refinery and enable it to convert low-value streams to useful products such as cleaner-burning transportation fuels, hydrogen, and electricity. PER+ is a prime example of the kind of innovative planning necessary for European refineries to stay competitive in a tough market. The project reached mechanical completion early this year, and is scheduled to start up in May. The paper describes the refinery, project objectives, process options, the SGHP process, soot ash removal, syngas treatment, power and hydrogen production, environmental issues, and construction.

  9. ,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"10272015 12:31:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRXNUS1","MLPRXNUS1","METRXNUS1","MENRXNUS1","MEYRXNUS1","...

  10. Upgrade Your Refinery for Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnnie, D. H., Jr.; Klooster, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Upgrading existing refineries for efficient energy utilization imposes strict restraints upon design engineers. Present and future production requirements must be defined. Reliable operating data must be obtained from historical records and test...

  11. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  12. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    naphtha Swing cut model Refinery Production LPG 18 20 Light Naphtha 6 6 Premium Gasoline 20 20 Offers lower net cost & different feed quantities Reg. Gasoline 80 92 Gas Oil 163 170 Fuel Oil 148 160 Net Cost of the refinery Crude distillation unit (CDU) 5 #12;CDU & C d d C lCDU & Cascaded Columns Cascaded Columns

  13. Steam System Management Program Yields Fuel Savings for Refinery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, L. D.; Hagan, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Phillips refinery at Borger, Texas, determined the need to develop a utility monitoring system. Shortly after this commitment was made, the refinery was introduced to a flowsheet modeling program that could be used to model and optimize steam...

  14. Refinery Input by PADD - Petroleum Supply Annual (2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Table showing refinery input of crude oil and petroleum products by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD).

  15. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocracking and hydrogen production are growing energy consumers in the refining industry. An energy balance for refineries

  16. How refinery fuel indexes have varied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, G.

    1997-01-06

    Refinery fuels costs have endured a steady incline since 1993, except for a period in 1993. As shown in the accompanying table, these increases in cost have occurred for residual fuel oil costs in three of the five PADD districts. The cost for natural gas for refinery usage also dropped steadily during the 3-year study. These conclusions are based on costs of an average refinery fuel consisting of 1 bbl each of PADD Districts 1--5 and an average US cost of 4.4 MMscf natural gas (a 1 bbl equivalent on a BTU content basis). Raw residual fuel oil and natural gas prices come from publications put out by the US Department of Labor.

  17. Crude oil as refinery feed stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boduszynski, M.M.; Farrell, T.R. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper gives a brief overview of the integrated oil refinery. It illustrates that crude oil refining involves {open_quotes}molecular tailoring,{close_quotes} where feed stock molecules are {open_quotes}tailored{close_quotes} through catalytic processing to make products with the most desirable composition. Chemical composition of crude oil as refinery feed stock is discussed. The emphasis is on the understanding of molecular transformations which occur in refinery processes to manufacture light transportation fuels. Diesel fuel manufacturing is used as an example. Recent environmental legislation in the United States has necessitated a significant upgrade in the quality of diesel fuel used for highway transportation. Examples are given to illustrate the impact that petroleum chemistry may have on the industry`s response to government regulations.

  18. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  19. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  20. Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    six years total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose... these issues. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A schematic of a typical refinery flare gas recovery facility is shown in Figure I. The facilities include the following pieces of equipment: - compressor suction drum - compressor set - inter-stage knock-out drum...

  1. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

  2. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    refineries with specific energy and cost savings data whenoperations. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%the potential energy and cost-savings (Frangopoluos et al. ,

  3. Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average values for 2002-2009 excluding months in 2005, 2006, and 2008 affected by hurricanes & refinery closures. Similarly, typical historical values are average planned...

  4. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    safe, reliable, efficient, and low-emission operation across a broad range of fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas. Displacing...

  5. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1989-01-01

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  6. Virginia Biodiesel Refinery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho) JumpWinside, Nebraska (UtilityVipiemmeRefinery

  7. Regulatory impact analysis for the petroleum refineries neshap. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The report analyzes the regulatory impacts of the Petroleum Refinery National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which is being promulgated under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CCA). This emission standard would regulate the emissions of certain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from petroleum refineries. The petroleum refineries industry group includes any facility engaged in the production of motor gasoline, naphthas, kerosene, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, or other products made from crude oil or unfinished petroleum derivatives. The report analyzes the impact that regulatory action is likely to have on the petroleum refining industry.

  8. Nigerian refineries strive for product balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obuasi, P.A.

    1985-06-17

    This article discusses the growth patterns of the Nigerian refining industry. Production and consumption are expected to follow the pattern of consumption of fuel products by the domestic market, Presently, however, production and consumption are not evenly balanced for most fuel products, and non-fuel products are domestically consumed but not produced. Some progress has been made in the effort to match production and consumption of fuel products. But the progress that would have been made to balance non-fuel products has been nullified by 50% of the Daduna refinery being idle. This is due to problems associated with importation of heavy crude oil into Nigeria and also a weak market for asphalt in Nigeria.

  9. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet details a project to improve operating procedures, including physical and chemical methods and the use of high-temperature coatings, to allow refineries to operate equipment below threshold fouling conditions and use the most effective minimization techniques.

  10. Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  11. Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vari, J.

    1992-01-01

    Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

  12. Refinery Energy Conservation Experience with Enhanced Surface Reboilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragi, E. G.; O'Neill, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of refinery services where existing reboilers were retubed or replaced with enhanced High Flux tubing to better utilize or conserve energy are reported. (1) Retubing an existing toluene column reboiler permitted the use of low cost 115...

  13. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  14. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    er iz 4. Energy Consumption The petroleum refining industry2003b. Paramount Petroleum: Plant-Wide Energy-EfficiencyFigure 8. Annual energy costs of petroleum refineries in the

  15. Terminal electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrodnik, J.P.; Bowen, G.K.

    1990-08-14

    This paper discusses a bipolar flow battery. It comprises a series of half cells in electrical communication with one another, the cells being defined by partitions comprising alternating electrodes and separators, each partition being secured to each adjacent partition about a common perimeter therewith, the series of half cells having a terminal electrode at an end thereof; an endblock, disposed at an end of the series of half cells, the endblock being secured to the terminal electrode; an electrolyte manifold in hydraulic communication with the half cells; and an electrolyte pump for urging electrolyte through the manifold and into the half cells.

  16. Terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE); Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Mirebeau, Pierre (Villebon sur Yvette, FR); Ganhungu, Francois (Vieux-Reng, FR); Lallouet, Nicolas (Saint Martin Boulogne, FR)

    2009-10-20

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  17. Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for...

  18. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  19. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  20. Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 section 313 list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In this volume, detailed procedures recommended for the measurement of selected petroleum refinery emissions in ambient air are presented.

  1. Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This volume identifies publications and databases that address ambient air concentrations measured near petroleum refineries for the selected target chemicals.

  2. Monitoring near refineries for airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study provides an ambient air concentration perspective to the engineering estimates of petroleum refinery emissions required under SARA Title III Section 313. It presents and discusses ambient air concentrations of 25 selected target chemicals measured at and near the perimeter (fenceline) of three refineries. Measurements were made over three consecutive 24-hour sampling periods at each refinery. The extent to which the concentrations of the target chemicals were due to fugitive emissions from the refineries is estimated.

  3. Alternative multimedia regulatory programs for next-generation refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Arguerro, R.; Emerson, D.

    2000-06-22

    The 25-year-old command-and-control environmental regulatory structure in the US has resulted in significant environmental improvements. Recently, however, its limitations (e.g., rigid application regardless of site-specific conditions, disregard of cross-media and multimedia impacts, limited incentives for new technology development and use) have become increasingly apparent. New regulatory approaches that recognize current and anticipated economic constraints, new knowledge of environmental processes and impacts, and the benefits of new technologies are needed. Such approaches could be especially important for the US petroleum refining industry. This industry operates under thin profit margins, releases chemicals that can produce adverse health and environmental impacts, and must meet the technological challenges of producing more highly refined fuels from poorer quality feedstocks. Under a grant from the Environmental Technology Initiative (ETI), Argonne National Laboratory and its subcontractor, Analytical Services, Inc. developed two alternative environmental regulatory programs for next-generation petroleum refineries. (In this report, next-generation refineries refers to the refineries of today as they operate in the next 20 or more years rather than to fully reengineered future refineries.) The objective of the ETI refinery project was to develop future-oriented regulatory programs for next-generation refineries that will expand the use of innovative technologies, encourage pollution prevention, demonstrate environmental responsibility, and maintain refinery economic performance. Rather than suggesting targeted, short-term modifications to existing media-specific command-and-control regulations, the ETI project suggests the use of new approaches that are broader and more flexible. It recognizes that giving refineries flexibility in meeting environmental protection goals can stimulate new technology development and use. Unlike most US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reinvention efforts, which seek results in 12 to 18 months, this ETI effort assumes a time frame of 20 years or more. It also assumes that existing laws and regulations can be changed. An iterative and interactive process was used by the project team to develop the alternative approaches. Information and stakeholder input were integrated to provide for constant revision and improvement. First, guidelines and principles were established to bound the study and set parameters for developing the approaches. Next, existing and projected environmental laws and regulations affecting petroleum refineries were examined to identify areas needing change. Then, to understand future challenges and opportunities, the projected refinery operating environment was described in terms of feedstock, product, technology, and economics. Finally several goals and indicators for assessing and comparing the alternatives were identified. On the basis of this background information, more than 60 options that could efficiently and effectively protect human health and the environment were identified. These options ranged from fundamental changes in program philosophy to procedural improvements. After the options were evaluated against the goals and indicators, many of them were integrated into two separate thematic paradigms: a risk-based paradigm and a goal-based paradigm. Elements common to both approaches include the following: (1) Establish the baseline--In establishing the baseline, the refinery and the regulator jointly identify residuals for which release limits must be established; (2) Set residual release limits--The refinery and the regulator jointly specify release limits on a facility-wide rather than a source-specific basis. A facility-wide permit documents the release limits; and (3) Assure compliance--Incentives provide the basis for assuring compliance, and flexibility in the compliance method is encouraged. Penalties apply if releases exceed the limits, and reporting requirements are streamlined relative to current practices.

  4. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Executive summary. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. The volume contains the Executive Summary.

  5. Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition Sylvain: refinery planning and crude-oil operations scheduling. The proposed approach consists of using Lagrangian approaches and produces better solutions in reasonable times. Keywords: refinery planning, crude-oil

  6. Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

    Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores Panagiotis Manolios and Daron Vroon College@ccs.neu.edu, daron.vroon@gmail.com Abstract. Recent advances in termination analysis have yielded new methods and determining how to proceed. In this paper, we address the issue of building termination analysis engines

  7. From outermost termination to innermost termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    From outermost termination to innermost termination Ren´e Thiemann Institute of Computer Science mechanism of func- tional programming languages. Therefore, termination analysis of term rewrite systems transformation such that a TRS is outermost terminating iff the transformed TRS is innermost terminat- ing

  8. APPENDXD.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    reported on the Form EIA-819. The stock data reported below include stocks held at refineries, bulk terminals, motor gasoline blending facilities, pipelines, and oxygenate...

  9. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  10. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  11. TABLE25.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  12. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  13. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  14. TABLE02.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  15. TABLE20.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Refinery Report," EIA-811, "Monthly Bulk Terminal Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"...

  16. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-04-01

    Through the California State IOF initiative, the California Energy Commission PIER Program developed a petroleum refining roadmap to identify energy issues and priorities unique to the refining industry in California and create a plan for future R&D that could help California refineries implement energy efficient technologies.

  17. Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha , Kevin C of a nonconvex Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) model for the scheduling of crude oil movement of crude oil and products. Furthermore, detailed scheduling models often require a continuous time

  18. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  19. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  20. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  1. Alternative future environmental regulatory approaches for petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Moses, D. O.; Emerson, D.; Arguerro, R.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Analytical Services, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, many industrial, regulatory, and community leaders have expressed concern that the current environmental regulatory structure disregards multimedia environmental impacts, provides few incentives to develop and use new technologies, and fails to consider site-specific conditions. For the US petroleum refining industry, faced with the need to produce higher-quality fuels from poorer-quality feedstocks, such criticisms are expected to increase. This article offers two alternative environmental regulatory approaches for existing petroleum refineries to use in the future. These alternative approaches are multimedia in scope, provide for new technology development and use, and allow flexibility in the means for meeting environmental goals. They have been reviewed and critiqued by various stakeholders, including industry representatives, regulators, and local and national community and environmental organizations. The integration of stakeholder comments and findings of ongoing national and international regulatory reinvention efforts in the development of these approaches positions them for potential use by other industries in addition to petroleum refineries.

  2. Nutrient-stimulated biodegradation of aged refinery hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, E.N.; Stokley, K.E.; Calcavecchio, P.; Bare, R.E.; Rothenburger, S.J.; Prince, R.C. [Exxon Research and Engineering, Annandale, NJ (United States); Douglas, G.S. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Aged hydrocarbon-contaminated refinery soil was amended with water and nutrients and tilled weekly for 1 year to stimulate biodegradation. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) and triterpane biomarkers, and Freon IR analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), were used to determine the extent of biodegradation. There was significant degradation of extractable hydrocarbon (up to 60%), but neither hopane, oleanane, nor the amount of polars decreased during this period of bioremediation, allowing them to be used as conserved internal markers for estimating biodegradation. Significant degradation of the more alkylated two- and three-ring compounds, and of the four-ring species pyrene and chrysene and their alkylated congeners, was seen. Substantial degradation (> 40%) of benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene also was seen. The results show that bioremediation can be a useful treatment in the cleanup of contaminated refinery sites.

  3. Shell plans $2. 2-billion renovation of Dutch refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladeur, P. (Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij B.V., Hague (Netherlands)); Bijwaard, H.

    1993-04-26

    Royal Dutch/Shell Group recently approved a $2.2 billion rejuvenation of its Pernis refinery, near Rotterdam. This upgrade will enable the refinery to meet product volume and quality demands well into the next century, while reducing environmental emissions. Cornerstones of the $1.7-billion main revamp project are a single-train, 8,000 metric tons/sd (mt/sd), or about 56,000 b/sd, hydrocracking unit and a three-train 1,650 mt/sd residue-gasification unit for production of hydrogen and sulfur-free fuel gas. Fuel gas will be used in a new 115-mw electricity cogeneration plant. In addition, new amine treating, sulfur recovery, and tail gas units will be installed. The paper describes the process selection; hydrocracking unit; gasification unit; utilities; construction; and environmental aspects.

  4. Martinez Refinery Completes Plant-Wide Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-11-01

    This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes how the Equilon Enterprises oil refinery in Martinez, California undertook a plant-wide energy assessment that focused on three key areas: waste minimization, process debottlenecking, and operations optimization. The assessment yielded recommendations, which, if implemented, can save more than 6,000,000 MMBtu per year and an estimated $52,000,000 per year, plus improve process control and reduce waste.

  5. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  6. Initial Assessment of U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U.S. Refineries for Purposes of Potential Bio-Based Oil Insertions Freeman, Charles J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Shinn,...

  7. Aspects of Holly Corporation's Acquisition of Sunoco Inc.'s Tulsa, Oklahoma Refinery

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration has produced a review of aspects of the Holly's acquisition of Sunoco's 85,000-barrels-per-day Tulsa refinery.

  8. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q.

    2010-12-08

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  9. GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL AGO HGO HFO RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude Distillation

  10. GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    HF REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL AGO HGO HFO RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude

  11. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  12. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  13. Asia/Pacific refineries spark growth in conversion capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-12-18

    Led by refiners in the Asia/Pacific region, worldwide capacity for conversion processes, such as fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, and coking, increased at a faster pace this year than did crude oil distillation capacity. Crude capacity showed only a small gain of 0.4% to 74.5 million b/d according to the Journal`s most recent survey of refining capacity. This article summarizes data from the survey on the largest refiners, capacities, conversion processes, fuel processes, processing comparison, and refinery size.

  14. Advanced controls pay out in 6 weeks at Texas refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullerdiek, E.A. [Marathon Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States); Hobbs, J.W. [Inferential Control Co., Broken Arrow, OK (United States)

    1995-06-19

    Marathon Oil Co. installed advanced controls on two crude units and a fluid catalytic cracking unit main fractionator at its 70,000 b/d Texas City, Tex., refinery. The advanced controls were based on inferred properties supplied by an outside vendor, who also provided consulting and assistance during the implementation phases. (Inferred properties are on-line computations for estimating laboratory test properties, such as ASTM boiling point and flash point, that are used for product quality control.) The paper discusses inferred properties, bias updating, control strategies, control implementation, and post-project work, including fuzzy logic, the statistical quality control program, benefits, and availability.

  15. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  16. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  17. The Heliospheric Termination Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

    2008-07-25

    The heliospheric Termination Shock is the largest (by dimension) shock in the heliosphere. It is believed that it is also the strongest shock and is responsible for the generation of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray component in the heliosphere. This chapter review the gross properties and observations of the Termination Shock. It is structured as follows: 1. The heliosphere, providing the heliospheric stage for Termination Shock formation, 2. The argument for a heliospheric Termination Shock, 3. The global heliospheric system, 4. Termination Shock properties, 5. Observations: the Voyager passages, radio observations, plasma waves and electron beams, traces of plasma and magnetic field, energetic particles, galactic cosmic rays, Termination Shock particles, the anomalous cosmic ray component, 6. Conclusions.

