National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reference case nuclear

  1. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  2. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014...

  3. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu) Sector and source...

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 888 867 902 891 901 900 924 0.2 United States a 790 769 804 808 808 812 833 0.3 Canada 88 89 86 72 72 67 62 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 9 8 12 12 20 20 29 4.5 OECD Europe 861 837

  5. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  6. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 117 115 113 115 114 118 0.0 United States a 102 102 101 101 102 102 105 0.1 Canada 13 14 12 10 10 10 9 -1.5 Mexico and

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 121 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 31.8 35.7 38.6 42.1 44.6 47.3 1.4 United States a 24.0 28.7

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Appendix A Table A2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.3 44.6 46.4 46.1 46.0 46.2 46.7 0.2 Natural gas 31.8 32.8 33.9 35.5 37.7 39.5 41.4 0.8 Coal 21.0 18.7 20.3 20.5 20.1 20.0 20.0 0.2 Nuclear 9.4 9.2 9.5 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.7 0.2 Other 13.1 12.9 15.6 16.6 17.5 18.6 20.3 1.6 Total 120.6 118.1 125.7 128.1 130.7

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 484 489 523 544 564 581 597 0.7 United States a 312 315 334 347 359 370 380 0.7 Canada 34 35 38 39 41 43 44 0.8 Mexico and Chile 137 139 151 158 164 169 173 0.8 OECD Europe 548 550 565 571 576 579 581

  10. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.7 128.1 130.7 133.8 138.1 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.0 102.9 103.8 105.7 0.4 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.1 15.6 16.3 17.1 18.1 0.8 Mexico and Chile 9.3

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,006 18,440 22,566 25,585 28,757 32,166 36,120 2.4 United States a 15,021 15,369 18,801 21,295 23,894 26,659 29,898 2.4 Canada 1,662 1,694 2,024 2,240 2,470 2,730 3,012 2.1 Mexico

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 30.8 31.8 32.8 34.3 36.5 38.2 40.1 0.8 United States a 24.5 25.5 26.1 26.9 28.1 28.8 29.7 0.5 Canada 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.6 1.5 Mexico and Chile 2.6 2.6 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.2 4.8

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 31.8 35.7 38.6 42.1 44.6 47.3 1.4 United States a 24.0 28.7 30.4 32.9 34.0 35.3 1.4 Canada 6.1 5.8 6.6 7.2 7.9 8.6 1.2 Mexico 1.7 1.2 1.5 2.0 2.6 3.3

  14. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I3. World other natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 12.0 9.8 9.5 10.7 10.3 10.3 -0.5 United States a 7.5 6.6 6.5 7.8 7.5 7.5 0.0 Canada 2.8 2.0 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.5 -2.2 Mexico 1.7 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 -1.2

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,558 6,343 6,569 6,620 6,675 6,769 6,887 0.3 United States a 5,483 5,272 5,499 5,511 5,514 5,521 5,549 0.2 Canada 562 563 557 577 587 621 647 0.5 Mexico and

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,666 1,715 1,766 1,849 1,965 2,063 2,167 0.8 United States a 1,305 1,363 1,394 1,432 1,497 1,538 1,586 0.5 Canada 205 205 213 234 261 287 310 1.5 Mexico and Chile 156 147 158 184 207 238 271 2.2 OECD Europe 1,016 970

  17. References | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    References U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System References Additional information related to the NMMSS may be located in the publications listed below. By referencing these documents, a more extensive understanding of the system may be gained. Other references extracted from DOE M 470.4-6 and used within the industry have also been included. "Agreement between the United States of America and the IAEA for the

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G1. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 39.2 41.4 44.6 48.7 52.2 1.2 Middle East 26.2 26.6 29.8

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G3. International other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.2 5.6 1.3 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2011-40 (2010 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38,441 39,055 44,716 48,842 53,114 57,747 63,278 1.7 United States a 48,094 48,865 56,285 61,453 66,639 72,107

  1. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,258 1,278 1,330 1,371 1,436 1,517 1,622 0.9 United States a 1,046 1,063 1,079 1,091 1,133 1,187 1,261 0.6 Canada 133 135

  2. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 41 42 45 49 52 57 59 1.2 United States a 36 37 39 39 39 40 41 0.4 Canada 4 4 5 8 12 15 16 4.9 Mexico and Chile 1 1

  3. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fred electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 88 88 66 37 36 35 35 -3.3 United States a 30 23 18 18 18 18 18 -0.9 Canada 6 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico and

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H15. World net coal-fred electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,857 1,630 1,808 1,820 1,786 1,778 1,769 0.3 United States a 1,733 1,514 1,709 1,724 1,713 1,704 1,702 0.4

  5. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H17. World net hydroelectric and other renewable electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,004 987 1,278 1,376 1,472 1,598 1,763 2.1 United States a 535 520 704 741 781 848 934 2.1 Canada 398 397 459 491 524 557 606 1.5 Mexico and Chile 71 69 115 144

  6. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H19. World net wind-powered electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 142 156 295 327 354 404 460 3.9 United States a 120 141 232 235 245 278 319 3.0 Canada 20 11 39 46 53 60 66

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6 12 57 65 79 96 120 8.7 United States a 6 11 51 59 71 88 110 8.5 Canada 0 0 3 3 4 5 5 10.3 Mexico and Chile 0 0 3

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fred generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 410 420 455 488 534 584 640 1.5 United States a 358 367 393 409 444 481 525 1.3 Canada 20 20 25 30 36 41 46 3.0

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 171 171 183 187 192 198 210 0.7 United States a 78 78 80 80 80 80 80 0.1 Canada 75 75 83 85 88 90 99 1.0 Mexico and

  10. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H9. World installed geothermal generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 3 3 5 7 9 10 11 4.3 United States a 3 3 4 5 7 8 9 4.6 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - Mexico and Chile 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3.3 OECD

  11. FAQS Reference Guide – Nuclear Safety Specialist

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the November 2007 edition of DOE Standard DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 53.6 53.0 52.3 51.7 51.1 50.6 49.9 -0.2 United States a 55.7 55.0 54.5 54.0 53.6 53.2 52.5 -0.2 Canada 38.8 38.9 37.0 37.0 36.1 36.2 35.8 -0.3 Mexico

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Appendix A Table A3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 23,390 26,577 29,942 33,569 37,770 2.5 United States a 15,021 15,369 18,801 21,295 23,894 26,659 29,898 2.4 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,700 1,881 2,074 2,293 2,529 2.1 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,890 3,400 3,974 4,618

  14. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Appendix A Table A11. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 2,881 2,838 2,861 2,812 2,785 2,794 2,812 0.0 United States a 2,291 2,240 2,269 2,227 2,182 2,163 2,147 -0.2 Canada 289 291 291 289 290 295 304 0.2 Mexico and Chile 301 307 301 296 313 335 361 0.6 OECD Europe 1,969 1,903 1,823 1,804

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix A Table A13. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 2,000 1,779 1,931 1,947 1,912 1,901 1,896 0.2 United States a 1,876 1,657 1,824 1,840 1,822 1,808 1,804 0.3 Canada 68 68 53 54 36 38 33 -2.5 Mexico and Chile 56 54 53 53 54 55 58 0.3 OECD Europe 1,208 1,251 1,228 1,244 1,219 1,195 1,178

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix J Table J2. World energy intensity by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (thousand Btu per 2010 dollar of GDP) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6.5 6.2 5.4 4.8 4.4 4.0 3.7 -1.9 United States a 6.4 6.1 5.4 4.8 4.3 3.9 3.5 -2.0 Canada 10.4 10.2 8.9 8.3 7.8 7.5 7.1 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 4.2 4.0 3.4 3.1 2.9 2.8 2.7 -1.4 OECD Europe 4.4 4.4 3.9 3.7 3.5 3.3 3.2 -1.1 OECD Asia 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.3 5.1 4.9 4.8 -0.5

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    30 Appendix A Table A5. World liquids consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.6 23.2 24.4 24.4 24.3 24.4 24.6 0.2 United States a 18.9 18.5 19.6 19.6 19.4 19.3 19.3 0.2 Canada 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 0.2 Mexico and Chile 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 0.6 OECD Europe 14.5 14.1 13.7 13.6 13.7 13.8 14.0 0.0 OECD Asia 7.9 8.2 7.7 7.5 7.5 7.5

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    86 Appendix G Table G2. World crude oil a production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 32.2 33.4 34.9 36.8 39.7 43.4 46.6 1.2 Middle East 22.9 23.2 26.2 27.9 30.3 33.4 35.6 1.5 North Africa 2.0 2.9 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 -1.0 West Africa 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.7 5.1 0.6 South America 3.0 3.0 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.6

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix I Table I2. World tight gas, shale gas and coalbed methane production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 19.8 26.0 29.0 31.4 34.3 37.0 2.3 United States a 16.6 22.1 23.9 25.1 26.5 27.8 1.9 Canada 3.3 3.8 4.9 5.5 6.3 7.0 2.8 Mexico 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.8 1.4 2.2 - Chile 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - OECD Europe 0.0 0.5 1.7 3.3 4.6 5.5 21.8 North Europe 0.0 0.5

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Appendix I Table I4. World net trade in natural gas by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 0.3 -2.6 -4.0 -5.4 -6.2 -6.9 - United States a 1.5 -2.6 -3.5 -4.8 -5.2 -5.6 - Canada -2.3 -1.9 -2.3 -2.4 -2.7 -2.8 0.7 Mexico 1.0 1.7 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.1 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.7 OECD Europe 7.8 10.9 11.9 12.7 13.0 14.0 2.1 North Europe 2.4 5.2 5.9 6.1 6.1 6.3 3.5

  1. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix A Table A7. World coal consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 21.0 18.7 20.3 20.5 20.1 20.0 20.0 0.2 United States a 19.6 17.3 19.2 19.3 19.2 19.0 19.0 0.3 Canada 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 -2.5 Mexico and Chile 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 OECD Europe 12.9 13.4 13.2 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.6 -0.2 OECD Asia 9.7 9.7 10.2 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 0.1

  2. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Appendix A Table A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 13.1 12.9 15.6 16.6 17.5 18.6 20.3 1.6 United States a 7.9 7.7 9.3 9.7 9.9 10.4 11.3 1.4 Canada 4.3 4.2 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.3 1.4 Mexico and Chile 0.9 1.0 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.7 OECD Europe 10.7 11.5 15.7 16.7 17.3 18.5 19.6 1.9 OECD Asia

  3. Reference Documents | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reference Documents Summary References Main Draft SEIS References Additional SEIS References Appendix C References Appendix D References Appendix E References Appendix F References Learn More Summary References Main Draft SEIS References Appendix C References Appendix D References Appendix E References Appendix F References Additional SEIS references

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C Low Economic Growth case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 47 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 123.3 123.9 124.7 126.3 128.8 0.3 United States a 96.8 94.4 98.7

  5. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    D High Oil Price case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.3 127.9 130.8 135.5 142.1 0.7 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.2 103.3

  6. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030...

