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1

Modeling the Hydrological Effect on Local Gravity at Moxa, Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A superconducting gravimeter has observed with high accuracy (to within a few nm s?2) and high frequency (1 Hz) the temporal variations in the earths gravity field near Moxa, Germany, since 1999. Hourly gravity residuals are obtained by time ...

Shaakeel Hasan; Peter A. Troch; J. Boll; C. Kroner

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

3

The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL in Australia. ... The TAS will be based on a thermal beam at the reactor face. ...

4

Attempt at paleomagnetic dating of opal, Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of paleomagnetic investigation of a drill core from the Opal Dome at Roosevelt Hot Springs are reported. A log of the core from 1.5 to 16.8 m is given. (MHR)

Brown, F.H.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Interaction between Hurricane Opal (1995) and a Warm Core Ring in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Opal (1995) experienced a rapid, unexpected intensification in the Gulf of Mexico that coincided with its encounter with a warm core ring (WCR). The relative positions of Opal and the WCR and the timing of the intensification indicate ...

Xiaodong Hong; Simon W. Chang; Sethu Raman; Lynn K. Shay; Richard Hodur

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The OPAL Equation of State and Low Metallicity Isochrones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Yale stellar evolution code has been modified to use the OPAL equation of state tables (Rogers 1994). Stellar models and isochrones were constructed for low metallicity systems ($-2.8 \\le [Fe/H] \\le -0.6$). Above $M\\sim 0.7\\,\\msun$, the isochrones are very similar to those which are constructed using an equation of state which includes the analytical Debye-Huckel correction at high temperatures. The absolute magnitude of the main sequence turn-off (\\mvto) with the OPAL or Debye-Huckel isochrones is about 0.06 magnitudes fainter, at a given age, than \\mvto derived from isochrones which do not include the Debye-Huckel correction. As a consequence, globular clusters ages derived using \\mvto are reduced by 6 -- 7\\% as compared to the ages determined from the standard isochrones. Below $M\\sim 0.7\\,\\msun$, the OPAL isochrones are systematically hotter (by approximately 0.04 in B-V) at a given magnitude as compared to the standard, or Debye-Huckel isochrones. However, the lower mass models fall out of the OPAL table range, and this could be the cause of the differences in the location of the lower main-sequences.

Brian Chaboyer; Yong --Cheol Kim

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effects of a Warm Oceanic Feature on Hurricane Opal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 4 October 1995, Hurricane Opal deepened from 965 to 916 hPa in the Gulf of Mexico over a 14-h period upon encountering a warm core ring (WCR) in the ocean shed by the Loop Current during an upper-level atmospheric trough interaction. Based on ...

Lynn K. Shay; Gustavo J. Goni; Peter G. Black

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Structure-related optical properties of luminescent hetero-opals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light-emitting hetero-opals have been synthesized by successive crystallization of one thin opalfilm on top of the other from beads of two different diameters and selective impregnation of one of films with luminescent CdTenanocrystals. A strong spectral and spatial anisotropy of the reflectance and the photoluminescencespectra has been observed and attributed to the photonic bandgap mismatch in opalfilms. Changes of the emission anisotropy with excitation power have been associated with the stimulation of CdTenanocrystal emission in a host opalfilm. An interface-related transmission minimum has been revealed and tentatively explained as the consequence of the distractive interference of optical modes of hetero-opal constituents. The idea of the interface resonance has been supported by the observation of the emission modification in this frequency range.

N. Gaponik; A. Eychmller; A. L. Rogach; V. G. Solovyev; C. M. Sotomayor Torres; S. G. Romanov

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Potential Benefits of Manmade Opals Demonstrated for First Time (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL experiments show that disordered inverse opals significantly scatter and trap near-infrared light, with possible impact on optoelectronic materials. Inverse opals, familiar in the form of brilliantly colored opal gemstones, are a class of materials that has astounding optical properties. Scientists have been exploring the ability of inverse opals to manipulate light in the hopes of harnessing this capacity for advanced technologies such as displays, detectors, lasers, and photovoltaics. A research group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that man-made inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering, consequently trapping wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR), which is important to a number of technologies. This discovery is the first experimental evidence to validate a 2005 theoretical model predicting the confinement of light in such structures, and it holds great promise for improving the performance of technologies that rely on careful light control. This breakthrough also makes possible optoelectronic technologies that use a range of low-cost molecular and semiconductor species that otherwise absorb light too weakly to be useful. The disordered inverse opal architecture validates the theoretical model that predicts the diffusion and confinement of light in such structures. Electrochemically deposited CdSe inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering and consequent NIR light trapping. This discovery holds promise for NIR light management in optoelectronic technologies, particularly those involving weakly absorbing molecular and semiconductor photomaterials.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A comparison of Rosseland-mean opacities from OP and OPAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monochromatic opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) (Seaton et al.) have been augmented by hitherto missing inner-shell contributions (Badnell & Seaton). OP Rosseland-mean opacities are compared with results from OPAL (Iglesias & Rogers) for the elements H, He, C, O, S and Fe. Overall, there is good agreement between OP and OPAL Rosseland-mean opacities for the 6-elements, but there are some differences. In particular, recent work (Bahcall et al.) has shown that helioseismology measurements give a very accurate value for the depth of the solar convection zone and that solar models give agreement with that value only if opacities there are about 7% larger than OPAL values. For the 6-element mix, here, we obtain Rosseland-mean opacities to be larger than OPAL by 5%.

M. J. Seaton; N. R. Badnell

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

A comparison of Rosseland-mean opacities from OP and OPAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monochromatic opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) (Seaton et al.) have been augmented by hitherto missing inner-shell contributions (Badnell & Seaton). OP Rosseland-mean opacities are compared with results from OPAL (Iglesias & Rogers) for the elements H, He, C, O, S and Fe. Overall, there is good agreement between OP and OPAL Rosseland-mean opacities for the 6-elements, but there are some differences. In particular, recent work (Bahcall et al.) has shown that helioseismology measurements give a very accurate value for the depth of the solar convection zone and that solar models give agreement with that value only if opacities there are about 7% larger than OPAL values. For the 6-element mix, here, we obtain Rosseland-mean opacities to be larger than OPAL by 5%.

Seaton, M J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Surface Wind Fields of 1995 Hurricanes Erin, Opal, Luis, Marilyn, and Roxanne at Landfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricanes Erin, Opal, Luis, Marilyn, and Roxanne were the most destructive hurricanes of 1995. At landfall, Luis and Marilyn contained maximum sustained winds (marine exposure) estimated at near 60 and 46 m s?1, respectively. The strongest ...

Mark D. Powell; Samuel H. Houston

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Luminescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots infiltrated into an opal matrix  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the photonic band gap in the photonic crystal, the synthesized SiO{sub 2} opal with embedded CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, on its luminescence in the visible spectral region is studied. It is shown that the position of the photonic band gap in the luminescence and reflectance spectra for the infiltrated opal depends on the diameter of the constituent nanospheres and on the angle of recording the signal. The optimal conditions for embedding the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots from the solution into the opal matrix are determined. It is found that, for the opal-CdSe/ZnS nanocomposites, the emission intensity decreases and the luminescence decay time increases in the spatial directions, in which the spectral positions of the photonic band gap and the luminescence peak of the quantum dots coincide.

Gruzintsev, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and Ultra-High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gran@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Emelchenko, G. A.; Masalov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Yakimov, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and Ultra-High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation); Barthou, C.; Maitre, A. [Institut des NanoSciences (France)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Environmental Influences on the Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Opal (1995) over the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Opal intensified rapidly and unexpectedly over the Gulf of Mexico between 1800 UTC 3 October and 1000 UTC 4 October 1995. During this period the storm central pressure decreased from 963 to 916 hPa and sustained winds reached 68 m s?1. ...

Lance F. Bosart; W. Edward Bracken; John Molinari; Christopher S. Velden; Peter G. Black

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Influence of Atmospheric Asymmetries on the Intensification of Hurricane Opal: Piecewise PV Inversion Diagnosis of a GFDL Model Forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although Hurricane Opal of 1995 is one of the most intensely studied hurricanes ever, the cause of the hurricane's rapid intensification over the Gulf of Mexico is still a matter of controversy. While some authors have concluded that an ...

Lloyd J. Shapiro; J. Dominique Mller

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A synoptic comparison of the MHD and the OPAL equations of state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed comparison is carried out between two popular equations of state (EOS), the Mihalas-Hummer-Dappen (MHD) and the OPAL equations of state, which have found widespread use in solar and stellar modeling during the past two decades. They are parts of two independent efforts to recalculate stellar opacities; the international Opacity Project (OP) and the Livermore-based OPAL project. We examine the difference between the two equations of state in a broad sense, over the whole applicable rho-T range, and for three different chemical mixtures. Such a global comparison highlights both their differences and their similarities. We find that omitting a questionable hard-sphere correction, tau, to the Coulomb interaction in the MHD formulation, greatly improves the agreement between the MHD and OPAL EOS. We also find signs of differences that could stem from quantum effects not yet included in the MHD EOS, and differences in the ionization zones that are probably caused by differences in the mechanisms for pressure ionization. Our analysis do not only give a clearer perception of the limitations of each equation of state for astrophysical applications, but also serve as guidance for future work on the physical issues behind the differences. The outcome should be an improvement of both equations of state.