  18. Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Stephanie

    distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functionsTermination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion Aaron Stump Computer type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced

  19. Valero: Houston Refinery Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Develop an Energy Optimization and Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-01

    This Industrial Technologies Program case study describes an energy assessment team's recommendations for saving $5 million in energy, water, and other costs at an oil refinery in Houston, Texas.

  20. CO2 Reduction through Optimization of Steam Network in Petroleum Refineries: Evaluation of New Scenario 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K; Khodaie, H.; Amidpour, M.

    2008-01-01

    Steam network of petroleum refinery is energy intensive, and consequently contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions. A simple model for the estimation of CO2 emissions associated with operation of steam network as encountered...

  1. Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Corinne Valkenburg, Staff Engineer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  2. A Case Study of Steam System Evaluation in a Petroleum Refinery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatesan, V. V.; Iordanova, N.

    2003-01-01

    in the areas of: Steam generation, Steam distribution, Steam Utilization, Condensate recovery, and Combustion optimization in kilns. By implementing all the above 31 ECMs, the refinery is estimated to save $3.5 million annually. Based on our preliminary...

  3. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  4. Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Berthold

    2006-02-22

    The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

  5. Restoration of Refinery Heaters Using the Technique of Prefabricated Ceramic Fiber Lined Panels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sento, H. D.

    1981-01-01

    OF REFINERY HEATERS USING THE TECHNIQUE OF PREFABRICATED CERAMIC FIBER LINED PANELS Henry D. Sento Exxon Co. U.S.A., Refining Department Baton Rouge, Louisiana ABSTRACT Refinery heater fuel requirements often represent HEATER COMPONENTS 50... in position and seal welded. This completes the job. TYPICAL RESTORATION These are Panels Being Shop Prefabricated Prior to Turnaround 25 ESL-IE-81-04-04 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981...

  6. Hydrocracking in a low-fuel-oil refinery: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, N.D.; Traylor, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    At the TOSCO Bakersfield refinery in California, hydrocracking is an important process the conversion of heavy oil to gasoline. The process facilitates maximizing the yield of gasoline, the refinery's primary product. Over the last 15 years, increased production goals have been achieved through increases in the capacity of the hydrocracking unit, and improvements in gasoline yield have been obtained by modifying the unit to use new improved catalysts.

  7. Emission factors for leaks in refinery components in heavy liquid service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taback, H.; Godec, M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this program was to provide sufficient screening data so that EPA can develop an official set of emission factors (expressed in lb/hr/component) for refinery components (valves, flanged connectors, non-flanged connectors, pumps, open-ended lines, and other) in heavy liquid (BL) service. To accomplish this, 211,000 existing HL screening values from Southern California refineries were compiled and compared with 2,500 new HL screening measurements taken at two refineries in the state of Washington. Since Southern California is an area in extreme non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore has tight emission control regulations, it was felt that its screening data may not be representative of refineries without tight emission controls. Thus, the Southern California screening data were compared to screening measurements at refineries in an area that is in attainment of the NAAQS and without emissions control, which is the case for those refineries in Washington. It was found that statistically there was no significant difference in emission factors between the two areas and, therefore, there appears to be no difference in emissions from heavy liquid components in areas with and without leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. The new emission factors range from 1/7 to 1/3 times the current EPA emission factors. This program was sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and an API report will soon be released providing complete details.

  8. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  9. Termination-Insensitive Computational Indistinguishability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Termination-Insensitive Computational Indistinguishability (and applications to computational indistinguishability: termination-insensitive computational indistinguishability (tic-indistinguishability). Tic-indistinguishability models indistinguishability with respect to distinguishers that cannot distinguish be- tween termination

  10. Termination and Recovery

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume defines event Termination and determination of when it is appropriate to cease emergency response activities and of associated notifications. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  11. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H.

    2008-07-01

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Local Termination: theory and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endrullis, Joerg; Waldmann, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of termination using well-founded monotone algebras has been a milestone on the way to automated termination techniques, of which we have seen an extensive development over the past years. Both the semantic characterisation and most known termination methods are concerned with global termination, uniformly of all the terms of a term rewriting system (TRS). In this paper we consider local termination, of specific sets of terms within a given TRS. The principal goal of this paper is generalising the semantic characterisation of global termination to local termination. This is made possible by admitting the well-founded monotone algebras to be partial. We also extend our approach to local relative termination. The interest in local termination naturally arises in program verification, where one is probably interested only in sensible inputs, or just wants to characterise the set of inputs for which a program terminates. Local termination will be also be of interest when dealing with a specif...

  13. Termination of Isabelle Functions via Termination of Rewriting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    Termination of Isabelle Functions via Termination of Rewriting Alexander Krauss,1 ChristianFG Informatik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Germany Abstract. We show how to automate termination proofs and invoking an external termination prover. Our link to the external prover includes full proof reconstruction

  14. Report Form for Program Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Report Form for Program Termination Program(s) to be deleted: Effective date of termination: 1. List reasons for termination and describe the background leading to this decision. 2. Technical the last five years. #12;3. Impact of the termination. Internal 3.1 What if any impact

  15. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  16. Soil cleaning at Czechowice Refinery A. Worsztynowicz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    passive and active variations of a biopile technique were selected for the demonstration. The lagoon of the lagoon. A divider, made of clay and air-impermeable, separates active section of the biopile from the passive one. The bulk material of the biopile consists of a 1meter high layer of contaminated soil, mixed

  17. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 2. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 2 of the study.

  18. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 3. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 3 of the study.

  19. Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 1 of the study.

  20. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ENVIRON International Corporation, in collaboration with Callidus Technologies by Honeywell and Shell Global Solutions, Inc., will develop and demonstrate a full-scale fuel blending and combustion system. This system will allow a broad range of opportunity fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas, to be safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria pollutants. The project will develop a commercial technology for application in refinery and chemical plant process heaters where opportunity fuels are used.

  1. Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Critical aspects of technology...

  2. Shipboard regasification terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, G.; Zednik, J.

    1999-07-01

    Mobil Technology Company and Mobil Shipping and Transportation Company have jointly developed a new combination of existing proven equipment to regasify LNG. Advantages of this Shipboard Regasification Terminal (SRT) include accelerated initial gas delivery schedule, low capital cost, delivery of smaller quantities of LNG at a competitive price and shorter term of LNG purchase and improved financing options. These advantages benefit both the supplier of LNG and the purchaser. SRT can be used as an interim supply to developing markets allowing the demand to grow while developing downstream infrastructure. This concept does not involve offshore transfer of cryogenic fluids while delivering near-ambient temperature pipeline quality gas at typical pipeline pressures. During times when gas is not required, the SRT ship can easily be returned to the trade of transporting and delivering LNG to conventional land based terminals. This paper will discuss the merits of Shipboard Regasification Terminals in general, cover the development of this concept and review the factors guiding the use of SRT vs. an onshore terminal.

  3. Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Aaron; Weirich, Stephanie; 10.4204/EPTCS.43.6

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a type-and-effect system called Teqt, which distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functions, for a lambda calculus with general recursion and equality types. The central idea is to include a primitive type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced from possibly diverging to total, using a proof of Terminates t. We call such coercions termination casts, and show how to implement terminating recursion using them. For the meta-theory of the system, we describe a translation from Teqt to a logical theory of termination for general recursive, simply typed functions. Every typing judgment of Teqt is translated to a theorem expressing the appropriate termination property of the computational part of the Teqt term.

  4. Allocation of energy use in petroleum refineries to petroleum products : implications for life-cycle energy use and emission inventory of petroleum transportation fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Lee, H.; Molburg, J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products go through different processes within a refinery. Allocation at the subprocess level (i.e., the refining process level) instead of at the aggregate process level (i.e., the refinery level) is advocated by the International Standard Organization. In this study, we seek a means of allocating total refinery energy use among various refinery products at the level of individual refinery processes. We present a petroleum refinery-process-based approach to allocating energy use in a petroleum refinery to petroleum refinery products according to mass, energy content, and market value share of final and intermediate petroleum products as they flow through refining processes within a refinery. The results from this study reveal that product-specific energy use based on the refinery process-level allocation differs considerably from that based on the refinery-level allocation. We calculated well-to-pump total energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for gasoline, diesel, LPG, and naphtha with the refinery process-based allocation approach. For gasoline, the efficiency estimated from the refinery-level allocation underestimates gasoline energy use, relative to the process-level based gasoline efficiency. For diesel fuel, the well-to-pump energy use for the process-level allocations with the mass- and energy-content-based weighting factors is smaller than that predicted with the refinery-level allocations. However, the process-level allocation with the market-value-based weighting factors has results very close to those obtained by using the refinery-level allocations. For LPG, the refinery-level allocation significantly overestimates LPG energy use. For naphtha, the refinery-level allocation overestimates naphtha energy use. The GHG emission patterns for each of the fuels are similar to those of energy use.We presented a refining-process-level-based method that can be used to allocate energy use of individual refining processes to refinery products. The process-level-based method captures process-dependent characteristics of fuel production within a petroleum refinery. The method starts with the mass and energy flow chart of a refinery, tracks energy use by individual refining processes, and distributes energy use of a given refining process to products from the process. In allocating energy use to refinery products, the allocation method could rely on product mass, product energy contents, or product market values as weighting factors. While the mass- and energy-content-based allocation methods provide an engineering perspective of energy allocation within a refinery, the market-value-ased allocation method provides an economic perspective. The results from this study show that energy allocations at the aggregate refinery level and at the refining process level could make a difference in evaluating the energy use and emissions associated with individual petroleum products. Furthermore, for the refining-process-level allocation method, use of mass -- energy content- or market value share-based weighting factors could lead to different results for diesel fuels, LPG, and naphtha. We suggest that, when possible, energy use allocations should be made at the lowest subprocess level

  5. Eternal Inflation with Arrival Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry Stoltenberg; Andreas Albrecht

    2015-01-18

    We analyze the cosmological role of terminal vacua in the string theory landscape, and point out that existing work on this topic makes very strong assumptions about the properties of the terminal vacua. We explore the implications of relaxing these assumptions (by including "arrival" as well as "departure" terminals) and demonstrate that the results in earlier work are highly sensitive to their assumption of no arrival terminals. We use our discussion to make some general points about tuning and initial conditions in cosmology.

  6. Scheduling of oil-refinery operations Felipe Diaz-Alvarado2, Francisco Trespalacios1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    for the products. Product yields are specified for each crude. Minimum product yields for CDU. D-Slot Based Continuous-Time Formulation for Crude-Oil Scheduling Problems. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Mouret, S. Optimal Scheduling of Refinery Crude-Oil Operations. Ph.D. Thesis. Department of Chemical

  7. 1994 lubricating oil and wax capacities of U. S. and Canadian refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The paper consists of several tables which list the names of US and Canadian refineries, their location, and their capacity for production of lubricating oil and waxes categorized by finishing operations and primary processing. A separate table lists US and Canadian re-refiners and their capacity for refining waste lubricating oils.

  8. Optimal Industrial Load Control in Smart Grid: A Case Study for Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    the industry is a manufacturing unit (e.g., automotive, food, pulp-and-paper, chemicals, refining, and iron. In this paper, we investigate optimal load control for industrial load which involves several new and distinctOptimal Industrial Load Control in Smart Grid: A Case Study for Oil Refineries Armen Gholian, Hamed

  9. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils a Rhizosphere Science Research Group, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, N122S Agricultural Sciences North Manure and Byproducts Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA c Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group

  10. Application and Operation of a 2-MW Organic Rankine Cycle System on a Refinery FCC Unit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The nation's largest organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system was started up in July 1984 at a West Coast oil refinery. The system includes two hermetically sealed turbine-generator units, each rated at 1070 kW. Each turbine...

  11. Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Automation - FACS DOT Products, Inc. - NOVA #12;Distributed Control System Runs control algorithmthreetimesGross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization Xueyu Chen, Derya, Baton Rouge, LA (February 28, 2003) #12;INTRODUCTION o Status of on-line optimization o Theoretical

  12. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Emmanuel; Tel, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the sequential world, the processes involved in a distributed system do not necessarily know when a computation is globally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination, detection by a distributed observer, detection of the global termination. We give a complete characterisation (except in the local termination detection case where a partial one is given) for each of this termination detection and show that they define a strict hierarchy. These results emphasise the difference between computability of a distributed task and termination detection. Furthermore, these characterisations encompass all standard criteria that are usually formulated : topological restriction (tree, rings, or triangu- lated networks ...), topological knowledge (size, diameter ...), and local knowledge to distinguish nodes (identities, sense of direction). These re- sult...

  13. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.

    2015-03-30

    the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards...

  14. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  15. Use of Comprehensive Utility Software for Optimal Energy Management and Electric Grid Failure Assessment in an Oil Refinery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedard, S.; Hammache, A.; Poulin, B.; Ayotte-Sauve, A.

    2015-01-01

    software for optimal energy management and electric grid failure assessment in an oil refinery New Orleans – IETC Conference June 3, 2015 Serge Bédard M. Eng. Senior Project Manager CanmetENERGY - Industrial Optimization Systems ESL-IE-15...-06-18 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 ? Who is CanmetENERGY ? Project objectives ? Description of the refinery ? COGEN software ? Modeling strategy ? Energy saving projects ? Savings...

  16. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Reviews work in engineered thin-film nanoscale thermoelectric materials and nano-bulk materials with high ZT undertaken by...

  17. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MIDWEST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS MIDWEST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 1. Bulk Power Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24 D. Retail Access

  18. Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Describes technique of explosively...

  19. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  20. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  1. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  2. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  3. Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

    1985-01-01

    RETROFIT WITH GAS TURBINES ACHIEVE BOTH ENERGY SAVINGS AND EMISSION REDUCTIONS F. Giacobbe*, G. Iaquaniello**, R. G. Minet*, P. Pietrogrande* *KTI Corp., Research and Development Division, Monrovia, California **KTI SpA., Rome, Italy ABSTRACT... Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NO emissions while also generating electricity ~t an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented. INTRODUCTION Petroleum refining...

  4. Evaluating electric-resistance-welded tubing for refinery and chemical plant applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C.J.; Hotaling, A.C. )

    1993-02-01

    A laboratory technique was developed to assess the potential for preferential attack along the longitudinal seam of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) carbon steel tubing exposed to refinery and chemical plant process streams. Used in conjunction with an evaluation of mill fabrication practices, the test procedure can identify high-quality ERW products that can be used in many applications in place of seamless components at significant cost savings.

  5. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

  6. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil from Biomass Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI |Service ofConditioning FilterReferenceRefinery

  7. The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K.

    2008-10-15

    In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

  8. Who lives near coke plants and oil refineries An exploration of the environmental inequity hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, J.D.; Beaulieu, N.D.; Sussman, D.; Sadowitz, M.; Li, Y.C. )

    1999-04-01

    Facility-specific information on pollution was obtained for 36 coke plants and 46 oil refineries in the US and matched with information on populations surrounding these 82 facilities. These data were analyzed to determine whether environmental inequities were present, whether they were more economic or racial in nature, and whether the racial composition of nearby communities has changed significantly since plants began operations. The Census tracts near coke plants have a disproportionate share of poor and nonwhite residents. Multivariate analyses suggest that existing inequities are primarily economic in nature. The findings for oil refineries are not strongly supportive of the environmental inequity hypothesis. Rank ordering of facilities by race, poverty, and pollution produces limited (although not consistent) evidence that the more risky facilities tend to be operating in communities with above-median proportions of nonwhite residents (near coke plants) and Hispanic residents (near oil refineries). Over time, the radical makeup of many communities near facilities has changed significantly, particularly in the case of coke plants sited in the early 1900s. Further risk-oriented studies of multiple manufacturing facilities in various industrial sectors of the economy are recommended.

  9. Co-Terminal Handbook I. What is a co-terminal degree?.................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Co-Terminal Handbook 2014-2015 #12;Contents I. What is a co-terminal degree................................................................................10 VIII. Transferring to a Different Co-Terminal Program............................111 IX. Withdrawing from the Co-Terminal Program....................................122 X. Resources

  10. TERMINATION OF IDEAL COS m phi WINDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laslett, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    6 III . Termination of the cos A. B. Analysis ExamplesTERMINATION OF IDEAL COS m~ WINDING L.J. Laslett, S. Caspi,MAG-77 TERMINATION OF IDEAL COS WINDING L. J . Las1ett, S.

  11. TERMINATION OF IDEAL COS m phi WINDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laslett, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    6 III . Termination of the cos A. B.of Dipole Magnets 1. The Lambertson-Coupland TerminationTerminations Employing the Function f(y) = k(y/a)P

  12. Unrestricted Termination and Non-termination Arguments for Bit-Vector Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KrĂśning, Daniel

    Unrestricted Termination and Non-termination Arguments for Bit-Vector Programs Cristina David, Daniel Kroening, and Matt Lewis University of Oxford Abstract. Proving program termination is typically for proving termination of many terminating programs, and furthermore a termination argument for a program

  13. Terminality implies non-signalling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bob Coecke

    2014-12-30

    A 'process theory' is any theory of systems and processes which admits sequential and parallel composition. `Terminality' unifies normalisation of pure states, trace-preservation of CP-maps, and adding up to identity of positive operators in quantum theory, and generalises this to arbitrary process theories. We show that terminality and non-signalling coincide in any process theory, provided one makes causal structure explicit. In fact, making causal structure explicit is necessary to even make sense of non-signalling in process theories. We conclude that because of its much simpler mathematical form, terminality should be taken to be a more fundamental notion than non-signalling.