  7. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by region and end-use sector, High Oil Price case, 2010-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD...

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E Low Oil Price case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 57 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-s40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 126.5 129.2 131.8 135.0 138.9 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 101.2 102.7 103.6 104.6

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G7. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 43.2 45.6 49.9 54.7 59.4 1.7 Middle East 26.2 26.6 31.1

  10. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G9. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.9 4.8 0.8 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7 4.0

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix H Table H16. World net nuclear electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 888 867 902 891 901 900 924 0.2 United States a 790 769 804 808 808 812 833 0.3 Canada 88 89 86 72 72 67 62 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 9 8 12 12 20 20 29 4.5 OECD Europe 861 837 845 879 930 948 896 0.2 OECD Asia 304 161 381 437 457 450 427 3.5 Japan 156 17

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-s40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 126.5 129.2 131.8 135.0 138.9 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 101.2 102.7 103.6 104.6 106.1 0.4 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.3 15.8 16.5 17.4 18.3 0.8 Mexico and

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E3. World liquids consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.6 23.2 24.9 25.0 25.2 25.5 26.1 0.4 United States a 18.9 18.5 20.0 20.1 20.1 20.2 20.4 0.4 Canada 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.4 Mexico and Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.6

  14. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 123.3 123.9 124.7 126.3 128.8 0.3 United States a 96.8 94.4 98.7 98.1 97.5 97.4 98.0 0.1 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.0 15.4 15.9 16.6 17.3 0.6 Mexico

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G5. World crude oil a production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 32.2 33.4 30.7 30.9 32.4 33.4 34.4 0.1 Middle East 22.9 23.2 22.7 23.0 24.4 25.2

  16. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Colon, Carlos Jové; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-08

    properties (parameters) used in these models are different, which not only make inter-model comparisons difficult, but also compromise the applicability of the lessons learned from one model to another model. The establishment of a reference case would therefore be helpful to set up a baseline for model development. A generic salt repository reference case was developed in Freeze et al. (2013) and the generic argillite repository reference case is presented in this report. The definition of a reference case requires the characterization of the waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, EBS backfill, host rock, and biosphere. This report mainly documents the processes in EBS bentonite and host rock that are potentially important for performance assessment and properties that are needed to describe these processes, with brief description other components such as waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, aquifer, and biosphere. A thorough description of the generic argillite repository reference case will be given in Jové Colon et al. (2014).

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    58 Appendix E Table E2. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 23,330 26,574 29,998 33,626 37,702 2.5 United States a 15,021 15,369 18,742 21,299 23,963 26,735 29,885 2.4 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,700 1,881 2,073 2,290 2,521 2.1 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,889 3,394 3,962

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix C Table C2. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 22,285 24,599 27,041 29,850 33,088 2.0 United States a 15,021 15,369 17,747 19,441 21,224 23,305 25,763 1.9 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,682 1,841 2,005 2,186 2,375 1.8 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,856 3,317

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix G Table G4. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 35.3 35.8 37.7 39.3 40.4 0.3 Middle East 26.2 26.6 26.5 27.0 28.6 29.8 30.6 0.5 North Africa 2.4 3.3 2.1 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 -1.4 West Africa 4.3 4.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 -0.2 South America 3.2 3.2

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix G Table G6. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.8 5.9 1.6 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.3 1.3 Liquids from renewable sources c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Liquids from coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Liquids

  1. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix G Table G8. World crude oil a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 32.2 33.4 38.9 41.1 45.3 49.7 54.5 1.8 Middle East 22.9 23.2 27.8 28.9 32.2 35.6 38.5 1.8 North Africa 2.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.3 0.5 West Africa 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.9 5.5 6.3 1.3 South America 3.0 3.0 3.8 4.7 5.1 5.6

  2. REFERENCE CASES FOR USE IN THE CEMENTITOUS PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Kosson, D.; Garrabrants, A.

    2010-08-31

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Project (CBP) is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institution cross cutting collaborative effort supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The period of performance is >100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management. The CBP has defined a set of reference cases to provide the following functions: (i) a common set of system configurations to illustrate the methods and tools developed by the CBP, (ii) a common basis for evaluating methodology for uncertainty characterization, (iii) a common set of cases to develop a complete set of parameter and changes in parameters as a function of time and changing conditions, (iv) a basis for experiments and model validation, and (v) a basis for improving conceptual models and reducing model uncertainties. These reference cases include the following two reference disposal units and a reference storage unit: (i) a cementitious low activity waste form in a reinforced concrete disposal vault, (ii) a concrete vault containing a steel high-level waste tank filled with grout (closed high-level waste tank), and (iii) a spent nuclear fuel basin during operation. Each case provides a different set of desired performance characteristics and interfaces between materials and with the environment. Examples of concretes, grout fills and a cementitious waste form are identified for the relevant reference case configurations.

  3. REFERENCE CASES FOR USE IN THE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C

    2009-01-06

    The Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) is a multidisciplinary cross cutting project initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The period of performance is >100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management. The CBP has defined a set of reference cases to provide the following functions: (1) a common set of system configurations to illustrate the methods and tools developed by the CBP, (2) a common basis for evaluating methodology for uncertainty characterization, (3) a common set of cases to develop a complete set of parameter and changes in parameters as a function of time and changing conditions, and (4) a basis for experiments and model validation, and (5) a basis for improving conceptual models and reducing model uncertainties. These reference cases include the following two reference disposal units and a reference storage unit: (1) a cementitious low activity waste form in a reinforced concrete disposal vault, (2) a concrete vault containing a steel high-level waste tank filled with grout (closed high-level waste tank), and (3) a spent nuclear fuel basin during operation. Each case provides a different set of desired performance characteristics and interfaces between materials and with the environment. Examples of concretes, grout fills and a cementitious waste form are identified for the relevant reference case configurations.

  4. Appendix E References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E References Crosswalk of Appendix E References to Main DSEIS Reference File name (Main DSEIS) or file name in Appendix E folder DOE (U.S. Department of Energy) 1999. Final ...

  5. Appendix D References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... NRC (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission) 1975. Reactor Safety Study: An Assessment of Accident Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400, NUREG-75014. October. NRC ...

  6. Appendix F References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Survey of Transportation of Radioactive Materials to and from Nuclear Power Plants. ... UMTRI 2003-6. Prepared for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration by the ...

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Case CO 2 Fee 10ton CO 2 Fee 25ton Coal plant retirements 8 gigawatts Source: EIA, ... gas combined-cycle plants to coal-fired steam turbines in five cases, 2008-2040 9 ...

  8. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission intensity index, 20051 Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case History Projections 2013 Carbon dioxide emissions per 2009 dollar GDP Energy use per 2009...

  9. Nuclear reference materials to meet the changing needs of the global nuclear community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, H.R.; Gradle, C.G.; Narayanan, U.I.; Oldham, R.D.; Mitchell, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) serves as the US Government`s Certifying Authority for nuclear reference materials and measurement calibration standards. In this role, NBL provides nuclear reference materials certified for chemical and/or isotopic compositions traceable to a nationally accepted, internationally compatible reference base. Emphasis is now changing as to the types of traceable nuclear reference materials needed as operations change within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and at nuclear facilities around the world. Environmental and waste minimization issues, facilities and materials transitioning from processing to storage modes with corresponding changes in the types of measurements being performed, emphasis on requirements for characterization of waste materials, difficulties in transporting nuclear materials, and International factors, including International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspection of excess US nuclear materials, are all contributing influences. During these changing times, ft is critical that traceable reference materials be provided for calibration or validation of the performance of measurement systems. This paper will describe actions taken and planned to meet the changing reference material needs of the global nuclear community.

  10. Draft SPD Supplemental EIS Master Reference List | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Draft SPD Supplemental EIS Master Reference List References for Chapters 1 - 5 References for Appendix A References for Appendix B References for Appendix C References for Appendix D References for Appendix E References for Appendix F References for Appendix G References for Appendix H References for Appendix I References for Appendix J References for Summary Learn More SPD SEIS References for Appendix C SPD SEIS References for Appendix D SPD SEIS References

  11. Nuclear reference materials to meet the changing needs of the global nuclear community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, H.R.; Gradle, C.G.; Narayanan, U.I.; Oldham, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) serves as the U.S. Government`s certifying authority for nuclear reference materials and measurement calibration standards. In this role, NBL provides nuclear reference materials certified for chemical and/or isotopic compositions traceable to a nationally accepted, internationally compatible reference base. Emphasis is now changing as to the types of traceable nuclear reference materials needed as operations change within the Department of Energy complex and at nuclear facilities around the world. New challenges include: environmental and waste minimization issues, facilities and materials transitioning from processing to storage modes with corresponding changes in the types of measurements being performed, emphasis on requirements for characterization of waste materials, and difficulties in transporting nuclear materials and international factors, including IAEA influences. During these changing times, it is critical that traceable reference materials be provided for calibration or validation of the performance of measurement systems. This paper will describe actions taken and planned to meet the changing reference material needs of the global nuclear community.

