Sample records for reference tennessee code

  1. TLG Beta Code Quick Reference Guide Revised: July 16, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    TLG Beta Code Quick Reference Guide Revised: July 16, 2009 This document provides a quick reference to Beta Code and its Unicode equivalents. For a comprehensive overview of Beta Code, please see the TLG Beta Code Manual. Unicode equivalents are correct as of Unicode 5.1. Table of Contents Notes

  2. Nuclear Science References Coding Manual D.F. Winchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Science References Coding Manual D.F. Winchell National Nuclear Data Center Brookhaven and coding procedures for specific topics . . 18 3.2.1 NUCLEAR REACTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.2.2 RADIOACTIVITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.2.3 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE

  3. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 as the Commercial Building Energy Code in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (hereafter referred to as ASHRAE 90.1-2001 or 90.1-2001) was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The State of Tennessee is considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-2001 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered in this report. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) simulations combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits. Tennessee currently has ASHRAE Standard 90A-1980 as the statewide voluntary/recommended commercial energy standard; however, it is up to the local jurisdiction to adopt this code. Because 90A-1980 is the recommended standard, many of the requirements of ASHRAE 90A-1980 were used as a baseline for simulations.

  4. Selection of Long-Term Reference Frames in Dual-Frame Video Coding Using Simulated Annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, M.; Cosman, P. C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Index Terms—Dual-frame video coding, long-term reference frame, simulated annealing, video compression.

  5. Referred by UCSD Environment, Health & Safety Office Industrial Hygiene, Mail Code 0958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Referred by UCSD Environment, Health & Safety Office Industrial Hygiene, Mail Code 0958 I:\\Industrial_Hygiene

  6. Potential Job Creation in Tennessee as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  7. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The University of Tennessee Health Science Center INSTRUCTIONS FOR TOTALLY DISABLED AND/OR SENIOR CITIZEN ENROLLING IN CREDIT COURSES In accordance with provisions of Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 49 to The University of Tennessee Health Science Center. You must make application for admission to the University

  8. Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials section of the Tennessee Code covers all of the regulations, licenses, permits, siting requirements, and practices relevant to a nuclear energy development. ...

  9. Tennessee waltz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Allison (Allison Carol)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tennessee Waltz is a collection of short stories, set in Memphis, Tennessee, about the lives of three characters, a mother, daughter, and grandmother. These stories raise a series of questions: What is absolute? What is ...

  10. Oil and Gas Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oil and Gas section of the Tennessee Code, found in Title 60, covers all regulations, licenses, permits, and laws related to the production of natural gas. The laws create the Oil and Gas...

  11. Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and...

  12. Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program is to select and fund projects that best result in a reduction of emissions and pollutants identified below. The Clean Tennessee Energy...

  13. Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Water Resources Information Act is designed to prevent the lowering of the ground water table by requiring that adequate information is obtained to document current demand for water...

  14. Forestry Policies (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee's forests are managed by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry Division. In 2010 the Division issued its Statewide Forest Action Plan, which includes a section detailing the bio-energy...

  15. Gas Companies Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Companies program is a set of rules that encourage the development of the natural gas industry in Tennessee. They empower gas companies to lay piped and extend conductors through the...

  16. Tennessee Small Business Investment Company Credit Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Small Business Company Credit Act offers $120 million in gross premiums tax credits to insurance companies that invest in companies certified by the State of Tennessee as TNInvestcos....

  17. Tennessee: Tennessee's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Tennessee.

  18. Job Training Assistance Programs (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Job Training Assistance Programs in Tennessee are a combination of three programs: The FastTrack Job Training Assistance Program (FJTAP), The Tennessee Job Skills Program (TJS), and The Job...

  19. Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations for Gas Companies, implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority) outline the standards for metering, distribution and electricity generation for utilities using gas....

  20. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  1. Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

  2. University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Tennessee Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wshed1.htm Watts Bar Watershed McMinn Monroe Pond Creek #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Water Quality in Pond Creek 35.6 miles of Mud Creek, Greasy Branch and Pond Creek listed on 2002? #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Pond Creek · Pasture based beef and dairy

  3. THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE SPACE INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Lloyd M.

    , or kernels; and, other oils and greases, including petroleum, fuel oil, sludge, synthetic oils, mineral oils#12;#12;THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE SPACE INSTITUTE OIL POLLUTION Photographs General Best Management Practices Master Forms Technical Data Regulatory Information TAB 9 ­ Oil

  4. Covenant Deferral Request for the Proposed Transfer of Land Parcel ED-8 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - Final - May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer a land parcel (hereinafter referred to as 'the Property') designated as Land Parcel ED-8 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by deed, and is submitting this Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, and applicable U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes ETTP, was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in November 1989. Environmental investigation and cleanup activities are continuing at ETTP in accordance with CERCLA, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). The FFA was entered into by the DOE-Oak Ridge Office (ORO), EPA Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in 1991. The FFA establishes the schedule and milestones for environmental remediation of the ORR. The proposed property transfer is a key component of the Oak Ridge Performance Management Plan (ORPMP) for accelerated cleanup of the ORR. DOE, using its authority under Section 161(g) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), proposes to transfer the Property to Heritage Center, LLC, a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET), hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center.' CROET is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation established to foster the diversification of the regional economy by re-utilizing DOE property for private-sector investment and job creation. The Property is located in the southern portion of ETTP and consists of approximately 84 acres proposed as the potential site for new facilities to be used for office space, industrial activities, or other commercial uses. The parcel contains both grassy fields located outside the ETTP 'main plant' area and infrastructure located inside the 'main plant' area. No buildings are included in the proposed ED-8 transfer. The buildings in ED-8 have already been transferred (Buildings K-1007, K-1580, K-1330, and K-1000). These buildings are not included in the transfer footprint of Land Parcel ED-8. A number of temporary structures, such as trailers and tents (non-real property), are located within the footprint. These temporary structures are not included in the transfer. DOE would continue to be responsible for any contamination resulting from DOE activities that is present on the property at the time of transfer but found after the date of transfer. The deed transferring the Property contains various restrictions and prohibitions on the use of the Property that are subject to enforcement pursuant to State Law Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) 68-212-225 and state real property law. These restrictions and prohibitions are designed to ensure protection of human health and the environment.

  5. Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

  6. Regulatory Facility Guide for Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation related regulations applicable to shipments originating at or destined to Tennessee facilities. Information on preferred routes is also given.

  7. THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center Human Resources 910 Madison Ave, Suite 722 Memphis, TN 38163 Tel: (901) 448-5600 Fax: (901) 448-5170 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE the Personnel Records of UT public domain. This gives any citizen of the State of Tennessee the right to view

  8. REFERENCES, REGULATIONS, & U. S. CODE General References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decommissioning Management Plan Sites," Federal Register 57 FR 6136. February 20, 1992. "Order Establishing Criteria and Schedule for Decommissioning the Bloomberg Site." Federal Register Agency for Toxic Substances. American Nuclear Society (ANS). 1994. Mobile In Situ Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy System. Transactions

  9. Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  10. Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    #12;Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Twenty ............................................................14 Nuclear Engineering Student Awards and Honors...................................................20 of the University of Tennessee Nuclear Engineering Department (UTNE) is intended to serve as a State

  11. Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    #12;Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Twenty ........................................................................................................................ 19 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS ............................................................23 STUDENT ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

  12. Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and Education Showcase Tennessee Veterans Business Association 3rd Annual Business and Education Showcase January 28,...

  13. STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION DIVISION OF RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH L&C ANNEX - THIRD FLOOR 401 CHURCH STREET NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37243-1532 LICENSEE: Babcock &...

  14. Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  15. Middle Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation (MTEMC) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offer incentives for residential customers through the In-Home Energy Evaluation Program. This...

  16. Southwest Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation (STEMC), in collaboration with The Tennessee Valley Authority, offers water heater rebates for residential customers. Rebates are available for...

  17. CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project Categorical...

  18. East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park The East Tennessee Technology the mission was changed to include the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and to recycle in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process, and production ceased

  19. Green Energy Property Tax Assessment (Tennessee) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Treasury Tennessee offers a special ad valorem property tax assessment for certified green energy production facilities. Property that generates electricity from a certified...

  20. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 1999. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 199a). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 1999, these CY 1999 goals were extended to CY 2000 for all waste streams that generated waste in 1999. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 51 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 1999 data.

  1. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 2000. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 2000). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 2000, these goals were extended to CY 2001 for all waste streams that generated waste in 2000. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 50 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 2000 data.

  2. East Tennessee State University Web Privacy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    East Tennessee State University Web Privacy Statement A Note to Children and Parents East Tennessee through a university Web site is handled. ETSU understands the importance of protecting the privacy of personal information, especially in today's electronic environment. This privacy policy covers the Web

  3. Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly. Second quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee. In every instance possible, county-level energy data are also shown. The report covers three substantive areas of the energy flow production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly has been developed by the Tennessee Energy Data Base Program to serve as a supplement to the Energy Division publication - The Tennessee Energy Profiles: 1960-1980. Historical data reported in this volume cover the production and utilization of major energy supplies by fuel type and economic sectors, as well as other energy data such as prices and fuel distribution. 12 figures, 12 tables.

  4. Tennessee Natural Gas Processed in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)ThousandNumber andCrudeTemperatureThousandin Tennessee

  5. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugSame MonthTennessee

  6. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Student Records Policy Approved by: Committee on Undergraduate Medical Education (CUME) College of Medicine Catalog 201213 POLICY STATEMENT: Student Records A student's official or permanent record pertains to academic progress

  7. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE PROGRESS, PROMOTION, AND GRADUATION Approved by STATEMENT: Satisfactory Academic Progress Students must achieve satisfactory academic progress progress standards mirror the academic progress policies of each individual college. A student

  8. Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrard, C. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    facilities in Tennessee, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  10. Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrard, C. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

  11. East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park The ETTP was originally built of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and recycling of spent fuel. The name was changed to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. In the 1980s, a reduction in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted

  12. East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park ETTP was originally built the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and recycling of uranium recovered from spent fuel for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process, and production ceased. The emphasis

  13. Tennessee

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumber of Water8

  14. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moved to establish an integrated and coordinated policy and administrative system for the management of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply to the management and monitoring of water resources. In recent years, however, the State, through the Tennessee

  15. REDUCED-COMPLEXITY DECODING FOR CONCATENATED CODES BASED ON RECTANGULAR PARITY-CHECK CODES AND TURBO CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Tan F.

    AND TURBO CODES John M. Shea and Tan F. Wong University of Florida Department of Electrical and Computer-check code (RPCC) with a turbo code. These concatenated codes are referred to as RPCC+turbo codes. RPCC+turbo codes have been shown to significantly outperform turbo codes in several scenarios [1],[2]. One

  16. Tennessee/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee Jump to: navigation,

  17. Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee Jump to:

  18. EA-1175: Proposed Title Transfer of East Tennessee Technology Park Land and Facilities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transfer the title of unneeded DOE real property located at the U.S. Department of Energy East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in...

  19. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Technical Standards for Admissions, Retention by the simultaneous acquisition of skills and professional attitudes and behavior. Our faculty has the responsibility-solving and diagnosis, the critical skills demanded of physicians, require all of these intellectual abilities

  20. The University of Tennessee LAW WOMEN CONSTITUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    The University of Tennessee LAW WOMEN CONSTITUTION MISSION STATEMENT The Mission Statement for Law community. Law Women strives to: · Raise awareness of issues related to women's participation community that address issues of concern to women. MEMBERSHIP, OFFICERS, & COMMITTEES 1. Law Women

  1. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Parcel ED-9 consists of about 13 acres that DOE proposes to transfer to Heritage Center, LLC (hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center'), a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The 13 acres include two tracts of land, referred to as ED-9A (7.06 acres) and ED-9B (5.02 acres), and a third tract consisting of about 900 linear feet of paved road and adjacent right-of-way, referred to as ED-9C (0.98 acres). Transfer of the title to ED-9 will be by deed under a Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides a summary of information to support the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity.

  2. Deputy Secretary Poneman Attends Ground Breaking at Tennessee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    vehicle, the LEAF, at its existing Smyrna, Tennessee plant. Nissan will offer electric vehicles to fleet and retail customers, and plans to ramp up production capacity...

  3. Secretary Chu, NNSA Administrator and the Tennessee Congressional...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Congressional Delegation Join Local Officials in Dedicating Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 Secretary Chu, NNSA Administrator and the Tennessee Congressional...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Reference Model 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Model 3 Sandia, NREL Release Wave Energy Converter Modeling and Simulation Code: WEC-Sim On July 29, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  5. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  6. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems

  7. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  8. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tributaries for their water sources continue to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state manyTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems

  9. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    continue to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domesticTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  10. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  11. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tributaries for their water sources continue to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state manyTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Water Resources Issues

  12. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and administrative system for the management of water resources in Tennessee. While the situation is improving to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee, have been the primary contributors to the management and monitoring of water resources. In recent years

  13. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the coding techniques are equally applicable to any voice signal whether or not it carries any intelligible information, as the term speech implies. Other terms that are commonly used are speech compression and voice compression since the fundamental idea behind speech coding is to reduce (compress) the transmission rate (or equivalently the bandwidth) And/or reduce storage requirements In this document the terms speech and voice shall be used interchangeably.

  14. EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee Technology Park and Surrounding Area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Oak Ridge Operations Office issued a final EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to convey DOE property located at the East Tennessee Technology Park and the surrounding area to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee, City of Oak Ridge, other agencies, or private entities for mixed use economic development.Public Comment Opportunities.

  15. Nutrient Management Issues inNutrient Management Issues in TennesseeTennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 large CAFOsCAFOs permittedpermitted All swineAll swine 136 medium136 medium CAFOs issued by Dept. of EnvironmentPermits issued by Dept. of Environment and Conservation (TDEC and enforcementenforcement www.state.tn.us/environment/permits/cafo.htmwww.state.tn.us/environment/permits/cafo.htm Tennessee

  16. Adams, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara, CaliforniaI JumpIowa:New York:Tennessee:

  17. Adamsville, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara, CaliforniaIAdamstown,Tennessee: Energy

  18. Clean Cities: Middle Tennessee Clean Fuels coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonoluluMaineMiddle Tennessee

  19. Kingston, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County,Kingsley,Hampshire:Tennessee:

  20. Dyersburg, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, NewDyer County, Tennessee: Energy Resources Jump

  1. Ooltewah, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resources JumpOoltewah, Tennessee:

  2. CASL Core Partner - Tennessee Valley Authority

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAES Home Home About UsTennessee Valley

  3. Springfield, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity CorpSpringfield, Tennessee: Energy Resources Jump

  4. Tennessee/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe nice ifTennessee/Incentives <

  5. Tennessee Valley Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumericTenino, Washington: EnergyTennessee

  6. Tennessee Valley Authority (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation Tengchong County Zhongdian EnergyTennessee

  7. Tennessee Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation Tengchong County ZhongdianTennessee Valley

  8. Code Description Code Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leave* 5127 Officials 5217 Faculty Sick Leave Payment 5124 Personal Service Contracts 5211 Research Services Contracts Scholarships & Fellowships Faculty Fringe Contract Services #12;Banner Account Code

  9. Tennessee-based IAC Helps Manufacturer Become More Energy Efficient

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Thanks to help from the Tennessee 3-Star Industrial Assessment Center, the FUJIFILM Hunt Chemicals U.S.A facility in Dayton, TN is saving an estimated $39,280 per year in energy savings. Find out more.

  10. GATTON COLLEGE OF PHARMACY EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Accreditation 11 Memberships 11 ETSU Vision Statement 11 ETSU Mission Statement 11 ETSU Values 11 ETSU Strategic........................................................................................ 63 Tennessee Board of Regents 63 ETSU Administration 64 College of Pharmacy Administration 64 FACULTY

  11. The Rural Opportunity Initiative Enhanced Job Tax Credit (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rural Opportunity Initiative Enhanced Job Tax Credit program provides enhanced job tax credits to businesses locating or expanding in certain Tennessee counties considered Tier 2 or Tier 3...

  12. Poroelastic references

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Christina Morency

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  13. Poroelastic references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christina Morency

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  14. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A.

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

  15. Reference Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead ofReference-Documents Sign In

  16. Recommendation 170: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park.

  17. Reference Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead ofReference-Documents Sign In About |

  18. Influences of Drawdown on Waterbird Use of Mudflats in Two Tennessee River Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Influences of Drawdown on Waterbird Use of Mudflats in Two Tennessee River Reservoirs John W: Critical for Survival Shallowly Flooded Mudflats Tennessee River Valley These areas serve as "re & Chickamauga Justification Manipulate Reservoir Water Levels Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) = Control Mudflat

  19. Semidefinite code bounds based on quadruple distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Acknowledgement. We thank Niels Oosterling for very helpful comments on the method. References. [1] E. Agrell, Bounds for unrestricted binary codes,.

  20. Spinal codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Jonathan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinal codes are a new class of rateless codes that enable wireless networks to cope with time-varying channel conditions in a natural way, without requiring any explicit bit rate selection. The key idea in the code is the ...

  1. A New Minimum Density RAID-6 Code with a Word Size of Eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plank, Jim

    @cs.utk.edu Technical Report CS-08-612 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Tennessee-6 Code with a Word Size of Eight James S. Plank Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer with a single parity disk so that the loss of any single data or parity disk may be tolerated without data loss

  2. Transition Plan for the K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmeister J.

    2008-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) was previously used to treat and process all sanitary sewage waste from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The plant was shut down on May 29, 2008 as a result of the transition of sewage treatment for ETTP to the City of Oak Ridge. The City of Oak Ridge expanded the Rarity Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant (RRSTP) to include capacity to treat the waste from the ETTP and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) constructed a new ETTP lift station and force main to RRSTP. In preparation for the shutdown of K-1203, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with Operation Management International (OMI) developed a shut down plan to outline actions that need to occur prior to the transition of the facility to Bechtel Jacob Company, LLC (BJC) for decontamination and demolition (D and D). This plan outlines the actions, roles, and responsibilities for BJC in order to support the transition of the K-1203 STP from OMI to the BJC Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and D and D programs. The D and D of the K-1203 Facilities is planned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Remaining Facilities D and D Action Memorandum in the Balance of Site-Utilities D and D Subproject in fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  3. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  4. Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $123 for the 2009 IECC and $415 for the 2012 IECC.