R. Trampedach; W. Dappen; V. A. Baturin

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

A synoptic comparison of the MHD and the OPAL equations of state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed comparison is carried out between two popular equations of state (EOS), the Mihalas-Hummer-Dappen (MHD) and the OPAL equations of state, which have found widespread use in solar and stellar modeling during the past two decades. They are parts of two independent efforts to recalculate stellar opacities; the international Opacity Project (OP) and the Livermore-based OPAL project. We examine the difference between the two equations of state in a broad sense, over the whole applicable rho-T range, and for three different chemical mixtures. Such a global comparison highlights both their differences and their similarities. We find that omitting a questionable hard-sphere correction, tau, to the Coulomb interaction in the MHD formulation, greatly improves the agreement between the MHD and OPAL EOS. We also find signs of differences that could stem from quantum effects not yet included in the MHD EOS, and differences in the ionization zones that are probably caused by differences in the mechanisms for pres...

Trampedach, R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

Ian B. Burgess; Joanna Aizenberg; Marko Loncar

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene and nonpedogenic/hypogene deposits and their relationship to the origin of calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. Special report No. 14  

SciTech Connect

This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this report is to try and establish criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene deposits of calcite/opal versus non-pedogenic/hypogene deposits of calcite/opal. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the pedogenic-hypogene debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site.

Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Monger, H.C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Olivier Cattaneo Gary Gereffi Cornelia Staritz Global Value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Banshee Reeks Nature Preserve · Sabine Hall ·PotomacSupply · Columbia Forest Products' plywood plant

Richardson, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reek opal moxa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Opals, Photonic Band Gap Materials, Pleochroic Refraction, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting Diode with Hole Blocking Materials as Dopants for Transport Layers Luminescence of the...

22

Red Opal: product-feature scoring from reviews  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online shoppers are generally highly task-driven: they have a certain goal in mind, and they are looking for a product with features that are consistent with that goal. Unfortunately, finding a product with specific features is extremely time-consuming ... Keywords: e-commerce, feature extraction, product reviews, search

Christopher Scaffidi; Kevin Bierhoff; Eric Chang; Mikhael Felker; Herman Ng; Chun Jin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coherent Phonon-Grain Boundary Scattering in Silicon Inverse Opals Bibek R. Parajuli,,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission coefficient of the grain boundary. Atomistic simulations40 reveal that the transmission dependence of the phonon reflection coefficient calculated from these simulations follows 2 was cleaved into two pieces: one for XRD and one for thermal measurement. (35) Klemens, P. G. Thermochim. Acta

Braun, Paul

24

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602792 Filling Fraction Dependent Properties of Inverse Opal Metallic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/grant number DAAD19-03-1- 0227. Some experiments were performed in the Center for Micro- analysis of Materials with previous observation on mono- layer cavity structures.[15] Our data is con- sistent with a model whereb). The result of this etching can be structurally modeled as an increase in the diameter

Braun, Paul

25

Balanced Contributions to the Intensification of Hurricane Opal as Diagnosed from a GFDL Model Forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary and propagating asymmetric features of atmospheric or oceanic origin near a hurricane are known to have an impact on its evolution. Although theoretical and observational studies have investigated the influence of such features on ...

J. Dominique Mller; Lloyd J. Shapiro

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Modification of the spontaneous emission of CdTe nanocrystals in TiO 2 inverted opals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A light source in a three-dimensional photonic crystal has been realized by depositing CdTenanocrystals on the inner surface of TiO 2 inverted opalfilms. Two effects

V. G. Solovyev; S. G. Romanov; C. M. Sotomayor Torres; M. Mller; R. Zentel; N. Gaponik; A. Eychmller; A. L. Rogach

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

28

NIST Reference transmittance densiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... illumination to the film step tablet with the recommended spectral flux distribution. ... film above the flash opal to measure the transmission density on ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

com  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Manager for Nuclear Operations at the Australian Nuclear Science & ... the 20MW open pool light water (OPAL) research reactor since going ...

30

Improved Photometric Standards and Calibration Procedures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from the external source is incident at 45 while the light from the ... A group of twelve 40 W opal-bulb incandescent lamps, operated at ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

ARE Update Volume 10, Number 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price Differentials Constant SoCal-border Opal Malin-Chicago Citygate4. Chicago Citygate 5. Henry Hub tial price equilibrium.

Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey; Hardesty, Shermain; Nataraj, Shanthi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Engineering...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fusion Energy Division, Plasma Fueling Group Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fusion Energy Division, Theory Group OPAL Experiment at Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), CERN...

33

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

46 47-5051-54 700703701145147148149  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

387 359 391 393 394 355 39 5 39 9 35 3 35 1 228 220 218 214 199 16 5 163 15 9 15 7 15 5 15 3 15 2 N M(EAST (AMERICANSTUDIES) YOSTHOUSE OAKC REEK C LU B ADM IN - OFFIC E REN TA L O FFIC E EU C A LYP TU S RO O M STUDIO EV-3 EV-2 EV-1 Village Escondido 06-710 MANZANITA DO M ANNEX MAINT. CTR. HOUSING (ADMIN) ESC. SLA VIA

Prinz, Friedrich B.

35

Extratropical Transition of Tropical Cyclones over the Western North Pacific. Part I: Evolution of Structural Characteristics during the Transition Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of extratropical cyclone structural characteristics that resulted from the extratropical transition of Typhoon (TY) David (1997) and TY Opal (1997) over the western North Pacific is examined. David moved poleward ahead of a ...

Patrick A. Harr; Russell L. Elsberry

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydrothermal Alteration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Hydrothermal Alteration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Alteration Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Alteration: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Opalized rock is often valued for its spectacular colors and it may indicate past hydrothermal activity (reference: https://uwaterloo.ca/earth-sciences-museum/what-earth/what-earth-minerals/what-earth-precious-opal) The heat and minerals of hydrothermal waters may result in the chemical alteration of rocks that it comes in contact with. The minerals that result from this alteration may be evidence of past hydrothermal activity. Opalization - alteration to opal. Argillization- alteration to clay minerals such as smectite, illite, and kaolinite which often form caprocks.

37

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Einstein "Einstein and the Daytime Sky" (continued) A B C D C. Imitation of opal Since Einstein was addressing a more general question than the color of the atmosphere, his results...

38

Wyoming's Economic Future: Planning for Sustained Prosperity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Highest-Priority the Highest-Priority Geological CO 2 Storage Sites and Formations in Wyoming Ronald C. Surdam Director, Carbon Management Institute Modified from Surdam, R.C., Jiao, Z., Stauffer, P., & Miller, T., 2009, An integrated strategy for carbon management combining geological CO 2 sequestration, displaced fluid production, and water treatment: Wyoming State Geological Survey Challenges in Geologic Resource Development No. 8, 25 p. WSGS, UW, State, and DOE- funded research identified two high-capacity sites in southwest Wyoming: Rock Springs Uplift & Moxa Arch Carbon Capture Potential In Southwest Wyoming Surdam, R.C. & Jiao, Z., 2007, The Rock Springs Uplift: An outstanding geological CO 2 sequestration site in southwest Wyoming: Wyoming State Geological Survey Challenges in Geologic Resource

39

Design of a grid service-based platform for in silico protein-ligand screenings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid computing offers the powerful alternative of sharing resources on a worldwide scale, across different institutions to run computationally intensive, scientific applications without the need for a centralized supercomputer. Much effort has been put ... Keywords: DOCK, Grid computing, Molecular simulation, Opal OP, Virtual screening

Marshall J. Levesque; Kohei Ichikawa; Susumu Date; Jason H. Haga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sharing and Protection in a Single-Address-Space Operating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of protection structures. Section 3 gives an overview of the basic Opal abstractions. Section 4 then describes or sparsely used data structures. Private-address-space systems force poor tradeoffs between protection, per others [Druschel et al. 1992 b]) that operat- ing system protection structures are not the right level

Levy, Hank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reek opal moxa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Probing Hurricanes with Stable Isotopes of Rain and Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain and water vapor were collected during flights in Hurricanes Olivia (1994), Opal (1995), Marilyn (1995), and Hortense (1995) and analyzed for their stable isotopic concentrations, or ratios, H218O:H2O and HDO:H2O. The spatial patterns and ...