  14. McKenize Terminal - 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2009-01-01

    Š2008 ASHRAE 83 ABSTRACT Empirical models of airflow output, power consumption, and primary airflow were developed for parallel fan powered variable air volume terminal units at typical operating pres- sures. Both 8 in. (203 mm) and 12 in. (304 mm...) primary air inlet terminal units from three manufacturers were evaluated. Generalized models were developed from the experimental data with coefficients varying by size and manufacturer. Fan power and airflow data were collected at down- stream static...

  15. A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvin, David

    A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which takes in crude oil, up to a maximum of 650,000 barrels per day (bbl/day) and produces **" means "**% octane".) Once crude oil enters the system, it goes fully through the process. The refinery

  16. BLENDING PROBLEM A refinery blends four petroleum components into three grades of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shier, Douglas R.

    BLENDING PROBLEM A refinery blends four petroleum components into three grades of gasoline/day $/barrel #1 5,000 $9.00 #2 2,400 7.00 #3 4,000 12.00 #4 1,500 6.00 Blending formulas and selling price 4,000 x4R + x4P + x4L 1,500 #12;blending: (1) x1R / (x1R + x2R + x3R + x4R) .40 or x1R .40(x1R

  17. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER ERCOT (Texas)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS ERCOT (Texas) November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 D. The New Wholesale Market and the Move Toward Retail Choice . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 3-8 A. The Bulk Power Transmission System

  18. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhamdhere, Dhananjay Madhav

    systems, Termination detection. \\Lambda Address all correspondence to this author. 1 #12; Distributed

  19. Program termination discussed by BOT AA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Program termination discussed by BOT AA and BOT Full (termination of concentrations does Education (CHE) Approval Process Timeline Program Terminations 2014-2015 NOTE: These dates reflect the shortest amount of time it takes to process a program termination through the approval cycle

  20. Division of Human Resources Termination Of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Division of Human Resources Termination Of Domestic Partnership Health Stipend Questions (813) 974 Insurance Stipend will terminate as of the Effective Date on this Termination of Domestic Partnership Health. ______ The Domestic Partnership Declaration attested to and filed by me with USF shall be and is terminated

  1. Termination of Nondeterministic Quantum Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjia Li; Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

    2012-01-04

    We define a language-independent model of nondeterministic quantum programs in which a quantum program consists of a finite set of quantum processes. These processes are represented by quantum Markov chains over the common state space. An execution of a nondeterministic quantum program is modeled by a sequence of actions of individual processes. These actions are described by super-operators on the state Hilbert space. At each step of an execution, a process is chosen nondeterministically to perform the next action. A characterization of reachable space and a characterization of diverging states of a nondeterministic quantum program are presented. We establish a zero-one law for termination probability of the states in the reachable space of a nondeterministic quantum program. A combination of these results leads to a necessary and sufficient condition for termination of nondeterministic quantum programs. Based on this condition, an algorithm is found for checking termination of nondeterministic quantum programs within a fixed finite-dimensional state space. A striking difference between nondeterministic classical and quantum programs is shown by example: it is possible that each of several quantum programs simulates the same classical program which terminates with probability 1, but the nondeterministic program consisting of them terminates with probability 0 due to the interference carried in the execution of them.

  2. Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    -Champaign 1241 Newmark Civil Engineering Lab, MC-250, 205 N. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, U.S.A., E Engineering, Inc., 8005 Hallet Street, Lenexa, KS 66215, U.S.A., E-mail: lynn.brown@hdrinc.com. ABSTRACT of crude oil and natural gas are trapped beneath the ground surface in non-permeable shale rock

  3. Page 1 EIA-815, Monthly Bulk Terminal and Blender Report U. S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIARegionalMethodologyNorth093EIA-815, Monthly

  4. Termination or Transfer Checklist for Managers Employees can terminate from their positions for many reasons including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    HR-FRM-050 Termination or Transfer Checklist for Managers Employees can terminate from etc. This checklist is to be used by managers when an employee is going to terminate from as part of the termination process. Type of Termination Resignation: If your employee is resigning, review

  5. Bioremediation of a Process Waste Lagoon at a Southern Polish Oil Refinery -DoE's First Demonstration Project in Poland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    a technology known as biopiling. The original lagoon sludge was amended and sold as a fuel to a local cement,000 ppm was targeted for treatment. The biopile was divided into two sections; an area of approximately at the refinery. Since the fall of 1997, approximately 80 tons of TPH have been removed from the biopile

  6. Li3PX4: Bulk and Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzwarth, Natalie

    show considerable promise for advancing battery technology ˇ Improved safety characteristics ˇ Allow properties are: ˇ Stability ˇ Inteface stability ˇ Ionic Conductivity Tesla Model S #12;Li3PX4: Bulk

  7. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stage expected to show a 5% fuel efficiency improvement in vehicle platform under US06 drive cycle caylor.pdf More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk...

  8. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

  9. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

  10. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

  11. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

  12. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization a program can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness

  13. Using indicators in finite termination procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. J. Williams; A. S. El-Bakry; R. W. Tapia

    1999-10-01

    The presence of bounded variables complicates finite termination procedures in interior-point methods for linear programming.

  14. Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps A series of slides showing the status of various LNG terminals (existing, under construction, proposed, etc.) in...

  15. Termination by Aphasia & Carotid Artery Disease: History and Definition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tkachuk, Emma

    2014-01-01

    nonfiction. Her paper on Termination by Aphasia and CarotidVol. 6 Issue 1 2014 Termination by Aphasia & Carotid Arterywith Leonid Krukov in Termination by Aphasia. People like

  16. Pooh-Poohing Copyright Law’s “Inalienable” Termination Rights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menell, Peter; Nimmer, David

    2010-01-01

    Accordingly, the relevant termination window under § 304(d)between them, to use termination rights to enhance theirand clarity of the termination of transfer provisions. Š

  17. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  18. Modularity of Termination Using Dependency Pairs ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    Modularity of Termination Using Dependency Pairs ? Thomas Arts 1 and J¨urgen Giesl 2 1 Computer@informatik.tu­darmstadt.de Abstract. The framework of dependency pairs allows automated ter­ mination and innermost termination proofs of this framework in order to prove termination in a modular way. Our mod­ ularity results significantly increase

  19. Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Ashish

    Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, CA, U.S.A tiwari@csl.sri.com Abstract. We show that termination of a class of linear loop programs is decidable. Linear loop programs are discrete-time linear systems with a loop condition governing termination

  20. Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs Ren´e Thiemann, J¨urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well-founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

  1. Revised December, 2014 DOSIMETRY TERMINATION REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised December, 2014 DOSIMETRY TERMINATION REQUEST In order to ensure that dosimetry records are accurately maintained we require that persons wishing to terminate personal dosimetry fill out this form attention. Your badge(s) will be terminated upon receipt of this form. PIs may be charged

  2. Fourth International Workshop on Termination Dagstuhl, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    Fourth International Workshop on Termination WST '99 Dagstuhl, Germany May 10­12, 1999 Abstracts #12; Fourth International Workshop on Termination WST '99 Dagstuhl, Germany May 10­12, 1999 Abstracts, The Netherlands) #12; Contents Hans Zantema The Termination Hierarchy for Term Rewriting

  3. Total termination of term rewriting is undecidable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Total termination of term rewriting is undecidable Hans Zantema Utrecht University, Department Usually termination of term rewriting systems (TRS's) is proved by means of a monotonic well­founded order. If this order is total on ground terms, the TRS is called totally terminating. In this paper we prove that total

  4. Termination Analysis with Compositional Transition Invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KrĂśning, Daniel

    Termination Analysis with Compositional Transition Invariants Daniel Kroening1 , Natasha Sharygina2 termination provers rely on a safety checker to con- struct disjunctively well-founded transition invariants that uses a light-weight check based on transitivity of ranking relations to prove program termination. We

  5. Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs Renâ??e Thiemann, JË?urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well­founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

  6. Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Ashish

    Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari # SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, CA, U.S.A tiwari@csl.sri.com Abstract. We show that termination of a class of linear loop programs is decidable. Linear loop programs are discrete­time linear systems with a loop condition governing termination

  7. Terminals and Ports Jan C. Willems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terminals and Ports Jan C. Willems ESAT, K.U. Leuven, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium Email: Jan. An electrical circuit is a device that interacts with its environment through wires, called terminals. On each terminal, there are two interaction variables, a potential and a current. Interconnection of circuits

  8. Semicontinuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    , and classical applications are total correctness and termination of partial evaluation. In languagesSemi­continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel # Institut für Informatik Ludwig to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored in its type

  9. TERMINATION OF SIMPLY MODED WELLTYPED LOGIC PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    is borrowed from [9], defining a similar notion in the context of termination of off­line partial evaluation only partially corresponds to our intuitive notion of a ``terminating computation''. This is becauseTERMINATION OF SIMPLY MODED WELL­TYPED LOGIC PROGRAMS UNDER TABLED EXECUTION MECHANISM Sofie

  10. Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, Luisa Tan

    This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

  11. Premelting at Defects Within Bulk Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Peter

    Premelting at Defects Within Bulk Colloidal Crystals A. M. Alsayed,1 M. F. Islam,1 J. Zhang,1 P. J at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals using real- time video microscopy. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed, three- dimensional colloidal structures made from thermally

  12. Termination or Transfer Checklist for Employees Employees can terminate from their positions for many reasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    HR-FRM-051 Termination or Transfer Checklist for Employees Employees can terminate from etc. This checklist is to be used by employees who are terminating from the University or transferring the University, review the voluntary termination policy for the minimum notice guidelines required

  13. Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation Germ´an Vidal challenges in partial evaluation is the design of automatic methods for ensuring the termination of spe- cialisation. It is well known that the termination of partial evalua- tion can be ensured when the considered

  14. Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation ? Germ#19;an approach by designing a simple partial evaluator in which global termination is always ensured o#15;ine (i but only provides partial termination guarantees. Holst [18] was the #12;rst to relate (within

  15. Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation Germ´an Vidal approach by designing a simple partial evaluator in which global termination is always ensured offline (i for ensuring the termination of offline partial eval- uation yet. Recent progress include [9], which presents

  16. Bulk equations of motion from CFT correlators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Kabat; Gilad Lifschytz

    2015-07-27

    To O(1/N) we derive, purely from CFT data, the bulk equations of motion for interacting scalar fields and for scalars coupled to gauge fields and gravity. We first uplift CFT operators to mimic local AdS fields by imposing bulk microcausality. This requires adding an infinite tower of smeared higher-dimension double-trace operators to the CFT definition of a bulk field, with coefficients that we explicitly compute. By summing the contribution of the higher-dimension operators we derive the equations of motion satisfied by these uplifted CFT operators and show that we precisely recover the expected bulk equations of motion. We exhibit the freedom in the CFT construction which corresponds to bulk field redefinitions.

  17. Bulk equations of motion from CFT correlators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabat, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To O(1/N) we derive, purely from CFT data, the bulk equations of motion for interacting scalar fields and for scalars coupled to gauge fields and gravity. We first uplift CFT operators to mimic local AdS fields by imposing bulk microcausality. This requires adding an infinite tower of smeared higher-dimension double-trace operators to the CFT definition of a bulk field, with coefficients that we explicitly compute. By summing the contribution of the higher-dimension operators we derive the equations of motion satisfied by these uplifted CFT operators and show that we precisely recover the expected bulk equations of motion. We exhibit the freedom in the CFT construction which corresponds to bulk field redefinitions.

  18. PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

  19. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

    1996-11-01

    Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

  20. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  1. The Bulk Viscosity of a Pion Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egang Lu; Guy D. Moore

    2011-01-31

    We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of pion mass, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity zeta ~ (F_0^8/m_\\pi^5) exp(2m_\\pi/T), where F_0 = 93 MeV is the pion decay constant.

  2. A remote image analysis terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daigle, Lucien Don

    1976-01-01

    A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D VITA 140 142 157 157 162 163 164 170 179 190 234 Vrzt I, I S'I' III' I: I OIIRI:. 8 The Remote Image Analysis Terminal System Block Diagram The Digital Interface The Analog Interface Digitizer...- flow Chart Loading and Transmission of Position Coordinates Page 59 61 63 65 66 II-22 II-23 Keyboard Block Diagram Generation and Transmission cE a Hex Digit 69 70 II- 24 I I-25 Opcode Table 73 Partial Block Diagram...

  3. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Charles; Wilson, Robert

    2014-04-30

    This project culminated in the demonstration of a full-scale industrial burner which allows a broad range of “opportunity” gaseous fuels to be cost-effectively and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria air pollutants. The burner is capable of maintaining a stable flame when the fuel composition changes rapidly. This enhanced stability will contribute significantly to improving the safety and reliability of burner operation in manufacturing sites. Process heating in the refining and chemicals sectors is the primary application for this burner. The refining and chemical sectors account for more than 40% of total industrial natural gas use. Prior to the completion of this project, an enabling technology did not exist that would allow these energy-intensive industries to take full advantage of opportunity fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gaseous fuels include biogas (from animal and agricultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills) as well as syngas (from the gasification of biomass, municipal solid wastes, construction wastes, and refinery residuals). The primary challenge to using gaseous opportunity fuels is that their composition and combustion performance differ significantly from those of conventional fuels such as natural gas and refinery fuel gas. An effective fuel-flexible burner must accept fuels that range widely in quality and change in composition over time, often rapidly. In Phase 1 of this project, the team applied computational fluid dynamics analysis to optimize the prototype burner’s aerodynamic, combustion, heat transfer, and emissions performance. In Phase 2, full-scale testing and refinement of two prototype burners were conducted in test furnaces at Zeeco’s offices in Broken Arrow, OK. These tests demonstrated that the full range of conventional and opportunity fuels could be utilized by the project’s burner while achieving robust flame stability and very low levels of air pollutant emissions. In Phase 3, the team retrofitted three fuel-flexible burners into a fired heater at a Shell plant and demonstrated the project’s technology over a 6-month period. The project burners performed well during this period. They remain in commercial service at the Shell plant. Through this work, an improved understanding of flame stabilization mechanisms was gained. Also, methods for accommodating a wide range of fuel compositions were developed. This knowledge facilitated the commercialization of a new generation of burners that are suitable for the fuels of the future.

  4. Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low Activity Waste (LAW) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the safe...

  5. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2008-03-15

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on the refinery of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report on the Workshop on the Refinery of the Future has been prepared for participants to provide them with a succinct summary of the presentations, deliberations, and discussions. In preparing the summary, we have striven to capture the key findings (conclusions) and highlight the issues and concerns raised during the plenary and breakout sessions. The presentation of the summary of the proceedings follows the final workshop agenda, which is given in Section I; each section is tabbed to facilitate access to specific workshop topics. The material presented relies heavily on the outline summaries prepared and presented by the Plenary Session Chairman and the Facilitators for each breakout group. These summaries are included essentially as presented. In addition, individuals were assigned to take notes during each session; these notes were used to reconstruct critical issues that were discussed in more detail. The key comments made by the participants, which tended to represent the range of views expressed relative to the issues, are presented immediately following the facilitator`s summary outline in order to convey the flavor of the discussions. The comments are not attributed to individuals, since in many instances they represent a composite of several similar views expressed during the discussion. The facilitators were asked to review the writeups describing the outcomes of their sessions for accuracy and content; their suggested changes were incorporated. Every effort has thus been made to reconstruct the views expressed as accurately as possible; however, errors and/or misinterpretations undoubtedly have occurred.

  7. New process technology already existing in your refinery: Hydroprocessing-FCC Synergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanger, C.W. Jr.; Fletcher, R.; Johnson, C.; Reid, T. [Akzo Nobel Chemicals Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-01

    New processing technology is now available to improve refinery operating margins. The cost of this technology is minor if a refiner has a VGO or Resid hydrotreater and an FCCU. The primary requirement is changing the way work is done. Addition of new capital can be an optional step. The New technology is Hydroprocessing-FCC Synergy. Redirecting the work effort to operate, optimize, and budget the FCC pretreater, the FCC and any FCC post-treaters as one unit can optimize margins. Calculating the unit operating margins on the difference of FCC final product value minus the pretreater and FCC operating costs highlights the new technology`s enhanced profitability. The synergy connectiveness is made through the hydrocarbon flow and properties. Selecting the proper conditions and catalyst to complement each other`s performance is the technical key. This paper discusses the techniques for catalyst and operating condition selection. The concept of changing formulations with processing age is discussed. Finally a case study comparing Hydroprocessing-FCC Synergy versus classical non-synergistic approaches is presented, including the effect of new Hydroprocessing and FCC catalysts on the profitability increase.

  8. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  9. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  10. The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells Print Monday, 28...

  11. THRESHOLD RADIOACTIVITY FOR BULK FOOD SAMPLES BY GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THRESHOLD RADIOACTIVITY FOR BULK FOOD SAMPLES BY GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THRESHOLD RADIOACTIVITY FOR BULK FOOD SAMPLES BY GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY...

  12. Light-Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrate Light-Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrate Presenter: Arpan Chakraborty, Soraa Inc. This...

  13. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for...

  14. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

  15. Automation of Termination: Abstracting CCG through MWG Automation of Termination: Abstracting Calling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Automation of Termination: Abstracting CCG through MWG Automation of Termination: Abstracting.Ayala-Rinc´on & C.A.Munoz IX Semin´ario Informal(, mas Formal!) November 29, 2013 1 / 32 #12;Automation science. While classical results state the undecidability of various termination problems, automated

  16. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler­Style Course­Of­Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  17. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler-Style Course-Of-Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  18. Termination Analysis of Term Rewriting by Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    Termination Analysis of Term Rewriting by Polynomial Interpretations and Matrix Interpretations of the University of Innsbruck in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of "Doktor der technischen Wissenschaften" advisor: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Aart Middeldorp Innsbruck, March 2012 #12;#12;dissertation Termination

  19. Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blass, Andreas R.

    Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings Andreas Blass Yuri Gurevich Abstract The following observation may be useful in establishing program termination: if a transitive relation R is covered of the stature P of a well partial ordering P and show that |R| 1 × ˇ ˇ ˇ × n and that this bound is tight

  20. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  1. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iorio; G. Lambiase

    2014-11-28

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, that cannot be explained by the conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  2. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  3. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks James D. McCalley August 23, 2005 #12, and Electric Transportation Systems (1) What energy flow patterns would yield significantly improved energy (ISU - Randy Larabee) ˇ City of Ames (Ames - Merlin Hove) ˇ MidAmerican Energy (Des Moines - Alan O

  4. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    natural gas pipeline capacity from gulf to NE? Production: How would major investment in a specific/trading restrictions? What would be impacts on fuel and electricity markets? How do high natural gas prices drive1 Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks Electrical Engineering Professor Jim Mc

  5. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER NORTHEAST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS NORTHEAST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions Activities and Retail Competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-49 5. Prices, Market Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13 A. Overview of Product Markets, Market Design and Pricing Rules . . . . . . . 1-15 1. Energy

  6. Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination Pinak Tulpule architecture was used as globally shared memory structure for detection of algorithm termination. This paper of algorithm termination. Keywords--autonomous agent-based reconfiguration, dis- tributed algorithms, shipboard

  7. Increasing Creel Interview Efficiency Through Early Survey Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increasing Creel Interview Efficiency Through Early Survey Termination HAL R. OSBURN and MIKE G were terminated early when no angler interviews were con ducted by a specified time. Using this method, terminating

  8. Termination Analysis of Java Bytecode Elvira Albert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenas, Puri

    program properties is often split into separately proving partial correctness and termination. ObjectTermination Analysis of Java Bytecode Elvira Albert1 , Puri Arenas1 , Michael Codish2 , Samir Abstract. Termination analysis has received considerable attention, traditionally in the context

  9. Notice of Termination for Authorization under TPDES General Permit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Termination for Authorization under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Notice of Termination for...

  10. The r-Process in Supersonic Neutrino-Driven Winds: The Roll of Wind Termination Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takami Kuroda; Shinya Wanajo; Ken'ichi Nomoto

    2007-09-17

    Recent hydrodynamic studies of core-collapse supernovae imply that the neutrino-heated ejecta from a nascent neutron star develops to supersonic outflows. These supersonic winds are influenced by the reverse shock from the preceding supernova ejecta, forming the wind termination shock. We investigate the effects of the termination shock in neutrino-driven winds and its roll on the r-process. Supersonic outflows are calculated with a semi-analytic neutrino-driven wind model. Subsequent termination-shocked, subsonic outflows are obtained by applying the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. We find a couple of effects that can be relevant for the r-process. First is the sudden slowdown of the temperature decrease by the wind termination. Second is the entropy jump by termination-shock heating, up to several 100NAk. Nucleosynthesis calculations in the obtained winds are performed to examine these effects on the r-process. We find that 1) the slowdown of the temperature decrease plays a decisive roll to determine the r-process abundance curves. This is due to the strong dependences of the nucleosynthetic path on the temperature during the r-process freezeout phase. Our results suggest that only the termination-shocked winds with relatively small shock radii (~500km) are relevant for the bulk of the solar r-process abundances (A~100-180). The heaviest part in the solar r-process curve (A~180-200), however, can be reproduced both in shocked and unshocked winds. These results may help to constrain the mass range of supernova progenitors relevant for the r-process. We find, on the other hand, 2) negligible roles of the entropy jump on the r-process. This is a consequence that the sizable entropy increase takes place only at a large shock radius (~10,000km) where the r-process has already ceased.

  11. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, legal representative, Carol (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  12. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  13. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM (DBVS) EXTERNAL REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HONEYMAN, J.O.

    2007-02-08

    The Hanford mission to retrieve and immobilize 53 million gallons of radioactive waste from 177 underground storage tanks will be accomplished using a combination of processing by the waste treatment plant currently under construction, and a supplemental treatment that would process low-activity waste. Under consideration for this treatment is bulk vitrification, a versatile joule-heated melter technology which could be deployed in the tank farms. The Department proposes to demonstrate this technology under a Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) permit issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology using both non-radioactive simulant and blends of actual tank waste. From the demonstration program, data would be obtained on cost and technical performance to enable a decision on the potential use of bulk vitrification as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford. An independent review by sixteen subject matter experts was conducted to assure that the technical basis of the demonstration facility design would be adequate to meet the objectives of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) program. This review explored all aspects of the program, including flowsheet chemistry, project risk, vitrification, equipment design and nuclear safety, and was carried out at a time when issues can be identified and corrected. This paper describes the mission need, review approach, technical recommendations and follow-on activities for the DBVS program.

  15. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  16. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  17. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  18. Final Report - Development of New Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Technology to Recover High Valued Products from Chemical Plant and Refinery Waste Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith Ludwig

    2004-06-14

    Project Objective was to extend pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology into previously under-exploited applications such as polyolefin production vent gas recovery and H2 recovery from refinery waste gases containing significant amounts of heavy hydrocarbons, aromatics, or H2S.

  19. Detecting Termination of Active Database Rules Using Symbolic Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Indrakshi

    Detecting Termination of Active Database Rules Using Symbolic Model Checking Indrakshi Ray is the non-termination of rules. Although algorithms have been proposed to detect non-termination, al- most all provide a conservative estimate; that is, the algorithms detect all the potential cases of non-termination

  20. Financial Policy Manual 2411 NOTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE TERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2411 NOTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE TERMINATION Effective: December 1986 To establish policy regarding the timely processing of the termination notice to the Payroll Department is required for effecting an employee's termination. Terminating the current pay distribution does

  1. Termination of algebraic type systems: the syntactic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Raamsdonk, Femke

    Termination of algebraic type systems: the syntactic approach Gilles Barthe and Femke van Raamsdonk applications in proof­checking. A natural question in this field concerns the termination or strong normalisation of such systems and is as follows: given a terminating type system T and a terminating rewriting

  2. DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy This policy applies to all non to discipline, suspend with or without pay, or terminate employees for just cause. Just cause includes to discipline or termination for just cause, the University reserves the right to demote, suspend or terminate

  3. Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features Jamie Andrews Dept of termination for logic programs. I am particularly interested in the termination of logic programs which use practical features such as the Prolog ``cut''. In order to prove termination of such programs

  4. Tyrolean Termination Tool Nao Hirokawa and Aart Middeldorp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirokawa, Nao

    Tyrolean Termination Tool Nao Hirokawa and Aart Middeldorp Institute of Computer Science University describes the Tyrolean Termination Tool (TTT in the sequel), the successor of the Tsukuba Termination Tool are not (yet) avail- able in any other termination tool, in some detail. TTT is a tool for automatically

  5. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  6. A new class of high ZT doped bulk nanothermoelectrics through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new class of high ZT doped bulk nanothermoelectrics through bottom-up synthesis A new class of high ZT doped bulk nanothermoelectrics through bottom-up synthesis Reports on...

  7. Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 February 1, 2012 - 12:48pm Addthis The U.S. Department of...

  8. Composition, structure, and performance of nanocrystal bulk heterojunction photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Kevin J. (Kevin Joon-Ming)

    2015-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and study of bulk heterojunction solar cells composed of PbS quantum dots and TiO2. In particular, we study the effects that bulk heterojunction composition and structure have on resulting device ...

  9. Effective monitoring of non-chromate chemical treatment programs for refinery cooling systems using sewage water as make-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AlMajnouni, A.D.; Jaffer, A.E. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-08-01

    Treated sewage water as make-up to the cooling tower requires novel approaches to control potential cooling water problems common to refineries besides meeting environmental regulations. An intensive field study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of non-chromate treatment programs. On-line cleaning of the exchangers occurred prior to instituting the new chemical treatment program. Low carbon steel corrosion rates with minimal deposition was achieved. Microbiological fouling was controlled with chlorination and non-oxidizing biocide program. Field results are presented which compare the efficacy of these proprietary treatments to control corrosion and inhibit scale and fouling. Analytical results which provide a comprehensive performance evaluation of a new non-chromate chemical treatment program are presented.

  10. Improving the bulk data transfer experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

    2008-05-07

    Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

  11. RAPID/Bulk Transmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintasNEPA Timelines <Bulk Transmission

  12. RAPID/BulkTransmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintasNEPA Timelines <Bulk

  13. SSC termination will be lengthy and expensive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.

    1994-03-14

    Closing down the huge Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is going to take a lot of time and money. Congress gave the Department of Energy $640 million to begin the shutdown in fiscal 1994, and DOE is asking for another $180 million next year. In the meantime, Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary has come up with a termination plan for the project that will guide the department's activities. Much of the expense associated with terminating the SSC project involves closing out the many contracts the department has for building and supplying the site. Other major parts of the termination will be the environmental restoration and asset closeout, and the benefits provided for the SSC's employees. Two things still unresolved are the settlement DOE must make with Texas for the state's investment in the project and deciding what will be done with the facilities already there.

  14. Critical analysis of plume containment modeling in a thin heterogeneous unconfined aquifer: application to a bulk fuel storage terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia, Karl Edward

    1997-01-01

    program to simulate capture zones. It was found that the semi-analytical modeling effort performed by the consultants contracted by Chevron predicted a capture zone and drawdown at each well that were significantly less than there numerical counterpart...

  15. The Bulk Channel in Thermal Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2010-02-17

    We investigate the thermal correlator of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor in the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. Our goal is to constrain the spectral function in that channel, whose low-frequency part determines the bulk viscosity. We focus on the thermal modification of the spectral function, $\\rho(\\omega,T)-\\rho(\\omega,0)$. Using the operator-product expansion we give the high-frequency behavior of this difference in terms of thermodynamic potentials. We take into account the presence of an exact delta function located at the origin, which had been missed in previous analyses. We then combine the bulk sum rule and a Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Euclidean correlator to determine the intervals of frequency where the spectral density is enhanced or depleted by thermal effects. We find evidence that the thermal spectral density is non-zero for frequencies below the scalar glueball mass $m$ and is significantly depleted for $m\\lesssim\\omega\\lesssim 3m$.

  16. Bulk chemical and Hfâ??W isotopic consequences of incomplete accretion during planet formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Christina A; Nimmo, Francis; Chambers, John E

    2015-01-01

    Bulk chemical and Hf–W isotopic consequences of incompletestyle affects the bulk chemical and isotopic outcomes ofto investigate the bulk chemical and isotopic consequences

  17. Cost reduction ideas for LNG terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibullah, A.; Weldin, F.

    1999-07-01

    LNG projects are highly capital intensive and this has long been regarded as being inevitable. However, recent developments are forcing the LNG industry to aggressively seek cost reductions. For example, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) process is increasingly seen as a potential rival technology and is often being touted as an economically superior alternative fuel source. Another strong driving force behind needed cost reductions is the low crude oil price which seems to have settled in the $10--13/bb. range. LNG is well positioned as the fuel of choice for environmentally friendly new power projects. As a result of the projected demand for power especially in the Pacific Rim countries several LNG terminal projects are under consideration. Such projects will require a new generation of LNG terminal designs emphasizing low cost, small scale and safe and fully integrated designs from LNG supply to power generation. The integration of the LNG terminal with the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plant offers substantial cost savings opportunities for both plants. Various cost reduction strategies and their impact on the terminal design are discussed including cost reduction due to integration.

  18. eRA Training Team1 Terminations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    eRA Training Team1 xTrain Terminations Electronic Research Administration Sponsored by: The National Institutions of Health, Office of Extramural Research April 2010 #12;eRA Training Team2 xTrain General Information xTrain Overview The following section provides general information on the xTrain

  19. eRA Training Team1 Terminations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    eRA Training Team1 xTrain Terminations Electronic Research Administration Sponsored by: The National Institutes of Health, Office of Extramural Research March 2012 #12;eRA Training Team2 xTrain General Information xTrain Overview The following section provides general information on the xTrain

  20. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,564 23,050 322 0 25,936 Refinery 0 0 140 0 0 140 Bulk Terminal 0 613 17,580 0 0 18,193 Ethylene 0 0 251 0 0 251 Pipeline 0 1,625 3,944 320 0 5,889 Natural Gas Processing Plant 0...

  1. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    21,727 323 0 24,672 Refinery 0 0 219 0 0 219 Bulk Terminal 0 1,130 17,161 0 0 18,291 Ethylene 0 0 216 0 0 216 Pipeline 0 1,417 3,824 321 0 5,562 Natural Gas Processing Plant 0...

  2. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    21,726 323 0 24,671 Refinery 0 0 219 0 0 219 Bulk Terminal 0 1,130 17,161 0 0 18,291 Ethylene 0 0 216 0 0 216 Pipeline 0 1,417 3,824 321 0 5,562 Natural Gas Processing Plant 0...

  3. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

    2013-04-09

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  4. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ)

    2011-03-01

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

  6. DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.

    2013-10-10

    A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

  7. ISSUANCE 2015-06-08: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps, Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps, Final Rule

  8. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, A.

    2013-01-01

    INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May 2013 Andy Hoyle, Senior... ? Best Practices and Procedures ? Execute Opportunities ? Track Financial and Economic Benefits 6 weeks 12 weeks >12 weeks Implement Quick Wins OBJECTIVE: SUSTAINED IMPROVEMENT IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY May 2013 ESL-IE-13-05-14 Proceedings...

  9. Carbon Capture and Sequestration (via Enhanced Oil Recovery) from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart Mehlman

    2010-06-16

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE’s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  10. N-Terminal T4 Lysozyme Fusion Facilitates Crystallization of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N-Terminal T4 Lysozyme Fusion Facilitates Crystallization of a G Protein Coupled Receptor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: N-Terminal T4 Lysozyme Fusion Facilitates...

  11. Stochastic partial differential equations with singular terminal condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popier, Alexandre

    Stochastic partial differential equations with singular terminal condition A Matoussi, Lambert Piozin, A Popier To cite this version: A Matoussi, Lambert Piozin, A Popier. Stochastic partial differential equations with singular terminal condition. 2015. HAL Id: hal-01152687 https

  12. General Properties and Termination Conditions for Soft Constraint Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    General Properties and Termination Conditions for Soft Constraint Propagation S. Bistarelli (bista for its termination. 1. Introduction Soft constraints allow to model faithfully many real­life problems [14], probabilistic [10] and partial [11] constraints. The constraint propagation techniques usually

  13. Performance of ECM controlled VAV fan powered terminal units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cramlet, Andrew Charles

    2009-05-15

    Empirical performance models of fan airflow, primary airflow and power consumption were developed for series and parallel variable air volume fan powered terminal units. An experimental setup and test procedure were created to test the terminal...

  14. Macroscopic and direct light propulsion of bulk graphene material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tengfei; Wu, Yingpeng; Xiao, Peishuang; Yi, Ningbo; Lu, Yanhong; Ma, Yanfeng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    It has been a great challenge to achieve the direct light manipulation of matter on a bulk scale. In this work, the direct light propulsion of matter was observed on a macroscopic scale for the first time using a bulk graphene based material. The unique structure and properties of graphene and the morphology of the bulk graphene material make it capable of not only absorbing light at various wavelengths but also emitting energetic electrons efficiently enough to drive the bulk material following Newtonian mechanics. Thus, the unique photonic and electronic properties of individual graphene sheets are manifested in the response of the bulk state. These results offer an exciting opportunity to bring about bulk scale light manipulation with the potential to realize long-sought proposals in areas such as the solar sail and space transportation driven directly by sunlight.

  15. Hyperon bulk viscosity in the presence of antikaon condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debarati Chatterjee; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2009-10-31

    We investigate the hyperon bulk viscosity due to the non-leptonic process $n + p \\rightleftharpoons p + \\Lambda $ in $K^-$ condensed matter and its effect on the r-mode instability in neutron stars. We find that the hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient in the presence of antikaon condensate is suppressed compared with the case without the condensate. The suppressed hyperon bulk viscosity in the superconducting phase is still an efficient mechanism to damp the r-mode instability in neutron stars.

  16. RAPID/BulkTransmission/General Construction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎ | BulkTransmission‎ |RAPID/BulkTransmission/General

  17. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Idaho | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎ | BulkTransmission‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/Idaho <

  18. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Access | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎ | BulkTransmission‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/Idaho

  19. RPM-1 suppressors Act in synapse formation and axon termination in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Gloriana Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Variant Protein in Axon Termination and Synaptogenesis. St.Protein Acts in Axon Termination and Synaptogenesis in C.RPM-1 Regulates Axon Termination and Synaptogenesis through

  20. Rotor Termination in a Patient-Specific Model of Atrial Fibrillation /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzales, Matthew James

    2013-01-01

    of atrial fibrillation termination by rapidly unbinding Na+of atrial fibrillation termination by pure sodium channelfor spontaneous termination of reentrant tachycardias.

  1. Roles for Wnts and their receptors in topographic mapping and laminar termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Alisha

    2011-01-01

    tectum may be assigned termination sites on a "first come,Mapping and Laminar Termination A dissertation submitted inTermination ..

  2. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanism of Poly(A)-Dependent Transcription Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    dependent transcription termination. Nature 463, 245–249.of transcription termination factors with the RNA polymerasecomplexes in vitro by the termination factor Rat1. J. Biol.