  5. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

  6. Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone 1, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zone 1 is a 1400-acre area outside the fence of the main plant at The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone, ETTP (Zone 1 Interim ROD) (DOE 2002) identifies the remedial actions for contaminated soil, buried waste, and subsurface infrastructure necessary to protect human health and to limit further contamination of groundwater. Since the Zone 1 Interim Record of Decision (ROD) was signed, new information has been obtained that requires the remedy to be modified as follows: (1) Change the end use in Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA) from unrestricted industrial to recreational; (2) Remove Exposure Units (EU5) ZI-50, 51, and 52 from the scope of the Zone I Interim ROD; (3) Change the end use of the duct bank corridor from unrestricted industrial to restricted industrial; and (4) Remove restriction for the disturbance of soils below 10 feet in Exposure Unit (EU) Z1-04. In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.435, these scope modifications are a 'significant' change to the Zone 1 Interim ROD. In accordance with CERCLA Sect. 117 (c) and 40 CFR 300.435 (c)(2)(i), such a significant change is documented with an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD). The purpose of this ESD is to make the changes listed above. This ESD is part of the Administrative Record file, and it, and other information supporting the selected remedy, can be found at the DOE Information Center, 475 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ORR is located in Roane and Anderson counties, within and adjacent to the corporate city limits of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ETTP is located in Roane County near the northwest corner of the ORR. ETTP began operation during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. The original mission of ETTP was to produce enriched uranium for use in atomic weapons. The plant produced enriched uranium from 1945 until 1985. Uranium production was terminated in 1987. ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, so remediation activities are conducted under CERCLA. The primary contaminants of concern at ETTP follow: (1) In groundwater - volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at multiple locations (trichloroethene is generally the most prevalent compound); (2) In sediment - inorganic elements, radionuclides, and polychlorinated biphenyls; (3) In soil - inorganic elements, radionuclides, semivolatile organic compounds (particularly the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and VOCs; and (4) In facilities - radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls (abandoned facilities also pose a safety and health hazard to workers.) The purposes of the remedial actions selected in the Zone 1 Interim ROD are to allow unrestricted industrial use down to 10 feet and to remediate potential sources of groundwater contamination. Following is a summary of the major components of the Zone 1 Interim ROD remedy: (1) Excavation of the Blair Quarry burial area and associated contaminated soil; (2) Excavation of miscellaneous contaminated soil in the K-895 Cylinder Destruct Facility area and in the Powerhouse Area; (3) Removal of sludge and demolition of the K-710 sludge beds and Imhoff tanks; (4) Implementation of land use controls (LUCs); and (5) Characterization of soil and remediation of areas that exceed remediation levels.

  7. Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine February 3, 2003 I on the progress of the website for the DFAC. It is a work in progress and should be on-line during March 2003. V for the College of Medicine that will be held next Monday. At that time the Dean will provide his vision

  8. The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management 112 Conference Center Building Knoxville, TN to the Office of Risk Management. NOTE: Please share this information within your department/unit with those with University and State requirements. It is imperative that the Office of Risk Management be notified

  9. East Tennessee State University (ETSU) eJobs at ETSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    East Tennessee State University (ETSU) eJobs at ETSU Frequently Asked Questions Q.) How do I obtain an ETSU application for employment? A.) Apply for a regular budgeted position at ETSU using the eJobs at ETSU online system. Please visit the ETSU employment opportunities website for instructions at: http://www.etsu

  10. COSY INFINITY reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berz, M.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a reference manual for the arbitrary order particle optics and beam dynamics code COSY INFINITY. It is current as of June 28, 1990. COSY INFINITY is a code to study and design particle optical systems, including beamlines, spectrometers, and particle accelerators. At its core it is using differential algebraic (DA) methods, which allow a very systematic and simple calculation of high order effects. At the same time, it allows the computation of dependences on system parameters, which is often interesting in its own right and can also be used for fitting. COSY INFINITY has a full structured object oriented language environment. This provides a simple interface for the casual user. At the same time, it offers the demanding user a very flexible and powerful tool for the study and design of systems, and more generally, the utilization of DA methods. The power and generality of the environment is perhaps best demonstrated by the fact that the physics routines of COSY INFINITY are written in its own input language and are very compact. The approach also considerably facilitates the implementation of new features because they are incorporated with the same commands that are used for design and study. 26 refs.

  11. EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed land transfer to the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority for the development of a general aviation airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download No downloads found for this office.

  12. Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

  13. Update and inclusion of resuspension model codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porch, W.M.; Greenly, G.D.; Mitchell, C.S.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model codes for estimating radiation doses from plutonium particles associated with resuspended dust were improved. Only one new code (RSUS) is required in addition to the MATHEW/ADPIC set of codes. The advantage is that it estimates resuspension based on wind blown dust fluxes derived for different soil types. 2 references. (ACR)

  14. CONCEPT computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delene, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONCEPT is a computer code that will provide conceptual capital investment cost estimates for nuclear and coal-fired power plants. The code can develop an estimate for construction at any point in time. Any unit size within the range of about 400 to 1300 MW electric may be selected. Any of 23 reference site locations across the United States and Canada may be selected. PWR, BWR, and coal-fired plants burning high-sulfur and low-sulfur coal can be estimated. Multiple-unit plants can be estimated. Costs due to escalation/inflation and interest during construction are calculated.

  15. Code constructions and code families for nonbinary quantum stabilizer code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketkar, Avanti Ulhas

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilizer codes form a special class of quantum error correcting codes. Nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes are studied in this thesis. A lot of work on binary quantum stabilizer codes has been done. Nonbinary stabilizer codes have received much...

  16. Deep Residential Retrofits in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Hendrick, Timothy P [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is furthering residential energy retrofit research in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee by selecting 10 homes and guiding the homeowners in the energy retrofit process. The homeowners pay for the retrofits, and ORNL advises which retrofits to complete and collects post-retrofit data. This effort is in accordance with the Department of Energy s Building America program research goal of demonstrating market-ready energy retrofit packages that reduce home energy use by 30 50%. Through this research, ORNL researchers hope to understand why homeowners decide to partake in energy retrofits, the payback of home energy retrofits, and which retrofit packages most economically reduce energy use. Homeowner interviews help the researchers understand the homeowners experience. Information gathered during the interviews will aid in extending market penetration of home energy retrofits by helping researchers and the retrofit industry understand what drives homeowners in making positive decisions regarding these retrofits. This report summarizes the selection process, the pre-retrofit condition, the recommended retrofits, the actual cost of the retrofits (when available), and an estimated energy savings of the retrofit package using EnergyGauge . Of the 10 households selected to participate in the study, only five completed the recommended retrofits, three completed at least one but no more than three of the recommended retrofits, and two households did not complete any of the recommended retrofits. In the case of the two homes that did none of the recommended work, the pre-retrofit condition of the homes and the recommended retrofits are reported. The five homes that completed the recommended retrofits are monitored for energy consumption of the whole house, appliances, space conditioning equipment, water heater, and most of the other circuits with miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) and lighting. Thermal comfort is also monitored, with temperature and humidity measured in all conditioned zones, attics, crawlspaces, and unconditioned basements. In some homes, heat flux transducers are installed on the basement walls to help determine the insulating qualities of the technologies and practices. EnergyGauge is used to estimate the pre-retrofit and post-retrofit home energy rating system (HERS) index and reduction in energy consumption and energy bill. In a follow-up report, data from the installed sensors will be presented and analyzed as well as a comparison of the post-retrofit energy consumption of the home to the EnergyGauge model of the post-retrofit home. Table ES1 shows the retrofits that were completed at the eight households where some or all of the recommended retrofits were completed. Home aliases are used to keep the homeowners anonymous. Some key findings of this study thus far are listed as follows. Some homeowners (50%) are not willing to spend the money to reach 30 50% energy savings. Quality of retrofit work is significantly variable among contractors which impact the potential energy savings of the retrofit. Challenges exist in defining house volume and floor area. Of the five homes that completed all the recommended retrofits, energy bill savings was not the main driver for energy retrofits. In no case were the retrofits cost neutral given a 15 year loan at 7% interest for the retrofit costs.

  17. Holographic codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latorre, Jose I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a remarkable four-qutrit state that carries absolute maximal entanglement in all its partitions. Employing this state, we construct a tensor network that delivers a holographic many body state, the H-code, where the physical properties of the boundary determine those of the bulk. This H-code is made of an even superposition of states whose relative Hamming distances are exponentially large with the size of the boundary. This property makes H-codes natural states for a quantum memory. H-codes exist on tori of definite sizes and get classified in three different sectors characterized by the sum of their qutrits on cycles wrapped through the boundaries of the system. We construct a parent Hamiltonian for the H-code which is highly non local and finally we compute the topological entanglement entropy of the H-code.

  18. Holographic codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose I. Latorre; German Sierra

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a remarkable four-qutrit state that carries absolute maximal entanglement in all its partitions. Employing this state, we construct a tensor network that delivers a holographic many body state, the H-code, where the physical properties of the boundary determine those of the bulk. This H-code is made of an even superposition of states whose relative Hamming distances are exponentially large with the size of the boundary. This property makes H-codes natural states for a quantum memory. H-codes exist on tori of definite sizes and get classified in three different sectors characterized by the sum of their qutrits on cycles wrapped through the boundaries of the system. We construct a parent Hamiltonian for the H-code which is highly non local and finally we compute the topological entanglement entropy of the H-code.

  19. EIS-0152: Iroquois/Tennessee Phase I Pipeline Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to asses the environmental impacts of constructing and operating an interstate natural gas pipeline and associated infrastructure to transport gas from Canada and domestic sources to the New England Market, as proposed by the Iroquois Gas Transmission System and the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy was a cooperating agency during statement development and adopted the statement on 9/1/1990.

  20. Summary References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Authority) 2007. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Completion and Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 2, Rhea County, Tennessee. June. Available online...

  1. Tennessee Valley Authority atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor simulation interim annual report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, J.W.; Krishnan, R.P.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a detailed description of the work performed during 1979 for the Tennessee Valley Authority in support of the TVA Fluidized-Bed Combustor (FBC) Demonstration Plant Program. The work was carried out under task 4, modeling and simulation of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) systems. The overall objective of this task is to develop a steady-state mathematical model with the capability of predicting trends in bed performance under various feed and operating conditions. As part of this effort, three predictive subprograms (subcodes) were developed during 1979: (1) bubble-growth subcode, (2) sorbent-coal ash elutriation and attrition subcode, and (3) coal combustion subcode. These codes, which are currently being tested with experimental data, are capable of predicting how some of the important operating variables in the AFBC affect its performance. After testing against field data, these subcodes will be incorporated into an overall AFBC system code, which was developed earlier at ORNL for analysis of the Department of Energy (DOE) Component Test and Integration Unit (CTIU) at Morgantown, West Virginia. In addition to these predictive subcodes, the overall system code previously developed for the CTIU is described. The material balance is closed, based on vendor-supplied data. This balance is then used to predict the heat transfer characteristics of the surfaces (submerged and freeboard) in the AFBC. Existing correlations for heat transfer in AFBC are used in the code along with thermophysical properties of the various streams.

  2. Space-Time Turbo Codes Youjian Liu and Michael P. Fitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Youjian "Eugene"

    Space-Time Turbo Codes Youjian Liu and Michael P. Fitz Department of Electrical Engineering. We propose a new class of scalable space{time codes based on turbo codes or turbo trellis codes 1]. They will be referred as space{time turbo codes (STT) in the sequel. The scalability implies that the code rate

  3. approximation code ddscat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We refer to DDscat as to the parent code in this document. Versions 7.3.0 of both codes have the identical functionality but the quite different implementation. Started as a...

  4. Gleason, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI Wind

  5. Murfreesboro, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) | OpenGA References:

  6. 2012-2013 Yates Dissertation Fellowships Graduate School -University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2012-2013 Yates Dissertation Fellowships Graduate School - University of Tennessee, Knoxville 2012-2013Yates Dissertation Fellowships The Yates Dissertation Fellowships provide recognition and financial the dissertation process. Eligibility Criteria: A candidate must be a University of Tennessee, Knoxville graduate

  7. Persistence of hydrologic variables and reactive stream solute concentrations in an east Tennessee watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    , Knoxville, TN 37996, United States e Center for Environmental Biotechnology, The University of Tennessee, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States b Civil and Environmental Engineering, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 4 August 2010 Received

  8. Alaska Administrative Code - Title 17, Chapter 10, Section 11...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - Types of Encroachments Authorized Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Alaska Administrative Code - Title...

  9. California Public Resources Code Division 3, Chapter 4 - Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Public Resources Code Division 3, Chapter 4 - Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute:...

  10. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 87 Geothermal Drilling and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Drilling and Conservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 87...

  11. High Performance “Reach” Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Edelson New Buildings Institute A Growing Role for Codes and Stretch Codes in Utility Programs Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency November 9, 2011 ESL-KT-11-11-39 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 New Buildings Institute ESL..., Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ?31? Flavors of Codes ? Building Codes Construction Codes Energy Codes Stretch or Reach Energy Codes Above-code programs Green or Sustainability Codes Model Codes ?Existing Building? Codes Outcome-Based Codes ESL-KT-11...

  12. CURRICULUM CODE: 611 & 613 MINOR CODE 061 DEGREE CODE: 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    CURRICULUM CODE: 611 & 613 MINOR CODE 061 DEGREE CODE: 31 DAAF 12/09 Hunter College of the City Stamp THIS AUDIT IS NOT OFFICIAL UNTIL APPROVED BY THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR DEGREE AUDIT UNIT Student Specialization Section #12;CURRICULUM CODE: 611 & 613 MINOR CODE 061 DEGREE CODE: 31 DAAF 12/09 *****A SEPARATE

  13. CURRICULUM CODE_611 & 613 MINOR CODE 062 DEGREE CODE _31_

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    CURRICULUM CODE_611 & 613 MINOR CODE 062 DEGREE CODE _31_ 1/24/2006 Hunter College of the City-mail address Department Stamp THIS AUDIT IS NOT OFFICIAL UNTIL APPROVED BY THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR, DEGREE Section Only For January 2010 Graduate #12;CURRICULUM CODE_611 & 613 MINOR CODE 062 DEGREE CODE _31_ 1

  14. Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Sections 337 the properties and potential safety and health hazards of the materials which they use or to which they are exposed. Employees who use or may be exposed to potentially hazardous substances or harmful physical

  15. Lewis County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:New York:NewLeupp,LevyTennessee: Energy

  16. Bradley County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBoston Heights,BoyneTennessee: Energy Resources Jump to:

  17. Carter County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreenCarrizo EnergyCarrolltonMontana:Tennessee:

  18. Scott County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformation Evaluation,SchmidNorthMississippi: EnergyTennessee:

  19. Signal Mountain, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbH Jump to:SierraMountain, Tennessee:

  20. Tennessee - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumber of Water8Tennessee

  1. Jefferson County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias SolarJane Capital4.1672949°, -97.87216° ShowTennessee:

  2. Hickman County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hi-GtelTennessee: Energy Resources

  3. Houston County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania:County, Wyoming: EnergyCare Co LtdTennessee:

  4. Perry County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Tennessee: Energy Resources

  5. Polk County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratini Energia S6665°,JumpFlorida:Tennessee: Energy

  6. City of Etowah, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton,City ofCityEtowah, Tennessee

  7. Hardin County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation Handbook forHansung A ETexas:04961°,Tennessee:

  8. Tennessee Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergyTeamDevelopmentDevelopingNEPA ReviewTennessee

  9. Stewart County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt.Steep GradientWashington: Energy ResourcesTennessee:

  10. Sullivan County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation, searchNew Jersey)Indiana: EnergyYork:Tennessee:

  11. Dyer County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, NewDyer County, Tennessee: Energy Resources Jump to:

  12. Marion County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri: Energy Resources Jump to:Tennessee: Energy

  13. McMinn County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°, -88.864698° Show MapMcMinn County, Tennessee:

  14. Tennessee/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe nice ifTennessee/Incentives

  15. Tennessee Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts RegionsPaulShades of PerfectionTennessee Regions

  16. Tennessee Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts RegionsPaulShades of PerfectionTennessee

  17. Anderson County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan2809328°, -95.3102505° Show MapCarolina:Tennessee:

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tennessee Valley Authority - AL 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown Site -Tennessee Valley

  19. Montgomery County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County, California:Tennessee: Energy Resources Jump

  20. Moore County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:StrategyMoodyTennessee:

  1. Benton County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBayBelmontInformation IndianaInformationTennessee:

  2. Robertson County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio: EnergyTennessee: Energy Resources Jump to:

  3. City of Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville,Livingston,CityCity of Memphis, Tennessee

  4. Claiborne County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach,Stuart,Woolstock, IowaTennessee: Energy

  5. Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNew York:Information8186°,Nebraska:Tennessee:

  6. AESOP XX: summary of proceedings. [Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24 to 26, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 20th meeting of the Association for Energy Systems, Operations, and Programming (AESOP) was held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, on April 24 to 26, 1979. Representatives of DOE Headquarters discussed the effects that new security and privacy regulations will have on automatic data processing operations. The status and future possibilities of the Business Management Information System (BMIS) were also discussed. Then representatives of various DOE offices and contractors presented reports on various topics. This report contains two-page summaries of the papers presented at the meeting. Session topics and titles of papers were as follows: Washington report (New ADP issues; BMIS: the Business Management Information System; Nuclear weapons and the computer); Improving the productivity of the computing analyst/programer (What productivity improvement tools are available; Rocky Flats experience with SDM/70; Albuquerque Operations Office experience with SDM/70; Planning and project management; Minicomputer standards and programer productivity; MRC productivity gains through applications development tools); User viewpoints and expectations of data processing (User perspectives on computer applications; User viewpoints on environmental studies; Planning and implementing a procurement system; Two sides of the DP coin); Data base management (Use of data base systems within DOE; Future trends in data base hardware; Future trends in data base software; Toward automating the data base design process); and Management discussions. Complete versions of three of the papers have already been cited in ERA. These can be located by reference to the entry CONF-790431-- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)

  7. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ``closure`` in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document.