Stanley Gedzelman; James Lawrence; John Gamache; Michael Black; Edward Hindman; Robert Black; Jason Dunion; Hugh Willoughby; Xiaoping Zhang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Presented by The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report" Maslow, A. H. (1943). A Theory of Human Motivation. Psychological Review, 50, 370-396. David · Under development at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) Bragg Institute for instruments on the OPAL reactor source · ANSTO Team: Nick Hauser, Tony Lam · Mark Green (TechX, Buffalo

43

CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MCKEESPORT MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE WALBORN RESERVOIR YOUN GSVILLE RPD-LORAIN -1 INGOMAR-GRUBBS BIG MEADOWS GARD EN ISLE TURT LE CREEK LEWIST ON E BR USH CR EEK FOOT VILLE BU LL CREEK BESSEMER EAGLEVILLE LIVER POOL E RIDGEVILLE E EVANS CIT Y GUIT ONVILLE WOLF S COR NERS WIN DFALL ABBEYVILLE ROC K CAMP LEATH ER WOOD AR COLA CR EEK MEC HANICST OWN NINE MILE RU N WALKCHALK RENFR EW-MCCALMONT BU FFALO N VALENCIA WELLIN GT ON

44

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL DEGAS COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL DEGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL DEGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INT H WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CR EEK C OAL DEGAS OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS BIG SANDY C REEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL DEGAS

45

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

46

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

47

Up-dated opacities from the Opacity Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the code AUTOSTRUCTURE, extensive calculations of inner-shell atomic data have been made for the chemical elements He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. The results are used to obtain up-dated opacities from the Opacity Project, OP. A number of other improvements on earlier work have also been included. Rosseland-mean opacities from OP are compared with those from OPAL. Differences of 5 to 10% occur. OP gives the `Z-bump', at log(T)=5.2, to be shifted to slightly higher temperatures. The opacities from OP, as functions of temperature and density, are smoother than those from OPAL. Extensive tests show that the numerical accuracy of the OP opacities following integration over frequency mesh and interpolation on temperature-density mesh is better than 1%. Prior to a number of recent investigations which have indicated a need for a downward revision in the solar abundances of oxygen and other elements, there was good agreement between properties of the sun deduced from helioseismology and from stellar evolution models calculated using OPAL opacities. The revisions in abundances destroy that agreement. In a recent paper Bahcall et al argue that the agreement would be restored if opacities for the regions of the sun between 0.7 and 0.4 solar radii were larger than those given by OPAL by about 10%. In the region concerned, the present results from OP do not differ from those of OPAL by more than 2.5%.

N. R. Badnell; M. A. Bautista; K. Butler; F. Delahaye; C. Mendoza; P. Palmeri; C. J. Zeippen; M. J. Seaton

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mixing of biogenic siliceous and terrigenous clastic sediments: South Belridge field and Beta field, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intermixing and interbedding of biogenically derived siliceous sediment with terrigenous clastic sediment in reservoirs of upper Miocene age provides both reservoir rock and seal and influences productivity by affecting porosity and permeability. Miocene reservoirs commonly contain either biogenic-dominated cyclic diatomite, porcelanite, or chert (classic Monterey Formation) or clastic-dominated submarine fan sequences with interbedded or intermixed siliceous members of biogenic origin. Biogenic-clastic cycles, 30-180 ft thick, at South Belridge field were formed by episodic influx of clastic sediment from distant submarine fans mixing with slowly accumulating diatomaceous ooze. The cycles consist of basal silt and pelletized massive diatomaceous mudstone, overlain by burrowed, faintly bedded clayey diatomite and topped by laminated diatomite. Cycle tops have higher porosity and permeability, lower grain density, and higher oil saturation than clay and silt-rich portions of the cycles. Submarine fan sediments forming reservoirs at the Beta field are comprised of interbedded sands and silts deposited in a channelized middle fan to outer fan setting. Individual turbidites display fining-upward sequences, with oil-bearing sands capped by wet micaceous silts. Average sands are moderately to poorly sorted, fine- to medium-grained arkosic arenites. Sands contain pore-filling carbonate and porcelaneous cements. Porcelaneous cement consists of a mixture of opal-A, opal-CT, and chert with montmorillonite and minor zeolite. This cement is an authigenic material precipitated in intergranular pore space. The origin of the opal is biogenic, with recrystallization of diatom frustules (opal-A) into opal-CT lepispheres and quartz crystals. Porcelaneous cement comprises 4-21% of the bulk volume of the rock. Seventy percent of the bulk volume of the cement is micropore space.

Schwartz, D.E. (Shell Western Exploration and Production, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

High energy physics at UC Riverside  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; D{phi} experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon interactions at TEV II; CYGNUS experiment; final results from {nu}{sub e}{sup {minus}e} elastic scattering; physics with CLEO detector at CESR; results from JADE at PETRA; rare kaon-decay experiment at BNL; search for top quark; and super conducting super collider activities.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Institut de Minralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condenss UMR 7590 CNRS UPMC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the vicinity of uranium mine tailings sites or for the safety assessment of potential high-level nuclear waste Spéciation de l'uranium dans l'environnement : Application aux opales de Nopal I (Mexique) et aux résidus nucléaires à haute activité. La spéciation de l'uranium, influencée par de nombreux facteurs biotiques ou

52

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, January--March 1993. Volume 3, No. 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: High Fluence Third Harmonic Generation; Ultraviolet Induced Transient Absorption in KDP and Its Influence on Fourth Harmonic Frequency Conversion; Relativistic Semiclassical Atomic Transition Rates; Verification of OPAL Opacity Code Predictions for Conditions of Astrophysical Interest; Solid Hydrogen Surfaces; Large Aperture Sol-Gel Random Phase Plates for Beam Smoothing on Nova; and Neutron Time-of-Flight Ion Temperature Diagnostic for Nova.

Amendt, P.A. [ed.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tau lepton physics at LEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The talk covers three contributions on (i) the final measurement of branching ratios and spectral functions of t decays using the full LEP-I data from ALEPH, (ii) a preliminary measurement of the t hadronic branching ratios from DELPHI and (iii) a measurement of the strange spectral function in hadronic t decays from OPAL. These measurements are discussed and the relevant physics topics are briefly reviewed.

Z. Zhang; the ALEPH; DELPHI; OPAL Collaboration

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

The strong coupling from tau decays without prejudice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review our recent determination of the strong coupling \\alpha_s from the OPAL data for non-strange hadronic tau decays. We find that \\alpha_s(m^2_\\tau) =0.325+-0.018 using fixed-order perturbation theory, and \\alpha_s(m^2_\\tau)=0.347+-0.025 using contour-improved perturbation theory. At present, these values supersede any earlier determinations of the strong coupling from hadronic tau decays, including those from ALEPH data.

Boito, Diogo; Jamin, Matthias; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but it also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization electrostatics potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.

Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M.; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred; Nielsen, Jens E.; Baker, Nathan A.

2011-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than during the deposition of natural calcite-opal deposits.

S. Levy

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Towards Quantitative Simulations of High Power Proton Cyclotrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSI operates a cyclotron based high intensity proton accelerator routinely at an average beam power of 1.3MW. With this power the facility is at the worldwide forefront of high intensity proton accelerators. The beam current is practically limited by losses at extraction and the resulting activation of accelerator components. Further intensity upgrades and new projects aiming at an even higher average beam power, are only possible if the relative losses can be lowered in proportion, thus keeping absolute losses at a constant level. Maintaining beam losses at levels allowing hands-on maintenance is a primary challenge in any high power proton machine design and operation. In consequence, predicting beam halo at these levels is a great challenge and will be addressed in this paper. High power hadron driver have being used in many disciplines of science and, a growing interest in the cyclotron technology for high power hadron drivers are being observed very recently. This report will briefly introduce OPAL, a tool for precise beam dynamics simulations including 3D space charge. One of OPAL's flavors (OPAL-cycl) is dedicated to high power cyclotron modeling and is explained in greater detail. We then explain how to obtain initial conditions for our PSI Ring cyclotron which still delivers the world record in beam power of 1.3 MW continuous wave (cw). Several crucial steps are explained necessary to be able to predict tails at the level of 3\\sigma ... 4\\sigma in the PSI Ring cyclotron. We compare our results at the extraction with measurements, obtained with a 1.18 MW cw production beam. Based on measurement data, we develop a simple linear model to predict beam sizes of the extracted beam as a function of intensities and confirm the model with simulations.