  12. Nuclear Science References (NSR) from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database is an indexed bibiliography of primary and secondary references in nuclear physics research. About 80 journals are regularly scanned for articles. Recent references are added on a weekly basis. Approximately 4300 entries are added to the database annually. In general, articles are included in NSR if they include measured, calculated, or deduced quantitative nuclear structure or reaction data. Papers that apply previously known data are generally not included. Examples of this include neutron activation analysis using known cross sections or radiological dating using known half-lives. The database can be searched like a normal bibliographic database but can also be searched by the data that distinguishes it, data such as the nuclide, target/parent/daughter, reaction, incident particles, and outgoing particles. (Specialized Interface) [Taken from the NSR Help pages at http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr/nsr_help.jsp

  13. SPD SEIS References for Appendix I | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Institute), 2002, Deterring Terrorism: Aircraft Crash Impact Analyses Demonstrate Nuclear Power Plant's Structural Strength, December. 444 NRC (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory...

  14. SPD SEIS References for Appendix J | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17. 462 NRC (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission), 2012c, "Actions in Response to the Japan Nuclear Accident" (accessed May 9, 2012, http:www.nrc.govreactorsoperating...

  15. Main Draft SEIS References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Survey of the TVA Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant, Hamilton County, Tennessee. March. ... NCDC (National Climatic Data Center) 2008. "Wind-Average Wind Speed (MPH)." Data through ...

  16. Preliminary Reference Case Results for Oil and Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Reference Case Results for Oil and Natural Gas AEO2014 Oil and Gas Supply Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis September 26, 2013 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AEO2014P uses ref2014.d092413a AEO2013 uses ref2013.d102312a Changes for AEO2014 2 * Revised shale & tight play resources (EURs, type curves) * Updated classification of shale gas, tight gas, &

  17. References & Links | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    References & Links 48CFR Chapter 9, Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) Department of Energy Acquisition Requirements (DEAR) DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program DOE Order 472.2, Personnel Security DOE Order 206.2 DOE Order 470.4B Executive Order 10865 Executive Order 12968 Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Federal Bureau of Investigations FIPS PUB 201-2, Personal Identity Verification (PIV) of Federal Employees and Contractors Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of

  18. Coal-by-Rail: A Business-as-Usual Reference Case | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal-by-Rail: A Business-as-Usual Reference Case Title Coal-by-Rail: A Business-as-Usual Reference Case Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2015 Authors Mintz, MM, Saricks,...

  19. Recent References: January through April 1992 (from Nuclear Data Sheets, v.66, issue 3, July 1992)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramavataram, S.

    1992-07-01

    In support of a continuing program of systematic evaluation of nuclear structure data, the National Nuclear Data Center maintains a complete computer file of references to the nuclear physics literature. Each reference is tagged by a keyword string, which indicates the kinds of data contained in the article. This master file of Nuclear Structure References (NSR) contains complete keyword indexes to literature published since 1969, with partial indexing of older references. 467 refs. This database record covers the entire volume 66, issue 3, July 1992. The publisher has assigned separate DOIs to each key section of this volume. They are: 1) Recent references January through April 1992, DOI 10.1016/S0090-3752(92)80087-Z; 2) Key numbers and keywords, DOI - 10.1016/S0090-3752(81)80088-2; 3) Reaction Index, DOI 10.1016/S0090-3752(92)80089-3; 4) References, DOI 10.1016/S0090-3752(92)80090-7; 5) Secondary Sources, DOI 10.1016/S0090-3752(92)80011-W.

  20. Student attitudes toward the threat of nuclear war: Friends as influential reference persons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marasch, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    A renewed interest in research into the psychology of the threat of nuclear war occurred in the past decade as national attention focused increasingly on the arms race between the US and the USSR. Some of this research began the task of exploring the social influences upon attitudes and responses to the nuclear threat. Research on friends as potential influences upon nuclear attitudes was minimal. The present study investigated the role of college friends as potential reference persons in the formation of nuclear attitudes. A battery of questionnaires addressing various nuclear war and non-nuclear war attitudes was completed by 200 student-friend dyads from introductory psychology and sociology courses at the University of North Dakota. Three hypotheses were presented in this study. One hypothesis was that students would perceive their friends as having similar attitudes toward the threat of nuclear war. A second hypothesis was that the actual attitudes between pairs of students and friends would be similar. The third hypothesis was that the attitudes would have become more similar over the course of the development of the friendship (as measured retrospectively). The first hypothesis was borne out by the data. The second and third hypotheses were not supported. There are several implications of the findings. One implication is that the nuclear issue may not be as salient to college students as other, more immediate, issues. Another implication is that a relative lack of communication between college students on political issues precludes more effective mutual influence upon the development and change of such attitudes. A false consensus bias appeared to be operative when the students perceived that their attitudes were similar. Further discussion is presented in regard to past and future psychological research upon nuclear war attitudes.

  1. Approved reference and testing materials for use in Nuclear Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Daniel, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    This document, addressed to members of the waste management research and development community summarizes reference and testing materials available from the Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center (MCC). These materials are furnished under the MCC's charter to distribute reference materials essential for quantitative evaluation of nuclear waste package materials under development in the US. Reference materials with known behavior in various standard waste management related tests are needed to ensure that individual testing programs are correctly performing those tests. Approved testing materials are provided to assist the projects in assembling materials data base of defensible accuracy and precision. This is the second issue of this publication. Eight new Approved Testing Materials are listed, and Spent Fuel is included as a separate section of Standard Materials because of its increasing importance as a potential repository storage form. A summary of current characterization information is provided for each material listed. Future issues will provide updates of the characterization status of the materials presented in this issue, and information about new standard materials as they are acquired. 7 references, 1 figure, 19 tables.

  2. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections March 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's

  3. Selected, annotated bibliography of studies relevant to the isolation of nuclear wastes. [705 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, L.K.; Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Faust, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    This annotated bibliography of 705 references represents the first in a series to be published by the Ecological Sciences Information Center containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information relevant to nuclear waste isolation. Most references discuss deep geologic disposal, with fewer studies of deep seabed disposal; space disposal is also included. The publication covers both domestic and foreign literature for the period 1954 to 1980. Major chapters selected are Chemical and Physical Aspects; Container Design and Performance; Disposal Site; Envirnmental Transport; General Studies and Reviews; Geology, Hydrology and Site Resources; Regulatory and Economic Aspects; Repository Design and Engineering; Transportation Technology; Waste Production; and Waste Treatment. Specialized data fields have been incorporated to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the Measured Radionuclides field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the Measured Parameters field. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. When the author is not given, the corporate affiliation appears first. If these two levels of authorship are not given, the title of the document is used as the identifying level. Indexes are provided for author(s), keywords, subject category, title, geographic location, measured parameters, measured radionuclides, and publication description.

  4. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Varga, Z.; Mayer, K.; Bonamici, C. E.; Hubert, A.; Hutcheon, I.; Kinman, W.; Kristo, M.; Pointurier, F.; Spencer, K.; Stanley, F.; et al

    2015-05-11

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the ²²⁰Th/²³⁴U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory proceduresmore » used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations.« less

  5. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varga, Z.; Mayer, K.; Bonamici, C. E.; Hubert, A.; Hutcheon, I.; Kinman, W.; Kristo, M.; Pointurier, F.; Spencer, K.; Stanley, F.; Steiner, R.; Tandon, L.; Williams, R.

    2015-05-11

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the ²²⁰Th/²³⁴U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory procedures used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations.

  6. Technical basis for cases N-629 and N-631 as an alternative for RTNDT reference temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkle, John Graham; Server, W. L.

    2007-01-01

    ASME Code Cases N-629/N-631, published in 1999, provided an important new approach to allow material specific, measured fracture toughness curves for ferritic steels in the code applications. This has enabled some of the nuclear power plants whose reactor pressure vessel materials reached a certain threshold level based on overly conservative rules to use an alternative RTNDT to justify continued operation of their plants. These code cases have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and these have been proposed to be codified in Appendix A and Appendix G of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This paper summarizes the basis of this approach for the record.

  7. Model-reference adaptive control applied to load-following of a space-nuclear power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.; Parlos, A.G.; New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies; Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power systems are presently being investigated as an alternative for both commercial and military space power systems because of their projected longevity of 7 to 10 years, their mass advantage over other space power sources at powers above approximately 25 kW{sub e}, and their ability to operate without direct illumination from the sun. These space-nuclear power systems are being designed to supply from tens of kilowatts to multimegawatts of power for continuous operation of seven years and more. Space-nuclear power systems designs that meet these requirements will not be available for refueling or maintenance during their lifetime. To ensure that the space-nuclear power system will operate safely and will respond in a predictable and desired manner, the design of the system's controller must account for changes in the system parameters over its lifetime. This paper applies model-reference adaptive control to an increase in the power demand by the load. A model-reference adaptive controller will force the actual space-nuclear power system to follow the predictable and desired response of a reference model, despite changes in the actual system's operating parameters. Included in this paper are the model-reference adaptive control algorithm, the description of the computer simulation of a space-nuclear power system and the reference model, and results that demonstrate the application of model-reference adaptive control to a change in the load power demand. The results demonstrate that model-reference adaptive control can ensure the transient response of the system despite differences between the design of the system and the as-built system as well as for variations in the systems parameters. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents

  9. Integrating Nuclear Energy to Oilfield Operations – Two Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Lee O. Nelson; Michael G. McKellar; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Mike W. Patterson