  8. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  9. Tennessee gas field brings Eastern Overthrust new life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern US Overthrust Belt has gained an E and P company in its southern reaches while seeing de-emphasis from a long time player in more northerly areas. A gas field discovered in the early 1980s in northeastern Tennessee is nearly ready to be placed on production. It would be the first commercial gas production in the southern portion of the belt, which extends more than 1,000 miles from Alabama to New England. Tengasco has five wells capable of producing gas from Cambro-Ordovician Knox in Swan Creek field, southwest of Sneedville in Hancock County, Tenn., about 10 miles south of Lee County, Va. It hopes to drill five more wells by year-end. It began laying a 30--35 MMcfd, 23 mile, 6 in. gas pipeline to Rogersville, Tenn., early last month. Torch Inc., Belle Chasse, La., has the contract. Tengasco plans to start production later this year. Initially a gas utility in neighboring Hawkins County will take 8--9 MMcfd and transport any excess gas to Tenneco Energy affiliate East Tennessee Natural Gas Co. The primary production to date in Swan Creek field has been in a 300 ft section some 400--450 ft from the top of Knox. No water has been found.

  10. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. (Tennessee Valley Authority (US)); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (US)); Cropp, J.W. (Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau, Chattanooga, TN (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  11. THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER (UTHSC) 2014 NURSING PRE-MATRICULATION PROGRAM APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    1 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER (UTHSC) 2014 NURSING PRE-MATRICULATION PROGRAM: _________________________________________________________________________________ CITIZENSHIP: Are you a U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or foreign national who possesses a visa permitting

  12. Race, Place, and Family: Narratives of the Civil Rights Movement in Brownsville, Tennessee, and the Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bond, Jo Zanice

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the Civil Rights Movement through the experiences of primarily two African American families with roots in Brownsville, Tennessee. This study, based on archival research and oral histories, ...

  13. UTNEUPDATEUTNEUPDATEA Publication from the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Tennessee Continues Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    UTNEUPDATEUTNEUPDATEA Publication from the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Tennessee FALL 2014 UCOR Continues Nuclear Engineering Support Sam Donnald and Nathan Capps Outstanding NE Engineering Achieves Major Advances in Enrollment, Research, and Recognition UT Nuclear Engineering Achieves

  14. Hope and despair: visual arts in the drama of Tennessee Williams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Stephanie

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The following investigation will focus on three of Tennessee Williams' later plays: The Red Devil Battery Sign, Vieux Carre, and The Two-Character Play. By drawing parallels between these three samples of his later work and various movements...

  15. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  16. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  17. Hope and despair: visual arts in the drama of Tennessee Williams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Stephanie

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    between reality and dream is also prevalent in the Symbolist movement's drama and visual arts. In her article, "Tennessee Williams: Optimistic Symbolist, " June Bennet Larsen discusses Williams' work in relation to this genre. In both cases...

  18. Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Developed jointly...

  19. Department of Energy Construction Safety Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has adopted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926 ``Safety and Health Regulations for Construction,`` and related parts of 29 CFR 1910, ``Occupational Safety and Health Standards.`` This nonmandatory reference guide is based on these OSHA regulations and, where appropriate, incorporates additional standards, codes, directives, and work practices that are recognized and accepted by DOE and the construction industry. It covers excavation, scaffolding, electricity, fire, signs/barricades, cranes/hoists/conveyors, hand and power tools, concrete/masonry, stairways/ladders, welding/cutting, motor vehicles/mechanical equipment, demolition, materials, blasting, steel erection, etc.

  20. Factors influencing participation in craft organizations: a study of East Tennessee craftspeople and their organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monk, Phillip Myrl

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FACTORS INFLUENCING PARTICIPATION IN CRAFT ORGANIZATIONS: A STUDY OF EAST TENNESSEE CRAFTSPEOPLE AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONS A Thesis by PHILLIP MYRL MONK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment.... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Sociology FACTORS INFLUENCING PARTICIPATION IN CRAFT ORGANIZATIONS: A STUDY OF EAST TENNESSEE CRAFTSPEOPLE AND THEIR OGRANIZATIONS A Thesis by PHILLIP MYRL MONK Approved...

  1. Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  2. Fiscal Year 1993 Well Plugging and Abandonment Program Summary Report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from October 1993 through August 1994. A total of 57 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  3. The measurement of contact areas and temperature during frictional sliding of Tennessee sandstone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teufel, Lawrence William

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE MEASUREMENT OF CONTACT AREAS AND TEMPERATURE DURING FRICTIONAL SLIDING OF TENNESSEE SANDSTONE A Thesis by LAWRENCE WILLIAM TEUFEL Submit';ed to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTERS OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subiect: Geology THE MEASUREMENT OF CONTACT AREAS AND TEMPERATURES DURING FRICTIONAL SLIDING OF TENNESSEE SANDSTONE A Thesis by LAWRENCE WILLIAM TEUFEL Approved as to sty1e and content by: Cha rma...

  4. High frequency reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  5. MELCOR computer code manuals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR`s phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package.

  6. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  7. MINET (momentum integral network) code documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tuyle, G J; Nepsee, T C; Guppy, J G [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINET computer code, developed for the transient analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer, is documented in this four-part reference. In Part 1, the MINET models, which are based on a momentum integral network method, are described. The various aspects of utilizing the MINET code are discussed in Part 2, The User's Manual. The third part is a code description, detailing the basic code structure and the various subroutines and functions that make up MINET. In Part 4, example input decks, as well as recent validation studies and applications of MINET are summarized. 32 refs., 36 figs., 47 tabs.

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Construction Codes is responsible for the administration of the State Construction Code Act (1972 PA 230), also known as the Uniform Construction Code.

  9. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden pallets, contaminated equipment, decontamination materials, etc.).

  10. Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee Grant # CMMI-0423485 Multiscale Design of Functionally Graded Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vel, Senthil

    Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee Grant: Engineering Design #12;Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville

  11. Application Protocol Reference Architecture Application Protocol Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sinderen, Marten

    Application Protocol Reference Architecture 165 Chapter 7 Application Protocol Reference Architecture This chapter proposes an alternative reference architecture for application protocols. The proposed reference architecture consists of the set of possible architectures for application protocols

  12. Generalized concatenated quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    We discuss the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using ...

  13. Baseline Environmental Analysis Report for the K-1251 Barge Facility at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Winkle J.E.

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-1251 Barge Facility, which is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to lease the facility to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the use, by a potential lessee, of government-owned facilities at ETTP. This report is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The lease footprint is slightly over 1 acre. The majority of the lease footprint is defined by a perimeter fence that surrounds a gravel-covered area with a small concrete pad within it. Also included is a gravel drive with locked gates at each end that extends on the east side to South First Avenue, providing access to the facility. The facility is located along the Clinch River and an inlet of the river that forms its southern boundary. To the east, west, and north, the lease footprint is surrounded by DOE property. Preparation of this report included the review of government records, title documents, historic aerial photos, visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, and interviews with current and former employees involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products or their derivatives and acutely hazardous wastes were known to have been released or disposed. Radiological surveys were conducted and chemical samples were collected to assess the facility's condition.

  14. Concatenated Conjugate Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuru Hamada

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A conjugate code pair is defined as a pair of linear codes either of which contains the dual of the other. A conjugate code pair represents the essential structure of the corresponding Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) quantum code. It is known that conjugate code pairs are applicable to (quantum) cryptography. We give a construction method for efficiently decodable conjugate code pairs.

  15. CURRICULUM CODE 308 DEGREE CODE _40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    CURRICULUM CODE 308 DEGREE CODE _40 Hunter College of the City University of New York - Office Print) E-mail address OES Stamp THIS AUDIT IS NOT OFFICIAL UNTIL APPROVED BY THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR Specialization Section #12;CURRICULUM CODE_308_ DEGREE CODE _40__ Course Prefix & Number Course Title Credits

  16. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No Further Investigation (NFI) determination made on land that adjoins ED-4 to the east (DOE 1997a) and to the south (DOE 1997b).

  17. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Morency, Christina

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  18. Value of Information References

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  19. Precision displacement reference system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Dubois, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Strother, Jerry D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  20. Membrane reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.; Bloom, I.D.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference electrode utilizes a small thin, flat membrane of a highly conductive glass placed on a small diameter insulator tube having a reference material inside in contact with an internal voltage lead. When the sensor is placed in a non-aqueous ionic electrolytic solution, the concentration difference across the glass membrane generates a low voltage signal in precise relationship to the concentration of the species to be measured, with high spatial resolution. 2 figs.

  1. NERSC/DOE BER Requirements Workshop Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReference Materials ReferenceReference Materials Reference

  2. NERSC/DOE FES Requirements Workshop Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReference MaterialsReferenceReference Materials Reference

  3. The Graduate School The School of Graduate Studies has enjoyed more than 50 years of leadership in Tennessee and in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    offerings at ETSU rank only behind the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the University of Memphis. ETSU, along with Middle Tennessee State University, is the third-largest public graduate school and health sciences. This application booklet is designed to give you a brief overview of ETSU's wide range

  4. 11-0187 E11-7015-00-014-11 1M 4/10 http://middletennessee.tennessee.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Conditioner, Giles County Joey and Gail Chessor, Grinder's Switch Winery, Hickman County Dan and Debbie Eiser, Blueberries on the Buffalo, Lawrence County Representatives from three agricultural enterprises and Tractor-Mounted Sprayers White Pine, Tennessee Riverbend Nurseries Thompsons Station, Tennessee Tri

  5. 754 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 5, MAY 2001 Turbo-SPC Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ping, Li

    754 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 5, MAY 2001 Turbo-SPC Codes Li Ping, Member, IEEE Abstract--This letter is concerned with a family of modified turbo-type codes, referred to as turbo-SPC (single parity check) codes. A technique based on the SPC code is introduced to re- place

  6. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Jonas T., E-mail: jonastyleranderson@gmail.com

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  7. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  8. Development of the IMPACS materials management system at Tennessee Gas Transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, W.A.; Owen, R.J.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tennessee Gas Transmission is one of the largest natural-gas-transmission companies in the world. Its revenues in 1983 exceeded $4 billion, and it employs approximately 3600 people. TGT was incorporated as the Tennessee Gas and Transmission Company in 1943. It has several subsidiaries including Midwestern Gas Transmission, East Tennessee Natural Gas, Channel Industries, and Tenngasco. TGT is also the original corporation from which the Tenneco, Inc., group of companies emerged. In this issue this article deals with the materials management function at TGT. More specifically, it elaborates on TGT's new fully integrated materials management system, IMPACS. The article details the need for a new system, the implementation of the system, the benefits derived from the system, and the operation of the system. 4 figures.

  9. Half-Product Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmadi, Santosh Kumar

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of codes, half-product codes, derived from product codes, is characterized. These codes have the implementation advantages of product codes and possess a special structural property which leads them to have larger (at least 3/2 times more...

  10. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.; Vissers, D.R.

    1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell are described. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  11. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  12. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald R. (Belmont, MA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  13. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo (Lisle, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  14. Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Section 95.011 Waters Important...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Administrative Code Section 95.011 Waters Important to Anadromous Fish Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  15. Title 20 Alaska Administrative Code Section 25.112 Oil & Gas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil & Gas Well Plugging Requirements Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 20 Alaska Administrative Code...

  16. Title 20 Alaska Administrative Code Section 25.105 Oil & Gas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil & Gas Well Abandonment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 20 Alaska Administrative Code Section...

  17. List of codes Language abbreviation codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portugal MT Malta GR Greece SE Sweden TR Turkey Country codes for the ERASMUS Institutional Identification codes A Austria IR L Ireland BG Bulgaria LV Latvia B Belgium IS Iceland CY Cyprus MT Malta D Germany L

  18. Generalized Concatenation for Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    We show how good quantum error-correcting codes can be constructed using generalized concatenation. The inner codes are quantum codes, the outer codes can be linear or nonlinear classical codes. Many new good codes are ...

  19. A comparison of Tennessee Williams' Summer and smoke and The eccentricities of a nightingale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Shirley Lois

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS ' SUMMER AND SMOKE AND THE ECCENTRICITIES OF A N1GHT1NGALE A Thesi s by S HIRLEY LOIS BOYD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS May 197B Major Subject: English A COMPARISON OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS' SUMMER AND SMOKE AND THE ECCENTRICITIES OF A NIGHTINGALE A Thesi s by SHIRLEY LOIS BOYD Approved as to style and content by: g'~t. &i7 'i IL. Chairman of Commi...

  20. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation`s DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) is responsible for assuring the citizens of Tennessee that their health, safety and environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation are protected and that appropriate remedial action is taken to provide this protection. TDEC/DOE-O has five program sections that reflect the organizational structure of the TDEC Bureau of Environment Divisions, as well as DOE`s Environmental Safety and Health, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs.

  1. Preterites and past participles in the Tennessee Civil War Veterans Questionnaires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abney, Lisa Jo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the eastern section of Tennessee was inhabited by some 35,000 people. The lower half of East Tennessee and Cumberland Plateau were unsettled u n t i l the 1800's. By 1835, with the removal of the Indians, the counties of Polk, Hamilton, and Bradley were... and the Cumberland Plateau, the coal of the plateau, the stone of the Cumberlands, and the copper of the lower Unakas. The area quickly grew, and between 1880-1910 the population doubled i n areas such as Polk and Marion counties, which were the centers...

  2. Quantum convolutional stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinthamani, Neelima

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum error correction codes were introduced as a means to protect quantum information from decoherance and operational errors. Based on their approach to error control, error correcting codes can be divided into two different classes: block codes...

  3. Guam- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In September 2012, The Guam Building Code Council adopted the draft [http://www.guamenergy.com/outreach-education/guam-tropical-energy-code/ Guam Tropical Energy Code]. It must be adopted by...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009 S.B. 1182 created the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission. The 11-member Commission was given the power to conduct rulemaking processes to adopt new building codes. The codes adopted...

  5. Grant Reference Lead / Sole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Overall Score Grant Reference Lead / Sole Grant Grant Holder Research Organisation Project of Birmingham Controls on Soil Carbon Export revealed by Novel Tracers on multiple timescales (SCENT) Standard Grant DEC12 8 8 NE/K011871/1 N Melanie Leng NERC British Geological Survey A 500,000-year environmental

  6. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraon, Andrei

    Principal Investigators 7 Laboratory Personnel 8 EH&S Personnel 8 HAZARDOUS WASTE ACCUMULATION AREAS 9 Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT LabelingHAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office

  7. CONCRETE PAVEMENT Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONCRETE PAVEMENT Reference Manual Prepared for Federal Highway Administration Office of Pavement by National Concrete Pavement Technology Center at Iowa State University 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700 No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date February 2008 Concrete Pavement

  8. MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

  9. Cisco Reference Configurations for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    ............................................................................................. 10 EMC VNX5500 Storage Layout.0 with EMC VNX5500 Series Storage Systems White Paper November 2012 © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. AllCisco Reference Configurations for Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Fast Track Data Warehouse 4.0 with EMC

  10. Codeword Stabilized Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Cross; Graeme Smith; John A. Smolin; Bei Zeng

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unifying approach to quantum error correcting code design that encompasses additive (stabilizer) codes, as well as all known examples of nonadditive codes with good parameters. We use this framework to generate new codes with superior parameters to any previously known. In particular, we find ((10,18,3)) and ((10,20,3)) codes. We also show how to construct encoding circuits for all codes within our framework.

  11. Generalized Concatenated Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Grassl; Peter Shor; Graeme Smith; John Smolin; Bei Zeng

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using this method, we construct families of new single-error-correcting nonadditive quantum codes, in both binary and nonbinary cases, which not only outperform any stabilizer codes for finite block length, but also asymptotically achieve the quantum Hamming bound for large block length.

  12. Encoding Subsystem Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli; Andreas Klappenecker

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the encoding of operator quantum error correcting codes i.e. subsystem codes. We show that encoding of subsystem codes can be reduced to encoding of a related stabilizer code making it possible to use all the known results on encoding of stabilizer codes. Along the way we also show how Clifford codes can be encoded. We also show that gauge qubits can be exploited to reduce the encoding complexity.

  13. Tennessee Valley Authority atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor simulation interim annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, J.W.; Culver, M.H.; Krishnan, R.P.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description of the work performed during 1980 for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in support of the TVA Fluidized-Bed Combustion (FBC) Demonstration Plant Program is presented. The work was carried out under Task 4, modeling and simulation of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) systems. The overall objective of this task is to develop a steady-state mathematical model with the capability of predicting trends in bed performance under various feed and operating conditions. Previously during 1979, three predictive subcodes (subprograms) were developed: bubble growth subcode, elutriation-attrition subcode, and coal combustion subcode. During 1980, three additional predictive subcodes were developed: the SO/sub 2/ capture subcode, the NO/sub x/ emissions subcode, and the freeboard subcode. Also, during this period, the following subcodes were combined to form an overall simulation code of the AFBC bed: (1) bubble growth subcode, (2) elutriation-attrition subcode, (3) coal combustion subcode, (4) SO/sub 2/ capture subcode, and (5) NO/sub x/ emissions subcode. In addition, an energy balance routine was added to the combined code. The resulting overall bed simulation, which is currently being tested with experimental data, is capable of predicting how some of the important operating variables affect AFBC's performance. The freeboard model has been combined with the overall bed simulation and is currently being debugged. Once the overall AFBC simulation is operational, it will be tested against field data from operating AFBCs and used to simulate the TVA/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 20-MW(e) AFBC pilot plant. (WHK)

  14. Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (D-025): Summary of closure under Rules Governing Hazardous Waste Management in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.E.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 29, 1988, the Revised Closure Plan for Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin,'' Y/TS-390 (Reference 1) was submitted to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for review and transmittal to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE). The closure activities described in the closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal (CRSDB). The closure of CRSDB is a final closure. The Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB), Unit D-025, was an unlined, man-made sediment disposal facility on Chestnut Ridge, south of New Hope Pond (NHP). The CRSDB was constructed during 1972--73 for the disposal of sediments hydraulically dredged from NHP. It was designed to hold approximately 30,000 cubic yards of sediments. Since 1973, the basin had been used for the periodic disposal of sediments excavated from NHP and its appurtenant structures. NHP has previously received discharges form RCRA-related waste streams. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. On optimal constacyclic codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuliano G. La Guardia

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the class of constacyclic codes, which is a natural generalization of the class of cyclic and negacyclic codes. This class of codes is interesting in the sense that it contains codes with good or even optimal parameters. In this light, we propose constructions of families of classical block and convolutional maximum-distance-separable (MDS) constacyclic codes, as well as families of asymmetric quantum MDS codes derived from (classical-block) constacyclic codes. These results are mainly derived from the investigation of suitable properties on cyclotomic cosets of these corresponding codes.