Y. J. Bi; A. Adelmann; R. Dlling; M. Humbel; W. Joho; M. Seidel; T. J. Zhang

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Abstract Infrared spectroscopy is particularly good at identifying awide variety of hydrothermally altered minerals with no samplepreparation, and is especially helpful in discrimination amongclay minerals. We have performed several promising pilot studieson geothermal drill core and cuttings that suggest the efficiencyof the technique to sample continuously and provide alterationlogs similar to geophysical logs. We have successfully identifiedlayered silicates, zeolites, opal, calcite, and iron oxides and

59

Constraining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analyses of solar photospheric abundances suggest that the oxygen abundance in the solar atmosphere needs to be revised downwards. In this study we investigate the consequence of this revision on helioseismic analyses of the depth of the solar convection zone and the helium abundance in the solar envelope and find no significant effect. We also find that the revised abundances along with the current OPAL opacity tables are not consistent with seismic data. A significant upward revision of the opacity tables is required to make solar models with lower oxygen abundance consistent with seismic observations.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

SOLAR MIXTURE OPACITY CALCULATIONS USING DETAILED CONFIGURATION AND LEVEL ACCOUNTING TREATMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An opacity model (OPAS) combining detailed configuration and level accounting treatments has been developed to calculate radiative opacity of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The model is presented and used to compute spectral opacities of a solar mixture. Various density-temperature couples have been considered from the solar center up to the vicinity of the radiative/convective zone interface. For a given solar thermodynamic path, OPAS calculations are compared to Opacity Project (OP) and OPAL data. Rosseland mean opacity values are in very good agreement over all the considered solar thermodynamic path, while OPAS and OP spectral opacities of each element may vary considerably. Main sources of discrepancy are discussed.

Blancard, Christophe; Cosse, Philippe; Faussurier, Gerald [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reek opal moxa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

MSSM Higgs Boson Searches at LEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final results from the MSSM Higgs boson searches from the LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL are presented. The results are statistically combined and the statistical significance for signal and background hypotheses are given. Upper bounds on the production cross sections are set for several Higgs-like topologies. Interpretations for six benchmark scenarios in the MSSM, both for CP-conserving and CP-violating scenarios, are given. Limits on the tan(beta) parameter, and in some scenarios upper limits on the neutral Higgs boson masses are set.

Andre Sopczak

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Dietary supplementation of marine algae and the modification of thrombocyte aggregation parameters in avian pulmonary hypertension syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with marine algae (MA) as a source of omega-3 fatty acids on thrombocyte aggregation and the incidence of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS) in the broiler chicken. Broilers were either reared under hypobaric conditions (simulated altitude 2900 m) to induce PHS or under normobaric conditions (altitude 96.7 m). Broilers were fed a 0.8% MA diet in the first experiment and a 5.8% MA diet in the second experiment for a period of five reeks. Compared to normobaric broilers, hypobaric broilers had lower body weights, increased hematocrit levels, and greater right ventricular weight to total ventricular weight (RV/TV) ratios. Body weights, lung weights, and hematocrit levels were not different between either dose of MA and control-fed birds in either environment. RV/TV ratios were not different between 0.8% MA-fed and control-fed broilers in the first experiment. There were no differences in the rate of PHS mortality under hypobaric conditions between control-fed and 0.8% MA-fed birds. In the second experiment, 5.8% MA-fed broilers reared under hypobaric conditions had a greater RV/TV ratio than control-fed birds in the same environment, and an increased rate of PHS mortality. Compared to normobaric broilers, hypobaric broilers produced less nitric oxide in the right pulmonary artery, significant after four weeks of hypobaric exposure. Thrombocyte counts were reduced in hypobaric broilers at four and five weeks of age. There were no consistent differences in whole blood or thrombocyte-rich plasma aggregation between any diet or environment group. These data suggest that dietary supplementation of 5.8% MA appears to enhance right ventricular hypertrophy and increase PHS-mortality in hypobaric-reared broilers. Additionally, changes in the rate of thrombocyte aggregation do not seem to be correlated with these results nor with the development of PHS in the broiler chicken.

Carpenter, Amy Renee

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

After the fire is out: A post in-situ combustion audit, Upper Miocene deepwater sands, San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

An audit of small-scale, air in-situ combustion projects developed in the upper Miocene Monarch and Webster unconsolidated, arkosic sand reservoirs, Midway Sunset field, Kern County, California, demonstrates minor rock diagenesis. Burn distribution and progression is controlled by reservoir continuity, layering, and original permeability variations. Air in-situ combustion projects were operated between 1962 and 1976. Injected air drives a burning oil (coke) front through a reservoir reaching maximum temperatures of 650C. Dense new well control including 3,000 ft of core is part of a large steamdrive development. Fireflood-induced diagenesis was clearly visible in core. Altered zones include sands with reduced oil saturations, burn zones with remaining coke, and reddish (oxidized) zones with no hydrocarbons. Wireline log response in these zones have been highly modified. Detailed mapping by subzone using pre- and post-burn logs permits the determination of three-dimensional burn and reduced saturation geometries. Little rock alteration occurred in these sands. The only diagenesis of the sand fraction was to calcite grains, where oil/calcite reactions produced calcium sulfate rims and CO{sub 2} gas. X-ray diffraction of finer 'matrix' reveals no recrystallization of opal-CT, no irreversible collapse of smectite, and only minor removal of kaolinite. Partial dissolution of opal and zeolites was visible in SEM. This nonequilibrium mineral suite probably reflects kinetic control by grain size, protective grain coatings, and alteration time.

Eagan, J.M.; Barrett, M.L. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Soustek, P.G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

s077.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Heavy Neutral Leptons, Searches for NODE=S077 (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons NODE=S077245 Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS NODE=S077340 Note that LEP results in combination with REUSSER 91 exclude a fourth NODE=S077340 stable neutrino with m< 2400 GeV. NODE=S077MNS;CHECK LIMITS VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >45.0 >45.0 >45.0 >45.0 95 ABREU 92B DLPH Dirac OCCUR=2 >39.5 >39.5 >39.5 >39.5 95 ABREU 92B DLPH Majorana >44.1 95 ALEXANDER 91F OPAL Dirac OCCUR=2 >37.2 95 ALEXANDER 91F OPAL Majorana none 3-100 90 SATO 91 KAM2 Kamiokande II >42.8 95 1 ADEVA 90S L3 Dirac OCCUR=2 >34.8 95 1 ADEVA 90S L3 Majorana >42.7 95 DECAMP 90F ALEP Dirac

65

Citation: K. Hagiwara  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Heavy Neutral Leptons, Searches for (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Note that LEP results in combination with REUSSER 91 exclude a fourth stable neutrino with m< 2400 GeV. VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >45.0 >45.0 >45.0 >45.0 95 ABREU 92B DLPH Dirac >39.5 >39.5 >39.5 >39.5 95 ABREU 92B DLPH Majorana >44.1 95 ALEXANDER 91F OPAL Dirac >37.2 95 ALEXANDER 91F OPAL Majorana none 3-100 90 SATO 91 KAM2 Kamiokande II >42.8 95 1 ADEVA 90S L3 Dirac >34.8 95 1 ADEVA 90S L3 Majorana >42.7 95 DECAMP 90F ALEP Dirac 1 ADEVA 90S limits for the heavy neutrino apply if the mixing with the charged leptons satisfies U 1 j 2

66

s077.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutral Neutral Leptons, Searches for (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons (A) Heavy Neutral Leptons Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Stable Neutral Heavy Lepton MASS LIMITS Note that LEP results in combination with REUSSER 91 exclude a fourth stable neutrino with m< 2400 GeV. VALUE (GeV) CL% DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT >45.0 >45.0 >45.0 >45.0 95 ABREU 92B DLPH Dirac >39.5 >39.5 >39.5 >39.5 95 ABREU 92B DLPH Majorana >44.1 95 ALEXANDER 91F OPAL Dirac >37.2 95 ALEXANDER 91F OPAL Majorana none 3-100 90 SATO 91 KAM2 Kamiokande II >42.8 95 1 ADEVA 90S L3 Dirac >34.8 95 1 ADEVA 90S L3 Majorana >42.7 95 DECAMP 90F ALEP Dirac 1 ADEVA 90S limits for the heavy neutrino apply if the mixing with the charged leptons satisfies U 1 j 2 + U 2

67

Up-dated opacities from the Opacity Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the code AUTOSTRUCTURE, extensive calculations of inner-shell atomic data have been made for the chemical elements He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. The results are used to obtain up-dated opacities from the Opacity Project, OP. A number of other improvements on earlier work have also been included. Rosseland-mean opacities from OP are compared with those from OPAL. Differences of 5 to 10% occur. OP gives the `Z-bump', at log(T)=5.2, to be shifted to slightly higher temperatures. The opacities from OP, as functions of temperature and density, are smoother than those from OPAL. Extensive tests show that the numerical accuracy of the OP opacities following integration over frequency mesh and interpolation on temperature-density mesh is better than 1%. Prior to a number of recent investigations which have indicated a need for a downward revision in the solar abundances of oxygen and other elements, there was good agreement between properties of the sun deduced from helioseismol...