    2011-11-01

    Fossil fuel resources that require large energy inputs for extraction, such as the Canadian oil sands and the Green River oil shale resource in the western USA, could benefit from the use of nuclear power instead of power generated by natural gas combustion. This paper discusses the technical and economic aspects of integrating nuclear energy with oil sands operations and the development of oil shale resources. A high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) that produces heat in the form of high pressure steam (no electricity production) was selected as the nuclear power source for both fossil fuel resources. Both cases were based on 50,000 bbl/day output. The oil sands case was a steam-assisted, gravity-drainage (SAGD) operation located in the Canadian oil sands belt. The oil shale development was an in-situ oil shale retorting operation located in western Colorado, USA. The technical feasibility of the integrating nuclear power was assessed. The economic feasibility of each case was evaluated using a discounted cash flow, rate of return analysis. Integrating an HTGR to both the SAGD oil sands operation and the oil shale development was found to be technically feasible for both cases. In the oil sands case, integrating an HTGR eliminated natural gas combustion and associated CO2 emissions, although there were still some emissions associated with imported electrical power. In the in situ oil shale case, integrating an HTGR reduced CO2 emissions by 88% and increased natural gas production by 100%. Economic viabilities of both nuclear integrated cases were poorer than the non-nuclear-integrated cases when CO2 emissions were not taxed. However, taxing the CO2 emissions had a significant effect on the economics of the non-nuclear base cases, bringing them in line with the economics of the nuclear-integrated cases. As we move toward limiting CO2 emissions, integrating non-CO2-emitting energy sources to the development of energy-intense fossil fuel resources is becoming

  10. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  11. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated

  12. Analysis of Reference Design for Nuclear-Assisted Hydrogen Production at 750C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego

    2010-05-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This report describes the resulting new INL reference design coupled to two alternative HTGR power conversion systems, a Steam Rankine Cycle and a Combined Cycle (a Helium Brayton Cycle with a Steam Rankine Bottoming Cycle). Results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions when coupled to the two different power cycles are also presented. A 600 MWt high temperature gas reactor coupled with a Rankine steam power cycle at a thermal efficiency of 44.4% can produce 1.85 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.6 kg/s of oxygen. The same capacity reactor coupled with a combined cycle at a thermal efficiency of 42.5% can produce 1.78 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.0 kg/s of oxygen.

  13. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research January 5-6, 2011 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  14. An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Reflecting Provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and Recent Changes in the Economic Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report updates the Reference Case presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 based on recently enacted legislation and the changing macroeconomic environment.

  15. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences August 3-4, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors [not available] NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion

  16. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics November 12-13, 2009 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  17. Nuclear proliferation: Lessons learned from the Iraqi case. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The nuclear weapons inspection regime implemented in Iraq following the United Nations coalition victory in Desert Storm is the most intrusive in history. Important conclusions about the current non-proliferation regime can therefore be determined from a study of Iraq's progress. This thesis examines Iraq's efforts to acquire nuclear weapons. The supply side of the equation is also studied, with a concentration upon the contributions of NATO nations. The strategic culture of Iraq is discussed, in an effort to discover why Iraq sought nuclear weapons. Finally, policy prescriptions are advanced. The current non-proliferation regime needs to be improved if the spread of nuclear weapons is to be halted, or even slowed. The most promising way to improve this regime is to involve the U.N. Special Commission and the U.N. Security Council in the management of the problem of nuclear proliferation.... Iraq, Strategic culture, Non-Proliferation treaty, International atomic energy agency, Nuclear weapons, Middle east security, Nuclear suppliers group, United Nations.

  18. Mechanism reduction for multicomponent surrogates: A case study using toluene reference fuels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Strategies and recommendations for performing skeletal reductions of multicomponent surrogate fuels are presented, through the generation and validation of skeletal mechanisms for a three-component toluene reference fuel. Using the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis method followed by a further unimportant reaction elimination stage, skeletal mechanisms valid over comprehensive and high-temperature ranges of conditions were developed at varying levels of detail. These skeletal mechanisms were generated based on autoignition simulations, and validation using ignition delay predictions showed good agreement with the detailed mechanism in the target range of conditions. When validated using phenomena other than autoignition, suchmore » as perfectly stirred reactor and laminar flame propagation, tight error control or more restrictions on the reduction during the sensitivity analysis stage were needed to ensure good agreement. In addition, tight error limits were needed for close prediction of ignition delay when varying the mixture composition away from that used for the reduction. In homogeneous compression-ignition engine simulations, the skeletal mechanisms closely matched the point of ignition and accurately predicted species profiles for lean to stoichiometric conditions. Furthermore, the efficacy of generating a multicomponent skeletal mechanism was compared to combining skeletal mechanisms produced separately for neat fuel components; using the same error limits, the latter resulted in a larger skeletal mechanism size that also lacked important cross reactions between fuel components. Based on the present results, general guidelines for reducing detailed mechanisms for multicomponent fuels are discussed.« less

  19. Mechanism reduction for multicomponent surrogates: A case study using toluene reference fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Strategies and recommendations for performing skeletal reductions of multicomponent surrogate fuels are presented, through the generation and validation of skeletal mechanisms for a three-component toluene reference fuel. Using the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis method followed by a further unimportant reaction elimination stage, skeletal mechanisms valid over comprehensive and high-temperature ranges of conditions were developed at varying levels of detail. These skeletal mechanisms were generated based on autoignition simulations, and validation using ignition delay predictions showed good agreement with the detailed mechanism in the target range of conditions. When validated using phenomena other than autoignition, such as perfectly stirred reactor and laminar flame propagation, tight error control or more restrictions on the reduction during the sensitivity analysis stage were needed to ensure good agreement. In addition, tight error limits were needed for close prediction of ignition delay when varying the mixture composition away from that used for the reduction. In homogeneous compression-ignition engine simulations, the skeletal mechanisms closely matched the point of ignition and accurately predicted species profiles for lean to stoichiometric conditions. Furthermore, the efficacy of generating a multicomponent skeletal mechanism was compared to combining skeletal mechanisms produced separately for neat fuel components; using the same error limits, the latter resulted in a larger skeletal mechanism size that also lacked important cross reactions between fuel components. Based on the present results, general guidelines for reducing detailed mechanisms for multicomponent fuels are discussed.

  20. Insider Threat Case Studies at Radiological and Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Noah Gale; Hobbs, Christopher

    2015-04-13

    Seven case studies are presented. The cases include thefts of various materials and sabotage. For each case there is an overview of the incident, a timeline, a profile of the perpetrator, and a discussion of the security system failures which allowed the incident to take place.

  1. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and related equipment 2 ... 0.33 0.33 0.33 0.33 0.35 0.37 0.39 0.5% Computers and related equipment 3 ... 0.13 0.12 0.10 0.08 0.07 0.06 0.05...

  2. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    district services. 2 Includes (but is not limited to) miscellaneous uses such as transformers, medical imaging and other medical equipment, elevators, escalators, off-road...

  3. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 1,096 1,016 1,077 1,114 1,127 1,126 1,121 0.3% Waste coal supplied 2 ... 13 11 14 14 15 17 19...

  4. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sources: 2011 and 2012 interregional firm electricity trade data: 2012 seasonal reliability assessments from North American Electric Reliability Council regional entities and...

  5. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 29.52 28.85 29.72 29.67 30.56 31.49 32.63 0.4% Non-renewable energy expenditures by sector (billion 2012 dollars) Residential...

  6. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    523.3 1.5% 1 Does not include water heating portion of load. 2 Includes televisions, set-top boxes, home theater systems, DVD players, and video game consoles. 3 Includes desktop...

  7. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    12.92 12.90 13.09 -0.2% 1 Commercial trucks 8,501 to 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating. 2 CAFE standard based on projected new vehicle sales. 3 Includes CAFE credits for...

  8. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector and source (million metric tons, unless otherwise noted)...

  9. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane ... 0.51 0.51 0.42 0.40...

  10. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 4,370 4,525 5,735 6,467 7,148 7,784 8,443 2.3% Agriculture, mining, and construction ... 1,556 1,623 2,226 2,311 2,389 2,457...

  11. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    supplies. 2 Includes lease condensate. 3 Tight oil represents resources in low-permeability reservoirs, including shale and chalk formations. The specific plays included in...

  12. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    DC, September 2013). 2011 and 2012 natural gas spot price at Henry Hub: Thomson Reuters. 2011 and 2012 electric power prices: EIA, Electric Power Monthly, DOEEIA-0226,...

  13. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2011 and 2012 Brent and West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot prices: Thomson Reuters. 2011 and 2012 average imported crude oil cost: U.S. Energy Information...

  14. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 9,429 9,603 11,592 12,773 14,220 15,828 17,635 2.2% Real investment ... 1,744 1,914 2,876 3,269 3,740...

  15. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    road oil, still gas, special naphthas, petroleum coke, crude oil product supplied, methanol, and miscellaneous petroleum products. 14 Includes energy for combined heat and...

  16. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    energy. See Table A17 for selected nonmarketed residential and commercial renewable energy data. 5 Includes non-biogenic municipal waste, liquid hydrogen, methanol, and some...

  17. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. 3 Other Europe and Eurasia Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan,...

  18. Appendix A: Reference case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 133.0 147.6 173.1 175.0 178.2 184.2 199.2 1.1% Distributed generation (natural gas) 7 ... 0.0 0.0 1.6 3.3 4.6 6.2 8.9 - -...

  19. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sources 5 ... 476 459 600 634 660 686 735 1.7% Distributed generation (natural gas) ... 0 0 1 2 2 3 4 - - Total...

  20. Analysis of the morality of intention in nuclear deterrence, with special reference to final retaliation. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Quite apart from its apparent political obsolescence, the policy of nuclear deterrence is vulnerable to attack for its seemingly obvious immorality. Nuclear war is blatantly immoral, and nuclear deterrence requires a genuine intention to resort to the nuclear retaliation which would precipitate such a war. Therefore, since it is wrong to intend that which is wrong to do, deterrence is immoral. This thesis seeks to examine the nature of the deterrent intention as a means of verifying the soundness of the above deontological argument. This examination is carried out by first suggesting an acceptable notion of intention in general and then, after analysing the views of deterrent intention by other writers, proceeding to demonstrate the uniqueness of that intention. Having done this, and having explored the possibility that deterrence need not contain a genuine intention to retaliate, the thesis moves on to suggest and defend a moral principle which states that endeavours requiring the formation of an immoral intention may nevertheless be moral. Called the Principle of Double Intention (and based on the Principle of Double Effect), it offers a method for the moral assessment of agents who form immoral intentions within larger contexts. By applying this principle to nuclear deterrence, it is demonstrated that agents who undertake such a policy may be morally justified in doing so, provided certain conditions are met. The thesis closes with a refutation of the objection that an agent cannot rationally form an intention (such as that required in deterrence) which he has no reason to carry out.