  16. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The West Virginia State Fire Commission is responsible for adopting and promulgating statewide construction codes. These codes may be voluntarily adopted at the local level. Local jurisdictions...

  17. Overview of the BISON Multidimensional Fuel Performance Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. M. Perez; G. Pastore; R. C. Martineau

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BISON is a modern multidimensional multiphysics finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. A brief background is provided on the code’s computational framework (MOOSE), governing equations, and material and behavioral models. Ongoing code verification and validation work is outlined, and comparative results are provided for select validation cases. Recent applications are discussed, including specific description of two applications where 3D treatment is important. A summary of future code development and validation activities is given. Numerous references to published work are provided where interested readers can find more complete information.

  18. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective Equipment Ignition Incident on February 18, 2003, at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 18, 2003, a general laborer employed at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) by MACTEC Constructors, Inc. (MACTEC) was performing rebar removal with a gas-powered cut-off machine. MACTEC is a subcontractor to Bechtel Jacobs Company LL (BJC). The sparks from the cut-off machine ignited the right leg of his 100% cotton anticontamination (anti-c) coveralls and the plastic bootie.

  19. OSH technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an evaluation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Occupational Safety and Health programs for government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities, the Department of Labor`s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommended a technical information exchange program. The intent was to share written safety and health programs, plans, training manuals, and materials within the entire DOE community. The OSH Technical Reference (OTR) helps support the secretary`s response to the OSHA finding by providing a one-stop resource and referral for technical information that relates to safe operations and practice. It also serves as a technical information exchange tool to reference DOE-wide materials pertinent to specific safety topics and, with some modification, as a training aid. The OTR bridges the gap between general safety documents and very specific requirements documents. It is tailored to the DOE community and incorporates DOE field experience.

  20. Reference Undulator Measurement Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.

  1. Channel coding for high speed links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blitvic, Natasa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the benefit of channel coding for high-speed backplane or chip-to-chip interconnects, referred to as the high-speed links. Although both power-constrained and bandwidth-limited, the high-speed links ...

  2. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  3. STEP Intern Reference Check Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Intern Reference Check Sheet, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  4. Proceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    American operating environment differs than the operating practices found throughout much of the rest freight and intercity passenger traffic. One of the challenges created by this operating environmentProceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference JRC2013 April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

  5. Geoarchaeological Investigation of the Coats-Hines Site (40WM31), Williamson County, Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalle, Kayla Anne

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coats-Hines site (40WM31) is a potential pre-Clovis site located in Franklin, Tennessee. The site rests, geographically, at the convergence of the Central Basin and Western Highland Rim. The site was discovered during the construction of a...

  6. Form 207 Version Date: 5/31/07 Page 1 of 4 East Tennessee State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Form 207 Version Date: 5/31/07 Page 1 of 4 Form 207 East Tennessee State University ETSU. CURRENT APPROVAL DATE: D. Location(s) Where Study is Being Conducted: ETSU VAMC JCMC Other MSHA Site: Name: ETSU Department & Box #: Off Campus Address: Phone: Pager: Fax: Email Address: Study Contact

  7. City of Knoxville, Tennessee City Council Resolution for solar PV system

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is a scan of the resolution, dated July 26, 2011, for the approval of the City of Knoxville, Tennessee to use $250,000 of EECBG funding for finding innovative financing mechanisms for a planned installation of a 90-kW solar PV system.

  8. Jose March-Leuba Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering: University of Tennessee, 1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurements & Control, Nuclear Science and Technology Division. · From 1991 ­ 1992, Dr. March;Nuclear Engineering and Design, Nuclear Technology and as a member of the Technical Program CommitteesJose March-Leuba Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering: University of Tennessee, 1984 M. S. in nuclear

  9. John T. Mihalczo PhD. in Nuclear Engineering : University of Tennessee, 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , just as his early work in experiments for nuclear criticality safety for Y-12 impacted national in nuclear criticality safety, nuclear weapons identification, nuclear materials processing, and nuclearJohn T. Mihalczo PhD. in Nuclear Engineering : University of Tennessee, 1970 Masters in Physics

  10. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-186-1628, Raytheon Missile Systems Division, Bristol, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salisbury, S.; Lucas, C.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for cutting-oil mists, metal working fluids, and mineral spirits at Raytheon Missile Systems Divisions, Bristol, Tennessee in July, 1985. The evaluation was requested confidentially to investigate the occurrence of skin rashes in Machine-Department employees.

  11. Waterbird and Food Resource Responses to Winter Drawdown in the east Tennessee River Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) Replenishment of Fat Reserves Introduction Migratory Stopovers: Critical for Survival Shallowly Flooded Mudflats (Acreage) of Mudflats 2) Waterbird Use and Activities on Mudflats 3) Food Resource Abundance (i" Drawdown Mudflat Exposure Late July ­ Early Aug. #12;5 East Tennessee Chickamauga Reservoir Hiwassee River

  12. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  13. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  14. Escape into illusions of the South in characters of Tennessee Williams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nieuwenhuize, Paul Franklin

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Named Desire. (New York, 1947), -. 13. 9 Williams, Tennessee. Me &ose Tattoo. Reprinted in Contem=crar Drama, ed. Stanley Clayes and David S=ercer. New York, 19~2 , p. 433. 22 and bowl, and on the wall a coloured lithograph of blindfolaed Hope...

  15. Fault Diagnosis with Bayesian Networks: Application to the Tennessee Eastman Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fault Diagnosis with Bayesian Networks: Application to the Tennessee Eastman Process Sylvain VERRON is to present and evaluate the performance of a new procedure for industrial process diagnosis. This method are not very efficient in the space described by all variables of the process, an identification of impor- tant

  16. Mercury Issues and Complexities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Redefining the Conceptual Model - 12277

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Mark; Southworth, George; Watson, David [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Looney, Brian; Eddy-Dilek, Carol [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Ketelle, Richard [Restoration Services Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Releases of mercury from an industrial facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee in the 1950's and early 1960's resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater within the facility, as well as downstream surface waters. Remediation efforts, which began in the 1980's, have decreased waterborne mercury concentrations near the facility, but elevated levels of mercury remain in the soil, sediment, water, and biota. Widespread distribution of mercury sources and complex mercury transport pathways are some of many challenges at the site. For effective environmental management and closure decision making relative to mercury contamination at the facilities, an up-to-date conceptual model of mercury source areas, processes, likely flow paths, and flux was deemed necessary. Recent facility and reconfiguration efforts, site characterizations, remedial actions, and research are facilitating the collection of new mercury data in Oak Ridge. To develop the current model, a multi-organizational team reviewed existing conceptual models from a variety of sources, consolidated historical data and source information, gathered input from local experts with extensive site knowledge, and used recently collected mercury data from a variety of sampling programs. The developed site conceptual model indicates that the nature and extent of mercury concentration and contaminant flux has significantly changed in the ten years since flux-based conceptual models were used for previous remedial action decisions. A new water treatment system has effectively reduced mercury inputs to the creek and is removing substantially greater quantities of mercury from groundwater than was expected. However, fish concentrations in downstream waters have not responded to decreased water concentrations in the stream. Flux from one large out-fall at the creek's headwaters appears to be a greater percentage of the overall flux leaving the site than previous years, albeit year to year variation in flux is large, and the many small sources of mercury identified in the model may also be important if the goal is to reach very low mercury levels in stream water and fish. The conceptual model is a key reference in helping to prioritize future remedial actions, defining future monitoring, conducting numerical modeling efforts, and evaluating research needs. (authors)

  17. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  18. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Mike Patterson

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory developed the Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC) for tritium permeation in the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR). All the component models in the VHTR were developed and were embedded into the MATHLAB SIMULINK package with a Graphic User Interface. The governing equations of the nuclear ternary reaction and thermal neutron capture reactions from impurities in helium and graphite core, reflector, and control rods were implemented. The TPAC code was verified using analytical solutions for the tritium birth rate from the ternary fission, the birth rate from 3He, and the birth rate from 10B. This paper also provides comparisons of the TPAC with the existing other codes. A VHTR reference design was selected for tritium permeation study from the reference design to the nuclear-assisted hydrogen production plant and some sensitivity study results are presented based on the HTGR outlet temperature of 750 degrees C.

  19. NERSC/DOE BES Requirements Workshop Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReference MaterialsReference Materials Reference Materials

  20. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : reference guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. It is targeted specifically to run on large-scale parallel computing platforms but also runs well on a variety of architectures including single processor workstations. It also aims to support a variety of devices and models specific to Sandia needs. This document is intended to complement the Xyce Users Guide. It contains comprehensive, detailed information about a number of topics pertinent to the usage of Xyce. Included in this document is a netlist reference for the input-file commands and elements supported within Xyce; a command line reference, which describes the available command line arguments for Xyce; and quick-references for users of other circuit codes, such as Orcad's PSpice and Sandia's ChileSPICE.

  1. Certification plan for safety and PRA codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toffer, H.; Crowe, R.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Ades, M.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A certification plan for computer codes used in Safety Analyses and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the operation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors has been prepared. An action matrix, checklists, and a time schedule have been included in the plan. These items identify what is required to achieve certification of the codes. A list of Safety Analysis and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SA PRA) computer codes covered by the certification plan has been assembled. A description of each of the codes was provided in Reference 4. The action matrix for the configuration control plan identifies code specific requirements that need to be met to achieve the certification plan's objectives. The checklist covers the specific procedures that are required to support the configuration control effort and supplement the software life cycle procedures based on QAP 20-1 (Reference 7). A qualification checklist for users establishes the minimum prerequisites and training for achieving levels of proficiency in using configuration controlled codes for critical parameter calculations.

  2. Certification plan for safety and PRA codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toffer, H.; Crowe, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A certification plan for computer codes used in Safety Analyses and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the operation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors has been prepared. An action matrix, checklists, and a time schedule have been included in the plan. These items identify what is required to achieve certification of the codes. A list of Safety Analysis and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SA&PRA) computer codes covered by the certification plan has been assembled. A description of each of the codes was provided in Reference 4. The action matrix for the configuration control plan identifies code specific requirements that need to be met to achieve the certification plan`s objectives. The checklist covers the specific procedures that are required to support the configuration control effort and supplement the software life cycle procedures based on QAP 20-1 (Reference 7). A qualification checklist for users establishes the minimum prerequisites and training for achieving levels of proficiency in using configuration controlled codes for critical parameter calculations.

  3. ILU 2.0beta1 Reference Manual Bill Janssen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Bill

    ILU 2.0beta1 Reference Manual Bill Janssen parc.xerox.com> Mike Spreitzer parc@xerox.com> Dan Larner parc@xerox.com> Chris Jacobi parc@xerox.com> (with contributions from Doug-Language Unification (ILU) system. Lots of people contributed significant amounts of code to the ILU system, including

  4. Generalized Concatenation for Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Grassl; Peter W. Shor; Bei Zeng

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how good quantum error-correcting codes can be constructed using generalized concatenation. The inner codes are quantum codes, the outer codes can be linear or nonlinear classical codes. Many new good codes are found, including both stabilizer codes as well as so-called nonadditive codes.

  5. Optomechanical reference accelerometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerberding, Oliver; Melcher, John; Pratt, Jon; Taylor, Jacob

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an optomechanical accelerometer with high dynamic range, high bandwidth and read-out noise levels below 8 {\\mu}g/$\\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$. The straightforward assembly and low cost of our device make it a prime candidate for on-site reference calibrations and autonomous navigation. We present experimental data taken with a vacuum sealed, portable prototype and deduce the achieved bias stability and scale factor accuracy. Additionally, we present a comprehensive model of the device physics that we use to analyze the fundamental noise sources and accuracy limitations of such devices.

  6. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-1538,469Appendix E4 Reference

  7. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-1538,469Appendix E4 Reference4

  8. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-1538,469Appendix E4 Reference46

  9. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-1538,469Appendix E44 Reference

  10. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor2 Reference

  11. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor2 Reference4

  12. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor2 Reference46

  13. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor2 Reference464

  14. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor24 Reference

  15. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor24 Reference6

  16. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubiccurrentFor24 Reference68

  17. REFERENCES Baines, W. D.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurvesSpeedingScientificof ScientificQ LA-UR- " "REFERENCES

  18. References to Astrophysics Papers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired SolarReferences to

  19. Graph concatenation for quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigi, Salman

    Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the ...

  20. Origins of Scaling in Genetic Code Oliver Obst1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polani, Daniel

    Information and Communications Technology Centre, Locked Bag 17, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia 2 Department useless systems (i.e., ambiguous genetic coding) and indexical reference systems (i.e., zero referentially useless systems (ambiguous HGT) and indexical reference systems (zero-redundancy HGT). Zipf's law

  1. Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of Partial Grid E9, David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduct verification surveys of available grids at the DWI 1630 in Knoxville, Tennessee. A representative with the Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) team from ORISE conducted a verification survey of a partial area within Grid E9.

  2. EA-1113: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed lease of 957.16 acres of the Oak Ridge Reservation to the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC). ETEC proposes ...

  3. Antares Reference Telescope System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antares is a 24-beam, 40-TW carbon-dioxide laser-fusion system currently nearing completion at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target (typically 300 to 1000 ..mu..m in diameter) located approximately at the center of a 7.3-m-diameter by 9.3-m-long vacuum (10/sup -6/ torr) chamber. The design goal is to position the targets to within 10 ..mu..m of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares Reference Telescope System is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares Reference Telescope System consists of two similar electro-optical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9X optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front-lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back-lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and trade-offs are discussed. The final system chosen (which is being built) and its current status are described in detail.

  4. Coal data: A reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  5. Sales Tax Credit for Clean Energy Technology (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/Incentives/TN71F-67.6.346.htm Tenn. Code Ann. Section 67-6-346] allows a taxpayer to take a credit, to apply for a refund of taxes paid, or to apply for...

  6. CONCATENATED CODES BASED ON MULTIDIMENSIONAL PARITY-CHECK CODES AND TURBO CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Tan F.

    CONCATENATED CODES BASED ON MULTIDIMENSIONAL PARITY-CHECK CODES AND TURBO CODES John M. Shea, Florida Abstract--Turbo-codes provide communications near capac- ity when very large interleavers (and parity-check code can be used as an outer code with a turbo code as an inner code in a serial

  7. CH 6 REFERENCES.DOC 6-1 6 References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFERENCES.DOC Allan, S., A. R. Buckley, and J. E. Meacham. 2001. Atlas of Oregon. Second Edition. William J

  8. EA-1113: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Economic Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Economic Council This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed lease of 957.16 acres of the Oak Ridge Reservation to the East Tennessee Economic Council. ETEC proposes to develop an industrial park on the leased site to provide employment opportunities for DOE and contractor employees affected by decreased federal funding.

  9. Final report of the second dye-tracer test at the Chesnut Ridge Security Pits, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) manages a closed hazardous waste disposal unit, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), in the form of two trenches and several auger-holes, located on top of the eastern portion of Chestnut Ridge at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Tennessee. The groundwater monitoring system for the unit presently consists of a network of upgradient and downgradient monitor wells. To investigate the discharge of groundwater to springs and streams, Energy Systems, through Geraghty and Miller, Inc., conducted an initial dye-tracer study during the driest part of 1990. The dye was detected at some of the monitoring sites, but verification was necessary due to the proximity of some sites to extraneous dye sources. Based on the results of the initial study, Energy Systems recommended to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in the 1990 Groundwater Quality Assessment Report (GWQAR) (HSW 1991) for the CRSP that a second dye-tracer study be conducted during the wet weather season. The procedures and materials were reviewed, and a field inspection of the monitoring sites was performed in the fall of 1991. The actual test commenced during the first week of February 1992 with a 4-week baseline monitoring period to determine the inherent variability of the emission spectra within the wavelength range characteristic of Rhodamine WT (RWT) and Fluorescent Brightener 28 (FB28) or similar naturally occuring compounds within in the aquifer. This is commonly referred as background in discussion of minimum detectable levels of dyes. On March 13, RWT and FB28 were injected; weekly monitoring began with the collection of the first set of detectors on March 19. The test was originally scheduled to conclude after 12 weeks but was extended to 18 weeks when no definitive results were obtained.

  10. Calendar year 1994 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1994 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1994 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y- 12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts: Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference containing the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline (March 1 of the following CY). Part 2 of the annual groundwater report, to be issued mid-year, will contain a regime-wide evaluation of groundwater quality, present the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describe changes in monitoring priorities, and present planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis activities.

  11. Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Load and Demand-Side Management submodule. Volume 2, Model code listing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II of the documentation contains the actual source code of the LDSM submodule, and the cross reference table of its variables. The code is divided into two parts. The first part contains the main part of the source code. The second part lists the INCLUDE files referenced inside the main part of the code.

  12. Joint Source-Channel Coding via Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alajaji, Fady

    Joint Source-Channel Coding via Turbo Codes by Guang-Chong Zhu A dissertation submitted coding. One of the most exciting break- throughs in channel coding is the invention of Turbo codes, whose- tigate three joint source-channel coding issues in the context of Turbo codes. In the #12;rst part

  13. Nuclear Science References Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

  14. Long life reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yonco, R.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An external, reference electrode is provided for long term use with a high temperature, high pressure system. The electrode is arranged in a vertical, electrically insulative tube with an upper portion serving as an electrolyte reservoir and a lower portion in electrolytic communication with the system to be monitored. The lower end portion includes a flow restriction such as a porous plug to limit the electrolyte release into the system. A piston equalized to the system pressure is fitted into the upper portion of the tube to impart a small incremental pressure to the electrolyte. The piston is selected of suitable size and weight to cause only a slight flow of electrolyte through the porous plug into the high pressure system. This prevents contamination of the electrolyte but is of such small flow rate that operating intervals of a month or more can be achieved. 2 figs.