Badnell, N R; Butler, K; Delahaye, F; Mendoza, C I; Palmeri, P; Zeippen, C J; Seaton, M J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two-meter survey work at Rhodes Marsh began in December of 2007 followed by more recent activity in May of 2008. More than 65 2-meter-deep temperatures have been measured over a distance of 7 km (Figure 4). At the foot of the Pilot Mountains these data roughly parallel the southern end of Benton Springs fault. Anomalous temperatures up to 26.7°C occur adjacent to opalized sands and reveal a significant NW elongate temperature anomaly more than 5 km long. Cold shallow groundwater at the playa's eastern margin

70

Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relict Geothermal Features Relict Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Relict Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Relict Geothermal Features: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Relict geothermal surface feature, include the mineral formations left behind by hot springs, fumaroles, and geysers as well as the alteration of minerals by geothermal waters (e.g. opalization of sediments). Such alteration and deposits are indicators of past hydrothermal activity. Though surface activity has ceased in many areas, relict geothermal features may indicate the presence of a still active geothermal system below the surface. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Relict_Geothermal_Features&oldid=600720"

71

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming: Where Power Transmission & Generation Meet Wyoming: Where Power Transmission & Generation Meet Wyoming Infrastructure Authority Given our vast resources, we're the Energy Gateway to the West June 21, 2011 Fort Collins, CO 1 Loyd G. Drain Executive Director Meeting Transmission Challenges in the Rocky Mountain Region 2 Wyoming * Wyoming is #1 in total energy produced in the U.S. * #1 in coal production-PRB coal is marketed in 37 states * #2 in natural gas production * #1 in uranium reserves * #1 in developable Class 6 & 7 wind resource in the West * In the last year, WY has added 2BCFD+ of gas pipeline capacity o El Paso's Ruby Line from Opal, WY to Malin, OR: 1.5 BCFD o TransCanada's Bison Line from NE WY to ND: .477 BCFD

72

Particle Data Group - Errata 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Review of Particle Physics 7 Review of Particle Physics During the time between editions of the Review of Particle Physics and the Particle Physics Booklet, we often find a number of errata. We correct most errata on our WWW pages. If you should find errata that are not known to us, please send mail to pdg @ lbl.gov. Page 1 and multiple others of the Web version below: Gauge and Higgs Boson Particle Listings Z boson (July 16, 2007): - In sub-header text to many measurement blocks any reference to "The Z boson" note should also include reference to LEP-SLC 06 (published in Phys. Rept. 427; 257 (2006)), e.g.: 'see the note "The Z boson" and ref. LEP-SLC 06' in the "Z MASS" sub-header text (page 1). - List of Z REFERENCES, page 48, should contain LEP-SLC 06 PRPL 427 257 ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL, SLD

73

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The distinction between a fluid's liquid and gaseous phases breaks down at a certain temperature and pressure; when illuminated under these conditions, the fluid looks milky white, like a common opal. Einstein found how this relates to the reason the sky is blue. A B C D A. A path with a detour If you look at many artists' renderings of Albert Einstein, you are likely to find some that depict Einstein with some representation of the universe as a whole, or black holes, or other objects in deep space. Because many such pictures exist, we may, somewhat unconsciously, associate Einstein with the dark nighttime sky. This is a quite reasonable association, since Einstein's theories of space and time deal with the universe as a whole and with certain astrophysical

74

A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Erosion in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka), Wyoming, has exposed a cross section of older hydrothermal alteration in the canyon walls. The altered outcrops of the post-collapse tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) extend from the canyon rim to more than 300 m beneath it. The hydrothermal minerals are zoned, with an advanced argillic alteration consisting of an association of quartz (opal)

75

Structural fabric and in-situ stress analyses of the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is a hot-water dominated system in fractured plutonic and metamorphic rock. A principal purpose of this study was to determine the geometry and origin of fractures as an aid to developing a structural model for the reservoir. The results may also be useful for the design of hydrofracture experiments at the Roosevelt KGRA. Three major normal fault trends are present in the Mineral Mountains. North-northeast trending faults, including the Opal Mound Fault, form the center of low electrical resistivity and high heat flow anomalies. Major east-west trending structures such as the Hot Springs Fault form structural boundaries for the geothermal reservoir. A set of northwest trending faults also occurs in the KGRA. Structural analysis was conducted by field mapping of joints, small shear zones, and dikes. Three major styles of fracturing have been identified.

Yusas, M.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Regmi Research Series ,Year 14, December 1, 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Notlficit~n of. the Home Department, 1952 '11. ll1tJ re ions of tl opal, ,18l;4 12. Hulak. Arrangements) A.D. 1825-'26 13. Bem1s91On of Jhara Obligations A.D. 181G-1? ' 14. Mora Documents on the .Thara System Currency System in Nineteenth... Edra 17 t 1995 (0) .... ptv.)Joor. 2, 1938).. - - , ~r1a~ tj1nlstc~ _Juddha Shumshere 1ssu(;d tlE .fOll~Wing oJdorQll Kort;.1k 29. 17'1l (Noval!lbor 1", 1940) ' ': , In Case a " b~gr.hatt.1 It:lvy 1~ imposed, _ (replacing the I11des and slur...

Regmi, Mahesh C

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at LEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four LEP collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, have collected a total of 2461 pb-1 of e+e- collision data at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. The data are used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The search results of the four collaborations are combined and examined in a likelihood test for their consistency with two hypotheses: the background hypothesis and the signal plus background hypothesis. The corresponding confidences have been computed as functions of the hypothetical Higgs boson mass. A lower bound of 114.4 GeV/c2 is established, at the 95% confidence level, on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson. The LEP data are also used to set upper bounds on the HZZ coupling for various assumptions concerning the decay of the Higgs boson.

G. Abbiendi

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at LEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combined results of the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson from the four LEP experiments are given. These results are based on the full data sample collected by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL at centre-of-mass energies up to 209GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of about 2.5fb-1. A slight excess of events over the background expectation is found at the 2sigma level, originating mainly from the ALEPH 4-jet channel. This excess is compatible with what expected for the production of a SM Higgs boson with a mass of 115.6GeV/c2. A combined 95% confidence level lower limit of 114.1GeV/c2 on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson is derived.

F. Cerutti

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geology of the Soda Lake geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Soda Lake geothermal area is located in the Carson Desert, west-central Nevada. Hot springs activity has occurred in the Soda Lake area in the past, resulting in surface deposits which have motivated present geothermal exploration. The geothermal anomaly is in Quaternary clastic sediments which are as much as 4600 feet thick. The sediments consist of interbedded deltaic, lacustrine, and alluvial sediments. Quaternary basaltic igneous activity has produced cinder cones, phreatic explosions that formed the maar occupied by Soda Lake, and possible dikes. Opal deposition and soil alteration are restricted to a small area two miles north of Soda Lake. The location of hot springs activity and the surface thermal anomaly may be partially controlled by north-northeast-trending faults.

Sibbett, B.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

2001-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reek opal moxa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reasons for production decline in the diatomite, Belridge oil field: a rock mechanics view  

SciTech Connect

This work summarized research conducted on diatomite cores from the Belridge oil field in Kern County. The study was undertaken to try to explain the rapid decline in oil production in diatomite wells. Characterization of the rock showed that the rock was composed principally of amorphous opaline silica diatoms with only a trace of crystoballite quartz or chert quartz. Physical properties tests showed the diatomite to be of low strength and plastic. Finally, it was established that long-term creep of diatomite into a propped fracture proceeds at a rate of approximately 6 x 10-5 in./day, a phenomenon which may be a primary cause of rapid production declines. The testing program also revealed a matrix stength for the formation of calculated 1325 PSI, a value to consider when depleting the reservoir. This also may help to explain the phase transformation of opal ct at calculated 2000 to 2500 ft depth.

Strickland, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Search for Neutral MSSM Higgs Bosons at LEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four LEP collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, have searched for the neutral Higgs bosons which are predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The data of the four collaborations are statistically combined and examined for their consistency with the background hypothesis and with a possible Higgs boson signal. The combined LEP data show no significant excess of events which would indicate the production of Higgs bosons. The search results are used to set upper bounds on the cross-sections of various Higgs-like event topologies. The results are interpreted within the MSSM in a number of "benchmark" models, including CP-conserving and CP-violating scenarios. These interpretations lead in all cases to large exclusions in the MSSM parameter space. Absolute limits are set on the parameter tanb and, in some scenarios, on the masses of neutral Higgs bosons.

ALEPH; DELPHI; L3; OPAL Collaborations. The LEP Working Group "for Higgs Boson Searches"

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah: characterization of rock types and alteration in Getty Oil Company well Utah state 52-21  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Getty Oil Company well 52-21 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area was drilled to 7500 feet in predominantly upper amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks. All lithologies in the drill hole are pervasively but weakly altered: the alteration assemblage is chlorite + sericite + clays with occasional traces of calcite, above 2300 feet, and chlorite + sericite + clays + calcite +- epidote below 2500 feet. A zone of increased alteration intensity from approximately 1800 feet to 2300 feet occurs within and adjacent to a dacite dike which cuts the metamorphic rocks. A second zone of stronger alteration extends from 6000 feet to the bottom of the drill hole. The drill hole which is located approximately 5000 feet south of the center of the silica apron known as the Opal Mound was apparently drilled beyond the influence of acid, high-sulfate brines such as have affected the upper portions of drill holes 72-16, 76-1 and University of Utah 1A and 1B.