  1. Evaluation of a Business Case for Safeguards by Design in Nuclear Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Seward, Amy M.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

    2012-12-01

    Safeguards by Design (SbD) is a well-known paradigm for consideration and incorporation of safeguards approaches and associated design features early in the nuclear facility development process. This paradigm has been developed as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and has been accepted as beneficial in many discussions and papers on NGSI or specific technologies under development within NGSI. The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security funded the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to examine the business case justification of SbD for nuclear power reactors. Ultimately, the implementation of SbD will rely on the designers of nuclear facilities. Therefore, it is important to assess the incentives which will lead designers to adopt SbD as a standard practice for nuclear facility design. This report details the extent to which designers will have compelling economic incentives to adopt SbD.

  2. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. A Case for Molecular Recognition in Nuclear Separations: Sulfate Separation from Nuclear Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Bowman-James, Kristin; Day, Victor W.; Kang, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the case for molecular-recognition approaches for sulfate removal from radioactive wastes via the use of anion-sequestering systems selective for sulfate, using either liquid liquid extraction or crystallization. Potential benefits of removing sulfate from the waste include improved vitrification of the waste, reduced waste-form volume, and higher waste-form performance, all of which lead to potential cleanup schedule acceleration and cost savings. The need for sulfate removal from radioactive waste, especially legacy tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, is reviewed in detail and primarily relates to the low solubility of sulfate in borosilicate glass. Traditional methods applicable to the separation of sulfate from radioactive wastes are also reviewed, with the finding that currently no technology has been identified and successfully demonstrated to meet this need. Fundamental research in the authors laboratories targeting sulfate as an important representative of the class of oxoanions is based on the hypothesis that designed receptors may provide the needed ability to recognize sulfate under highly competitive conditions, in particular where the nitrate anion concentration is high. Receptors that have been shown to have promising affinity for sulfate, either in extraction or in crystallization experiments, include hexaurea tripods, tetraamide macrocycles, cyclo[8]pyrroles, calixpyrroles, and self-assembled urea-lined cages. Good sulfate selectivity observed in the laboratory provides experimental support for the proposed molecular-recognition approach.

  4. Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of plutonium. Nuclear safety technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, V.L.

    1993-12-23

    This report presents results of computations of doses and the associated health risks of postulated accidental atmospheric releases from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) of one gram of weapons-grade plutonium in a form that is respirable. These computations are intended to be reference computations that can be used to evaluate a variety of accident scenarios by scaling the dose and health risk results presented here according to the amount of plutonium postulated to be released, instead of repeating the computations for each scenario. The MACCS2 code has been used as the basis of these computations. The basis and capabilities of MACCS2 are summarized, the parameters used in the evaluations are discussed, and results are presented for the doses and health risks to the public, both the Maximum Offsite Individual (a maximally exposed individual at or beyond the plant boundaries) and the population within 50 miles of RFP. A number of different weather scenarios are evaluated, including constant weather conditions and observed weather for 1990, 1991, and 1992. The isotopic mix of weapons-grade plutonium will change as it ages, the {sup 241}Pu decaying into {sup 241}Am. The {sup 241}Am reaches a peak concentration after about 72 years. The doses to the bone surface, liver, and whole body will increase slightly but the dose to the lungs will decrease slightly. The overall cancer risk will show almost no change over this period. This change in cancer risk is much smaller than the year-to-year variations in cancer risk due to weather. Finally, x/Q values are also presented for other applications, such as for hazardous chemical releases. These include the x/Q values for the MOI, for a collocated worker at 100 meters downwind of an accident site, and the x/Q value integrated over the population out to 50 miles.

  5. B53 case on display in Texas | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) B53 case on display in Texas Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 10:13am "The Last of the Big Dogs" has a new home after Pantex workers recently delivered one of the few remaining B53 nuclear weapons cases to the Freedom Museum USA in Pampa, Texas. The final B53, which received its "Big Dog" nickname from dismantlement workers due to its massive size, was dismantled at Pantex on October 25, 2011, in a historic ceremony. The B53 was the oldest, largest and most destructive

  6. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I. )

    1990-12-01

    This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. Implementing Stakeholders' Access to Expertise: Experimenting on Nuclear Installations' Safety Cases - 12160

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilli, Ludivine; Charron, Sylvie

    2012-07-01

    In 2009 and 2010, the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (IRSN) led two pilot actions dealing with nuclear installations' safety cases. One concerned the periodical review of the French 900 MWe nuclear reactors, the other concerned the decommissioning of a workshop located on the site of Areva's La Hague fuel-reprocessing plant site in Northwestern France. The purpose of both these programs was to test ways for IRSN and a small number of stakeholders (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) members, local elected officials, etc.) to engage in technical discussions. The discussions were intended to enable the stakeholders to review future applications and provide valuable input. The test cases confirmed there is a definite challenge in successfully opening a meaningful dialogue to discuss technical issues, in particular the fact that most expertise reports were not public and the conflict that exists between the contrary demands of transparency and confidentiality of information. The test case also confirmed there are ways to further improvement of stakeholders' involvement. (authors)

  8. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter...

  9. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation...

  10. nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesu.s-japan-exchange-best-practices-nuclear-emergency-respon...

  11. Socio-economic impacts of nuclear generating stations: Crystal River Unit 3 case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, P.A.

    1982-07-01

    This report documents a case study of the socio-economic impacts of the construction and operation of the Crystal River Unit 3 nuclear power station. It is part of a major post-licensing study of the socio-economic impacts at twelve nuclear power stations. The case study covers the period beginning with the announcement of plans to construct the reactor and ending in the period 1980 to 1981. The case study deals with changes in the economy, population, settlement patterns and housing, local government and public services, social structure, and public response in the study area during the construction/operation of the reactor. A regional modeling approach is used to trace the impact of construction/operation on the local economy, labor market, and housing market. Emphasis in the study is on the attribution of socio-economic impacts to the reactor or other causal factors. As part of the study of local public response to the construction/operation of the reactor, the effects of the Three Mile Island accident are examined.

  12. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:05

  13. Reference Model Project (RMP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Model Project (RMP) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE ASCR Program Manager Yukiko Sekine Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:54

  15. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise ... efficient 21stcentury NSE with less environmental impact. ... is referred to as Stockpile Stewardship and Management. ...

  16. Quick Reference

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reference 2015 Annual Planning Summary (APS) User's Guide 1, 2 PART 1 OFFICE Enter the office preparing this APS. NEPA REVIEWS Select one of two responses. SITE-WIDE EISs Select...

  17. Reference Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials There are a variety of reference materials the NSSAB utilizes and have been made available on its website. Documents Fact Sheets - links to Department of Energy Nevada Field Office webpage Public Reading Room NTA Public Reading Facility Open Monday through Friday, 7:30 am to 4:30 pm (except holidays) 755C East Flamingo Road Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 Phone (702) 794-5106 http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/testingarchive.aspx DOE Electronic Database Also available to the public is an

  18. The NEPA reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, L.L.; Reinke, D.C.

    1999-10-01

    The NEPA Reference Guide conveniently organizes and indexes National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations and guidance, along with relevant federal case law, all in one place. It allows the user to quickly learn the statutory, regulatory, and case law authority for a large number of NEPA subjects. A unique feature of The NEPA Reference Guide is its detailed index that includes a large number of diverse NEPA subjects. The index enables users to find and compile any statutory, regulatory (including CEQ guidance), and case law original source material and references on virtually any NEPA subject. This will be an especially useful tool for new NEPA practitioners who need to become immersed in a particular subject quickly.

  19. Nuclear power and the allocation of emissions allowances: a new hampshire case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Space, William

    2007-04-15

    The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative's model rule allows states to allocate carbon allowances to nuclear power plants. New Hampshire's 2003 decision to include nuclear uprates in its NO{sub x} allocations represents a relevant precedent. (author)

  20. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4.3 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.0 1.4 Natural gas plant liquids 3.1 3.3 3.4 4.0 4.2 4.4 4.8 4.7 1.2 Biofuels c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -...

  1. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4.6 4.9 5.3 5.8 5.9 1.9 Natural gas plant liquids 3.1 3.3 3.4 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.3 1.6 Biofuels c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -...

  2. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2011-40 ... 4.7 4.8 4.5 4.3 4.1 4.1 4.0 -0.6 Electricity 18.0 18.4 22.5 25.5 28.6 32.0 35.8 ...

  3. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9.7 15.3 15.2 14.2 13.8 13.5 1.2 Canada 3.4 3.6 3.7 5.4 6.4 7.3 7.8 8.0 2.7 Mexico and Chile 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.4 3.7 3.9 4.2 1.1 OECD Europe 4.9 4.6 4.3 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.4 -1.0...

  4. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9.7 13.6 12.9 11.7 11.2 10.6 0.4 Canada 3.4 3.6 3.7 4.7 5.1 5.5 5.7 5.8 1.6 Mexico and Chile 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.4 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.2 -1.0 OECD Europe 4.9 4.6 4.3 3.1 2.9 2.5 2.4 2.5 -2.0...

  5. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Persian Gulf Share of World Production 29% 29% 31% 32% 35% 38% 40% 42% a Crude and lease condensate includes tight oil, shale oil, extra-heavy oil, field condensate, and bitumen. b ...

  6. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Persian Gulf Share of World Production 29% 29% 31% 24% 24% 26% 27% 28% a Crude and lease condensate includes tight oil, shale oil, extra-heavy oil, field condensate, and bitumen. b ...

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Non-OECD Asia 168.2 175.9 222.7 246.4 269.9 295.1 322.1 2.2 China 109.4 115.0 147.3 159.4 ... Non-OECD Asia 26,261 27,914 44,139 56,222 69,542 84,680 102,015 4.7 China 13,286 14,309 ...

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,708 2,383 2,612 2,840 3,079 3,332 2.4 China 1,065 1,153 1,657 1,808 1,937 2,066 2,194 ... Non-OECD Asia 56 56 55 53 50 48 46 -0.7 China 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 -0.9 India 8 7 7 7 7 7 6 ...