  3. Creating Clarity for the Process of Managing Residents through Remediation, Probation and Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Remediation, Probation and Termination Murano T, Lypson M,remediation, probation and termination (RPT), as well as theobservation period. 4. Termination: when a resident is

  4. Vehicle drive module having improved terminal design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-04-25

    A terminal structure for vehicle drive power electronics circuits reduces the need for a DC bus and thereby the incidence of parasitic inductance. The structure is secured to a support that may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as by direct contact between the terminal assembly and AC and DC circuit components. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  5. Power converter having improved terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kaishian, Steven C.

    2007-03-06

    A terminal structure for power electronics circuits reduces the need for a DC bus and thereby the incidence of parasitic inductance. The structure is secured to a support that may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as by direct contact between the terminal assembly and AC and DC circuit components. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  6. New nano structure approaches for bulk thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jeonghoon

    2010-01-01

    in bulk thermoelectric materials", M. Mater. Res. Soc.Thermoelectricity", Materials Reserach Society Symposium,Johnson, D. C. , Eds. Materials Research Society: Boston,

  7. Synovial fluid homeostasis : bulk flow, lubricant transport, and biophysical restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, William Joseph

    2012-01-01

    of synovial fluid lubricants hyaluronan and proteoglycan 4HOMEOSTASIS: BULK FLOW, LUBRICANT TRANSPORT, AND BIOPHYSICALmodel of synovial fluid lubricant composition in normal and

  8. Optimizing Morphology of Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells A dissertation submittedBulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells by Jing Gao Doctorheterojunction polymer solar cells is profoundly influenced

  9. Discovery of New Alloys by Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery of New Alloys by Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis The Critical Materials Institute (CMI) is developing new capabilities in the search for new materials or substitutions in...

  10. Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulatory Roadmapping Pgower's picture Submitted by Pgower(50) Contributor 7 August, 2014 - 14:19 One-day workshop to review regulatory roadmaps for bulk transmission. Date:...

  11. Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure April 29, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Jenny Nelson...

  12. Economic manufacturing of bulk metallic glass compositions by microalloying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.

    2003-05-13

    A method of making a bulk metallic glass composition includes the steps of:a. providing a starting material suitable for making a bulk metallic glass composition, for example, BAM-11; b. adding at least one impurity-mitigating dopant, for example, Pb, Si, B, Sn, P, to the starting material to form a doped starting material; and c. converting the doped starting material to a bulk metallic glass composition so that the impurity-mitigating dopant reacts with impurities in the starting material to neutralize deleterious effects of the impurities on the formation of the bulk metallic glass composition.

  13. Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes from First Principles and Classical Reactive Molecular Dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lithium...

  14. Bulk viscosity of QCD matter near the critical temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kharzeev; K. Tuchin

    2007-05-29

    Kubo's formula relates bulk viscosity to the retarded Green's function of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Using low energy theorems of QCD for the latter we derive the formula which relates the bulk viscosity to the energy density and pressure of hot matter. We then employ the available lattice QCD data to extract the bulk viscosity as a function of temperature. We find that close to the deconfinement temperature bulk viscosity becomes large, with viscosity-to-entropy ratio zeta/s about 1.

  15. Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals in a Decision-Making Context1 potential offshore Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) sites and the types of terminals that might occupy those sites. The study had to evaluate the engineering feasibility of siting an LNG receiving terminal

  16. Proof-Theoretic Analysis of Termination Proofs Wilfried Buchholz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchholz, Wilfried

    Proof-Theoretic Analysis of Termination Proofs Wilfried Buchholz Mathematisches Institut der the order type of a termination ordering #30; places a bound on the lengths of reduction sequences; is the order type of a termination ordering #30; for a #12;nite rewrite system R then the function G#3; from

  17. SAT Instances for Termination Analysis with Carsten Fuhs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    SAT Instances for Termination Analysis with AProVE Carsten Fuhs LuFG Informatik 2, RWTH Aachen for tackling the search problems in automated termination analysis for term rewrite systems and for programming languages. Indeed, even since the last SAT competition in 2007, many new termination techniques have been

  18. Type-Based Termination of Functional Programs Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Type-Based Termination of Functional Programs Andreas Abel Department of Computer Science Ludwig Timmendorfer Strand, Germany Andreas Abel (LMU Munich) Type-Based Termination KPS'07 1 / 21 #12;Introduction Termination Question: Will the run of a program eventually halt? Undecidable for Turing-complete programming

  19. DETECTING TERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTED COMPUTATIONS USING MARKERS Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tropper, Carl

    DETECTING TERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTED COMPUTATIONS USING MARKERS Jayadev Misra Department in designing computations by process networks, is detection of termination. We propose a very simple algorithm for termination detection in an arbitrary network using a single marker We show an application of this scheme

  20. Abstraction and Implementation of a Lightweight Distributed Termination Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Simon

    Abstraction and Implementation of a Lightweight Distributed Termination Protocol D.M. Goodeve , C, University of Leeds, UK Department of Computer Science, Trinity College Dublin, Eire Abstract Termination synchronisation on this state costly. Many parallel applica- tions are structured such that termination occurs

  1. 9-1 (03/25/15) TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9-1 (03/25/15) SECTION 9 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT 9.1 NON-RENEWAL OF APPOINTMENT Non employees, except tenured and tenure-track faculty, are employees at-will, who may be terminated at any time unenforceable and is subject to termination without advance notice if, during the term of the faculty member

  2. Loop summarization and termination analysis Aliaksei Tsitovich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KrĂśning, Daniel

    Loop summarization and termination analysis Aliaksei Tsitovich1 , Natasha Sharygina1 , Christoph M termination analysis based on loop summarization. The algorithm relies on a library of ab- stract domains Introduction The program termination problem has received increased interest in the recent past. In practice

  3. Plasma waves associated with the termination W. S. Kurth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Plasma waves associated with the termination shock W. S. Kurth , D. A. Gurnett and R. B. Decker, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD Abstract. Voyager 1 crossed the termination shock for nearly a year prior to the termination shock crossing. The Langmuir waves are thought to be produced

  4. Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples David Thibodeau Decemer 3, 2011 Abstract Termination is an important property for programs and is necessary for formal proofs to make sense. In order to make sure that a program using recursion is terminating, one can use

  5. Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel-based approach to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored criterion, * *a calculus for semi-continuous function is developed. 1 Introduction Termination

  6. THE SIZE-CHANGE TERMINATION PRINCIPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR BASED LANGUAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvernat, Pierre

    THE SIZE-CHANGE TERMINATION PRINCIPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR BASED LANGUAGES PIERRE HYVERNAT Laboratoire describes an automatic termination checker for a generic first- order call-by-value language in ML style. We arguments of recursive calls evolve during evaluation. The result is a criterion for termination extending

  7. Type-Based Termination, Inflationary Fixed-Points, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Type-Based Termination, Inflationary Fixed-Points, and Mixed Inductive-Coinductive Types Andreas Science (FICS 2012) ETAPS 2012, Tallinn, Estonia 24 March 2012 Andreas Abel (LMU) Type-Based Termination AIM XV 1 / 1 #12;Introduction Aspects of Termination What the talk is about: foundational approach

  8. Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pientka, Brigitte

    Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax-directed termination and reduction checker for higher-order logic programs and output of well-moded predicates. These reduction con- straints are exploited during termination checking

  9. On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems Dieter Hofbauer 1 Universit¨at GH@theory.informatik.uni­kassel.de Abstract. It is shown that for terminating ground term rewrite systems the length of derivations a suitable interpretation into the natural numbers. Terminating ground systems are not necessarily

  10. Computer Science at Kent On Modular Termination Proofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Computer Science at Kent On Modular Termination Proofs Jonathan C. Martin and Andy King Technical by the Computing Laboratory, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NF, UK. Abstract Reasoning about termination is a key issue in logic program development. One classic technique for proving termination is to construct

  11. On Automating Inductive and Non-Inductive Termination Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamareddine, Fairouz

    On Automating Inductive and Non-Inductive Termination Methods Fairouz Kamareddine and Francois of the function which satis es a notion of terminal prop- erty and then verifying that this construction processPre can only deal with the termination proofs that are inductive. There are however many functions

  12. The Dependency Pair Framework: Combining Techniques for Automated Termination Proofs #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    The Dependency Pair Framework: Combining Techniques for Automated Termination Proofs # J of the most powerful techniques for automated termination proofs of term rewrite systems. Up to now of new methods for termination analy­ sis. To demonstrate this, we present several new techniques within

  13. On Termination of Integer Linear Loops Joel Ouaknine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    On Termination of Integer Linear Loops Jo¨el Ouaknine Department of Computer Science Oxford con- cerns the termination of simple linear loops of the form: x u ; while Bx c do x Ax + a , where initial integer vectors u, such a loop terminates. The correctness of our algorithm relies

  14. The termination hierarchy for term rewriting Hans Zantema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    The termination hierarchy for term rewriting Hans Zantema Utrecht University, The Netherlands e-mail: hansz@cs.uu.nl (Tutorial talk) A natural way to prove termination of a term rewriting system is to #12. If the operations are strictly monotone in all arguments then indeed termination of the TRS can be concluded

  15. Termination and Reduction Checking for HigherOrder Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pientka, Brigitte

    Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher­Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax­directed termination and reduction checker for higher­order logic programs and output of well­moded predicates. These reduction con­ straints are exploited during termination checking

  16. Termination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    [24], partial evaluation [1, 48], refining methods for proving the termination of rewriting [8, 9Termination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems Germ´an Vidal Technical University.g., it forms the basis of functional logic languages). Surprisingly, the termination of narrowing has been

  17. Termination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    ], model checking [17], partial evaluation [1, 32], refining methods for proving the terminationTermination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems Germ´an Vidal Technical University in different contexts, ranging from the- orem proving to language design. Surprisingly, the termination of nar

  18. Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing and Equational Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobar, Santiago

    constraint solving [4, 5], partial evaluation [6], and model checking [17], among others. TerminationModular Termination of Basic Narrowing and Equational Unification Mar´ia Alpuente Santiago Escobar steps to a set of unblocked (or basic) positions. In this work, we study the modularity of termination

  19. Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    , and classical applications are total correctness and termination of partial evaluation. In languagesSemi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel Institut für Informatik Ludwig to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored in its type

  20. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ? 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ? 315 ą 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient ?{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  1. Excitonic exchange splitting in bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, H.; Wang, L.; Zunger, A.

    1999-02-01

    We present an approach to calculate the excitonic fine-structure splittings due to electron-hole short-range exchange interactions using the local-density approximation pseudopotential method, and apply it to bulk semiconductors CdSe, InP, GaAs, and InAs. Comparing with previous theoretical results, the current calculated splittings agree well with experiments. Furthermore, we provide an approximate relationship between the short-range exchange splitting and the exciton Bohr radius, which can be used to estimate the exchange splitting for other materials. The current calculation indicates that a commonly used formula for exchange splitting in quantum dot is not valid. Finally, we find a very large pressure dependence of the exchange splitting: a factor of 4.5 increase as the lattice constant changes by 3.5{percent}. This increase is mainly due to the decrease of the Bohr radius via the change of electron effective mass. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Determination of Bulk Dimensional Variation in Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James F. Cuttino Dr. Edward P. Morse

    2005-04-14

    The purpose of this work is to improve the efficiency of green sand foundries so that they may continue to compete as the most cost-effective method of fabrication while meeting tightening constraints on near-net shape manufacturing. In order to achieve this objective, the study is divided into two major components. The first component concentrated on identifying which processes control surface finish on the castings and which provide potential reductions in variations. The second component identified metrological methods that effectively discern between the geometry of bulk material versus surface finish in order to more accurately determine the quality of a part. The research resulted in the determination of an empirical relationship relating pouring parameters to dimensional variation, with an R2 value of greater than 0.79. A significant difference in variations obtained from vertical vs. horizontal molding machines was also noticed. When analyzed separately, however, the resulting empirical relationships for horizontal and vertical machines had reduced R2 values, probably due to the reduced data sets. Significant parameters when considering vertical and horizontal molding machines together included surface roughness, pattern type, iron type, pouring rate, copper content, amount of Western Bentonite, and permeability.

  3. Improving Bulk Microphysics Parameterizations in Simulations of Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Franklin, Charmaine N.

    2013-06-05

    To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) in regional and global climate models, a double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified and the results are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). Rather than using prescribed aerosols as in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR), a prognostic doublemoment aerosol representation is introduced to predict both the aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated. Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes, maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (SC) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds (DCC) in the southeast of China from the Department of Energy/ARM Mobile Facility (DOE/AMF) - China field campaign. The results from Bulk-2M exhibit a much better agreement in the cloud number concentration and effective droplet radius in both the SC and DCC cases with those from SBM and field measurements than those from Bulk-OR. In the SC case particularly, Bulk-2M reproduces the observed drizzle precipitation, which is largely inhibited in Bulk-OR. Bulk-2M predicts enhanced precipitation and invigorated convection with increased aerosol loading in the DCC case, consistent with the SBM simulation, while Bulk-OR predicts the opposite behaviors. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm 2 stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 ?m is determined as a more realistic setting in the autoconversion parameterization. The saturation adjustment employed in calculating condensation/evaporation in the bulk scheme is identified as the main factor responsible for the large discrepancies in predicting cloud water in the SC case, suggesting that an explicit calculation of diffusion growth with predicted supersaturation is necessary for further improvements of the bulk microphysics scheme. Lastly, a larger rain evaporation rate below cloud is found in the bulk scheme in comparison to the SBM simulation, which could contribute to a lower surface precipitation in the bulk scheme.

  4. Influence of a combustion-driven oscillation on global mixing in the flame from a refinery flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langman, A.S.; Nathan, G.J.

    2011-01-15

    An assessment of the influence of strong combustion-driven oscillations on mixing rates and visible radiation in the flame from a full-scale refinery flare is reported. Importantly, the oscillations were generated naturally, with no external forcing, and at a high Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6}. These conditions differentiate this study from those of previous investigations, which all involved some external forcing and were at a Re too low to ensure fully turbulent flow within the flame. A frame-by-frame analysis of video footage, providing good resolution of the instantaneous edge of each flame, was used to assess flame dimensions, and so to determine a global residence time. Since the flames are in the fast-chemistry regime, the visual imagers can be used to determine a global mixing rate. The analysis reveals a consistent picture that the combustion-driven oscillations do not result in a significant change to the global mixing rate, but do increase the visible radiation. This is in contrast to previous investigations, using externally forced jets, where forcing at the preferred mode has been found to increase mixing rates and reduce radiation. (author)

  5. Strategic planning for and implementation of reclaimed municipal waste water as make-up to a refinery cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, W.R.; Mazur, J.J.; Rao, N.M.

    1996-08-01

    This paper discusses the successful use of treated municipal plant waste water effluent (Title 22) in a refinery cooling water system. Conversion from well water to this make-up water source was preceded by developing a carefully crafted transition plan. Steps were taken to identify key system performance indicators, establish desired performance goals, and implement stringent monitoring and control protocols. In addition, all possible contingencies were considered and solutions developed. Treating Title 22 waters is very challenging and entails risks not associated with normal makeup waters. Several novel on-line monitoring and control tools are available which help minimize these risks while enhancing tower operation. Performance monitoring of critical system parameters is essential in order to provide early warning of problems so that corrective measures can be implemented. In addition, a high level of system automation enhances reliable operation. Corrosion, scaling and microbiological performance of the system with Title 22 water is discussed in comparison to previous well water make-up.

  6. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

  7. Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.CORPORATION /AnalysisProduct:

  8. T-duality trivializes bulk-boundary correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese Mathai; Guo Chuan Thiang

    2015-07-26

    Recently we introduced T-duality in the study of topological insulators. In this paper, we study the bulk-boundary correspondence for three phenomena in condensed matter physics, namely, the quantum Hall effect, the Chern insulator, and time reversal invariant topological insulators. In all of these cases, we show that T-duality trivializes the bulk-boundary correspondence.