Ballantyne, G.H.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NERSC.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based on DFT based on DFT Hai-Ping
Cheng,
Dept.
of
Physics
and
the
Quantum
Theory
 Project,
University
of
Florida
 UF-HPC
 Theoretical Methods * First-Principles
calculaAons
based
on
density 
funcAonal
theory
 * Green's
funcAon
techniques
 * Molecular
Dynamics
 * Boltzmann
equaAon
 * Beyond
LDA-GGA
(+U,
QMC,
GW...)
 * MulA-scale
SimulaAons
 Computer Software * PWSCF,
VASP,
BO-LSD-MD,
SIEATA
 * SMEAGOL,
Igator,
Layer
KKR,
PWSCF-Cond
 * DL_POLY,
AMBER
 * Boltzmann
transport
(no-name)
 * CASINO,
SAX,
SAX-Spin
 * OPAL:
MulA-scale
SimulaAons
 Approach Scientific Problems via computational physics * ParAcle
surface
interacAon:
structure,
dynamics, 
charge
transfer,
magneAc
pa\ern


85

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and alteration mapping analyzed exposed rocks in geothermal region. Neither geologic mapping nor deep drilling have revealed potential deep primary aquifers. Surface alteration at Coso is of three main types: (1) clay-opal-alunite alteration, (2) weak argillic alteration, and (3) stockwork calcite veins and veinlets, which are locally associated with calcareous sinter. References Hulen, J. B. (1 May 1978) Geology and alteration of the Coso

86

The Large-Angle Photon Veto System for the NA62 Experiment at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThe branching ratio (BR) for the decay K + ? ? + ? ? is a sensitive probe for new physics. The NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS will measure this BR to within about 10%. To reject the dominant background from channels with final state photons, the large-angle vetoes (LAVs) must detect photons of energy as low as 200 MeV with an inefficiency of less than 10 ?4, as well as provide energy and time measurements with resolutions of 10 % and 1 ns for 1 GeV photons. The LAV detectors make creative reuse of lead glass blocks recycled from the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. We describe the mechanical design and challenges faced during construction, the characterization of the lead glass blocks and solutions adopted for monitoring their performance, and the development of front-end electronics to allow simultaneous time and energy measurements over an extended dynamic range using the time-over-threshold

F. Ambrosino; B. Angelucci; A. Antonelli; F. Costantini; R. Fantechi; S. Gallorini; S. Giudici; E. Leonardi; I. Mannelli; P. Massarotti; M. Moulson; M. Napolitano; V. Palladino; F. Rafaelli; M. Raggi; G. Saracino; M. Serra; T. Spadaro; P. Valente; S. Venditti; F. Ambrosino; P. Massarotti; M. Napolitano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

s086.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

s s I (J P ) = 0(0 - ) I , J, P need confirmation. Quantum numbers shown are quark- model predictions. B 0 s MASS B 0 s MASS B 0 s MASS B 0 s MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5366.77± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.77± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.77± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.77± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.3. See the ideogram below. 5366.90± 0.28± 0.23 1 AAIJ 12E LHCB p p at 7 TeV 5364.4 ± 1.3 ± 0.7 LOUVOT 09 BELL e + e - → Υ(5S) 5366.01± 0.73± 0.33 2 ACOSTA 06 CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 5369.9 ± 2.3 ± 1.3 32 3 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV 5374 ± 16 ± 2 3 ABREU 94D DLPH e + e - → Z 5359 ± 19 ± 7 1 3 AKERS 94J OPAL e + e - → Z 5368.6 ± 5.6 ± 1.5 2 BUSKULIC 93G ALEP e + e - → Z * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5370 ± 1 ± 3 DRUTSKOY 07A BELL Repl. by LOUVOT 09 5370 ± 40 6 4 AKERS 94J OPAL e + e - → Z 5383.3

88

s028.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Magnetic Monopole Searches NODE=S028 A REVIEW GOES HERE - Check our WWW List of Reviews NODE=S028 Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches NODE=S028C NODE=S028C X-SECT MASS CHG ENERGY (cm 2 ) (GeV) (g) (GeV) BEAM DOCUMENT ID TECN <1.6E- 38 200-1200 1 7000 p p 1 AAD 12CS ATLS <5E- 38 45-102 1 206 e + e - 2 ABBIENDI 08 OPAL <0.2E- 36 200-700 1 1960 p p 3 ABULENCIA 06K CNTR < 2.E- 36 1 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU OCCUR=2 < 0.2 E- 36 2 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU OCCUR=3 < 0.09E- 36 3 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU OCCUR=4 < 0.05E- 36 ≥ 6 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU OCCUR=5 < 2.E- 36 1 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU OCCUR=6 < 0.2E- 36 2 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU OCCUR=7 < 0.07E- 36 3 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU

89

s007.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Number Number of Neutrino Types The neutrinos referred to in this section are those of the Standard SU(2)×U(1) Electroweak Model possibly extended to allow nonzero neutrino masses. Light neutrinos are those with m < m Z /2. The limits are on the number of neutrino mass eigenstates, including ν 1 , ν 2 , and ν 3 . A REVIEW GOES HERE - Check our WWW List of Reviews Number from e + e - Colliders Number from e + e - Colliders Number from e + e - Colliders Number from e + e - Colliders Number of Light ν Types Number of Light ν Types Number of Light ν Types Number of Light ν Types VALUE DOCUMENT ID TECN 2.9840± 0.0082 2.9840± 0.0082 2.9840± 0.0082 2.9840± 0.0082 1 LEP-SLC 06 RVUE * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3.00 ± 0.05 2 LEP 92 RVUE 1 Combined fit from ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL Experiments. 2 Simultaneous fits to all measured cross section data from all four LEP experiments.

90

zmini-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z Z BOSON Revised September 2013 by M.W. Gr¨ unewald (U. College Dublin and U. Ghent), and A. Gurtu (Formerly Tata Inst.). Precision measurements at the Z-boson resonance using electron-positron colliding beams began in 1989 at the SLC and at LEP. During 1989-95, the four LEP experiments (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) made high-statistics studies of the pro- duction and decay properties of the Z. Although the SLD experiment at the SLC collected much lower statistics, it was able to match the precision of LEP experiments in determining the effective electroweak mixing angle sin 2 θ W and the rates of Z decay to b- and c-quarks, owing to availability of polarized electron beams, small beam size, and stable beam spot. The Z-boson properties reported in this section may broadly be categorized as: * The standard 'lineshape' parameters of the Z con- sisting of its mass, M Z , its total width, Γ Z , and

91

s007.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Number Number of Neutrino Types NODE=S007 The neutrinos referred to in this section are those of the Standard NODE=S007 SU(2)×U(1) Electroweak Model possibly extended to allow nonzero neutrino masses. Light neutrinos are those with m < m Z /2. The limits are on the number of neutrino mass eigenstates, including ν 1 , ν 2 , and ν 3 . A REVIEW GOES HERE - Check our WWW List of Reviews NODE=S007 Number from e + e - Colliders Number from e + e - Colliders Number from e + e - Colliders Number from e + e - Colliders NODE=S007210 Number of Light ν Types Number of Light ν Types Number of Light ν Types Number of Light ν Types NODE=S007NE NODE=S007NE VALUE DOCUMENT ID TECN 2.9840 ± 0.0082 2.9840 ± 0.0082 2.9840 ± 0.0082 2.9840 ± 0.0082 1 LEP-SLC 06 RVUE * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3.00 ± 0.05 2 LEP 92 RVUE 1 Combined fit from ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL Experiments. NODE=S007NE;LINKAGE=AL

92

Wall-rock alteration and uranium mineralization in parts of Thomas Range Mining District, San Juan County, Utah, and its significance in mineral exploration  

SciTech Connect

Several important uranium deposits associated with fluorspar and beryllium are located in parts of Thomas Range area. the mineralization is found in dolomites and dolomitic limestones of Paleozoic age and sandstones, tuffs, and rhyolites belonging to the Tertiary Spor Mountain and Topaz Mountain Formations. The pipes, veins, and nodules of fluorspar are replaced by uranium. Veins and disseminations of radioactive fluorspar and opal and overgrowths of secondary minerals are found in rhyolites, tuffs, carbonate rocks, and breccias. The radioactivity in sandstones and conglomerates emanates from weeksite, beta-uranophane, zircon, gummite, and zircon. It also occurs as highly oxidized rare aphanitic grains disseminated in a few ore deposits. The results of the present investigations may influence the initiation of future exploration programs in the Thomas Range mining district. Hydrothermal fluids of deep-seated magmatic origin rich in U, V, Th, Be, and F reacted with the country rocks. The nature and sequence of wall-rock alteration and its paragenetic relationship with the ores have been determined. The mineralization is confined to the altered zones. The ore bodies in the sedimentary rocks and the breccias are located in the fault zones. More than 1000 faults are present in the area, greatly complicating mineral prospecting. The wall-rock alteration is very conspicuous and can be used as a valuable tool in mineral exploration.