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Asia 8.2 8.3 8.9 9.1 9.2 9.6 9.9 0.6 China 4.4 4.4 4.9 5.2 5.5 6.0 6.3 1.2 India 1.0 ... Asia 7.2 7.2 7.4 7.2 7.0 7.1 6.9 -0.2 China 4.1 4.1 4.3 4.5 4.4 4.7 4.7 0.5 India 0.8 ...

  10. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... OECD Asia 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.3 5.1 4.9 4.8 -0.5 Japan 4.9 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.4 4.3 4.1 -0.5 South ... Non-OECD Asia 6.4 6.3 5.0 4.4 3.9 3.5 3.2 -2.4 China 8.2 8.0 6.4 5.4 4.7 4.1 3.7 -2.8 ...

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OECD Asia 203 204 207 208 208 207 206 0.0 Japan 127 127 125 123 120 117 114 -0.4 South ... Non-OECD Asia 3,691 3,730 4,013 4,159 4,278 4,373 4,443 0.6 China 1,373 1,381 1,435 1,450 ...

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Appendix H Table H10. World installed solar generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 5 8 32 36 44 54 67 7.7 United States a 4 8 28 32 39 48 61 7.7 Canada 1 1 2 3 3 4 4 5.9 Mexico and Chile 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 14.4 OECD Europe 52 70 93 93 93 94 98 1.2 OECD Asia 7 9 45 51 57 59 60 6.9 Japan 5 7 38 43 48 49 49 7.4 South Korea 1 1 2 3 4 4 4 5.1 Australia

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix H Table H12. World total net electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 5,071 5,017 5,449 5,724 6,036 6,359 6,727 1.1 United States a 4,102 4,055 4,351 4,513 4,691 4,860 5,056 0.8 Canada 627 616 692 748 809 880 958 1.6 Mexico and Chile 342 346 406 463 535 618 713 2.6 OECD Europe 3,455 3,483 3,858 4,090 4,328 4,590 4,889 1.2

  14. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix H Table H14. World net natural gas-fred electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,234 1,446 1,396 1,600 1,840 2,048 2,237 1.6 United States a 1,014 1,228 1,117 1,223 1,371 1,478 1,569 0.9 Canada 61 63 97 136 187 230 272 5.3 Mexico and Chile 160 154 182 240 282 340 396 3.4 OECD Europe 766 645 655 746 905 1,056 1,321 2.6

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Appendix H Table H18. World net hydroelectric electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 747 703 764 784 806 831 887 0.8 United States a 319 275 292 294 295 295 297 0.3 Canada 372 377 403 414 425 437 475 0.8 Mexico and Chile 57 51 68 76 86 99 114 2.9 OECD Europe 498 556 592 617 617 617 657 0.6 OECD Asia 128 115 127 131 135 143 153

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix H Table H2. World installed liquids-fred generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 125 121 108 98 92 87 85 -1.2 United States a 105 101 89 80 75 71 70 -1.3 Canada 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 -1.0 Mexico and Chile 16 16 14 14 13 12 12 -1.0 OECD Europe 50 50 47 45 43 41 39 -0.9 OECD Asia 58 59 54 52 49 47 45 -1.0 Japan 52 52 49 46 44 42 40 -1.0 South

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Appendix H Table H20. World net geothermal electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 22 21 37 49 64 75 85 5.0 United States a 15 16 27 39 52 62 70 5.5 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - Mexico and Chile 7 6 10 10 11 13 15 3.5 OECD Europe 11 12 21 23 23 23 25 2.7 OECD Asia 9 9 17 18 20 22 25 3.9 Japan 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.1 South Korea 0 0 1 1 2 2 2

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Appendix H Table H22. World net other renewable electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 87 94 125 151 169 191 210 2.9 United States a 75 77 103 115 119 125 138 2.1 Canada 6 9 14 28 41 55 60 7.0 Mexico and Chile 6 8 8 8 9 11 13 1.8 OECD Europe 155 149 201 210 210 210 224 1.5 OECD Asia 28 37 60 71 80 84 87 3.1 Japan 23 33 38 44 50

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Appendix H Table H4. World installed coal-fred generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 333 327 279 276 272 272 271 -0.7 United States a 314 308 263 260 260 260 260 -0.6 Canada 10 10 7 7 3 3 2 -5.2 Mexico and Chile 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 -0.2 OECD Europe 197 198 207 200 194 188 183 -0.3 OECD Asia 109 112 117 113 111 109 110 -0.1 Japan 50 50 49 47 46 44 43

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix H Table H6. World installed hydroelectric and other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 273 293 372 396 424 460 507 2.0 United States a 168 185 233 240 252 273 301 1.8 Canada 85 87 106 114 123 132 144 1.8 Mexico and Chile 20 21 34 42 48 55 62 3.9 OECD Europe 337 372 514 534 553 594 626 1.9 OECD Asia 54 57 115 129 145 153

  1. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Appendix H Table H8. World installed wind-powered generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 53 67 107 117 127 141 159 3.1 United States a 47 59 83 84 87 97 110 2.2 Canada 5 6 15 18 20 22 24 5.0 Mexico and Chile 1 2 9 16 19 22 25 10.1 OECD Europe 94 107 189 203 222 263 277 3.5 OECD Asia 6 6 24 29 37 40 44 7.2 Japan 2 3 3 5 8 8 8 4.1 South Korea 0 0

  2. Poroelastic references

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Christina Morency

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  3. Poroelastic references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christina Morency

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  4. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and...

  5. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID 412- 11/16/2012 - Page 1 Log No 2012-263 Reference Materials * Transporting Radioactive Waste to the Nevada National Security Site fact sheet (ww.nv.energy.gov/library/factsheets/DOENV_990.pdf) - Generators contract with commercial carriers - U.S. Department of Transportation regulations require carriers to select routes which minimize radiological risk * Drivers Route and Shipment Information Questionnaire completed by drivers to document routes taken to the NNSS upon entry into Nevada -

  6. Information Content of a New Observable: The Case of the Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    By systematically varying coupling constants characterizing the nuclear energy density functional and studying the resulting confidence ellipsoid, we quantify the relationships ...

  7. Quick Reference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quick Reference 2016 Annual Planning Summary (APS) User's Guide 1, 2 PART 1 OFFICE Enter the office preparing this APS. NEPA REVIEWS Select one of two responses. SITE-WIDE Select one of three responses. DOCUMENT NUMBER & TITLE Enter the DOE NEPA identification number if available, e.g., DOE/EIS-XXXX. If no document number has been assigned, enter N/A. Also enter the document title. Text is limited to 350 characters. PART 2 TYPE Select the type of document using the dropdown menu. STATUS

  8. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-26

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

  9. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 6 References References for A 6: A 6 (Nuclear Physics A708 (2002)) A 6 (Nuclear Physics A490 (1988)) A 6 (Nuclear Physics A413 (1984)) A 6 (Nuclear Physics A320...

  10. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 9 References References for A 9: A 9 (Nuclear Physics A745 (2004)) A 9 (Nuclear Physics A490 (1988)) A 9 (Nuclear Physics A413 (1984)) A 9 (Nuclear Physics A320...

  11. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 20 References References for A 20: A 20 (Nuclear Physics A636 (1998)) A 20 (Nuclear Physics A475 (1987)) A 20 (Nuclear Physics A392 (1983)) A 20 (Nuclear Physics A300...

  12. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 8 References References for A 8: A 8 (Nuclear Physics A745 (2004)) A 8 (Nuclear Physics A490 (1988)) A 8 (Nuclear Physics A413 (1984)) A 8 (Nuclear Physics A320...

  13. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 7 References References for A 7: A 7 (Nuclear Physics A708 (2002)) A 7 (Nuclear Physics A490 (1988)) A 7 (Nuclear Physics A413 (1984)) A 7 (Nuclear Physics A320...

  14. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 5 References References for A 5: A 5 (Nuclear Physics A708 (2002)) A 5 (Nuclear Physics A490 (1988)) A 5 (Nuclear Physics A413 (1984)) A 5 (Nuclear Physics A320...

  15. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 3 References References for A 3: A 3 (Nuclear Physics A848 (2010)) A 3 (Nuclear Physics A474 (1987)) Last modified on 20 May 2014...

  16. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Topical report on reference eastern humid low-level sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop an order-of-magnitude estimate for the potential dose to man resulting from biotic transport mechanisms at a humid reference low-level waste site in the eastern US. A description of the reference site is presented that includes the waste inventories, site characteristics and biological communites. Parameter values for biotic transport processes are based on data reported in current literature. Transport and exposure scenarios are developed for assessing biotic transport during 500 years following site closure. Calculations of radionuclide decay and waste container decomposition are made to estimate the quantities available for biotic transport. Doses to man are calculated for the biological transport of radionucludes at the reference site after loss of institutional control. These dose estimates are compared to dose estimates we calculated for the intruder-agricultural scenarios reported in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). Dose to man estimates as a result of cumulative biotic transport are calculated to be of the same order-of-magnitude as the dose resulting from the more commonly evaluated human intrusion scenario. The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by findings presented in this report. Through biotic transport, radionuclides can be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man.

  17. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear-waste disposal. Topical report on reference western arid low-level sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop an order of magnitude estimate for the potential dose to man resulting from biotic transport mechanisms at a reference western arid low-level waste site. A description of the reference site is presented that includes the waste inventories, site characteristics and biological communities. Parameter values for biotic transport processes are based on data reported in current literature. Transport and exposure scenarios are developed for assessing biotic transport during 100 years following site closure. Calculations of radionuclide decay and waste container decomposition are made to estimate the quantities available for biotic transport. Dose to a man occupying the reference site following the 100 years of biotic transport are calculated. These dose estimates are compared to dose estimates for the intruder-agricultural scenario reported in the DEIS for 10 CFR 61 (NRC). Dose to man estimates as a result of biotic transport are estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the dose resulting from the more commonly evaluated human intrusion scenario. The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by the findings presented in this report. These results indicate that biotic transport has the potential to influence low-level waste site performance. Through biotic transport, radionuclides may be moved to locations where they can enter exposure pathways to man.