  9. Bulk Acoustic Resonator Based on Piezoelectric ZnO Belts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Bulk Acoustic Resonator Based on Piezoelectric ZnO Belts Brent A. Buchine, William L. Hughes, F, a bulk acoustic resonator based on ZnO belts is demonstrated. This device shows a great deal of promise-like geometry, making them ideal candidates as SMR, FBAR, and beam resonators.13 However, handling belts can

  10. MORPHOLOGY DEPENDENT SHORT CIRCUIT CURRENT IN BULK HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    MORPHOLOGY DEPENDENT SHORT CIRCUIT CURRENT IN BULK HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELL Biswajit Ray, Pradeep, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA ABSTRACT Polymer based bulk heterostructure (BH) solar cell offers a relatively inexpensive option for the future solar cell technology, provided its efficiency increases beyond

  11. New results on water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    contract as temperature decreases, liquid bulk water begins to expand when its temperature drops below 4°C remains at 4°C while colder layers of 0°C water "float" on top (cf.. Fig. 1 of Ref. [2]). The mysterious properties of liquid bulk water become more pronounced in the supercooled region below 0°C [3-5]. For example

  12. The Economic Case for Bulk Energy Storage in Transmission Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of using energy storage, optimized for multiple objectives, including cost, congestion, and emissions: Optimal Generation Expansion Planning with Integration of Variable Re- newables and Bulk Energy Storage Systems Pumped-hydroelectric energy storage has proven to be valuable as bulk energy storage for energy

  13. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of Bulk Titanium for MEMS Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of Bulk Titanium for MEMS Applications E. R. Parker,a, * B. J for the bulk micromachining of microelectromechanical MEMS devices. Titanium- based MEMS have the potential for the microfabrication of titanium-based MEMS devices. Š 2005 The Electrochemical Society. DOI: 10.1149/1.2006647 All

  14. Short communication Fractal in fracture of bulk metallic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jianbo

    Short communication Fractal in fracture of bulk metallic glass M.Q. Jiang a,b , J.X. Meng a , J. Bulk metallic glass B. Dynamic fracture C. Nanoscale periodic corrugation C. Fractal a b s t r a c t We investigate the nanoscale periodic corrugation (NPC) structures on the dynamic fracture surface of a typical

  15. Bulk Vitrification Castable Refractory Block Protection Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Beck, Andrew E.; Brouns, Thomas M.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Matyas, Josef; Minister, Kevin BC; Schweiger, Michael J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Tinsley, Bronnie P.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-05-01

    Bulk vitrification (BV) was selected for a pilot-scale test and demonstration facility for supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford U.S. DOE Site. During engineering-scale (ES) tests, a small fraction of radioactive Tc (and Re, its nonradioactive surrogate) were transferred out of the LAW glass feed and molten LAW glass, and deposited on the surface and within the pores of the castable refractory block (CRB). Laboratory experiments were undertaken to understand the mechanisms of the transport Tc/Re into the CRB during vitrification and to evaluate various means of CRB protection against the deposition of leachable Tc/Re. The tests used Re as a chemical surrogate for Tc. The tests with the baseline CRB showed that the molten LAW penetrates into CRB pores before it converts to glass, leaving deposits of sulfates and chlorides when the nitrate components decompose. Na2O from the LAW reacts with the CRB to create a durable glass phase that may contain Tc/Re. Limited data from a single CRB sample taken from an ES experiment indicate that, while a fraction of Tc/Re is present in the CRB in a readily leachable form, most of the Tc/Re deposited in the refractory is retained in the form of a durable glass phase. In addition, the molten salts from the LAW, mainly sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates, begin to evaporate from BV feeds at temperatures below 800 C and condense on solid surfaces at temperatures below 530 C. Three approaches aimed at reducing or preventing the deposition of soluble Tc/Re within the CRB were proposed: metal lining, sealing the CRB surface with a glaze, and lining the CRB with ceramic tiles. Metal liners were deemed unsuitable because evaluations showed that they can cause unacceptable distortions of the electric field in the BV system. Sodium silicate and a low-alkali borosilicate glaze were selected for testing. The glazes slowed down molten salt condensate penetration, but did little to reduce the penetration of molten salt. Out of several refractory tile candidates, only greystone and fused-cast alumina-zirconia-silica (AZS) refractory remained intact and well bonded to the CRB after firing to 1000 C. The deformation of the refractory-tile composite was avoided by prefiring the greystone tile to 800 C. Condensed vapors did not penetrate the tiles, but Re salts condensed on their surface. Refractory corrosion tests indicated that a 0.25-inch-thick greystone tile would not corrode during a BV melt. Tiles can reduce both vapor penetration and molten salt penetration, but vapor deposition above the melt line will occur even on tiles. The Tc/Re transport scenario was outlined as follows. At temperatures below 700 C, molten ionic salt (MIS) that includes all the Tc/Re penetrates, by capillarity, from the feed into the CRB open porosity. At approximately 750 C, the MIS decomposes through the loss of NOx, leaving mainly sulfate and chloride salts. The Na2O formed in the decomposition of the nitrates reacts with insoluble grains in the feed and with the aluminosilicates in the CRB to form more viscous liquids that reduce further liquid penetration into the CRB. At 800 to 1000 C, a continuous glass phase traps the remains of the MIS in the form of inclusions in the bulk glass melt. At 1000 to 1200 C, the salt inclusions in the glass slowly dissolve but also rise to the surface. The Tc/Re salts also evaporate from the free surface of the glass melt that is rapidly renewed by convective currents. The vapors condense on cooler surfaces in the upper portion of the CRB, the box lid, and the off-gas system.

  16. Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

    1980-07-01

    Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Details of the study are presented in this volume. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors. Remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

  17. Method of making hermetic seals for hermetic terminal assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2010-04-13

    This invention teaches methods of making a hermetic terminal assembly comprising the steps of: inserting temporary stops, shims and jigs on the bottom face of a terminal assembly thereby blocking assembly core open passageways; mounting the terminal assembly inside a vacuum chamber using a temporary assembly perimeter seal and flange or threaded assembly interfaces; mixing a seal admixture and hardener in a mixer conveyor to form a polymer seal material; conveying the polymer seal material into a polymer reservoir; feeding the polymer seal material from the reservoir through a polymer outlet valve and at least one polymer outlet tube into the terminal assembly core thereby filling interstitial spaces in the core adjacent to service conduits, temporary stop, and the terminal assembly casing; drying the polymer seal material at room temperature thereby hermetically sealing the core of the terminal assembly; removing the terminal assembly from the vacuum chamber, and; removing the temporary stops, shims.

  18. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  19. Reproductive Termination in Female Japanese Monkeys: A Comparative Life History Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedigan, Linda M.

    Reproductive Termination in Female Japanese Monkeys: A Comparative Life History Perspective MARY S; reproductive termination ABSTRACT This study explores the question of reproductive termination (loss used a large sample of completed lives to identify reproductively terminated female Japanese macaques

  20. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Holmes; N. G. Parker; M. J. W. Povey

    2010-02-16

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50 degrees Celsius. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  1. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menchhofer, Paul A.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  2. Bulk and surface half-metallicity: The case of D0{sub 3}-type Mn{sub 3}Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hao; Gao, G. Y. Hu, Lei; Ni, Yun; Zu, Fengxia; Zhu, Sicong; Wang, Shuling; Yao, K. L.

    2014-01-21

    Motivated by the experimental realization of D0{sub 22}-type Mn{sub 3}Ge (001) films [Kurt et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 132410 (2012)] and the structural stability of D0{sub 3}-type Heusler alloy Mn{sub 3}Ge [Zhang et al. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25, 206006 (2013)], we use the first-principles calculations based on the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave method to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of D0{sub 3}-type Heusler alloy Mn{sub 3}Ge and its (001) surface. We show that bulk D0{sub 3}-Mn{sub 3}Ge is a half-metallic ferromagnet with the minority-spin energy gap of 0.52?eV and the magnetic moment of 1.00??{sub B} per formula unit. The bulk half-metallicity is preserved at the pure Mn-terminated (001) surface due to the large exchange split, but the MnGe-terminated (001) surface destroys the bulk half-metallicity. We also reveal that the surface stabilities are comparable between the D0{sub 3}-Mn{sub 3}Ge (001) and the experimental D0{sub 22}-Mn{sub 3}Ge (001), which indicates the feasibility to grow the Mn{sub 3}Ge (001) films with D0{sub 3} phase other than D0{sub 22} one. The surface half-metallicity and stability make D0{sub 3}-Mn{sub 3}Ge a promising candidate for spintronic applications.

  3. Coordinating Tectons: Bipyridyl Terminated Allenylidene Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Lengkeek, Nigel A.; Petrie, Simon; Sanford, Vanessa; Schauer, Phil A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Stranger, Robert; White, Allan H.

    2009-01-15

    A series of complexes with {pi}-conjugated carbon chains terminated by bipyridyl moieties has been prepared. These allenylidene complexes were derived from 9-hydroxy-9-ethynyl-4,5-diazafluorene, the preparation of which is reported; the new allenylidene complexes are highly colored with the cumulated carbon chain terminating in a bipyridyl unit providing a site for further coordination. The synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structure determination of trans-[MCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]PF{sub 6} (M = Ru, P{intersection}P = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm), 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe), 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe); M = Os, P{intersection}P = dppm) are described. The effect of the variation in metal and ligand on electronic and electrochemical characteristics of these complexes has been investigated by using UV-vis, solution electrochemistry, and a combination of these techniques in spectroelectrochemical experiments. DFT calculations have been performed on trans-[RuCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]{sup q} (P{intersection}P = dppm, bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (dmpm); q = -1, 0, +1, +2) and subsequently solvent-corrected calculations with use of COSMO were also undertaken to examine the nature of electronic transitions in various oxidation states.

  4. Brane-Bulk energy exchange and agegraphic dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Sheykhi

    2010-02-06

    We consider the agegraphic models of dark energy in a braneworld scenario with brane-bulk energy exchange. We assume that the adiabatic equation for the dark matter is satisfied while it is violated for the agegraphic dark energy due to the energy exchange between the brane and the bulk. Our study shows that with the brane-bulk interaction, the equation of state parameter of agegraphic dark energy on the brane, $w_D$, can have a transition from normal state where $w_D >-1 $ to the phantom regime where $w_D energy always satisfies $w^{\\mathrm{eff}}_D\\geq-1$.

  5. Chevron: Refinery Identifies $4.4 Million in Annual Savings by Using Process Simulation Models to Perform Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-05-01

    In an energy-efficiency study at its refinery near Salt Lake City, Utah, Chevron focused on light hydrocarbons processing. The company found it could recover hydrocarbons from its fuel gas system and sell them. By using process simulation models of special distillation columns and associated reboilers and condensers, Chevron could predict the performance of potential equipment configuration changes and process modifications. More than 25,000 MMBtu in natural gas could be saved annually if a debutanizer upgrade project and a new saturated gas plant project were completed. Together, these projects would save $4.4 million annually.

  6. Conceptual design assessment for the co-firing of bio-refinery supplied lignin project. Quarterly report, June 23--July 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglund, T.; Ranney, J.T.; Babb, C.L.

    2000-07-27

    The Conceptual Design Assessment for the Co-Firing of Bio-Refinery Supplied Lignin Project was successfully kicked off on July 23, 2000 during a meeting at the TVA-PPI facility in Muscle Shoals, AL. An initial timeline for the study was distributed, issues of concern were identified and a priority actions list was developed. Next steps include meeting with NETL to discuss de-watering and lignin fuel testing, the development of the mass balance model and ethanol facility design criteria, providing TVA-Colbert with preliminary lignin fuel analysis and the procurement of representative feed materials for the pilot and bench scale testing of the hydrolysis process.

  7. A complete characterization of termination of Hans ZANTEMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    A complete characterization of termination of 0 p 1 q ! 1 r 0 s Hans ZANTEMA Universiteit Utrecht@fmi.uni­passau.de Abstract We completely characterize termination of one­rule string rewriting systems of the form 0 p 1 q ! 1 r 0 s for every choice of positive integers p, q, r, and s. For the simply terminating cases, we

  8. A bulk-flow model of angled injection Lomakin bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soulas, Thomas Antoine Theo

    2001-01-01

    A bulk-flow model for determination of the leakage and dynamic force characteristics of angled injection Lomakin bearings is presented. Zeroth- and first-order equations describe the equilibrium flow for a centered bearing and the perturbed flow...

  9. Supply chain management in the dry bulk shipping industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bryan E. (Bryan Edward)

    2006-01-01

    This paper is intended to show the importance of supply chain management in the dry-bulk shipping industry. A hypothetical company, the Texas Grain and Bakery Corporation, was created. The values and calculations used are ...

  10. Structural and economic analysis of capesize bulk carriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Structural failures of bulk carriers continue to account for the loss of many lives every year. Capes are particularly vulnerable to cracking because of their large length, their trade in high density cargos, and the high ...

  11. New nano structure approaches for bulk thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jeonghoon

    2010-01-01

    developments in bulk thermoelectric materials", M. Mater.and M. D. Drsselhaus, "Thermoelectric figure of merit of aO'Quinn, " Thin-film thermoelectric devices with high room-

  12. Small Scale LNG Terminals Market Installed Capacity is anticipated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Although large scale LNG terminals have been preferably constructed across the world till date, the emergence of small demand centers for natural gas within small...

  13. Costs, Savings and Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Donald S.; Stelly, Randall; Parker, Cecil A.

    1958-01-01

    ,s - / cwdh\\@ Costs, Savi~gs;.itd Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms . ?. I I 1 i I I ! ,:ravings in hauling - 10 cents I \\ \\ 1 \\ savings in hauling - 15 cents -----------____--- 'savings in hauling - 20 cents Annual production..., 1,000 pounds Estimated number of years required for savings from a bulk tank to equal additional costs at different levels of production and savings in hauling costs. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEN'T STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION...

  14. Enhancement of bulk photovoltaic effect in topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Liang Z

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the shift current bulk photovoltaic response of materials close to a band inversion topological phase transition. We find that the bulk photocurrent reverses direction across the band inversion transition, and that its magnitude is enhanced in the vicinity of the phase transition. These results are demonstrated with first principles DFT calculations of BiTeI and CsPbI$_3$ under hydrostatic pressure, and explained with an analytical model, suggesting that this phenomenon remains robust across disparate material systems.

  15. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada | Open Energy Information

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  16. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/New Mexico | Open Energy Information

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  17. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Oregon | Open Energy Information

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  18. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Texas | Open Energy Information

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  19. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Utah | Open Energy Information

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  20. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Washington | Open Energy Information

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  1. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Wyoming | Open Energy Information

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  2. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Exploration | Open Energy Information

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  3. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Federal | Open Energy Information

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  4. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii | Open Energy Information

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  5. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Montana | Open Energy Information

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  6. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Nevada | Open Energy Information

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  7. RAPID/BulkTransmission/New Mexico | Open Energy Information

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  8. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Oregon | Open Energy Information

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  9. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Site Considerations | Open Energy Information

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  10. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas | Open Energy Information

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  11. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Transmission Siting & Interconnection | Open Energy

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  12. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Utah | Open Energy Information

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  13. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Washington | Open Energy Information

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  14. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/SiteWater Quality < RAPID‎ |

  15. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/SiteWater Quality < RAPID‎

  16. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/SiteWater Quality <

  17. NIOSH publications on video display terminals (revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    Materials developed by NIOSH concerning video display terminals (VDTs) comprise the publication. The first section listed citations of reports developed by NIOSH concerning VDTs and possible hazards associated with their use, and contained ordering information for these publications. Types of publications included NIOSH numbered publications, hazard evaluation and technical assistance reports, contract reports, journal articles, book chapters, presentations, and miscellaneous reports. The second section of the report contained full text copies of selected references from the bibliography. These references included testimony before congressional committees, presentations and articles dealing with radiation issues, reproductive outcomes of workers using VDTs the risk of spontaneous abortion, an epidemiologic investigation of electric and magnetic fields and operator exposure, controlling glare problems in the VDT work environment, and the design of rest breaks for VDT operators.

  18. Waste Form Qualification Compliance Strategy for Bulk Vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagaasen, Larry M.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brouns, Thomas M.

    2005-01-03

    The Bulk Vitrification System is being pursued to assist in immobilizing the low-activity tank waste from the 53 million gallons of radioactive waste in the 177 underground storage tanks on the Hanford Site. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process, a research and development facility known as the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is being built to demonstrate the technology. Specific performance requirements for the final packaged bulk vitrification waste form have been identified. In addition to the specific product-performance requirements, performance targets/goals have been identified that are necessary to qualify the waste form but do not lend themselves to specifications that are easily verified through short-term testing. Collectively, these form the product requirements for the DBVS. This waste-form qualification (WFQ) strategy document outlines the general strategies for achieving and demonstrating compliance with the BVS product requirements. The specific objectives of the WFQ activities are discussed, the bulk vitrification process and product control strategy is outlined, and the test strategy to meet the WFQ objectives is described. The DBVS product performance targets/goals and strategies to address those targets/goals are described. The DBVS product-performance requirements are compared to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant immobilized low-activity waste product specifications. The strategies for demonstrating compliance with the bulk vitrification product requirements are presented.

  19. Finsler geometric perspective on the bulk flow in the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe Chang; Ming-Hua Li; Sai Wang

    2013-05-09

    Astronomical observations showed that there may exist a bulk flow with peculiar velocities in the universe, which contradicts with the (\\Lambda)CDM model. The bulk flow reveals that the observational universe is anisotropic at large scales. In fact, a more reliable observation on the anisotropy of spacetime comes from the CMB power spectra. The WMAP and Planck satellites both show that there is a hemispherical power asymmetry at large-angular scales. In this paper, we propose a "wind" scenario to the bulk flow (or the anisotropy of spacetime). Under the influence of the "wind", the spacetime metric could become a Finsler structure. By resolving the null geodesic equation, we obtain the modified luminosity distance, which has a dipolar form at the leading order. Thus, the "wind" describes well the bulk flow. In addition, we perform a least-(\\chi^2) fit to the data of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Union2.1 compilation. The peculiar velocity of the bulk flow has an upper limit (v_{bulk}\\lesssim 4000 \\rm{km/s}), which is compatible with all the existing observational values.

  20. Battery system including batteries that have a plurality of positive terminals and a plurality of negative terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Thomas J; Symanski, James S; Kuempers, Joerg A; Miles, Ronald C; Hansen, Scott A; Smith, Nels R; Taghikhani, Majid; Mrotek, Edward N; Andrew, Michael G

    2014-01-21

    A lithium battery for use in a vehicle includes a container, a plurality of positive terminals extending from a first end of the lithium battery, and a plurality of negative terminals extending from a second end of the lithium battery. The plurality of positive terminals are provided in a first configuration and the plurality of negative terminals are provided in a second configuration, the first configuration differing from the second configuration. A battery system for use in a vehicle may include a plurality of electrically connected lithium cells or batteries.