Mohammad, H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

s044.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z Z J = 1 THE Z BOSON Revised April 2006 by C. Caso (University of Genova) and A. Gurtu (Tata Institute). Precision measurements at the Z-boson resonance using electron-positron colliding beams began in 1989 at the SLC and at LEP. During 1989-95, the four LEP experiments (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) made high-statistics studies of the pro- duction and decay properties of the Z. Although the SLD experiment at the SLC collected much lower statistics, it was able to match the precision of LEP experiments in determining the effective electroweak mixing angle sin 2 θ W and the rates of Z decay to b- and c-quarks, owing to availability of polarized electron beams, small beam size and stable beam spot. The Z-boson properties reported in this section may broadly be categorized as: * The standard 'lineshape' parameters of the Z con- sisting of its mass, M Z , its total width, Γ Z , and its partial decay widths,

94

s028.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Magnetic Monopole Searches A REVIEW GOES HERE - Check our WWW List of Reviews Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches Monopole Production Cross Section - Accelerator Searches X-SECT MASS CHG ENERGY (cm 2 ) (GeV) (g) (GeV) BEAM DOCUMENT ID TECN <1.6E- 38 200-1200 1 7000 p p 1 AAD 12CS ATLS <5E- 38 45-102 1 206 e + e - 2 ABBIENDI 08 OPAL <0.2E- 36 200-700 1 1960 p p 3 ABULENCIA 06K CNTR < 2.E- 36 1 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.2 E- 36 2 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.09E- 36 3 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.05E- 36 ≥ 6 300 e + p 4,5 AKTAS 05A INDU < 2.E- 36 1 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.2E- 36 2 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.07E- 36 3 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.06E- 36 ≥ 6 300 e + p 4,6 AKTAS 05A INDU < 0.6E- 36 >265 1 1800 p p 7 KALBFLEISCH 04 INDU

95

Citation: K. Hagiwara  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

b b I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 + ) Charge = - 1 3 e Bottom = -1 b-QUARK MASS b-QUARK MASS b-QUARK MASS b-QUARK MASS The b-quark mass is estimated from bottomonium and B masses. It cor- responds to the "running" mass m b (µ = m b ) in the MS scheme. We have converted masses in other schemes to the MS scheme using two-loop QCD pertubation theory with α s (µ=m b ) = 0.22. The range 4.0-4.5 GeV for the MS mass corresponds to 4.6-5.1 GeV for the pole mass (see the "Note on Quark Masses"). VALUE (GeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 4.0 to 4.5 OUR EVALUATION 4.0 to 4.5 OUR EVALUATION 4.0 to 4.5 OUR EVALUATION 4.0 to 4.5 OUR EVALUATION * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3.95 ± 0.57 1 ABBIENDI 01S OPAL MS scheme 4.21 ± 0.05 2 KUHN 01 THEO MS scheme 4.05 ± 0.06 3 NARISON 01B THEO MS scheme 4.7 ± 0.74 4 BARATE 00V ALEP MS scheme 4.20 ± 0.06 5 HOANG 00 THEO MS scheme 4.437 + 0.045 - 0.029 6 LUCHA

96

Hydrothermal alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA: DDH 1976-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot waters of the Roosevelt Thermal Area, Utah, have altered granitic rocks and detritus of the Mineral Range pluton, Utah. Alteration and mineral deposition recognized in a 200' drill core from DDH 1-76 is most intense in the upper 100 feet which consists of altered alluvium and opal deposits; the lower 100 feet is weakly altered quartz monzonite. Petrographic, x-ray, and chemical methods were used to characterize systematic changes in chemistry and mineralogy. Comparison of the alteration mineral assemblages with known water chemistry and equilibrium activity diagrams suggests that a simple solution equilibrium model cannot account for the alteration. A model is proposed in which upward moving thermal water supersaturated with respect to quartz and a downward moving cool water undersaturated with respect to quartz produces the observed alteration. An estimate of the heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration was made by calculating reaction enthalpies for alteration reactions at each depth. The estimated heat flow varied from .02 HFU (for 200' depth, 400,000 yr duration, and no sulfur oxidation) to 67 HFU (for 5,000' depth, 1,000 yr duration, and all sulfur oxidized from sulfide). Heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration are comparable with those from a cooling granitic magma.

Bryant, N.L.; Parry, W.T.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Low Solar Oxygen Abundance from the First Overtone OH Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extremely high-resolution (> 10^5) high-S/N (> 10^3) solar spectrum has been used to measure 15 very weak first overtone (Delta v = 2) infrared OH lines, resulting in a low solar abundance of A(O) ~ 8.6 when MARCS, 3D, and spatially and temporally averaged 3D model atmospheres are used. A higher abundance is obtained with Kurucz (A(O) ~ 8.7) and Holweger & Muller (A(O) ~ 8.8) model atmospheres. The low solar oxygen abundance obtained in this work is in good agreement with a recent 3D analysis of [OI], OI, OH fundamental (Delta v = 1) vibration-rotation and OH pure rotation lines (Asplund et al. 2004). The present result brings further support for a low solar metallicity, and although using a low solar abundance with OPAL opacities ruins the agreement between the calculated and the helioseismic measurement of the depth of the solar convection zone, recent results from the OP project show that the opacities near the base of the solar convection zone are larger than previously thought, bringing further confidence for a low solar oxygen abundance.

Jorge Melendez

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

Search for Charged Higgs Bosons in e+e- Collisions at sqrts(s) = 189-209 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search is made for charged Higgs bosons predicted by Two-Higgs-Doublet extensions of the Standard Model (2HDM) using electron-positron collision data collected by the OPAL experiment at sqrt(s)=189-209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 600 pb-1. Charged Higgs bosons are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into q qbar, tau nu or A W+-. No signal is observed. Model-independent limits on the charged Higgs-boson production cross section are derived by combining these results with previous searches at lower energies. Under the assumption BR(H+- -> tau nu) + BR(H+- -> qq)=1, motivated by general 2HDM type II models, excluded areas on the [m(H+-), BR(H+- -> tau nu)] plane are presented and charged Higgs bosons are excluded up to a mass of 76.3 GeV at 95% confidence level, independent of the branching ratio BR(H+- -> tau nu). A scan of the 2HDM type I model parameter space is performed and limits on the Higgs-boson masses m(H+-) and m(A) are presented for different choices of tan(beta).

The OPAL collaboration

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct solar models with the newly calculated radiative opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) and recently determined (lower) heavy element abundances. We compare results from the new models with predictions of a series of models that use OPAL radiative opacities, older determinations of the surface heavy element abundances, and refinements of nuclear reaction rates. For all the variations we consider, solar models that are constructed with the newer and lower heavy element abundances advocated by Asplund et al. (2005) disagree by much more than the estimated measuring errors with helioseismological determinations of the depth of the solar convective zone, the surface helium composition, the internal sound speeds, and the density profile. Using the new OP radiative opacities, the ratio of the 8 B neutrino flux calculated with the older and larger heavy element abundances (or with the newer and lower heavy element abundances) to the total neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is 1.09 (0.87) with a 9 % experimental uncertainty and a 16 % theoretical uncertainty, 1? errors. Subject headings: Sun: abundances, atomic processes, neutrinos, nuclear reactions, Sun: interior Recent, refined determinations of the surface heavy element abundances of the Sun have led to lower than previously believed heavy element abundances (see Asplund et al. 2005 and references therein). A number of authors have pointed out that these lower heavy element abundances lead to solar models that conflict with different aspects of helioseismological

John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Low Solar Oxygen Abundance from the First Overtone OH Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extremely high-resolution (> 10^5) high-S/N (> 10^3) solar spectrum has been used to measure 15 very weak first overtone (Delta v = 2) infrared OH lines, resulting in a low solar abundance of A(O) ~ 8.6 when MARCS, 3D, and spatially and temporally averaged 3D model atmospheres are used. A higher abundance is obtained with Kurucz (A(O) ~ 8.7) and Holweger & Muller (A(O) ~ 8.8) model atmospheres. The low solar oxygen abundance obtained in this work is in good agreement with a recent 3D analysis of [OI], OI, OH fundamental (Delta v = 1) vibration-rotation and OH pure rotation lines (Asplund et al. 2004). The present result brings further support for a low solar metallicity, and although using a low solar abundance with OPAL opacities ruins the agreement between the calculated and the helioseismic measurement of the depth of the solar convection zone, recent results from the OP project show that the opacities near the base of the solar convection zone are larger than previously thought, bringing further co...