  18. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 4 References References for A 4: A 4 (Nuclear Physics A541 (1992)) Last modified on 02 October 2012...

  19. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  20. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  1. Equips Nucleares SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SA Place: Madrid, Spain Zip: 28006 Sector: Services Product: ENSA is a Spanish nuclear components and nuclear services supply company. References: Equips Nucleares, SA1...

  2. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 11 References References for A = 11: A = 11 (Nuclear Physics A880 (2012)) A = 11 (Nuclear Physics A506 (1990)) A = 11 (Nuclear Physics A433 (1985)) A = 11 (Nuclear Physics A336 (1980)) A = 11 (Nuclear Physics A248 (1975)) A = 11 (Nuclear Physics A114 (1968)) A = 11 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 29

  3. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

  4. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links to Other Useful Sites Online Journals Institutions and Programs Related to Nuclear Physics U.S. Nuclear Data Program: All evaluated nuclear data supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. National Nuclear Data Center: Brookhaven National Laboratory; Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF), Nuclear Science References (NSR) and other databases. Isotopes Project: (E.O.L. Berkeley National Laboratory) Table of Isotopes, Isotope Explorer, XUNDL, Nuclear Data Dissemination Homepage, and

  5. Public involvement in the regulatory activities regarding nuclear fuel cycle facilities: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper reviews the involvement of a community-based organization in the activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding a uranium conversion facility that operated near Gore, Oklahoma from 1970 until 1992. Effective participation requires access to decision making. Access is a complex phenomenon that includes: (1) opportunity, both procedural and physical, (2) a common language, and (3) time and resources. The paper describes how both the community organization and the NRC responded to these requirements for access, the strategies that were most effective in securing meaningful public involvement in the decision making, and the impacts of that involvement on the organization.

  6. Calculation code evaluating the confinement of a nuclear facility in case of fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laborde, J.C.; Prevost, C.; Vendel, J.

    1995-02-01

    Accident events involving fire are quite frequent and could have a severe effect on the safety of nuclear facilities. As confinement must be maintained, the ventilation and filtration systems have to be designed to limit radioactive release to the environment. To determine and analyse the consequences of a fire on the contamination confinement, IPSN, COGEMA and SGN are participating in development of a calculation code based on introduction, in the SIMEVENT ventilation code, of various models associated to fire risk and mass transfer in the ventilation networks. This calculation code results from the coupling of the SIMEVENT code with several models describing the temperature in a room resulting of a fire, the temperatures along the ventilation ducts, the contamination transfers through out the ventilation equipments (ducts, dampers, valves, air cleaning systems) and the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters clogging. The paper proposed presents the current level of progress in development of this calculation code. It describes, in particular, the empirical model used for the clogging of HEPA filters by the aerosols derived from the combustion of standard materials used in the nuclear industry. It describes, also, the specific models used to take into account the mass transfers and resulting from the basic mechanisms of aerosols physics. In addition, an assessment of this code is given using the example of a simple laboratory installation.

  7. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shull, Doug

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  8. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 12 References References for A = 12: A = 12 (Nuclear Physics A506 (1990)) A = 12 (Nuclear Physics A433 (1985)) A = 12 (Nuclear Physics A336 (1980)) A = 12 (Nuclear Physics A248 (1975)) A = 12 (Nuclear Physics A114 (1968)) A = 12 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 24 February 2016

  9. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 13 References References for A = 13: A = 13 (Nuclear Physics A523 (1991)) A = 13 (Nuclear Physics A449 (1986)) A = 13 (Nuclear Physics A360 (1981)) A = 13 (Nuclear Physics A268 (1976)) A = 13 (Nuclear Physics A152 (1970)) A = 13 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) A = 13 (Reviews of Modern Physics 27 (1955); incomplete) Last modified on 17

  10. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 14 References References for A = 14: A = 14 (Nuclear Physics A523 (1991)) A = 14 (Nuclear Physics A449 (1986)) A = 14 (Nuclear Physics A360 (1981)) A = 14 (Nuclear Physics A268 (1976)) A = 14 (Nuclear Physics A152 (1970)) A = 14 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 05 October

  11. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 15 References References for A = 15: A = 15 (Nuclear Physics A523 (1991)) A = 15 (Nuclear Physics A449 (1986)) A = 15 (Nuclear Physics A360 (1981)) A = 15 (Nuclear Physics A268 (1976)) A = 15 (Nuclear Physics A152 (1970)) A = 15 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 19

  12. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 16 References References for A = 16: A = 16 (Nuclear Physics A564 (1993)) A = 16 (Nuclear Physics A460 (1986)) A = 16 (Nuclear Physics A375 (1982)) A = 16 (Nuclear Physics A281 (1977)) A = 16 (Nuclear Physics A166 (1971)) A = 16 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 19 May 2016

  13. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 17 References References for A = 17: A = 17 (Nuclear Physics A564 (1993)) A = 17 (Nuclear Physics A460 (1986)) A = 17 (Nuclear Physics A375 (1982)) A = 17 (Nuclear Physics A281 (1977)) A = 17 (Nuclear Physics A166 (1971)) A = 17 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 25 July 2016

  14. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 18 References References for A = 18: A = 18 (Nuclear Physics A595 (1995)) A = 18 (Nuclear Physics A475 (1987)) A = 18 (Nuclear Physics A392 (1983)) A = 18 (Nuclear Physics A300 (1978)) A = 18 (Nuclear Physics A190 (1972)) A = 18 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 22

  15. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 19 References References for A = 19: A = 19 (Nuclear Physics A595 (1995)) A = 19 (Nuclear Physics A475 (1987)) A = 19 (Nuclear Physics A392 (1983)) A = 19 (Nuclear Physics A300 (1978)) A = 19 (Nuclear Physics A190 (1972)) A = 19 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 13

  16. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  17. TUNL Nuclear Data Project, HTML Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A = 10 References References for A = 10: A = 10 (Nuclear Physics A745 (2004)) A = 10 (Nuclear Physics A490 (1988)) A = 10 (Nuclear Physics A413 (1984)) A = 10 (Nuclear Physics A320 (1979)) A = 10 (Nuclear Physics A227 (1974)) A = 10 (Nuclear Physics 78 (1966)) A = 10 (Corrections and Supplements Reference List of (1966LA04)) A = 10 (Nuclear Physics 11 (1959)) Last modified on 10 March 2016

  18. References - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    References by Website Administrator This page provides information and links to references. Technical Standards Technical Standards Program Technical Standards Home RevCom for Technical Standards Technical Standards Crosswalk NNSA Directives National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Supplemental Directives NNSA Policies (NAPs) FAR Federal Acquisition Regulations Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) CFR Code of Federal Regulations CFR (annual edition) 10

  19. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  20. Summary References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor. DOEEIS-0288. March. ... Supplemental EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Cooling Light Water Reactor." August. ...

  1. Appendix C References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor. ... of Gaseous Effluents in Routine Releases from Light-Water-Cooled Reactors. July. ...

  2. Appendix D References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Severe Accident Risks: Sequoyah, Unit 1. NUREGCR-4551, SAND86-1309. Main Report. ... Radiological Consequences of a Loss of Coolant Accident for Pressurized Water Reactors. ...

  3. Additional SEIS references | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Final Environmental Impact Statement, Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Royal Bank of Scotland for Construction and Startup of the Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, ...

  4. Appendix C References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOE (U.S. Department of Energy) 2003. Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE). ISCORS Technical Report No. 1. DOEEH-41200150802, Rev. 1. January. ...

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Starr, C.

    1963-01-01

    This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

  6. Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The below listing provides additional references related to Subsurface & Groundwater Remediation.  The references are categorized by documents types (e.g., Strategic Plans, Groundwater Plume...

  7. design basis threat | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    design basis threat Design Basis Threat NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special nuclear material, or ...

  8. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information for persons with access to UCNI, June 2014 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Reviewing Official's Training Resources Understanding Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information - Brochure UCNI Marking Reference Classification's Webpage on Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Policy Documents Training & Reference

  9. The case for unified linear reference system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinoza, J. Jr.; Mackoy, R.D.; Fletcher, D.R.

    1997-06-01

    The transportation industry distinguishes its activities and data into three functionally and institutionally distinct domains. Transportation infrastructure management activities make transport links (e.g., roads, rail lines, transit routes) available for travel. In contrast, civilian and military transport operations focus on finding and using the best transport links. Each of these three transportation interest groups - transportation facility operators, civilian and military transportation users - currently collects and maintains separate, often redundant or inconsistent information concerning the location and status of the transportation system, the vehicles using the system, and the passengers and freight (or material) being conveyed. Although there has been some progress made in integrating data within each domain, little emphasis has been placed on identifying and improving the flow of information between them. Because activities initiated in one domain affect conditions in the others, defining these flows is crucial to the next generation of planners, traffic managers and customers of transportation services. For example, construction and maintenance activities affect civilian and military route choices and travel times; large scale military movements disrupt civilian travel and have potentially major effects on the infrastructure and so on. This intertwined interest in the transportation system implies the need for data integration not only within each sphere of interest but among the spheres as well. Although recent policy statements by the U.S. Departments of Transportation and Defense and ITS America indicate a desire to combine and share information resources, there are enormous technical and institutional barriers that need to be overcome.

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (RFS2, for example) * Prices of primary energy (crude oil, etc.) LP * Minimize cost to ... Biomass- based diesel FAME biodiesel Green Diesel Cellulosic Drop-in For use as motor ...

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... and engineering notes: - Fuel economy (Final Rule 2017-2025 and Lumped Parameter Model) - Cost (derived from Final Rule ... Gaseous and fuel cell AEO2013 Transportation ...