  1. y:\\academic staff relations\\career processes\\terminations\\forms\\termination of employment -vacation payout 2014-2015.doc 14-12-22 hiTERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT VACATION PAYOUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    y:\\academic staff relations\\career processes\\terminations\\forms\\termination of employment - vacation payout 2014-2015.doc 14-12-22 hiTERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT ­ VACATION PAYOUT DURING 2014 - 2015/FACULTY: _________________________________________________ TERMINATION DATE: _________________________________________________ A. A staff member is expected to take his

  2. Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment in the decomposition of organic matter during the composting process. However, microbial communities active in composts of bacterial communities in livestock manure compost was determined based on terminal restriction fragment

  3. Influence of perovskite termination on oxide heteroepitaxy D. A. Schmidta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Influence of perovskite termination on oxide heteroepitaxy D. A. Schmidta Department of Physics, regardless of termination, indicating that the substrate cations and perovskite surface polarity play little- monly used substrate for growth of high Tc super- conductors1­4 and other perovskite-based materials,5

  4. TERMINATION OF NONSIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS CHARLES GLEN HOOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    TERMINATION OF NON­SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS BY CHARLES GLEN HOOT B.A., University of California, San Diego, 1982 M.A., Princeton University, 1985 THESIS Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements at Urbana­Champaign, 1996 Urbana, Illinois #12; TERMINATION OF NON­SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS Charles Glen Hoot

  5. TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS CHARLES GLEN HOOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS BY CHARLES GLEN HOOT B.A., University of California, San Diego, 1982 M.A., Princeton University, 1985 THESIS Submitted in partial ful llment of the requirements at Urbana-Champaign, 1996 Urbana, Illinois #12;TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS Charles Glen Hoot

  6. Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1996-12-01

    In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

  7. Dark goo: Bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Sebastien Gagnon; Julien Lesgourgues

    2011-09-16

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an "effective" pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local equilibrium today for viscous effects to be important.

  8. Dark goo: Bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon, Jean-Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an "effective" pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local eq...

  9. Bulk emission of scalars by a rotating black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Casals; S. R. Dolan; P. Kanti; E. Winstanley

    2008-07-17

    We study in detail the scalar-field Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by a higher-dimensional, rotating black hole. We numerically compute the angular eigenvalues, and solve the radial equation of motion in order to find transmission factors. The latter are found to be enhanced by the angular momentum of the black hole, and to exhibit the well-known effect of superradiance. The corresponding power spectra for scalar fields show an enhancement with the number of dimensions, as in the non-rotating case. We compute the total mass loss rate of the black hole for a variety of black-hole angular momenta and bulk dimensions, and find that, in all cases, the bulk emission remains significantly smaller than the brane emission. The angular-momentum loss rate is also computed and found to have a smaller value in the bulk than on the brane. We present accurate bulk-to-brane emission ratios for a range of scenarios.

  10. Initiate Job Termination Request Salaried Job This job aid provides the steps for initiating a Job Termination Request form from the Manager Self

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Page 1 Initiate Job Termination Request ­ Salaried Job Purpose This job aid provides the steps for initiating a Job Termination Request form from the Manager Self Service menu. This process is for Voluntary Terminations only. Please see your HR Services team for support with involuntary terminations. Complete

  11. Palladium diffusion into bulk copper via the (100) surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussmann, Ezra; Pohl, Karsten; Sun, Jiebing; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we measure the diffusion of Pd into bulk Cu at the Cu(100) surface. Interdiffusion is tracked by measuring the dissolution of the Cu(100)-c(2 x 2)-Pd surface alloy during annealing (T > 240 C). The activation barrier for Pd diffusion from the surface alloy into the bulk is determined to be (1.8 {+-} 0.6) eV. During annealing, we observe the growth of a new layer of Cu near step edges. Under this new Cu layer, dilute Pd remaining near the surface develops a layered structure similar to the Cu{sub 3}Pd L 1{sub 2} bulk alloy phase.

  12. No evidence for bulk velocity from type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huterer, Dragan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the effect of peculiar velocities on low-redshift type Ia supernovae. Velocities introduce an additional guaranteed source of correlations between supernova magnitudes that should be considered in all analyses of nearby supernova samples but has largely been neglected in the past. Applying a likelihood analysis to the latest compilation of nearby supernovae, we find no evidence for the presence of these correlations, although, given the significant noise, the data is also consistent with the correlations predicted for the standard LCDM model. We then consider the dipolar component of the velocity correlations - the frequently studied "bulk velocity" - and explicitly demonstrate that including the velocity correlations in the data covariance matrix is crucial for drawing correct and unambiguous conclusions about the bulk flow. In particular, current supernova data is consistent with no excess bulk flow on top of what is expected in LCDM and effectively captured by the covariance. We further clarify ...

  13. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J; Wang, Hsin; Ferber, Mattison K; Liang, Zhenxian

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress all depended on the porosity content in bulk-sintered silver. The only investigated property that was independent of porosity in that range was coefficient of thermal expansion.

  14. The ultimate biomass refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bungay, H.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Bits and pieces of refining schemes and both old and new technology have been integrated into a complete biomass harvesting, processing, waste recycle, and marketing complex. These choices are justified with economic estimates and technology assessments.

  15. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    vacuum resid) * Dilbit (tar sand bitumen diluted with 30% condensate) * Biomass fast pyrolysis oil (whole raw oil) * Norpar 12 (C 11 C 12 paraffinic solvent - used as naphtha...

  16. Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    ;7 Example 1: 5 crudes, 4 weeks Produce fuel gas, regular gasoline, premium gasoline, distillate, fuel oil gasoline, distillate, fuel oil and treated residu Optimal solution ($1000's) Profit 3641.3 Sales 33790 seconds (94% NLP, 6% MIP) #12;8 Example 2: 8 crudes, 6 weeks Produce fuel gas, regular gasoline, premium

  17. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline supply in a particular region because pipeline infrastructure, geography and marine shipping regulations constrain the amount of product that can flow among the different...

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubicFracking,MichiganThousand47,959.15References and2009

  19. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)698 1.8732009

  20. Refinery Capacity Report Historical

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)698 1.8732009

  1. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)698 1.8732009Fall

  2. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof EnergyResearch TriangleThroughclean fuelofPEER

  3. U.S. Refinery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE: AprilCubicProduction Capacity ofCrude Oil and

  4. U.S. Refinery

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear Jan FebFeet)YearCrude Oil and

  5. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -

  6. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 Idle Operating

  7. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168

  8. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacity Report

  9. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacity Report5

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacity

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacity Operable

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacity

  13. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacityof Last

  14. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168Capacityof

  15. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space5,168CapacityofVacuum

  16. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.

  17. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.CORPORATION / Refiner /

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.CORPORATION / Refiner

  19. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.CORPORATION /

  20. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.CORPORATION / Cokers

  1. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a.CORPORATION / CokersMethod

  2. Stress Tensor and Bulk Viscosity in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer J. Fries; Berndt Müller; Andreas Schäfer

    2008-08-30

    We discuss the influence of different initial conditions for the stress tensor and the effect of bulk viscosity on the expansion and cooling of the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In particular, we explore the evolution of longitudinal and transverse components of the pressure and the extent of dissipative entropy production in the one-dimensional, boost-invariant hydrodynamic model. We find that a bulk viscosity consistent with recent estimates from lattice QCD further slows the equilibration of the system, however it does not significantly increase the entropy produced.

  3. A study of carbon-14 of paleoatmospheric methane for the last glacial termination from ancient glacial ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrenko, Vasilii Victorovich

    2008-01-01

    for the last glacial termination." xii VITA Education Ph.D.the Last Glacial Termination: a horizontal ice core.the Last Glacial Termination: a horizontal ice core.

  4. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Battistini, Federica; Pérez, Alberto; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2011-01-01

    with transcription start and termination sites in yeast. BMCtranscription start and termination sites in yeast Özgenand TTS (Transcription Termination Site) (at least in yeast)

  5. Floating LNG terminal and LNG carrier interaction analysis for side-by-side offloading operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuriakose, Vinu P.

    2005-11-01

    Floating LNG terminals are a relatively new concept with the first such terminal in the world installed this year. The hydrodynamic interaction effects between the terminal and a LNG carrier in a side-by-side offloading arrangement is investigated...

  6. Initiation propagation and termination of elastodynamic ruptures associated with segmentation of faults and shaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    Initiation propagation and termination of elastodynamic ruptures associated with segmentation the initiation, propagation, and termination of ruptures and their relationship to fault geometry and shaking of terminations near fault ends; and persistent propagation directivity effects. Taking advantage of long

  7. Computing hypersurfaces which minimize surface energy plus bulk energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, John M.

    [Page 17] Computing hypersurfaces which minimize surface energy plus bulk energy John M. Sullivan this idea to construct an algorithm to find the minimum-energy surface on any boundary, where the surface energy density can depend on position or normal vector. Here we extend this algorithm to allow not only

  8. A phase space analysis for nonlinear bulk viscous cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Acquaviva; Aroonkumar Beesham

    2015-05-08

    We consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with both viscous radiation and nonviscous dust. The former has a bulk viscosity which is proportional to an arbitrary power of the energy density, i.e. $\\zeta \\propto \\rho_v^{\

  9. INTERNAL ELECTROSTATIC TRANSDUCTION FOR BULK-MODE MEMS RESONATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    This paper demonstrates a new approach to electrostatic drive and detection of bulk acoustic resonators coupled into the fundamental bending mode. The approach was deemed inefficient because air-gap capacitive by filling the air-gaps with a low Young's modulus, high- dielectric material. A more practical approach

  10. Synthesis of bulk superhard semiconducting B-C material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia A.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2004-08-30

    A bulk composite superhard material was synthesized from graphitelike BC{sub 3} at 20 GPa and 2300 K using a multianvil press. The material consists of intergrown boron carbide B{sub 4}C and B-doped diamond with 1.8 at.%B. The material exhibits semiconducting behavior and extreme hardness comparable with that of single-crystal diamond.

  11. Stress tensor and bulk viscosity in relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fries, Rainer J.; Mueller, Berndt; Schaefer, Andreas.

    2008-01-01

    REVIEW C 78, 034913 (2008) Stress tensor and bulk viscosity in relativistic nuclear collisions Rainer J. Fries,1,2,3 Berndt Mu?ller,3,4 and Andreas Scha?fer3,5 1Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas...

  12. Permanent magnet with MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Akiyasu, E-mail: yamamoto@appchem.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2?K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3?T at 20?K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB{sub 2} permanent bulk magnet was determined. Because MgB{sub 2} is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB{sub 2} bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

  13. Stresses resulting from compression of bulk cotton lint fibers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimbombi, Ezekiel Maswe

    1998-01-01

    materials to determine if bale tie breakage would occur. Young's modulus of bulk lint cotton was found to be 9 MPa and the Poisson's ratio was 0. 1, while 12 MPa was recorded for the shear modulus. The FEA analysis showed that round steel ties, at six ties...

  14. Small Molecule Solution-Processed Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Small Molecule Solution-Processed Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Arthur Aebersold Supervisors: J in solution processed BHJ solar cells, which are made from a PCBM Squaraine DyeCyanine Dye Absorber Molecules solar cell performance show a trend for better devices with an intemediate active layer thickness

  15. Belt conveyors for bulk materials. 6th ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The 16 chapters are entitled: Belt conveyor general applications economics; Design considerations; Characteristics and conveyability of bulk materials; Capacities, belt widths and speeds; Belt conveyor idlers; Belt tension and power engineering; Belt selection; Pulleys and shafts; Curves; Steep angle conveying; Belt cleaners and accessories; Transfer points; Conveyor motor drives and controls; Operation, maintenance and safety; Belt takeups; and Emerging technologies. 6 apps.

  16. Transfer passenger needs at airports : human factors in terminal design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brillembourg, Marie-Claire

    1982-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the needs of particular users of airport: transfer passengers. The object of this work has been to produce a set of design guidelines for terminals. these guidelines are framed upon a user-need survey ...

  17. Decision support systems for automated terminal area air traffic control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pararas, John Demetrios

    1982-01-01

    This work studies the automation of the terminal area Air Traffic Management and Control (ATM/C) system. The ATM/C decision-making process is analyzed and broken down into a number of "automation functions". Each of these ...

  18. The dynamic scheduling of aircraft in the near terminal area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear, Roger George

    1976-01-01

    Aircraft arrive in a random fashion into a terminal area seeking to land at a given runway. The aircraft are differentiated by their landing velocities. All aircraft are required to maintain a prespecified minimum horizontal ...

  19. Terminal control of a variable-stability slender reentry vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karmondy, Matthew T

    2008-01-01

    Various terminal control schemes are applied to a proposed slender reentry vehicle, controlled by two separately-articulating flaps. The flap deflections are summarized as symmetric and asymmetric flap deflections; the ...

  20. A Terminal Molybdenum Arsenide Complex Synthesized from Yellow Arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curley, John J.

    A terminal molybdenum arsenide complex is synthesized in one step from the reactive As4 molecule. The properties of this complex with its arsenic atom ligand are discussed in relation to the analogous nitride and phosphide ...

  1. A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-09-29

    In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW Immobilization facility or other supplemental treatment alternatives as provided in M-62-08.

  2. Reachability and Termination Analysis of Concurrent Quantum Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

    2012-06-09

    We introduce a Markov chain model of concurrent quantum programs. This model is a quantum generalization of Hart, Sharir and Pnueli's probabilistic concurrent programs. Some characterizations of the reachable space, uniformly repeatedly reachable space and termination of a concurrent quantum program are derived by the analysis of their mathematical structures. Based on these characterizations, algorithms for computing the reachable space and uniformly repeatedly reachable space and for deciding the termination are given.

  3. GAP-independent termination of photoreceptor light response by excess gamma subunit of the cGMP-phosphodiesterase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    of photoreceptor signal termination. Invest Oph- thalmol VisMolecular GAP-Independent Termination of Photoreceptor Light

  4. CAH TERMINATION POLICY All Exit Checklist activities must be conducted in accordance with all university policies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    CAH TERMINATION POLICY All Exit Checklist activities must be conducted in accordance with all://hr.ucf.edu/files/EmployeeExitQuestionnaire.pdf ˇ Termination Checklist at: https://hr.ucf.edu/files/TerminationChecklist.pdf CAH TERMINATION PROCEDURES assigned to him/her. Specific PeopleSoft access should be terminated as well. Terminating employees must

  5. Observing bulk diamond spin coherence in high-purity nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helena S. Knowles; Dhiren M. Kara; Mete Atature

    2013-10-03

    Nitrogen-vacancy centres (NVs) in diamond are attractive for research straddling quantum information science and nanoscale magnetometry and thermometry. While ultrapure bulk diamond NVs sustain the longest spin coherence times among optically accessible spins, nanodiamond NVs display persistently poor spin coherence. Here we introduce high-purity nanodiamonds accommodating record-long NV coherence times, >60 us, observed via universal dynamical decoupling. We show that the main contribution to decoherence comes from nearby nitrogen impurities rather than surface states. We protect the NV spin free precession, essential to DC magnetometry, by driving solely these impurities into the motional narrowing regime. This extends the NV free induction decay time from 440 ns, longer than that in type Ib bulk diamond, to 1.27 us, which is comparable to that in type IIa (impurity-free) diamond. These properties allow the simultaneous exploitation of both high sensitivity and nanometre resolution in diamond-based emergent quantum technologies.

  6. Zinc-bromine batteries for bulk energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellows, R.J.; Einstein, H.; Elspass, C.; Grimes, P.; Katner, E.; Malachesky, P.; Newby, K.

    1983-08-01

    The development of a utility bulk energy market has been severely limited by the lack of better energy storage batteries. Lead acid batteries presently dominate the market. However, lead acid batteries suffer various limitations in the area of cost, maintenance, etc. Design projections for zinc-bromine batteries are attractive for bulk energy storage (BES) and electric vehicle (EV) applications in terms of low manufacturing costs and good performance characteristics. Zinc-bromine battery projections compare favorably with both current lead acid batteries and other advanced battery candidates. In recent years, Exxon's zinc-bromine battery program has shown rapid progress in terms of solving system problems and demonstrating both rapid scale-up of the system and competitively low cost manufacturing techniques.