  15. Landscapes as references for design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, James P

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of the ways in which the forms in landscapes - natural terrain adapted and inhabited - can serve as references in architectural design. As references for design, landscapes provide a richness of responses ...

  16. Unfolding the color code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksander Kubica; Beni Yoshida; Fernando Pastawski

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The topological color code and the toric code are two leading candidates for realizing fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we show that the color code on a $d$-dimensional closed manifold is equivalent to multiple decoupled copies of the $d$-dimensional toric code up to local unitary transformations and adding or removing ancilla qubits. Our result not only generalizes the proven equivalence for $d=2$, but also provides an explicit recipe of how to decouple independent components of the color code, highlighting the importance of colorability in the construction of the code. Moreover, for the $d$-dimensional color code with $d+1$ boundaries of $d+1$ distinct colors, we find that the code is equivalent to multiple copies of the $d$-dimensional toric code which are attached along a $(d-1)$-dimensional boundary. In particular, for $d=2$, we show that the (triangular) color code with boundaries is equivalent to the (folded) toric code with boundaries. We also find that the $d$-dimensional toric code admits logical non-Pauli gates from the $d$-th level of the Clifford hierarchy, and thus saturates the bound by Bravyi and K\\"{o}nig. In particular, we show that the $d$-qubit control-$Z$ logical gate can be fault-tolerantly implemented on the stack of $d$ copies of the toric code by a local unitary transformation.

  17. MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jow, H.N.; Sprung, J.L.; Ritchie, L.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Rollstin, J.A. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Chanin, D.I. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the MACCS computer code. The purpose of this code is to simulate the impact of severe accidents at nuclear power plants on the surrounding environment. MACCS has been developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to replace the previously used CRAC2 code, and it incorporates many improvements in modeling flexibility in comparison to CRAC2. The principal phenomena considered in MACCS are atmospheric transport, mitigative actions based on dose projection, dose accumulation by a number of pathways including food and water ingestion, early and latent health effects, and economic costs. The MACCS code can be used for a variety of applications. These include (1) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, (2) sensitivity studies to gain a better understanding of the parameters important to PRA, and (3) cost-benefit analysis. This report is composed of three volumes. Volume I, the User's Guide, describes the input data requirements of the MACCS code and provides directions for its use as illustrated by three sample problems. Volume II, the Model Description, describes the underlying models that are implemented in the code, and Volume III, the Programmer's Reference Manual, describes the code's structure and database management. 59 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Budget Reconciliation Procedures Reference Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Budget Reconciliation Procedures Reference Guide eDev Course Number FMS723 Subject Area Budget Northwestern University #12;Reference Guide Budget Reconciliation Table of Contents Helpful Contacts....................................................................................... 14 723QuickRefGuidev1.4 2 of 14 #12;Reference Guide Budget Reconciliation Helpful Contacts Below

  19. List decoding of subspace codes and rank-metric codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdavifar, Hessam

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.2.2 Koetter-Kschischang Codes . . . . . . . . . . . .of Subspace Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 OverviewList-decodable Codes of Arbitrary Dimension . . . . . . .

  20. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe the RAs performed in Zone 2. The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into 7 geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the DQOs of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed, and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was executed and completed in FY 2007 for the 11 EUs addressed in this document. The main body of this report describes both the DVS process and scope of work performed and the RAs completed. The scope and approach for performing DVS activities performed in FY 2007 that lead to action/no further action decisions are presented in Sects. 2 through 4. RAs performed in FY 2007 are presented in Sects. 5 through 10. Future land use is described in Sect. 11, and the status of all Zone 2 EUs as of this PCCR is presented in Sect. 12.

  1. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  2. Model Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  3. Compiling Codes on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compiling Codes Compiling Codes Overview Open Mpi is the the only MPI library available on Euclid. This implementation of MPI-2 is described at Open MPI: Open Source High...

  4. Coding AuthentiCity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Rachel Havens

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes the impact of form-based codes, focusing on two research questions: (1) What is the underlying motivation for adopting a form-based code? (2) What motivations have the most significant impact on ...

  5. Introduction to Algebraic Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for health care. These self-correcting codes that occur in nature might be better than all of. our coding theory based on algebra or algebraic geometry. It is a myth

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ''Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For...

  8. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xin-Liang (Athens, GA); Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Chen, Huizhong (Lawrenceville, GA)

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Jersey Uniform Construction Code Act provides that model codes and standards publications shall not be adopted more frequently than once every three years. However, a revision or amendment...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All residential and commercial structures are required to comply with the state’s energy code. The 2009 New Mexico Energy Conservation Code (NMECC), effective June 2013, is based on 2009...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 1997, South Carolina's local governments adopted and enforced the building codes. In 1997, the law required statewide use of the most up-to-date building codes, which then required the...

  12. ORDINANCE NO.__________ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BELMONT AMENDING CHAPTER 7 OF THE CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO), 2009 Uniform Mechanical Code1 ORDINANCE NO.__________ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BELMONT AMENDING CHAPTER 7 OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF BELMONT; ADOPTING BY REFERENCE THE 2010 EDITION OF THE CALIFORNIA BUILDING STANDARDS CODE

  13. Coding for Cooperative Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppal, Momin Ayub

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of SWCNSQ based CF relaying as a performance benchmark, we will present a practical code design using low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes for error protection at the source, and nested scalar quantization plus irregular repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes... develop and design practical coding strategies which perform very close to the infor- mation theoretic limits. The cooperative communication channels we consider are: (a) The Gaussian re- lay channel, (b) the quasi-static fading relay channel, (c...

  14. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  15. Homological Product Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Bravyi; Matthew B. Hastings

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum codes with low-weight stabilizers known as LDPC codes have been actively studied recently due to their simple syndrome readout circuits and potential applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing. However, all families of quantum LDPC codes known to this date suffer from a poor distance scaling limited by the square-root of the code length. This is in a sharp contrast with the classical case where good families of LDPC codes are known that combine constant encoding rate and linear distance. Here we propose the first family of good quantum codes with low-weight stabilizers. The new codes have a constant encoding rate, linear distance, and stabilizers acting on at most $\\sqrt{n}$ qubits, where $n$ is the code length. For comparison, all previously known families of good quantum codes have stabilizers of linear weight. Our proof combines two techniques: randomized constructions of good quantum codes and the homological product operation from algebraic topology. We conjecture that similar methods can produce good stabilizer codes with stabilizer weight $n^a$ for any $a>0$. Finally, we apply the homological product to construct new small codes with low-weight stabilizers.

  16. Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2317&D2). Remedial actions performed in the Balance of Site (BOS) Laboratory Area of EU Z2-33 and two small areas in EU Z2-42 are described in Sects. 5 through 10 of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-33; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe RAs performed in the EU Z2-33 BOS Laboratory Area and two small areas in EU Z2-42. Approximately 18 acres in EU Z2-33 are addressed in this PCCR. Based on the results of the DVS evaluation and RAs performed, all 18 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. Three Federal Facility Agreement sites are addressed and recommended for no further action within this acreage, including: (1) K-1004-L Recirculating Cooling Water Lines Leak Sites; (2) K-1044 Heavy Equipment Repair Shop; and (3) K-1015-A Laundry Pit. Remedial actions for EU Z2-33 were developed in response to DVS characterization results described in the EU Z2-33 Technical Memorandum (Appendix A) and to support reindustrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park as a commercial industrial park. Remediation criteria were designed for the protection of a future industrial worker who normally would not have the potential for exposure to soil below 10ft bgs. Accordingly, the Zone 2 ROD required land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likel

  17. Understanding Perception Through Neural 'Codes'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J III

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception Through Neural ‘Codes’. In: Special Issue on “Perception Through Neural ‘Codes’. In: Special Issue on “Perception Through Neural ‘Codes’. In: Special Issue on “

  18. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  19. Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

  20. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)] [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract and site. We also had corporate EVMS experts available to us so as to draw upon their recent certification experiences with lessons learned. This knowledge was especially helpful for training of personnel that were involved in the certification which included Project Controls, Project Management and Control Account Managers. We were also able to bring in these corporate experts to assist with our training efforts. To assure our readiness for the review, we conducted a 'White Hat' review. The 'White Hat' team consisted of corporate experts in EVMS along with an industry expert in EVMS from Humphrey and Associates. This review identified early any weaknesses that we had so corrections could be enacted prior to the EVMS Certification Readiness Review. It also helped give the evaluators confidence that we had done proper due diligence prior to their arrival. Also critical to our success, was early communication with our evaluators. It is important to start the communications early to ensure you understand the expectations of the certification team and the process that will be used during the certification. Communication through the entire process is critical to understand expectations and issues along the way. Very important to the overall process was management commitment, support and reinforcement. Management made sure that all personnel involved knew the importance and made preparations a priority. This was noted as a key strength by the evaluators during the out-brief. As a result of our preparation, our review yielded one Corrective Action Report (CAR) and two Continuous Improvement Opportunities (CIOs). The Certification team in their out-brief explained that this was the lowest number of CARs and CIOs in the history of EVMS certifications in the DOE Complex. (authors)

  1. Shortened Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J.C. MacKay

    Simple arguments suggest that shortened codes must have distance properties equal to or better than those of their parent codes, and that they should be equally practical to decode. This relationship holds true in the case of low density generator codes and low density parity check codes. We investigate the properties of shortened turbo codes. I. Motivation for Shortening In our previous work on codes based on very sparse matrices we have observed that while codes with a low density generator matrix [1] are asymptotically bad, codes with a low density parity check matrix [2] are asymptotically good [3, 4, 5]. One way of viewing the relationship between low density generator matrix codes and low density parity check matrix codes is that one obtains a low density parity check matrix by taking the M \\Theta N parity check matrix [P IM ] of a (N; K) low density generator matrix code and chopping off its right-most M columns (where M = N \\Gamma K), to yield an M \\Theta K matrix [P], which...

  2. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to ElectricLNG Storage NetSummary"

  3. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  4. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  5. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Chase, Charles L. (Dublin, CA)

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  6. FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  7. FAQS Reference Guide – Emergency Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the January 2004 edition of DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  8. FAQS Reference Guide – Industrial Hygiene

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the November 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  9. FAQS Reference Guide – Construction Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the March 2004 edition of DOE-STD-1180-2004, Construction Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  10. FAQS Reference Guide – Environmental Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the June 2011 edition of DOE-STD-1156-2011, Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  11. Ris Energy Report 6 References Reference list for Chapter 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 6 References Reference list for Chapter 3 1. European Commission. (2007). Communication from the Commis- sion to the European Council and the European Parliament ­ An energy policy of the Brussels European Council 8/9 March 2007. Brussels. (7224/1/07 Rev. 1). 3. Danish Energy authority. (2007

  12. NERSC/DOE ASCR Requirements Workshop Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing

  13. Hamilton County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | OpenHalf Hollow Nursery

  14. UTHSC: Eligibility Verification for Entitlements Act As of October 1, 2012, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center requests that all applicants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    of Tennessee Health Science Center requests that all applicants applying for a public benefit (e.g. Academic to verify that persons seeking a "state public benefit" are a United States citizen or otherwise lawfully present in the United States. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center will verify the accuracy

  15. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  16. Appendix E References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA Reading Room SEIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor Reference Documents Appendix E References Appendix E References Crosswalk of...

  17. Mechanical code comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Dalton, Larry J. (Bernalillo, NM); Plummer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

  18. Banner Index Codes The Index code is a data-entry shortcut for the Fund code, Org code, and Program code in Banner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner Index Codes The Index code is a data-entry shortcut for the Fund code, Org code, and Program code in Banner Finance (FO-P's). Implementation of the Index has greatly decreased data entry coding ­ Account (object) - Program (FOAP) code numbers on any of your accounting forms (Contracts, Purchase Orders

  19. POET with C++ Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buhr, Peter Allan

    POET with #22;C++ Reference Manual University of Waterloo David Taylor and Peter A. Buhr c #3; 1996 July 23, 2006 #3; Permission is granted to make copies for personal or educational use #12; 2 POET Reference Manual Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Before Starting POET 3 3 Accessing POET 3 4 User Interface 3 5

  20. NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards Publication 500-292 #12;i NIST Special Publication 500-292 NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture, John Messina, Lee Badger and Dawn Leaf Information Techonology Laboratory Cloud Computing Program

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Codes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Codes Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production On June 13, 2014, in SNL maintains the equipment, experts, and partnerships required to develop technology for solar thermochemical...

  2. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  3. Graph Concatenation for Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salman Beigi; Isaac Chuang; Markus Grassl; Peter Shor; Bei Zeng

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code, and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the construction of good quantum codes of relatively large block length, concatenated quantum codes and their generalizations play an important role. We develop a systematic method for constructing concatenated quantum codes based on "graph concatenation", where graphs representing the inner and outer codes are concatenated via a simple graph operation called "generalized local complementation." Our method applies to both binary and non-binary concatenated quantum codes as well as their generalizations.

  4. Kentucky, Tennessee: corniferous potential may be worth exploring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, M.T.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The driller's term, corniferous, refers to all carbonate and clastic strata, regardless of geologic age, underlying the regional unconformity below the late Devonian-early Mississippian New Albany shale and overlying the middle Silurian Clinton shale in the study area. From oldest to youngest, the formations that constitute the corniferous are the middle Silurian Keefer formation, the middle Silurian Lockport dolomite, the upper Silurian Salina formation, the lower Devonian Helderberg limestone, the lower Devonian Oriskanysandstone, the lower Devonian Onondaga limestone, and in the extreme western portion of the study area, the middle Devonian Boyle dolomite. The overlying New Albany shale also is termed Ohio shale or Chattanooga shale in the Appalachian Basin. To drillers, it is known simply as the black shale. The study area is located in E. Kentucky on the western flank of the Appalachian Basin and covers all or parts of 32 counties.

  5. REFERENCE CHECK QUESTIONS Candidate Name:_____________________ Date of Reference:_____________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    are the candidate's most significant strengths? Any areas for improvement? If you were in a position to hire:_____________ Reference Name:_____________________ Company:____________________ Conducted by:_______________________ Phone (name) handle conflict? How about pressure? Stress? Describe the candidate's productivity, commitment

  6. Reed-Muller Codes: Spherically-Punctured Codes and Decoding Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapralova, Olga

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3 Code parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of linear codes . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 Reed-Muller

  7. Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott R.B.

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

  8. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  9. Universal space-time codes from demultiplexed trellis codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kose, Cenk; Wesel, R D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and A. R. Calderbank, “Space-time codes for high data ratePerformance criteria and code construction,” IEEE Trans.of space–time trellis codes,” IEEE Trans. Commun. , vol. 51,

  10. Relation Between Surface Codes and Hypermap-Homology Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Sarvepalli

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new class of quantum codes based on hypermaps were proposed. These codes are obtained from embeddings of hypergraphs as opposed to surface codes which are obtained from the embeddings of graphs. It is natural to compare these two classes of codes and their relation to each other. In this context two related questions are addressed in this paper: Can the parameters of hypermap-homology codes be superior to those of surface codes and what is precisely the relation between these two classes of quantum codes? We show that a canonical hypermap code is identical to a surface code while a noncanonical hypermap code can be transformed to a surface code by CNOT gates alone. Our approach is constructive; we construct the related surface code and the transformation involving CNOT gates.

  11. Safeguards and Security Program References

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes definitions for terms related to the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program and includes lists of references and acronyms/abbreviations applicable to S&S Program directives. Cancels the Safeguards and Security Glossary of Terms, dated 12-18-95. Current Safeguards and Security Program References can also be found at Safeguards and Security Policy Information Resource (http://pir.pnl.gov/)

  12. 2003 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the East Tennessee Technology Park (K-25).The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. Calendar years 1989 and 1990 monitoring well installation program Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the well-construction activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during 1989 and 1990. The well- construction program consisted of installing seventy-five monitoring wells. Geologists from ERCE (formally the Engineering, Design and Geosciences Group) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems), supervised and documented well-construction activities and monitored for health and safety concerns. Sixty-seven monitoring wells were installed under the supervision of an ERCE geologist from March 1989 to September 1990. Beginning in September 1990, Energy Systems supervised drilling activities for eight monitoring wells, the last of which was completed in December 1990. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Letter Report - Verification Survey of Final Grids at the David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduct verification surveys of grids at the DWI 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The independent verification team (IVT) from ORISE, conducted verification activities in whole and partial grids, as completed by BJC. ORISE site activities included gamma surface scans and soil sampling within 33 grids; G11 through G14; H11 through H15; X14, X15, X19, and X21; J13 through J15 and J17 through J21; K7 through K9 and K13 through K15; L13 through L15; and M14 through M16

  15. Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

  16. Fiscal year 1996 well installation program summary, Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1996 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge Tennessee. Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Two groundwater monitoring wells were installed during the FY 1996 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed in the Lake Reality area and was of polyvinyl chloride screened construction. The other well, installed near the Ash Disposal Basin, was of stainless steel construction.

  17. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  18. TEAM CUMBERLAND Tennessee Valley Authority 400 West Summit Hill Drive, Knoxville, TN 37902

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,ZaleskiThis Decision considers an Appeal ofIn1097 - InTennessee Valley

  19. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Carriker, Neil [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, Jesse G [ORNL; Gable, Jennifer [Environmental Standards, Inc.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  20. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  1. Quantum stabilizer codes and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of quantum error correction in paving the way to build a practical quantum computer is no longer in doubt. This dissertation makes a threefold contribution to the mathematical theory of quantum error-correcting codes. Firstly, it extends the framework of an important class of quantum codes -- nonbinary stabilizer codes. It clarifies the connections of stabilizer codes to classical codes over quadratic extension fields, provides many new constructions of quantum codes, and develops further the theory of optimal quantum codes and punctured quantum codes. Secondly, it contributes to the theory of operator quantum error correcting codes also called as subsystem codes. These codes are expected to have efficient error recovery schemes than stabilizer codes. This dissertation develops a framework for study and analysis of subsystem codes using character theoretic methods. In particular, this work establishes a close link between subsystem codes and classical codes showing that the subsystem codes can be constructed from arbitrary classical codes. Thirdly, it seeks to exploit the knowledge of noise to design efficient quantum codes and considers more realistic channels than the commonly studied depolarizing channel. It gives systematic constructions of asymmetric quantum stabilizer codes that exploit the asymmetry of errors in certain quantum channels.