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas & Biofuels Analysis October 4, 2012 | Washington, DC Preliminary AEO2013: Biofuels and Petroleum WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview 2 Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, & Biofuels Analysis Working Group Presentation for Discussion Purposes Washington DC, October 4, 2012 DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE as results are subject to change * World oil

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 14, 2012 | Washington, DC Annual Energy Outlook 2013: Modeling Updates in the Transportation Sector WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview 2 AEO2013 Transportation Model Updates Washington, D.C., August 2012 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Light-duty vehicle - Light-duty vehicle technology update based on EPA/NHTSA Notice of Proposed Rule for model years 2017 through 2025 * Heavy-duty vehicle

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) after U.S. Court of Appeals vacated Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) * Continued to coordinate with Survey Team and Statistics Group to: - ...

  15. Design Basis Threat | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Design Basis Threat NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special nuclear material, or SNM) and nuclear weapons in its custody. NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special nuclear material, or SNM) and nuclear weapons in its custody. NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special

  16. High frequency reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  17. High frequency reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  18. Nuclear energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear energy Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Nuclear energy is energy in the nucleus of an atom.1 References "EIA:...

  19. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, Richard; Kotter, Dale

    1994-01-01

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function.

  20. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  1. nuclear safety | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    safety United States and the Republic of Korea Sign Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation Washington, DC - Today Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Korean Foreign Minister Yun signed the successor United States - Republic of Korea Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation, or 123 Agreement, as they are referred to in the United States. The United States and the Republic of Korea (ROK

  2. Reference Model Project (RMP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Reference Model 5: Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter. NRELTP-5000-62861. Golden, CO, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). January 2015. Power Conversion Chain Design ...

  3. EFRC Management Reference Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC management reference document Energy Frontier Research Centers Acknowledgments of Support (v.1, October 2009) Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Science US Department ...

  4. The MacArthur Maze Fire and Roadway Collapse: A "Worst Case Scenario" for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Easton, Earl P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2012-07-06

    In 2007, a severe transportation accident occurred near Oakland, California, at the interchange known as the "MacArthur Maze." The accident involved a double tanker truck of gasoline overturning and bursting into flames. The subsequent fire reduced the strength of the supporting steel structure of an overhead interstate roadway causing the collapse of portions of that overpass onto the lower roadway in less than 20 minutes. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has analyzed what might have happened had a spent nuclear fuel transportation package been involved in this accident, to determine if there are any potential regulatory implications of this accident to the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This paper provides a summary of this effort, presents preliminary results and conclusions, and discusses future work related to the NRC's analysis of the consequences of this type of severe accident.

  5. Socioeconomic impacts of nuclear generating stations: Crystal River Unit 3 case study. Technical report 1 Oct 78-4 Jan 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, P.A.

    1982-07-01

    The report documents a case study of the socioeconomic impacts of the construction and operation of the Crystal River Unit 3 nuclear power station. It is part of a major post-licensing study of the socioeconomic impacts at twelve nuclear power stations. The case study covers the period beginning with the announcement of plans to construct the reactor and ending in the period, 1980-81. The case study deals with changes in the economy, population, settlement patterns and housing, local government and public services, social structure, and public response in the study area during the construction/operation of the reactor. A regional modeling approach is used to trace the impact of construction/operation on the local economy, labor market, and housing market. Emphasis in the study is on the attribution of socioeconomic impacts to the reactor or other causal factors. As part of the study of local public response to the construction/operation of the reactor, the effects of the Three Mile Island accident are examined.

  6. Sandia Energy - Reference Model Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Reference Model Project (RMP) Reference Model Documents Reference Model DocumentsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-...

  7. Multifunctional reference electrode (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multifunctional reference electrode Title: Multifunctional reference electrode A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the ...

  8. reference | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reference Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(88) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki...

  9. Uranium reference materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1987-07-01

    The Technical Measurements Center has prepared uranium mill tailings reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. Four materials were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides, using three tailings materials and a river-bottom soil diluent. All materials were ground, dried, and blended thoroughly to ensure homogeneity. The analyses on which the recommended values for nuclides in the reference materials are based were performed, using independent methods, by the UNC Geotech (UNC) Chemistry Laboratory, Grand Junction, Colorado, and by C.W. Sill (Sill), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Several statistical tests were performed on the analytical data to characterize the reference materials. Results of these tests reveal that the four reference materials are homogeneous and that no large systematic bias exists between the analytical methods used by Sill and those used by TMC. The average values for radionuclides of the two data sets, representing an unbiased estimate, were used as the recommended values for concentrations of nuclides in the reference materials. The recommended concentrations of radionuclides in the four reference materials are provided. Use of these reference materials will aid in providing uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial action contractors. 11 refs., 9 tabs.

  10. Quality Assurance REFERENCE GUIDE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and DOE contractors to enter into agreements of ... part II language uses the terms "nuclear power plant" or ... http:www.bing.comvideossearch?qWhat+is+the+stop+work+au...

  11. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Morency, Christina

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  12. REFERENCES Baines, W. D.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REFERENCES Baines, W. D. aud Peterson, E. G., 1951, "An Investigation of Flow Through ... D 50.8 m. A flow facility has been constructed for experiments with these screens. Air ...

  13. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  14. Membrane reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo; Bloom, Ira D.

    1989-01-01

    A reference electrode utilizes a small thin, flat membrane of a highly conductive glass placed on a small diameter insulator tube having a reference material inside in contact with an internal voltage lead. When the sensor is placed in a non-aqueous ionic electrolytic solution, the concentration difference across the glass membrane generates a low voltage signal in precise relationship to the concentration of the species to be measured with high spatial resolution.

  15. Precision displacement reference system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  16. Membrane reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.; Bloom, I.D.

    1988-01-21

    A reference electrode utilizes a small thin, flat membrane of a highly conductive glass placed on a small diameter insulator tube having a reference material inside in contact with an internal voltage lead. When the sensor is placed in a non-aqueous ionic electrolytic solution, the concentration difference across the glass membrane generates a low voltage signal in precise relationship to the concentration of the species to be measured, with high spatial resolution. 2 figs.

  17. Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the

  18. Centrales Nucleares Almaraz Trillo CNAT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (CNAT) Place: Madrid, Spain Zip: 28050 Product: CNAT is a Spanish producer of nuclear power, with plants in Almaraz and Trillo References: Centrales Nucleares...

  19. Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support NBL Program Office NBL PO Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Program Measurement Evaluation Nuclear Safeguards and ...

  20. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo; Vissers, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  1. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.; Vissers, D.R.

    1981-12-30

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell are described. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  2. Reference Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard

    2011-11-02

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progress to develop a representative set of Reference Models (RM) for the MHK industry to develop baseline cost of energy (COE) and evaluate key cost component/system reduction pathways.

  3. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    321 Unlimited Release Printed September 2012 Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract

  4. Decline of radionuclides in the nearshore environment following nuclear reactor closure: A U.K. case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cundy, A.B.; Croudace, I.W.; Warwick, P.E.; Bains, M.E.D.

    1999-09-01

    Radioactive discharges from nuclear facilities are frequently made into the marine environment and their fate during and after cessation of discharges is a matter of interest and concern. This study examines the decline of the radionuclides {sup 60} and {sup 65}Zn along the southern UK. coast, over the per 1988--1998, following the closure of the steam-generating heavy water (SGHW) reactor at AEA Winfrith, Dorset, UK. {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn (and other activation products such as {sup 63}Ni and {sup 55}Fe) were widely dispersed in the marine environment off the central south coast of England, due to authorized releases from AEA Winfrith. Significant interaction occurred with clay-rich sediments and biota. A general exponential decline in {sup 60}Co activities (and in {sup 65}Zn activity) is found in intertidal mudflat sediments, seaweed and marine fauna in different areas along the south coast following closure of the reactor in 1990. Effective half-lives are determined which vary from 1 to 4 years in surface sediments ({sup 60}Co only), 1--4 years in seaweed and 0.5--2.5 years in crustaceans, bivalves and molluscs. Physical mixing and bioturbation largely control the rate at which {sup 60}Co declines in surface sediments. Both {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn show a relatively slow rate of decline in seaweed and in marine fauna, showing that even after the virtual cessation of discharge from nuclear facilities, contamination of these organisms may persist for a number of years, albeit at reduced activities. Reasons for this persistence are likely to include absorption of radionuclides from sediment, and release and recycling of radionuclides via breakdown of contaminated organic material.

  5. OSH technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    In an evaluation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Occupational Safety and Health programs for government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities, the Department of Labor`s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommended a technical information exchange program. The intent was to share written safety and health programs, plans, training manuals, and materials within the entire DOE community. The OSH Technical Reference (OTR) helps support the secretary`s response to the OSHA finding by providing a one-stop resource and referral for technical information that relates to safe operations and practice. It also serves as a technical information exchange tool to reference DOE-wide materials pertinent to specific safety topics and, with some modification, as a training aid. The OTR bridges the gap between general safety documents and very specific requirements documents. It is tailored to the DOE community and incorporates DOE field experience.

  6. Alignment reference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  7. Chapter 6 - References

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-1 CHAPTER 6 REFERENCES BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), 2002. Bureau of Labor Statistics Data, <http://www.bls.gov/data>, accessed January 25. CAIRS (Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System), 2002. Statistics, <http://www.eh.doe.gov/cairs/stats.html>, accessed January 30. CEMRC (Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center), 2000. Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory Initiative, New Mexico State University, Carlsbad, New Mexico, December 15. CEQ

  8. Climate Change Reference Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-01-01

    This report was prepared for DOE Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy, in 1988, by Meridian Corporation, Alexandria, Va. It set the environmental impacts of geothermal power in the context of those of other renewables, coal, and nuclear. While this is a compendium from largely secondary sources, it gives estimates for CO2 per GWh for the three phases of resource extraction, facility construction, and facility operation. Tons of concrete and steel used are estimated. System include hydrothermal (dry steam, flashed, binary), geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma. (DJE 2005)

  9. Coal Data: A reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-26

    The purpose of Coal Data: A Reference is to provide basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the United States. The report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces new terms. Topics covered are US coal deposits, resources and reserves, mining, production, employment and productivity, health and safety, preparation, transportation, supply and stocks, use, coal, the environment, and more. (VC)

  10. Headquarters Security Quick Reference Book

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This quick reference book provides an overview of Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) security programs.