  7. Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Floerchinger; Nikolaos Tetradis; Urs Achim Wiedemann

    2015-03-10

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  8. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Arizona | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintasNEPARAPID/BulkTransmission/Arizona

  9. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Colorado | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublicBulkTransmission/Colorado < RAPID‎ |

  10. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublicBulkTransmission/Colorado < RAPID‎

  11. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublicBulkTransmission/Colorado <

  12. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Arizona | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublicBulkTransmission/Colorado

  13. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Colorado | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGenerationBulkTransmission/Environment/Colorado < RAPID‎ |

  14. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Federal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGenerationBulkTransmission/Environment/Colorado < RAPID‎

  15. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Hawaii | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGenerationBulkTransmission/Environment/Colorado <

  16. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Idaho | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGenerationBulkTransmission/Environment/Colorado

  17. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎ |

  18. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎

  19. Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department of EnergyEmergingEnergyBulk Hauling Equipment

  20. VCU Human Resources November 14, 2011 Instructions for Termination ePAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    VCU Human Resources November 14, 2011 Instructions for Termination ePAF TERME and TERMJ Overview We have revised the termination process and related ePAFs to help improve the efficiency and tracking of termination information. Effective July 26, 2010, Personnel Administrators (PAs) must submit termination e

  1. Enhanced surface diffusion through termination conversion during epitaxial SrRuO3 growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eom, Chang Beom

    Enhanced surface diffusion through termination conversion during epitaxial SrRuO3 growth Guus of the ferromagnetic oxide SrRuO3 on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 , we observe a self-organized conversion of the terminating to surface termination and growth mode.6 Because their application is mostly in mirror-symmetric trilayer

  2. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic D.M. Dhamdhere Sridhar Iyer E.K.K.Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Sridhar

    Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems D.M. Dhamdhere Sridhar Iyer E.K.K.Reddy Dept of Computer Science IIT Bombay Mumbai, INDIA Abstract A symmetric algorithm for detecting the termination Distributed algorithms, Distributed computation, Distributed termination, Dynamic systems, Termination

  3. Termination of Domestic Partnership Signature of faculty/staff/student domestic partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Termination of Domestic Partnership Signature of faculty/staff/student domestic partner Printed as of ________________________. I certify I have mailed a copy of this Termination to my above named former domestic partner. We the domestic partnership is terminated. In the event more than one such Termination of Domestic Partnership

  4. Properties of the termination shock observed by Voyager 2 and J. D. Richardson3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Properties of the termination shock observed by Voyager 2 H. Li,1,2 C. Wang,1 and J. D. Richardson3] In August 2007, Voyager 2 reached the termination shock and entered the heliosheath at a distance of about, the termination shock moved back and forth, and Voyager 2 crossed the termination shock multiple times. We use

  5. Quasi-Termination Analysis of Logic Programs Using Size-Change Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    is a relevant problem in several areas, like tabled evaluation or partial evaluation, where quasi-termination analysis Keywords Quasi-Termination, Partial Deduction 1. INTRODUCTION While the termination of logic notion in the context of of- fline partial evaluation of functional programs [25], where quasi-termination

  6. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  7. Bulk Viscosity and Cavitation in Boost-Invariant Hydrodynamic Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajagopal; Nilesh Tripuraneni

    2010-02-16

    We solve second order relativistic hydrodynamics equations for a boost-invariant 1+1-dimensional expanding fluid with an equation of state taken from lattice calculations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. We investigate the dependence of the energy density as a function of proper time on the values of the shear viscosity, the bulk viscosity, and second order coefficients, confirming that large changes in the values of the latter have negligible effects. Varying the shear viscosity between zero and a few times s/(4 pi), with s the entropy density, has significant effects, as expected based on other studies. Introducing a nonzero bulk viscosity also has significant effects. In fact, if the bulk viscosity peaks near the crossover temperature Tc to the degree indicated by recent lattice calculations in QCD without quarks, it can make the fluid cavitate -- falling apart into droplets. It is interesting to see a hydrodynamic calculation predicting its own breakdown, via cavitation, at the temperatures where hadronization is thought to occur in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions.

  8. Bulk Viscosity and Cavitation in Boost-Invariant Hydrodynamic Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    We solve second order relativistic hydrodynamics equations for a boost-invariant 1+1-dimensional expanding fluid with an equation of state taken from lattice calculations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. We investigate the dependence of the energy density as a function of proper time on the values of the shear viscosity, the bulk viscosity, and second order coefficients, confirming that large changes in the values of the latter have negligible effects. Varying the shear viscosity between zero and a few times s/(4 pi), with s the entropy density, has significant effects, as expected based on other studies. Introducing a nonzero bulk viscosity also has significant effects. In fact, if the bulk viscosity peaks near the crossover temperature Tc to the degree indicated by recent lattice calculations in QCD without quarks, it can make the fluid cavitate -- falling apart into droplets. It is interesting to see a hydrodynamic calculation predicting its own breakdown, via cavitation, at th...

  9. Standard practice for bulk sampling of liquid uranium hexafluoride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers methods for withdrawing representative samples of liquid uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from bulk quantities of the material. Such samples are used for determining compliance with the applicable commercial specification, for example Specification C787 and Specification C996. 1.2 It is assumed that the bulk liquid UF6 being sampled comprises a single quality and quantity of material. This practice does not address any special additional arrangements that might be required for taking proportional or composite samples, or when the sampled bulk material is being added to UF6 residues already in a container (“heels recycle”). 1.3 The number of samples to be taken, their nominal sample weight, and their disposition shall be agreed upon between the parties. 1.4 The scope of this practice does not include provisions for preventing criticality incidents. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of th...

  10. Dynamics of dendritic polymers in the bulk and under confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Fotiadou, S.; Androulaki, K.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Tanis, I.; Karatasos, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Frick, B.

    2014-05-15

    The structure and dynamics of a hyperbranched polyesteramide (HybraneŽ S 1200) polymer and its nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na{sup +}-MMT) are investigated by XRD, DSC, QENS, DS and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In bulk, the energy-resolved elastically scattered intensity from the polymer exhibits two relaxation steps, one attributed to sub-T{sub g} motions and one observed at temperatures above the glass transition, T{sub g}. The QENS spectra measured over the complete temperature range are consistent with the elastic measurements and can be correlated to the results emerging from the detailed description afforded by the atomistic simulations, which predict the existence of three relaxation processes. Moreover, dielectric spectroscopy shows the sub- T{sub g} beta process as well as the segmental relaxation. For the nanocomposites, XRD reveals an intercalated structure for all hybrids with distinct interlayer distances due to polymer chains residing within the galleries of the Na{sup +}-MMT. The polymer chains confined within the galleries show similarities in the behavior with that of the polymer in the bulk for temperatures below the bulk polymer T{sub g}, whereas they exhibit frozen dynamics under confinement at temperatures higher than that.

  11. 2014-03-06 Issuance: Test Procedures for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding test procedures for packaged terminal air conditioners and packaged terminal heat pumps, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary on March 6, 2014.

  12. Cooled electrical terminal assembly and device incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-05-24

    A terminal structure provides interfacing with power electronics circuitry and external circuitry. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the terminal structure and the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  13. Cooled electrical terminal assembly and device incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-08-22

    A terminal structure provides interfacing with power electronics circuitry and external circuitry. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the terminal structure and the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  14. Analysis and forecast of the capesize bulk carriers shipping market using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voudris, Athanasios V

    2006-01-01

    Investing in the bulk carrier market constitutes a rather risky investment due to the volatility of the bulk carrier freight rates. In this study it is attempted to uncover the benefits of using Artificial Neural Networks ...

  15. High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System (June 2010) High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System (June 2010) A...

  16. Notes 10. A thermohydrodynamic bulk-flow model for fluid film bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The complete set of bulk-flow equations for the analysis of turbulent flow fluid film bearings. Importance of thermal effects in process fluid applications. A CFD method for solution of the bulk-flow equations....

  17. In vitro Corrosion and Haemocompatibility of Bulk Nanocrystalline 304 Stainless Steel by Severe Rolling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    In vitro Corrosion and Haemocompatibility of Bulk Nanocrystalline 304 Stainless Steel by Severe; haemocompatibility. Abstract. Bulk nanocrystalline 304 stainless steel (nanocrystalline 304ss) discs had been successfully prepared by the commercial microcrystalline 304 stainless steel (microcrystalline 304ss) plate

  18. Role of chemical termination in edge contact to graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Qun; Guo, Jing, E-mail: guoj@ufl.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Edge contacts to graphene can offer excellent contact properties. Role of different chemical terminations is examined by using ab initio density functional theory and quantum transport simulations. It is found that edge termination by group VI elements O and S offers considerably lower contact resistance compared to H and group VII element F. The results can be understood by significantly larger binding energy and shorter binding distance between the metal contact and these group VI elements, which results in considerably lower interface potential barrier and larger transmission. The qualitative conclusion applies to a variety of contact metal materials.

  19. Static power reduction for midpoint-terminated busses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY)

    2011-01-18

    A memory system is disclosed which is comprised of a memory controller and addressable memory devices such as DRAMs. The invention provides a programmable register to control the high vs. low drive state of each bit of a memory system address and control bus during periods of bus inactivity. In this way, termination voltage supply current can be minimized, while permitting selected bus bits to be driven to a required state. This minimizes termination power dissipation while not affecting memory system performance. The technique can be extended to work for other high-speed busses as well.

  20. Base drive circuit for a four-terminal power Darlington

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Fred C. (Blacksburg, VA); Carter, Roy A. (Salem, VA)

    1983-01-01

    A high power switching circuit which utilizes a four-terminal Darlington transistor block to improve switching speed, particularly in rapid turn-off. Two independent reverse drive currents are utilized during turn off in order to expel the minority carriers of the Darlington pair at their own charge sweep-out rate. The reverse drive current may be provided by a current transformer, the secondary of which is tapped to the base terminal of the power stage of the Darlington block. In one application, the switching circuit is used in each power switching element in a chopper-inverter drive of an electric vehicle propulsion system.

  1. Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risk of wide-area bulk transmission system failures. The work makes use of two previously developed1 Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System for bulk transmission equipment that is based on the cumulative long-term risk caused by each piece

  2. Strontium Titanate DC Electric Field Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Solidly Mounted Resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Strontium Titanate DC Electric Field Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Solidly Mounted.3 0/0. Index Terms - Acoustic resonators, bulk acoustic wave devices, delay filters, ferroelectric,4] that can be exploited to realize voltage-switchable bulk-acoustic wave (BAW) devices for RF applications [5

  3. dc electric field tunable bulk acoustic wave solidly mounted resonator using SrTiO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    dc electric field tunable bulk acoustic wave solidly mounted resonator using SrTiO3 G. N. SaddikTiO3 solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave resonator has been designed, fabricated, and tested of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2759464 Thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators FBARs have been in use by research

  4. Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Description of Test Methods The Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems (ABWS) code of NIST Handbook 44 requires/14) DRAFT Page 2 Proper selection of the best method to use for testing is dependent upon the amount of test bulk material entirely or a combination of bulk material and trim weights.1 Thus, the determination

  5. Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT Page 1 EPO No. 16 Appendix B amount of scale error (high level steps 2 and 3) #12;Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08 step 1: Error = - 3 #12;Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT Page 3 Evaluating

  6. Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT Page 1 EPO No. 16 Appendix B of the scale; then remove the error weights. #12;Automatic Bulk Weighing Systems EPO ABWS (Rev. 08/14) DRAFT consecutive digital increments not permitted to be greater than 0.3 d Lower Increment #12;Automatic Bulk

  7. Bulk elastic fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudouin Saintyves; Olivier Dauchot; Elisabeth Bouchaud

    2013-08-17

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of a purely elastic fingering instability which arises when air penetrates into an elastomer confined in a Hele-Shaw cell. Fingers appear sequentially and propagate within the bulk of the material as soon as a critical strain, independent of the elastic modulus, is exceeded. Their width depends non-linearly on the distance between the confining glass plates. A key element in the driving force of the instability is the adhesion of layers of gels to the plates, which results in a considerable expense of elastic energy during the growth of the air bubble.

  8. Radiative cooling of bulk silicon by incoherent light pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyutenko, V. K. Bogatyrenko, V. V.; Malyutenko, O. Yu.

    2013-12-23

    In contrast to radiative cooling by light up conversion caused exclusively by a low-entropy laser pump and employing thermally assisted fluorescence/luminescence as a power out, we demonstrate light down conversion cooling by incoherent pumps, 0.47–0.94??m light emitting diodes, and employing thermal emission (TE) as a power out. We demonstrate ?3.5?K bulk cooling of Si at 450?K because overall energy of multiple below bandgap TE photons exceeds the energy of a single above bandgap pump photon. We show that using large entropy TE as power out helps avoid careful tuning of an incoherent pump wavelength and cool indirect-bandgap semiconductors.

  9. Multifunctional bulk plasma source based on discharge with electron injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimov, A. S.; Medovnik, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Savkin, K. P.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2013-01-15

    A bulk plasma source, based on a high-current dc glow discharge with electron injection, is described. Electron injection and some special design features of the plasma arc emitter provide a plasma source with very long periods between maintenance down-times and a long overall lifetime. The source uses a sectioned sputter-electrode array with six individual sputter targets, each of which can be independently biased. This discharge assembly configuration provides multifunctional operation, including plasma generation from different gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, acetylene) and deposition of composite metal nitride and oxide coatings.

  10. Non-Brownian molecular self-diffusion in bulk water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janez Stepišnik; Aleš Mohori?; Igor Serša

    2010-10-06

    The paper presents the velocity autocorrelation spectrum of bulk water measured by a new technique of NMR modulated gradient spin echo method. This technique is unprecedented for the spectrum measurement in the frequency interval between a few Hz to about 100 kHz with respect to directness and clarity of results and shows that a simple model of Brownian self-diffusion is not applicable to describe the diffusion dynamics of water molecules. The observed temperature dependant spectra of water show the existence of a slow chain-like dynamics in water, which we explain by coupling of diffusing molecule to broken bonds in the hydrogen bond network.

  11. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Air Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintasNEPA TimelinesBulkTransmission/Air

  12. Mixed Nash Equilibria in Concurrent Terminal-Reward Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Mixed Nash Equilibria in Concurrent Terminal-Reward Games Patricia Bouyer, Nicolas Markey, and Daniel Stan LSV ­ CNRS & ENS Cachan ­ France Abstract We study mixed-strategy Nash equilibria states with a value for each player). We show undecidability of the existence of a constrained Nash

  13. Snowball Earth termination by destabilization of equatorial permafrost methane clathrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Martin J.

    LETTERS Snowball Earth termination by destabilization of equatorial permafrost methane clathrate-gassing during post-glacial oceanic overturn7 or methane hydrate destabilization8­10 . Here we report the broadest range of oxygen isotope values yet measured in mar- ine sediments (225% to 112%) in methane seeps

  14. Prfungen 1. Termin FS 2015 Bachelor / Master Chemie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    Prüfungen 1. Termin FS 2015 Bachelor / Master Chemie Bachelor Biochemie Grundstudium Pharmazie to be handed in. Achtung: Die Wiederholungsprüfungstermine aus dem Bereich Chemie, Biochemie und Biologie make sure you always sign-up for the first exam date. Departement für Chemie und Biochemie

  15. Conservation of Heat Energy at Hot Petroleum Products Terminals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, J. C.; Graham, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Exxon operates several terminals which store asphalt and heavy fuel oil. Due to the rising cost of fuels, Exxon initiated a study to identify economic investments which would reduce the fuel needed to heat these products. First, fuel usage at four...

  16. Despite its chaotic and disrupted opening, Heathrow's Terminal 5 is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are famous for late completion and huge budget overruns. BAA, the company responsible for T5, avoided into the planning and construction of Terminal 5 at London's Heathrow airport shows how organisations can learn from major infrastructure programmes to improve their management of future projects. #12;Between June 2005

  17. BARNARD COLLEGE Termination of a Research Protocol Involving Human Subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BARNARD COLLEGE Termination of a Research Protocol Involving Human Subjects Title: Principal) Study subjects: A total of _____ subjects were enrolled since the last report to the IRB. Since initial study approval on _____________ a total of _____ subjects have been enrolled in this study and ____ have

  18. QER- Comment of Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good Afternoon, Please find the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District’s comments on Infrastructure Constraints in re: the QER Investigation hearing scheduled for Bismarck, ND on August 8, 2014. Please include these comments in the public record of the hearing. Thank you.

  19. Comments on universal properties of entanglement entropy and bulk reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haehl, Felix M

    2015-01-01

    Entanglement entropy of holographic CFTs is expected to play a crucial role in the reconstruction of semiclassical bulk gravity. We consider the entanglement entropy of spherical regions of vacuum, which is known to contain universal contributions. After perturbing the CFT with a relevant scalar operator, also the first order change of this quantity gives a universal term which only depends on a discrete set of basic CFT parameters. We show that in gravity this statement corresponds to the uniqueness of the ghost-free graviton propagator on an AdS background geometry. While the gravitational dynamics in this context contains little information about the structure of the bulk theory, there is a discrete set of dimensionless parameters of the theory which determines the entanglement entropy. We argue that for every (not necessarily holographic) CFT, any reasonable gravity model can be used to compute this particular entanglement entropy. We elucidate how this statement is consistent with AdS/CFT and also give v...

  20. Powder metallurgy processing and deformation characteristics of bulk multimodal nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farbaniec, L.; Dirras, G.; Krawczynska, A.; Mompiou, F.; Couque, H.; Naimi, F.; Bernard, F.; Tingaud, D.

    2014-08-15

    Spark plasma sintering was used to process bulk nickel samples from a blend of three powder types. The resulting multimodal microstructure was made of coarse (average size ? 135 ?m) spherical microcrystalline entities (the core) surrounded by a fine-grained matrix (average grain size ? 1.5 ?m) or a thick rim (the shell) distinguishable from the matrix. Tensile tests revealed yield strength of ? 470 MPa that was accompanied by limited ductility (? 2.8% plastic strain). Microstructure observation after testing showed debonding at interfaces between the matrix and the coarse entities, but in many instances, shallow dimples within the rim were observed indicating local ductile events in the shell. Dislocation emission and annihilation at grain boundaries and twinning at crack tip were the main deformation mechanisms taking place within the fine-grained matrix as revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Estimation of the stress from loop's curvature and dislocation pile-up indicates that dislocation emission from grain boundaries and grain boundary overcoming largely contributes to the flow stress. - Highlights: • Bulk multi-modal Ni was processed by SPS from a powder blend. • Ultrafine-grained matrix or rim observed around spherical microcrystalline entities • Yield strength (470 MPa) and ductility (2.8% plastic strain) were measured. • Debonding was found at the matrix/microcrystalline entity interfaces. • In-situ TEM showed twinning, dislocation emission and annihilation at grain boundaries.