  2. Software and codes for analysis of concentrating solar power technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a review and evaluation of software and codes that have been used to support Sandia National Laboratories concentrating solar power (CSP) program. Additional software packages developed by other institutions and companies that can potentially improve Sandia's analysis capabilities in the CSP program are also evaluated. The software and codes are grouped according to specific CSP technologies: power tower systems, linear concentrator systems, and dish/engine systems. A description of each code is presented with regard to each specific CSP technology, along with details regarding availability, maintenance, and references. A summary of all the codes is then presented with recommendations regarding the use and retention of the codes. A description of probabilistic methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of concentrating solar power technologies is also provided.

  3. Rateless Codes for AVC Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarwate, A D; Gastpar, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. [7] M. Luby, “LT codes,” in Proc. 43rd Ann. IEEE Symp.8] A. Shokrollahi, “Fountain codes,” in Proc. 41st AllertonChannel capacities for list codes,” J. Appl. Probabil. ,

  4. Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes Diploma Thesis Neele von Deetzen Arbeitsbereich Nachrichtentechnik School of Engineering and Science Bremen, February 28th, 2005 #12;Unequal Error Protection Turbo Convolutional Codes / Turbo Codes 18 3.1 Structure

  5. REFERENCES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P U T Edelivery205.1B

  6. Quantum Error Correcting Subsystem Codes From Two Classical Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Bacon; Andrea Casaccino

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The essential insight of quantum error correction was that quantum information can be protected by suitably encoding this quantum information across multiple independently erred quantum systems. Recently it was realized that, since the most general method for encoding quantum information is to encode it into a subsystem, there exists a novel form of quantum error correction beyond the traditional quantum error correcting subspace codes. These new quantum error correcting subsystem codes differ from subspace codes in that their quantum correcting routines can be considerably simpler than related subspace codes. Here we present a class of quantum error correcting subsystem codes constructed from two classical linear codes. These codes are the subsystem versions of the quantum error correcting subspace codes which are generalizations of Shor's original quantum error correcting subspace codes. For every Shor-type code, the codes we present give a considerable savings in the number of stabilizer measurements needed in their error recovery routines.

  7. Utah. Code. Ann. § 19-5-115: Spills or discharges of oil or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utah. Code. Ann. 19-5-115: Spills or discharges of oil or other substance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute:...

  8. CDOT Utility Accommodation Code Rule 2.2 - Utility Permits and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Accommodation Code Rule 2.2 - Utility Permits and Utility Relocation Permits to the State Highway Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  9. No Code: Null Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montfort, Nick

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue the productive discussion of uninscribed artworks in Craig Dworkin’s No Medium, this report discusses, in detail, those computer programs that have no code, and are thus empty or null. Several specific examples ...

  10. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Authority for adopting the state energy codes was previously vested in the Energy Security Office of the Department of Commerce (originally the Department of Public Services). In 1999-2000, the...

  12. Quantum error control codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major... Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  13. ENGINEERS DAYENGINEERS DAYThis year the University of Tennessee College of Engineering is celebrating the 100th Anniversary of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    ENGINEERS DAYENGINEERS DAYThis year the University of Tennessee College of Engineering is celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Engineers Day. Each October, undergraduate engineering classes of potential engineering students from high schools across the region. Last year, close to 1,000 students from

  14. EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

  15. Proposed Program: Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program for Staff Proposed by: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    : 1. Eligible for federal retirement benefits under a Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA)2#12;#12;Proposed Program: Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program for Staff Proposed by: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) Purpose: The UTIA Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program for Staff

  16. UTNEUPDATEUTNEUPDATEA Publication from the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Tennessee Dr. Jason P. Hayward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    UTNEUPDATEUTNEUPDATEA Publication from the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Tennessee Department of Nuclear EngineeringUTNEUPDATE Department Head's Message Dr. Wesley Hines New Faculty Outstanding MS Student: Cole Gentry NE Hosts Graduate Recruiting Weekend ANS Awards UT Nuclear Engineering

  17. Authorization of Disclosure I fully understand that, under the laws of the State of Tennessee, personnel records are considered public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    , personnel records are considered public records and may be inspected, extracted, or copied by any citizen of such records. THE FOLLOWING AUTHORIZATIONS ARE FOR RELEASE OF INFORMATION IN RESPONSE TO TELEPHONE INQUIRIES of Human Resources Management of the University of Tennessee to provide the following personnel information

  18. EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend (e.g., by changing setback requirements from surface water features and potential channels to groundwater) the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  19. Calendar Year 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2008 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2008 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0).

  20. Routine environmental audit of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12 Plant), Anderson County, Tennessee. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted August 22-September 2, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of DOE environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  1. Cost of electric-power interruptions to residences in the Tennessee Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmer, R W; Mack, R S

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the cost of electric power outages to residential customers of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The assessment focuses primarily on costs associated with rationing electric power by means of rotating blackouts of 1 to 3 h, exercised several times per year and perhaps as often as once each month. The cost of these blackouts is assessed in terms of several measures of lost consumer's surplus and lost production within the home. Estimates are developed by season for the typical home, for homes in different parts of the Tennessee Valley, and for homes with different mixes of appliances. Estimates for a typical home in the TVA region vary from 20 cents to 50 cents per kilowatthour depending upon the season and the method of measurement used. These valuations for the TVA region are compared to cost estimates for the US as a whole. The implications of outages lasting longer than 3 h are considered, and costs sustained in such outages are outlined.

  2. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  3. Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Wang; Kai Sun; Hen Fan; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

  4. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes: Systematic Codes Achieving the Binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sason, Igal

    Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes: Systematic Codes Achieving the Binary Erasure Channel Capacity@ee.technion.ac.il Abstract The paper introduces ensembles of accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes which asymp- totically by the first capacity-achieving ensembles of ir- regular repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes with bounded complexity

  5. Code: A Lightweight and Flexible Mobile Code Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picco, Gian Pietro

    evaluation of mobile code technology does not exist yet, some studies already evidenced that the powerful of client­server and mobile code in reducing the network traffic generated by management. The theoreticalŻCode: A Lightweight and Flexible Mobile Code Toolkit Gian Pietro Picco Dip. Automatica e

  6. "Charter and Code" Gap Analysis ANALYSIS FOR NORWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    "Charter and Code" ­ Gap Analysis ANALYSIS FOR NORWAY The European Charter for Researchers: Acceptable. The principle of research freedom is well-established in Norway. The committee refers for Research Ethics in Norway. #12;In recent years, issues of research ethics have received increasing

  7. C++ References Kenneth I. Joy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    . It enabled me to see how to use the language to accomplish what I wanted to do. ffl Scott Meyer's Book gave plate'' member functions came very close to the ``complete class'' paradigm, that I developed from Meyer that I attempt to utilize. #12; C++ References Page 2 of 3 Lippman, Stanley B., C++ Primer, 2nd Edition

  8. Alamouti Space Time Coded OFDM for Underwater Acoustic Channels Baosheng Li1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojanovic, Milica

    the time-variation of the channel. Adaptive channel estimation for space-time block coded (STBC) OFDM], [11]. Reference [9] discusses a jointly optimized MIMO-DFE with space- time trellis codes. In [10 stay fixed over the duration of one OFDM block, but may change from one block to another. Channel

  9. Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of Partial Grids H19, J21, J22, X20, and X21 at the David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site, Knoxville Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduct verification surveys of available grids at the David Witherspoon Incorporated 1630 Site (DWI 1630) in Knoxville, Tennessee. The IVT conducted verification activities of partial grids H19, J21, J22, X20, and X21.

  10. Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and East Tennessee Technology Park, Summary Report, May 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).

  11. MHD Generation Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to generate codes in Fortran and C of the full Magnetohydrodynamic equations is shown. The program used the free computer algebra system software REDUCE. This software has a package called EXCALC, which is an exterior calculus program. The advantage of this program is that it can be modified to include another complex metric or spacetime. The output of this program is modified by means of a LINUX script which creates a new REDUCE program to manipulate the MHD equations to obtain a code that can be used as a seed for a MHD code for numerical applications. As an example, we present part of output of our programs for Cartesian coordinates and how to do the discretization.

  12. Energy standards and model codes development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the energy standards and model codes process for the voluntary sector within the United States. The report was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Building Energy Standards Program and is intended to be used as a primer or reference on this process. Building standards and model codes that address energy have been developed by organizations in the voluntary sector since the early 1970s. These standards and model codes provide minimum energy-efficient design and construction requirements for new buildings and, in some instances, existing buildings. The first step in the process is developing new or revising existing standards or codes. There are two overall differences between standards and codes. Energy standards are developed by a consensus process and are revised as needed. Model codes are revised on a regular annual cycle through a public hearing process. In addition to these overall differences, the specific steps in developing/revising energy standards differ from model codes. These energy standards or model codes are then available for adoption by states and local governments. Typically, energy standards are adopted by or adopted into model codes. Model codes are in turn adopted by states through either legislation or regulation. Enforcement is essential to the implementation of energy standards and model codes. Low-rise residential construction is generally evaluated for compliance at the local level, whereas state agencies tend to be more involved with other types of buildings. Low-rise residential buildings also may be more easily evaluated for compliance because the governing requirements tend to be less complex than for commercial buildings.

  13. Cyclic simplex coded OTDR SNR enhancement of coded optical time domain reflectometry using cyclic simplex codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    Cyclic simplex coded OTDR SNR enhancement of coded optical time domain reflectometry using cyclic simplex codes *, , , e-mail : nkpark@plaza.snu.ac.kr Abstract: We propose and experimentally demonstrate the performance improvement of a coded optical time domain reflectometry using cyclic simplex

  14. Extended quantum color coding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashi, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Horibe, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Fukui University, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum color coding scheme proposed by Korff and Kempe [e-print quant-ph/0405086] is easily extended so that the color coding quantum system is allowed to be entangled with an extra auxiliary quantum system. It is shown that in the extended scheme we need only {approx}2{radical}(N) quantum colors to order N objects in large N limit, whereas {approx}N/e quantum colors are required in the original nonextended version. The maximum success probability has asymptotics expressed by the Tracy-Widom distribution of the largest eigenvalue of a random Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) matrix.

  15. Fiscal Year 2010 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-32 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORJO 1-2161 &D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORIO 1 -2224&D3) (RDRJRAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone I exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together, which allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was completed for the EU addressed in this document (EU Z2-32). The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-32. (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results. (4) Describe the remedial action performed in the K-1066-G Yard in EU Z2-32. Approximately 18.4 acres are included in the EU addressed in this PCCR. Based on results of the DVS evaluation, all 18.4 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. There are no Federal Facility Agreement Sites included in Appendix A of the Zone 2 ROD in EU Z2-32. The Zone 2 ROD requires land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likelihood of land use controls in EU Z2-32 being modified to: (1) eliminate the restriction on disturbance of soils below 10 ft bgs where data indicate the absence of residual contamination at any depth that would result in an unacceptable risk to the future industrial worker, and (2) permit alternative land uses that would be protective of future site occupants. Results of this screening evaluation indicate a high probability that restrictions on disturbing soil below 10 ft bgs could be safely eliminated for EU Z2-32. A qualitative screening evaluation considered the likelihood of unrestricted land use being protective of future site occupants. Based on this qualitative assessment, all 18.4 acres addressed in this PCCR were assigned a high probability for consideration of release for unrestricted land use. This document contains the main text (Sects. 1 through 13) and one appendix. The main text addresses the purpose for this PCCR as described above. Additional supporting detail (e.g., field work and data summaries, graphics) is provided in the EU Z2-32 technical memorandum (Appendix A). Historical and DVS analytical data used in this PCCR are provided on a compact disc accompanying this document and can be accessed through the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System.

  16. The Consumption of Reference Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. White; J. A. Vaccaro; H. M. Wiseman

    2008-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the operational restriction of the U(1)-superselection rule, states that contain coherences between eigenstates of particle number constitute a resource. Such resources can be used to facilitate operations upon systems that otherwise cannot be performed. However, the process of doing this consumes reference resources. We show this explicitly for an example of a unitary operation that is forbidden by the U(1)-superselection rule.

  17. HANFORD WASTE MINERALOGY REFERENCE REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report lists the observed mineral phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports that used experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases observed in Hanford waste.

  18. HANFORD WASTE MINEROLOGY REFERENCE REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report lists the observed mineral phase phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports using experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases present observed in Hanford waste.

  19. LCCP Desktop Application v1.0 Engineering Reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) Desktop Application Engineering Reference is divided into three parts. The first part of the guide, consisting of the LCCP objective, literature review, and mathematical background, is presented in Sections 2-4. The second part of the guide (given in Sections 5-10) provides a description of the input data required by the LCCP desktop application, including each of the input pages (Application Information, Load Information, and Simulation Information) and details for interfacing the LCCP Desktop Application with the VapCyc and EnergyPlus simulation programs. The third part of the guide (given in Section 11) describes the various interfaces of the LCCP code.

  20. NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgenda Workshop Agenda Large

  1. Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section CMPSCI 240: Reasoning about Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGregor, Andrew

    Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section CMPSCI 240: Reasoning about: April 29, 2014 #12;Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section Information Theory. #12;Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section Encoding Messages with Redundancy

  2. Calendar Year 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2009 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2009 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2009 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1A (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP. Narrative sections of this report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C contains construction details for the wells in each regime that were sampled during CY 2009 by either the Y-1

  3. Calendar Year 2006 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2006 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., preparing SAPs, coordinating sample collection, and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2006 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2006 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater and surface water contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP. Narrative sections of this report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C contains construction details for the wells in each regime that were sampled during CY 2006 by either the Y-12 GWPP or BJC. F

  4. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2004 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2004. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2004 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2004 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2004 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G contai

  5. Microgrid cyber security reference architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veitch, Cynthia K.; Henry, Jordan M.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Hart, Derek H.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a microgrid cyber security reference architecture. First, we present a high-level concept of operations for a microgrid, including operational modes, necessary power actors, and the communication protocols typically employed. We then describe our motivation for designing a secure microgrid; in particular, we provide general network and industrial control system (ICS)-speci c vulnerabilities, a threat model, information assurance compliance concerns, and design criteria for a microgrid control system network. Our design approach addresses these concerns by segmenting the microgrid control system network into enclaves, grouping enclaves into functional domains, and describing actor communication using data exchange attributes. We describe cyber actors that can help mitigate potential vulnerabilities, in addition to performance bene ts and vulnerability mitigation that may be realized using this reference architecture. To illustrate our design approach, we present a notional a microgrid control system network implementation, including types of communica- tion occurring on that network, example data exchange attributes for actors in the network, an example of how the network can be segmented to create enclaves and functional domains, and how cyber actors can be used to enforce network segmentation and provide the neces- sary level of security. Finally, we describe areas of focus for the further development of the reference architecture.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  7. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented.

  8. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  9. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  10. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal, cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  11. CBP TOOLBOX VERSION 2.0: CODE INTEGRATION ENHANCEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.; Flach, G.; BROWN, K.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes enhancements made to code integration aspects of the Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) Toolbox as a result of development work performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in collaboration with Vanderbilt University (VU) in the first half of fiscal year 2013. Code integration refers to the interfacing to standalone CBP partner codes, used to analyze the performance of cementitious materials, with the CBP Software Toolbox. The most significant enhancements are: 1) Improved graphical display of model results. 2) Improved error analysis and reporting. 3) Increase in the default maximum model mesh size from 301 to 501 nodes. 4) The ability to set the LeachXS/Orchestra simulation times through the GoldSim interface. These code interface enhancements have been included in a new release (Version 2.0) of the CBP Toolbox.

  12. Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

  13. Course Code: Course Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    - Frameworks; Decision Making Development life-cycle of a software system Bi-directional influence between-Critical Systems; Technology & Society. Brave New Worlds - Co-operative Computing; eLife. Learning OutcomesCourse Code: F29PD Course Title: Professional Development Course Co-ordinator: Sandy Jean

  14. The Woodland Carbon Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

  15. Chaotic Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Adrian Barbulescu; Andrew Guidi; Steven S. Pietrobon

    This paper describes a new class of codes, chaotic turbo codes. They were born from a symbiosis between a chaotical digital encoder and a turbo code. This paper investigates the most important properties of both chaotic digital encoders and turbo encoders in order to understand how the two complement each other. A Chaotic Turbo Encoder is then described and initial results will be presented. I. INTRODUCTION A chaotic digital encoder was defined for the first time in [1] as a non--linear digital filter with finite precision (8 bits) which behaves in a quasi--chaotic fashion, both with zero and nonzero input sequences. A simple chaotic encoder is shown in Figure 1 [1]. D Y k X k LCIRC D Figure 1: Chaotic Digital Encoder Mapper L L L L L L 1 The main features of chaotic digital encoders that are used in this paper are: # The system is digital which makes possible its integration with a turbo code. # The output of a chaotic digital encoder with arbitrary inputs has a broad...

  16. Reference Inflow Characterization for River Resource Reference Model (RM2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) is leading an effort to develop reference models for marine and hydrokinetic technologies and wave and current energy resources. This effort will allow the refinement of technology design tools, accurate estimates of a baseline levelized cost of energy (LCoE), and the identification of the main cost drivers that need to be addressed to achieve a competitive LCoE. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was charged with examining and reporting reference river inflow characteristics for reference model 2 (RM2). Published turbulent flow data from large rivers, a water supply canal and laboratory flumes, are reviewed to determine the range of velocities, turbulence intensities and turbulent stresses acting on hydrokinetic technologies, and also to evaluate the validity of classical models that describe the depth variation of the time-mean velocity and turbulent normal Reynolds stresses. The classical models are found to generally perform well in describing river inflow characteristics. A potential challenge in river inflow characterization, however, is the high variability of depth and flow over the design life of a hydrokinetic device. This variation can have significant effects on the inflow mean velocity and turbulence intensity experienced by stationary and bottom mounted hydrokinetic energy conversion devices, which requires further investigation, but are expected to have minimal effects on surface mounted devices like the vertical axis turbine device designed for RM2. A simple methodology for obtaining an approximate inflow characterization for surface deployed devices is developed using the relation umax=(7/6)V where V is the bulk velocity and umax is assumed to be the near-surface velocity. The application of this expression is recommended for deriving the local inflow velocity acting on the energy extraction planes of the RM2 vertical axis rotors, where V=Q/A can be calculated given a USGS gage flow time-series and stage vs. cross-section area rating relationship.

  17. Erasure Techniques in MRD codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; R. Sujatha; R. S. Raja Durai

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is organized into six chapters. The first chapter introduces the basic algebraic structures essential to make this book a self contained one. Algebraic linear codes and their basic properties are discussed in chapter two. In chapter three the authors study the basic properties of erasure decoding in maximum rank distance codes. Some decoding techniques about MRD codes are described and discussed in chapter four of this book. Rank distance codes with complementary duals and MRD codes with complementary duals are introduced and their applications are discussed. Chapter five introduces the notion of integer rank distance codes. The final chapter introduces some concatenation techniques.

  18. Coded modulation with Low Density Parity Check codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanaswami, Ravi

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes the design of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes for cases where coded modulation is used. We design these codes by extending the idea of Density Evolution (DE) that has been introduced as a powerful tool to analyze LDPC...

  19. Generating Code for High-Level Operations through Code Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Code for High-Level Operations through Code Composition James M. Stichnoth August 1997 of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements: Compilers, code generation, parallelism, communication generation #12;Abstract A traditional compiler

  20. EIS-0305: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee)This EIS evaluates DOE's proposal to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a Transuranic (TRU) Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste.

  1. Reference electrode for electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kessie, R.W.

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference electrode device is provided for a high temperature electrolytic cell used to electrolytically recover uranium from spent reactor fuel dissolved in an anode pool, the device having a glass tube to enclose the electrode and electrolyte and serve as a conductive membrane with the cell electrolyte, and an outer metal tube about the glass tube to serve as a shield and basket for any glass sections broken by handling of the tube to prevent their contact with the anode pool, the metal tube having perforations to provide access between the bulk of the cell electrolyte and glass membrane. 4 figs.

  2. PVWatts Version 1 Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobos, A. P.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NREL PVWatts(TM) calculator is a web application developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that estimates the electricity production of a grid-connected photovoltaic system based on a few simple inputs. PVWatts combines a number of sub-models to predict overall system performance, and makes several hidden assumptions about performance parameters. This technical reference details the individual sub-models, documents assumptions and hidden parameters, and explains the sequence of calculations that yield the final system performance estimation.

  3. Tips: References | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1 TNews & SolarLaundryReferences Tips:

  4. References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andBHoneywell9/%2A en7/%2ANationalReferences

  5. Tips: References | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for PumpingThe| Department ofAir DuctsTips:References Tips:

  6. Multiclass learning with simplex coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroueh, Youssef

    In this paper we discuss a novel framework for multiclass learning, defined by a suitable coding/decoding strategy, namely the simplex coding, that allows us to generalize to multiple classes a relaxation approach commonly ...

  7. Distributed control of coded networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of network coding has the potential to revolutionize the way people operate networks. For the benefits of network coding to be realized, distributed solutions are needed for various network problems. In ...

  8. Nevada Energy Code for Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the appendixes for the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The following topics are covered in the appendixes: (A) David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Historical Data, (B) Fieldwork Plans for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, (C) Risk Assessment, (D) Remediation Technology Discussion, (E) Engineering Support Documentation, (F) Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements, and (G) Cost Estimate Documentation.

  10. Development of DOE-2 Based Simulation Models for the Code-Compliant Commercial Construction Based on the ASHRAE Standard 90.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S.; Haberl, J.; Liu, Z.

    Conservation Code. Since most of the commercial portion of the 2000/2001 International Energy Conservation Code refers to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as the current code requirement for commercial construction, the simulation models based on the ASHRAE Standard...

  11. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  12. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam is disclosed. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave. 7 figures.

  13. Data report: Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, K A; Cook, J R; Fay, W M

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. The following sample types were collected in each state: Illinois - 716 stream sediment, 1046 ground water, 337 stream water; Indiana - 126 stream sediment, 443 ground water, 111 stream water; Kentucky - 4901 stream sediment, 6408 ground water, 3966 stream water; Tennessee - 3309 stream sediment, 3574 ground water, 1584 stream water; Ohio - 1214 stream sediment, 2049 ground water, 1205 stream water. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. Supplementary analyses by other techniques are reported for U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn. These analyses were made on 248 sediment samples from Tennessee. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation.

  14. Travel Codes Traveler Is Employee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Travel Codes Traveler Is Employee: 64100-Domestic Travel 64150-Mileage 64200-International Travel Supplies & Expense Codes 71410-Office Supplies 71430-Lab/Research Supplies (dollar value of each item less Charges Equipment Codes 84320-Equipment (non-computer & peripherals) with a cost of $5,000.00 or more per

  15. Rotationally invariant multilevel block codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulandaivelu, Anita

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to evaluate the performance of block codes that are designed to be rotationally invariant, in a multilevel coding scheme, over a channel modelled to be white gaussian noise. Also, the use of non-binary codes...

  16. Design of proximity detecting codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perisetty, Srinivas

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    delay insensitive, codes like unordered codes have been proposed. Although these codes are delay insensitive, the receiver still has to wait for all the 1s in the transmitted data to be received before sending an acknowledge signal to the sender. A new...

  17. Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, Georgia August development · Charge from BPTCS to B31 Standards Committee for Hydrogen Piping/Pipeline code development · B31.12 Status & Structure · Hydrogen Pipeline issues · Research Needs · Where Do We Go From Here? #12;4 Code

  18. Energy Codes and Standards: Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Halverson, Mark A.; Shankle, Diana L.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy codes and standards play a vital role in the marketplace by setting minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction. They outline uniform requirements for new buildings as well as additions and renovations. This article covers basic knowledge of codes and standards; development processes of each; adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy codes and standards; and voluntary energy efficiency programs.

  19. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TURBO CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alajaji, Fady

    PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TURBO CODES by Guangchong Zhu A project submitted to the Department named ``Turbo codes'' which claims an extraordinary performance with reasonable decoding complexity. In this project, we begin with a study on the structure and principle of Turbo codes. We then investigate

  20. Reference Model 2: %22Rev 0%22 Rotor Design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew F.; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Griffith, Daniel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary design for a three-bladed cross-flow rotor for a reference marine hydrokinetic turbine is presented. A rotor performance design code is described, along with modifications to the code to allow prediction of blade support strut drag as well as interference between two counter-rotating rotors. The rotor is designed to operate in a reference site corresponding to a riverine environment. Basic rotor performance and rigid-body loads calculations are performed to size the rotor elements and select the operating speed range. The preliminary design is verified with a simple finite element model that provides estimates of bending stresses during operation. A concept for joining the blades and support struts is developed and analyzed with a separate finite element analysis. Rotor mass, production costs, and annual energy capture are estimated in order to allow calculations of system cost-of-energy. Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd

  1. FastBit Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An index in a database system is a data structure that utilizes redundant information about the base data to speed up common searching and retrieval operations. Most commonly used indexes are variants of B-trees, such as B+-tree and B*-tree. FastBit implements a set of alternative indexes call compressed bitmap indexes. Compared with B-tree variants, these indexes provide very efficient searching and retrieval operations by sacrificing the efficiency of updating the indexes after the modification of an individual record. In addition to the well-known strengths of bitmap indexes, FastBit has a special strength stemming from the bitmap compression scheme used. The compression method is called the Word-Aligned Hybrid (WAH) code. It reduces the bitmap indexes to reasonable sizes and at the same time allows very efficient bitwise logical operations directly on the compressed bitmaps. Compared with the well-known compression methods such as LZ77 and Byte-aligned Bitmap code (BBC), WAH sacrifices some space efficiency for a significant improvement in operational efficiency. Since the bitwise logical operations are the most important operations needed to answer queries, using WAH compression has been shown to answer queries significantly faster than using other compression schemes. Theoretical analyses showed that WAH compressed bitmap indexes are optimal for one-dimensional range queries. Only the most efficient indexing schemes such as B+-tree and B*-tree have this optimality property. However, bitmap indexes are superior because they can efficiently answer multi-dimensional range queries by combining the answers to one-dimensional queries.

  2. Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Building Codes Project for the 2013...

  3. 2013 Reporting Unit Codes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2013 Reporting Unit Codes 2013 Reporting Unit Codes CFC Reporting Unit Codes 2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0372: Final Environmental Assessment Alignment: Achieving...

  4. Error Floors of LDPC Codes and Related Topics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Brian K.

    Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2 LDPC Codes . . . . . . . .2.1 Binary Linear Block Codes . . . . . . .

  5. National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture Consultation Draft Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture: Consultation Draft Environmental Information Architecture: Consultation Draft, Bureau of Meteorology, Canberra, Australia, pp. 52. With the exception

  6. Cross-References Applications of Nanofluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Cross-References Applications of Nanofluidics Electrokinetic Fluid Flow in Nanostructures Micro/Nano Flow Characterization Techniques Nanochannels for Nanofluidics: Fabrication Aspects Rapid Electrokinetic Patterning References 1. Conlisk, A.T.: Essentials of Micro and Nanofluidics with Application

  7. Calendar Year 2011 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC,

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2011 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. This report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and known extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for environmental cleanup on the ORR. In August 2011, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) replaced Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) as the DOE EM contractor. For this report, BJC/UCOR will be referenced as the managing contractor for CY 2011. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2011 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. This report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC/UCOR. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC. Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2011 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR address DOE Order 436.1 and DOE Order 458.1 requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring) and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). This report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. This report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

  8. Calendar Year 2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2010 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2010 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2010 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1A (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

  9. Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00-1 Planning Report Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Administration #12;February 2000 Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Final-006 Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Final Report February 2000

  10. Reference Phase of Fresnel Zone Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Webb

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard zone plate assumes that the shortest ray connecting a radiation source and a detection point has a phase of 0 deg thereby defining a reference phase. Here we examine the experimental consequences of varying this reference phase from 0 deg to 360 deg. It is concluded that reference phase is an intrinsic and useful property of zone plates.

  11. GAINING CONSENSUS: THE STORY OF ''OAK RIDGE TENNESSEE - A CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO THE ENVIRONMENT''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Robert; Freeman, Jenny; Gawarecki, Susan L; Hardy, Parker; Kopp, Steve; Mulvenon, Norman A; Pardue, William; Sarno, Doug

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, a diverse group of citizens ranging from conservationists to industrial developers joined forces to produce a factual description of Oak Ridge's environment and the issues associated with contamination on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reservation. This consensus effort was a result of common values not generally seen in this spectrum of philosophies, and of shared concerns about rising property taxes, declining city services, fleeing retail establishments, and diminishing real estate values. These problems are attributed to waning local DOE budgets coupled with Oak Ridge's national reputation of being contaminated and unsafe. This undeserved reputation harms the city's ability to attract new industry to replace declining federal employment and to induce families to live in the community. Representatives from a spectrum of conservation, environmental, economic development, local government, and civic organizations were invited to meet regarding how to best explain the complex environmental story of Oak Ridge and the DOE reservation. This large group decided to publish a straightforward explanation of the environmental quality of the city and its relationship to the DOE reservation in easy-to-understand language. The result was Oak Ridge, Tennessee--A Citizen's Guide to the Environment, a 28-page glossy booklet, distributed through the Chamber of Commerce and other organizations. The Oak Ridger ensured wide distribution in the community by publishing it as an insert in the daily paper. The material is also available on several web sites. A trifold brochure summarizing and promoting the larger document was also produced for wider distribution. The integrity of the Citizen's Guide was ensured by having a six-member editorial team manage writing and review of the document. There was no direct involvement by the DOE and its contractor. Knowledgeable citizen writers from throughout the community contributed technical and descriptive text. A professional technical editor melded the disparate styles into a cohesive publication. Volunteers from about 100 organizations reviewed the draft for accuracy of content and readability. Participating organizations, upon review of the final draft, then decided whether their names would be listed in the document as contributors and supporters. While the writing and editing was primarily accomplished by conservation and civic organizations, funding to print the final publications came largely from economic development interests and their supporters. The positive reception from the public upon release of Oak Ridge, Tennessee--A Citizen's Guide to the Environment stands as testament to the ability of diverse interest groups to come to consensus and communicate the environmental value of their community.

  12. T ID CODE I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER 1 | MARCHT ID CODE I

  13. Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section CMPSCI 240: Reasoning about Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGregor, Andrew

    Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section CMPSCI 240: Reasoning about 1, 2013 #12;Coding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section Information Theory Encoding for Transmission Coding for Compression Bonus Section Encoding Messages with Redundancy: Error Correcting Suppose

  14. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

  15. Quantum serial turbo-codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Poulin; Jean-Pierre Tillich; Harold Ollivier

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory of quantum serial turbo-codes, describe their iterative decoding algorithm, and study their performances numerically on a depolarization channel. Our construction offers several advantages over quantum LDPC codes. First, the Tanner graph used for decoding is free of 4-cycles that deteriorate the performances of iterative decoding. Secondly, the iterative decoder makes explicit use of the code's degeneracy. Finally, there is complete freedom in the code design in terms of length, rate, memory size, and interleaver choice. We define a quantum analogue of a state diagram that provides an efficient way to verify the properties of a quantum convolutional code, and in particular its recursiveness and the presence of catastrophic error propagation. We prove that all recursive quantum convolutional encoder have catastrophic error propagation. In our constructions, the convolutional codes have thus been chosen to be non-catastrophic and non-recursive. While the resulting families of turbo-codes have bounded minimum distance, from a pragmatic point of view the effective minimum distances of the codes that we have simulated are large enough not to degrade the iterative decoding performance up to reasonable word error rates and block sizes. With well chosen constituent convolutional codes, we observe an important reduction of the word error rate as the code length increases.

  16. Conjugate Codes and Applications to Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuru Hamada

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A conjugate code pair is defined as a pair of linear codes such that one contains the dual of the other. The conjugate code pair represents the essential structure of the corresponding Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) quantum code. It is argued that conjugate code pairs are applicable to quantum cryptography in order to motivate studies on conjugate code pairs.

  17. Turbo and LDPC Codes: Implementation, Simulation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valenti, Matthew C.

    1 Turbo and LDPC Codes: Implementation, Simulation, and Standardization June 7, 2006 Matthew/7/2006 Turbo and LDPC Codes 2/133 Tutorial Overview Channel capacity Convolutional codes ­ the MAP algorithm Turbo codes ­ Standard binary turbo codes: UMTS and cdma2000 ­ Duobinary CRSC turbo codes: DVB

  18. ILC cryogenic systems reference design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.J.; Geynisman, M.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab; Parma, V.; Tavian, L.; /CERN

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Global Design Effort (GDE) began in 2005 to study a TeV scale electron-positron linear accelerator based on superconducting radio-frequency (RF) technology, called the International Linear Collider (ILC). In early 2007, the design effort culminated in a reference design for the ILC, closely based on the earlier TESLA design. The ILC will consist of two 250 GeV linacs, which provide positron-electron collisions for high energy physics research. The particle beams will be accelerated to their final energy in superconducting niobium RF cavities operating at 2 kelvin. At a length of about 12 km each, the main linacs will be the largest cryogenic systems in the ILC. Positron and electron sources, damping rings, and beam delivery systems will also have a large number and variety of other superconducting RF cavities and magnets, which require cooling at liquid helium temperatures. Ten large cryogenic plants with 2 kelvin refrigeration are envisioned to cool the main linacs and the electron and positron sources. Three smaller cryogenic plants will cool the damping rings and beam delivery system components predominately at 4.5 K. This paper describes the cryogenic systems concepts for the ILC.

  19. Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

  20. Routine environmental audit of the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted February 14 through February 25, 1994, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The Routine Environmental Audit for the K-25 site was conducted as an environmental management assessment, supported through reviews of the Waste Management Program and the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. The assessment was conducted jointly with, and built upon, the results provided by the ``DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office Environment, Safety, health and Quality Assurance Appraisal at the K-25 Site.`` DOE 5482.1B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy and senior DOE managers with concise independent information as part of DOE`s continuing effort to improve environmental program performance. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and the minimization of risk to public health and the environment. The routine environmental audit is one method by which EH-24 accomplishes its mission, utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations.

  1. Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

  3. Down on the farm. An analysis of energy inputs in Tennessee Valley farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, W.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 150,159 farms in the 170 power counties of TVA; the largest percentage are in the Central District (26.4%). The majority of the farm operators reside on the farm they operate (101,592 operators or 67.7%). Individual or family-owned farms represent the largest type of farm organization (134,111 farms or 89.3%). Over 71,000 farms use electricity in actual farm production; farm expenses for electricity totaled $37,040,000 in 1982. Approximately 18% of the energy requirements in the American food system is used for actual farm production, while 82% goes for processing, marketing, transporting, and preparing food for consumption. Field crop production in the Tennessee Valley expends the majority of the gasoline (91.4%) and diesel (85.8%) inputs in the farm system. Livestock production consumes the majority of the electricity (89.9%), L.P. gas (70.0%), fuel oil (97.2%), and liquid fuel (99.3%). Dairy cow production is the most energy-intensive production in livestock. It consumes 63.4% of the gasoline, 78.6% of the diesel, 40.5% of the L.P. gas, and 64.5% of the electricity inputs in livestock.

  4. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-four. Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Tennessee governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  5. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, David; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua; Parker, Jack; Brandt, Craig; Holladay, Susan; Wolfe, Amy; Bogle, Mary Anna; Lowe, Kenneth; Hyder, Kirk

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge (Fig. 1), Tennessee supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) goal of understanding the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites for new solutions to environmental remediation and long-term stewardship. In particular, the FRC provides the opportunity for researchers to conduct studies that promote the understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of existing remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies. It offers a series of contaminated sites around the former S-3 Waste Disposal Ponds and uncontaminated sites in which investigators and students conduct field research or collect samples for laboratory analysis. FRC research also spurs the development of new and improved characterization and monitoring tools. Site specific knowledge gained from research conducted at the FRC also provides the DOE-Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) the critical scientific knowledge needed to make cleanup decisions for the S-3 Ponds and other sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR).

  6. Report of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) safety workshop, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 25--26, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Dumont, J.N.; Kendrick, C.M.; Row, T.H.; Thompson, P.B.; West, C.D.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Muhlheim, M.D.; McBee, M.R. (comp.)

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 25--26, 1988, about 60 people took part in an Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Safety Workshop, organized in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) and held in Knoxville, Tennessee. After a plenary session at which ANS Project staff presented status reports on the ANS design, research and development (R and D), and safety analysis efforts, the workshop broke into three working groups, each covering a different topic: Environmental and Waste Management, Applicable Regulatory Safety Criteria and Goals, and Reactor Concepts. Each group was asked to review the Project's approach to safety-related issues and to provide guidance on future reactor safety needs or directions for the Project. With the help of able chairmen, assisted by reporters and secretarial support, the working groups were extremely successful. Draft reports from each group were prepared before the workshop closed, and the major findings of each group were presented for review and discussion by the entire workshop attendance. This report contains the final version of the group reports, incorporating the results of the overall review by all the workshop participants.

  7. Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957.16 acres of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC), a non-profit community organization, for a period of 10 years, with an option for renewal. ETEC proposes to develop an industrial park on the leased site to provide employment opportunities for DOE and contractor employees affected by decreased federal funding. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA and implementation of mitigation measures defined in this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this mitigated FONSI. DOE will implement a Mitigation Action Plan for this project and provide annual reports on mitigation and monitoring.

  8. Certification report for final closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the Geotek Engineering Company, Inc., (Geotek) record of activities to support certification of final closure Of the subject Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II. Ex as noted herein, final closure of the landfill was completed in accordance with the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill 11 Closure/Post Closure Plan, Revision 2, submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on April 14, 1992, and approved by TDEC on May 27, 1994 (the ``Closure Plan``). minor modification to the Closure Plan allowing partial closure of the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II (Phase 1) was approved by TDEC on August 3, 1994. The Phase I portion of the closure for the subject landfill was completed on March 25, 1995. A closure certification report entitled Certification Report for Partial Closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was submitted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES) on March 28, 1995. The final closure represents the completion of the closure activities for the entire Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II Site. The contents of this report and accompanying certification are based on observations by Geotek engineers and geologists during closure activities and on review of reports, records, laboratory test results, and other information furnished to Geotek by LMES.

  9. Characterization plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Area-Wide Groundwater Program, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This characterization plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the characterization plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide subsequent GWOU remedial investigations. The plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It is important to note that the characterization plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. As such, remedial investigations will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This characterization plan outlines the overall strategy for the remedial investigations and defines tasks that are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  10. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-792 Switchyard Complex, which includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-79 1-B building, the K-796-A building, and the K-792 Northern Expansion Area located in the northwestern portion of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The total area of the property is approximately 19.91 acres. DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land area and buildings to the Heritage Center, LLC (Heritage Center), a subsidiary corporation of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned facility at ETTP to a non-federal entity. The area proposed for title transfer includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-792 Northern Expansion Area, Bldg. K-791-B, Bldg. K-796-A, and the underlying property known as the underlying fee. Located within the K-792 Switchyard footprint but not included in the transfer are Bldg. K-131 0-MP and Bldg. K- 131 0-MQ, two buildings owned by a private company that leases space in the northern portion of the Switchyard. The transfer footprint is bounded by Perimeter Road to the north and west, the parking area for Portal 8 to the south, and primarily the former K-792 Powerhouse Complex and Avenue 'U' North to the east; however, the eastern boundary along the Northern Expansion area has no physical features associated with it. Zone 2 remedial action objectives were developed by the DVS to support the future use of ETTP as a mixed-use commercial and industrial park. Therefore, remediation criteria were designed for the protection of the future industrial worker under the assumption the worker normally would not have the potential for exposure to soils at depths below 10 ft below ground surface (bgs). Accordingly, land use controls (LUCs) have been established to restrict disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to limit future land use to industriallcornmercial activities. Where the need for LUCs below 10 ft bgs is not warranted, this is so stated and explained. Once all actions associated with the DVS for Zone 1 and Zone 2 are completed and the data support it, there will be a re-evaluation with EPA and TDEC for the restriction on excavation below 10 ft. The DVS process and the preparation of this report included visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, a detailed records search, sampling and analysis of soils, radiological walkover surveys, and a risk evaluation. Resources evaluated as part of the records search included Federal Government records, title documents, aerial photographs that may reflect prior uses, and interviews with current and former employees 1 involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed of. In addition, radiological surveys of Bldgs. K-791-B and K-796-A were conducted to assess the buildings radiological condition. Soil vapor sampling and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) swipe sampling also were conducted within the buildings. Based on the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the existing information, including discussions and interviews referenced herein, and evaluation of the data gathered in preparation of the environmental baseline survey (EBS) for the K-792 Switchyard Complex, DOE recommends the following: Due to the uncertainty associated with the nature of the on-site groundwater and the need to evaluate and possibly address groundwater in the future, DOE recommends that the transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex be achieved by a covenant deferral per the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Sect. 120(h)(3)(c). Land use restrictions associated with the covenant deferral are described.

  11. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  12. MARSAME References 10 CFR 20.1003. Standards for Protection Against Radiation, Definitions. Code of Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/cfr/part071/full-text.html (accessed October 24, 2008). 10 CFR 820. Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activity:2.1.1.3.8.9.25.22 (accessed October 24, 2008). Abelquist, E. 2001. Decommissioning Health Physics: A Handbook for MARSSIM

  13. SUGGESTIONS FOR WIRING ENPHASE MICROINVERTERS Code references are to the 2008 NEC except where noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    with the various inverter modules. I have four of these inverters connected to Sharp PV modules and bolted inverters attached. These combinations of PV modules and microinverters do not meet the definition or requirements associated with true AC PV Modules as defined in 690.2 and in 690.6. Instructions supplied

  14. Clark County- Energy Conservation Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2010, Clark County adopted Ordinance 3897, implementing the Southern Nevada version of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for both residential and commercial buildings...

  15. Nonbinary Codeword Stabilized Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie Chen; Bei Zeng; Isaac L. Chuang

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The codeword stabilized (CWS) quantum codes formalism presents a unifying approach to both additive and nonadditive quantum error-correcting codes (arXiv:0708.1021 [quant-ph]), but only for binary states. Here we generalize the CWS framework to the nonbinary case (of both prime and nonprime dimension) and map the search for nonbinary quantum codes to a corresponding search problem for classical nonbinary codes with specific error patterns. We show that while the additivity properties of nonbinary CWS codes are similar to the binary case, the structural properties of the nonbinary codes differ substantially from the binary case, even for prime dimensions. In particular, we identify specific structure patterns of stabilizer groups, based on which efficient constructions might be possible for codes that encode more dimensions than any stabilizer codes of the same length and distance; similar methods cannot be applied in the binary case. Understanding of these structural properties can help prune the search space and facilitate the identification of good nonbinary CWS codes.

  16. Marin County- Solar Access Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marin County's Energy Conservation Code is designed to assure new subdivisions provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision to the extent feasible. ...

  17. Quantum Quasi-Cyclic LDPC Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manabu Hagiwara; Hideki Imai

    2010-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a construction of a pair of "regular" quasi-cyclic LDPC codes as ingredient codes for a quantum error-correcting code is proposed. That is, we find quantum regular LDPC codes with various weight distributions. Furthermore our proposed codes have lots of variations for length, code rate. These codes are obtained by a descrete mathematical characterization for model matrices of quasi-cyclic LDPC codes. Our proposed codes achieve a bounded distance decoding (BDD) bound, or known as VG bound, and achieve a lower bound of the code length.

  18. Super Special Codes using Super Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; K. Ilanthenral

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The new classes of super special codes are constructed in this book using the specially constructed super special vector spaces. These codes mainly use the super matrices. These codes can be realized as a special type of concatenated codes. This book has four chapters. In chapter one basic properties of codes and super matrices are given. A new type of super special vector space is constructed in chapter two of this book. Three new classes of super special codes namely, super special row code, super special column code and super special codes are introduced in chapter three. Applications of these codes are given in the final chapter.

  19. On the logical operators of quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark M. Wilde

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I show how applying a symplectic Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization to the normalizer of a quantum code gives a different way of determining the code's logical operators. This approach may be more natural in the setting where we produce a quantum code from classical codes because the generator matrices of the classical codes form the normalizer of the resulting quantum code. This technique is particularly useful in determining the logical operators of an entanglement-assisted code produced from two classical binary codes or from one classical quaternary code. Finally, this approach gives additional formulas for computing the amount of entanglement that an entanglement-assisted code requires.

  20. Closure certification report for the Bear Creek burial grounds B area and walk-in pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 5, 1993, the revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1100&D3 and Y/ER-53&D3, was approved by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The closure activities described in that closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for B Area and Walk-In Pits (WIPs), including placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs.

  1. Non-Residential Energy Code National and Regional Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-Residential Energy Code Comparison National and Regional Codes David Baylon Mike Kennedy #12 2003 · ASHRAE 90.1 2001 & addenda · E-Benchmark Guidelines (NBI) #12;Approach · Comparison of the State;Approach (cont.) · Provisions compared ­ Lighting power ­ Lighting controls ­ Mechanical systems ­ Building

  2. Building and Facility Codes Code Building Location Bldg # Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Building and Facility Codes Code Building Location Bldg # Coordinates APM Applied Physics & Mathematics Building Muir 249 F7 ASANT Asante Hall Eleanor Roosevelt 446 F5 BIO Biology Building Muir 259 F7 BIRCH Birch Aquarium SIO 2300 S-D7 BONN Bonner Hall Revelle 131 G8 BSB Biomedical Sciences Building

  3. Space time coded code division multiplexing on SC140 DSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Murali P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this research is to design a high data rate wireless communication system for multi-path fading channels. Code-division multiplexing is proposed as a modulation scheme for a space-time coded multiple antenna system that would guarantee...

  4. Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division...

  5. Weight Distribution of a Class of Binary Linear Block Codes Formed from RCPC Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yushi Dr.; Cosman, Pamela C; Milstein, Laurence B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formed from convolutional codes,” IEEE Trans. Commun. , vol.terminated convolutional codes,” IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory,decoding of linear block codes and related soft- decision

  6. Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The monitoring data were collected for the multiple programmatic purposes of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) and have been reported in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Annual Monitoring report presents only the results of the monitoring data evaluations required for waste management sites addressed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime. The Annual Monitoring Report also serves as a consolidated reference for the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained throughout the Bear Creek Regime under the auspices of the Y-12 GWPP. This report provides an evaluation of the CY 1996 monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater and surface water quality and long-term concentration trends of regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

  7. A Short Reference Grammar of Standard Slovene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Marc L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference grammar of the Slovene language designed for advanced-level language users and linguists to compare semantic categories across languages.

  8. FAQS Reference Guide – General Technical Base

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the December 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Reference Model Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic reference models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  11. Introduction Space Time Codes Space Time Coding with Feedback New Thoughts Summary Space-Time Coding for Multi-Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veeravalli, Venugopal

    Introduction Space Time Codes Space Time Coding with Feedback New Thoughts Summary Space 2007 #12;Introduction Space Time Codes Space Time Coding with Feedback New Thoughts Summary MIMO: Diversity vs Multiplexing Multiplexing Diversity Pictures taken from lectures notes on Space Time Coding

  12. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer program LFSC (Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  13. Stabilizer Codes over Frobenius Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadella, Sushma

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    now, the methods for quantum error correction were mainly based on quantum codes that rely on the arithmetic in finite fields. In contrast, this thesis aims to develop a basic framework for quantum error correcting codes over a class of rings known...

  14. Entanglement boosts quantum turbo codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Mark M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the unexpected breakdowns in the existing theory of quantum serial turbo coding is that a quantum convolutional encoder cannot simultaneously be recursive and non-catastrophic. These properties are essential for a quantum turbo code to have an unbounded minimum distance and for its iterative decoding algorithm to converge, respectively. Here, we show that the entanglement-assisted paradigm gives a theoretical and practical "turbo boost" to these codes, in the sense that an entanglement-assisted quantum (EAQ) convolutional encoder can possess both of the aforementioned desirable properties, and simulation results indicate that entanglement-assisted turbo codes can operate reliably in a noise regime 5.5 dB beyond that of standard quantum turbo codes. Entanglement is the resource that enables a convolutional encoder to satisfy both properties because an encoder acting on only information qubits, classical bits, gauge qubits, and ancilla qubits cannot simultaneously satisfy them. We give several examples o...

  15. Environmental Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park Year One - Execution with Certainty SM - 13120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, A.L. [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-7294 (United States)] [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-7294 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 1, 2011, URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) began its five-year, $1.4 billion cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. UCOR will close out cleanup operations that began in 1998 under a previous contract. When the Contract Base scope of work [1] is completed in 2016, the K-25 gaseous diffusion building will have been demolished and all waste dispositioned, demolition will have started on the K-27 gaseous diffusion building, all contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic waste in inventory (approximately 500 cubic meters) will have been transferred to the Transuranic Waste Processing Center, previously designated 'No-Path-To-Disposition Waste' will have been dispositioned to the extent possible, and UCOR will have managed DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)- owned facilities at ETTP, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Y-12 National Security Complex in a safe and cost-effective manner. Since assuming its responsibilities as the ETTP cleanup contractor, UCOR has completed its life-cycle Performance Measurement Baseline; received its Earned Value Management System (EVMS) certification; advanced the deactivation and demolition (D and D) of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building; recovered and completed the Tank W-1A and K-1070-B Burial Ground remediation projects; characterized, packaged, and shipped contact-handled transuranic waste to the Transuranic Waste Processing Center; disposed of more than 90,000 cubic yards of cleanup waste while managing the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF); and provided operations, surveillance, and maintenance activities at DOE EM facilities at ETTP, ORNL, and the Y-12 National Security Complex. Project performance as of December 31, 2012 has been excellent: - Cost Performance Index - 1.06; - Schedule Performance Index - 1.02. At the same time, since safety is the foundation of all cleanup work, UCOR's safety record goes hand in hand with its excellent project performance. Through calendar year 2012, UCOR's recordable injury rate was 0.33, and the company has worked close to 4 million hours without a lost work day injury. UCOR's safety record is one of the best in the DOE EM Complex. This performance was due, in large part, to the people and processes URS and CH2M HILL, the parent companies of UCOR, brought to the project. Key approaches included: - Selected and deployed experienced staff in key leadership positions throughout the organization; - Approached 'Transition' as the 'true' beginning of the cleanup project - kicking off a number of project initiatives such as Partnering, PMB development, D and D Plan execution, etc. - Established a project baseline for performance measurement and obtained EVMS certification in record time; - Determined material differences and changed conditions that warranted contract change - then quickly addressed these changes with the DOE client; - Aligned the project and the contract within one year - also done in record time; - Implemented Safety Trained Supervisor and Safety Conscious Work Environment Programs, and kicked off the pursuit of certification under DOE's Voluntary Protection Program. (authors)

  16. FAQS Reference Guide - Quality Assurance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reference Guide - Quality Assurance FAQS Reference Guide - Quality Assurance This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the April 2002 edition...

  17. On Quantum and Classical BCH Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salah A. Aly; Andreas Klappenecker; Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli

    2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical BCH codes that contain their (Euclidean or Hermitian) dual codes can be used to construct quantum stabilizer codes; this correspondence studies the properties of such codes. It is shown that a BCH code of length n can contain its dual code only if its designed distance d=O(sqrt(n)), and the converse is proved in the case of narrow-sense codes. Furthermore, the dimension of narrow-sense BCH codes with small design distance is completely determined, and - consequently - the bounds on their minimum distance are improved. These results make it possible to determine the parameters of quantum BCH codes in terms of their design parameters.

  18. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

  19. Explosive Demolition of a Fire-Water Tower At East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooksbank, R.D.; Rood, M.S.; Amrit, S.K.; Harper, M.S.; Dypolt, D.J.; Brehse, Mike [Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, P.O. Box 4699 Oak Ridge, TN 37931 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 17, 2006, the Department of Energy (DOE) successfully demolished a {approx}60 year old fire-water tower (K-1206-E), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, TN, using strategically placed explosive charges. The subject demolition project was executed by MCM Management Corporation and Demolition Dynamics under the management of DoE's prime contractor Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). The K-1206-E Fire Water Tower (Tower) supported the ETTP fire water protection system from the mid- 1950's until 1991. The 378,500-L (100,000-gallon) Tower, elevated 53-m (175-feet) above grade, was located in a grassy area within 152-m (500-feet) of several other occupied facilities. Electrical, control circuits and supply water servicing the Tower were deactivated in 2003. Free liquids and sludge were removed from the tank prior to demolition. Demolition of a facility employing explosive demolition at a federal site in the 'post-9/11 era' was a substantial challenge. The subject paper discusses: - the planning and coordination steps that were taken to successfully overcome the challenges prior to the demolition of the empty, deactivated Tower; - the method used for the engineered demolition of the Tower; and - the factors responsible for the successful execution of this demolition project. At least two previous attempts were made to demolish the Tower. In the first attempt, the execution of the project was deferred by the re-allocation of funds. In the subsequent attempt in 2004, the execution of this project was postponed due to concerns that an adjacent facility would have to shut down operations during the duration of mobilization and execution of the project and thereby incur potential financial losses. A total of 51 cubic meters (1,800 cubic feet) of demolition debris was generated, which was compliantly disposed of at a local landfill followed by site restoration.

  20. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Building Standards Code 2010 California Residential Code Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;2 #121 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Building Code 2010 California;3 CHAPTER 1 SCOPE AND ADMINISTRATION DIVISION I CALIFORNIA ADMINISTRATION No San Francisco Building Code