Melendez, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

PC-Cluster-Based Real-Time Simulation of an 8 synchronous machines network with HVDC link using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractIn this paper, we detail the real-time simulation results of a medium-sized network composed of 8 synchronous machines and an HVDC link. The model is composed of two Kundur-like 4 machines networks connected together with a 12pulse HVDC link. The complete network is modeled with SimPowerSystems with ARTEMIS real-time plug-in and is simulated in real-time on a RT-LAB InfiniBand PC-cluster composed of 3 dual-CPU dual-core Opteron PCs. The network model includes the HVDC control and protection systems as well as the synchronous machine regulators and power stabilizers. It also includes typical fault simulation capability like HVDC DC faults, thyristor misfires and AC faults. This model is excellent to study the complex interactions between an HVDC link and AC network under normal and transient conditions. The real-time simulation is controlled and monitored with a TestDrive interface from Opal-RT. This interface, based on LabView, permits easy monitoring and control of the complete system and enables Python-based scripting for automated tests. The proposed simulator can be interfaced with external equipments and controllers by direct reconfiguration of a FPGA I/O card with Xilinx System Generator blockset.

Christian Dufour; Jean-nicolas Paquin; Vincent Lapointe; Jean Blanger; Loic Schoen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tests of hadronic vacuum polarization fits for the muon anomalous magnetic moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a physically motivated model for the isospin-one non-strange vacuum polarization function Pi(Q^2) based on a spectral function given by vector-channel OPAL data from hadronic tau decays for energies below the tau mass and a successful parametrization, employing perturbation theory and a model for quark-hadron duality violations, for higher energies. Using a covariance matrix and Q^2 values from a recent lattice simulation, we then generate fake data for Pi(Q^2) and use it to test fitting methods currently employed on the lattice for extracting the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. This comparison reveals a systematic error much larger than the few-percent total error sometimes claimed for such extractions in the literature. In particular, we find that errors deduced from fits using a Vector Meson Dominance ansatz are misleading, typically turning out to be much smaller than the actual discrepancy between the fit and exact model results. The use of a ...

Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nonlinear RR Lyrae models with new Livermore opacities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A.N. Cox recently showed that a 20% opacity decrease in the 20,000--30,000 K region as indicated by the new Livermore OPAL opacities reconciles the discrepancy between pulsation and evolution masses of double-mode RR Lyrae variables. Nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations were performed for RR Lyrae models of mass 0l75 M{circle_dot}, 51 L{circle_dot}, and Z=0.0001 including this opacity decrease. The Stellingwerf periodic relaxation method was used to converge the models to a limit cycle, and the Floquet matrix eigenvalues calculated to search for a tendency of the fundamental mode to grow from the full-amplitude overtone solution, and the overtone mode to grow from the full-amplitude fundamental solution, thereby predicting double-mode behavior. Models of T{sup eff} < 7000 K with the opacity decrease have positive fundamental-mode growth rates in the overtone solution, in contrast to earlier results by Hodson and Cox, and models with T{sub eff} < 7000 have positive 1st overtone growth rates in the fundamental-mode behavior was not found.

Guzik, J.A.; Cox, A.N.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nonlinear RR Lyrae models with new Livermore opacities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A.N. Cox recently showed that a 20% opacity decrease in the 20,000--30,000 K region as indicated by the new Livermore OPAL opacities reconciles the discrepancy between pulsation and evolution masses of double-mode RR Lyrae variables. Nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations were performed for RR Lyrae models of mass 0l75 M{circle dot}, 51 L{circle dot}, and Z=0.0001 including this opacity decrease. The Stellingwerf periodic relaxation method was used to converge the models to a limit cycle, and the Floquet matrix eigenvalues calculated to search for a tendency of the fundamental mode to grow from the full-amplitude overtone solution, and the overtone mode to grow from the full-amplitude fundamental solution, thereby predicting double-mode behavior. Models of T{sup eff} < 7000 K with the opacity decrease have positive fundamental-mode growth rates in the overtone solution, in contrast to earlier results by Hodson and Cox, and models with T{sub eff} < 7000 have positive 1st overtone growth rates in the fundamental-mode behavior was not found.

Guzik, J.A.; Cox, A.N.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reasons for production decline in the diatomite, Belridge oil field: a rock mechanics view  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes research conducted on diatomite cores from the Belridge oil field in Kern County, CA. The study was undertaken to explain the rapid decline in oil production in diatomite wells by investigating three of six possible reasons. Characterization of the rock indicated that the rock was composed of principally amorphous opaline silica diatoms with only a trace of crystoballite quartz or chert quartz. Physical properties tests showed the diatomite to be of very low strength and plastic. It was established that longterm creep of diatomite into a propped fracture proceeds at a rate of approximately 1.5 microns/D (1.5 ..mu..m/d), a phenomenon that may contribute to rapid production declines. Also revealed was a matrix strength for the formation of about 1,325 psi (9136 kPa), a critical value to consider when depleting the reservoir. This also may help to explain the phase transformation to Opal CT around 2,000to 2,500-ft (610- to 762-m) depth.

Strickland, F.G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Abundance anomalies in pre-main-sequence stars: Stellar evolution models with mass loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of atomic diffusion on internal and surface abundances of A and F pre-main-sequence stars with mass loss are studied in order to determine at what age the effects materialize, as well as to further understand the processes at play in HAeBe and young ApBp stars. Self-consistent stellar evolution models of 1.5 to 2.8Msun with atomic diffusion (including radiative accelerations) for all species within the OPAL opacity database were computed and compared to observations of HAeBe stars. Atomic diffusion in the presence of weak mass loss can explain the observed abundance anomalies of pre-main-sequence stars, as well as the presence of binary systems with metal rich primaries and chemically normal secondaries such as V380 Ori and HD72106. This is in contrast to turbulence models which do not allow for abundance anomalies to develop on the pre-main-sequence. The age at which anomalies can appear depends on stellar mass. For A and F stars, the effects of atomic diffusion can modify both the internal and s...

Vick, M; Richer, J; Richard, O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Models for Solar Abundance Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations: Application to M67 and NGC188  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionary models taking into account radiative accelerations, thermal diffusion, and gravitational settling for 28 elements, including all those contributing to OPAL stellar opacities, have been calculated for solar metallicity stars of 0.5 to 1.4 solar masses. The Sun has been used to calibrate the models. Isochrones are fitted to the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of M67 and NGC188, and ages of 3.7 and 6.4 Gyr are respectively determined. Convective core overshooting is not required to match the turnoff morphology of either cluster, including the luminosity of the gap in M67, because central convective cores are larger when diffusive processes are treated. This is due mainly to the enhanced helium and metal abundances in the central regions of such models. The observation of solar metallicity open clusters with ages in the range 4.8--5.7Gyr would further test the calculations of atomic diffusion in central stellar regions: according to non-diffusive isochrones, clusters should not have gaps nea...

Michaud, G; Richer, J; Van den Berg, D A; Berg, Don A. Vanden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Search for doubly-charged Higgs Boson production in the decay H++ H-- ---> mu+ mu+ mu- mu - with the D0 detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a search for the pair production of doubly-charged Higgs Bosons in the process p{bar p} {yields} H{sup ++}H{sup --} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup -} using inclusive dimuon events. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 113 pb 1 and were recorded by the D0 experiment between August 2002 and June 2003. In the absence of a signal, 95% confidence level mass limits of M(H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 118.6 GeV/c{sup 2} and M(H{sub R}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 98.1 GeV/c{sup 2} are set for left-handed and right-handed doubly-charged Higgs boson, assuming 100% branching into muons and hypercharge |Y| = 2 and Yukawa coupling h{sub {mu}{mu}} > 10{sup -7}. This is the first search for doubly-charged Higgs bosons at hadron colliders. It significantly extends the previous mass limit of 100.5 GeV/c{sup 2} for a left-handed doubly-charged Higgs boson measured in the muon final states by the OPAL collaboration.

Zdrazil, Marian; /SUNY, Stony Brook

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Helioseismic Analysis of the Hydrogen Partition Function in the Solar Interior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The difference in the adiabatic gradient [gamma][sub 1] between inverted solar data and solar models is analyzed. To obtain deeper insight into the issues of plasma physics, the so-called intrinsic difference in [gamma][sub 1] is extracted, that is, the difference due to the change in the equation of state alone. Our method uses reference models based on two equations of state currently used in solar modeling, the Mihalas-Hummer-D[umlt a]ppen (MHD) equation of state and the OPAL equation of state (developed at Livermore). Solar oscillation frequencies from the SOI/MDI instrument on board the [ital SOHO] spacecraft during its first 144 days in operation are used. Our results confirm the existence of a subtle effect of the excited states in hydrogen that was previously studied only theoretically (Nayfonov D[umlt a]ppen). The effect stems from an internal partition function of hydrogen, as is used in the MHD equation of state. Although it is a pure hydrogen effect, it takes place in somewhat deeper layers of the Sun, where more than 90[percent] of hydrogen is ionized, and where the second ionization zone of helium is located. Therefore, the effect will have to be taken into account in reliable helioseismic determinations of the astrophysically relevant helium abundance of the solar convection zone. [copyright] [ital [copyright] 1999.] [ital The American Astronomical Society

Basu, S. (Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Natural Sciences, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)); Daeppen, W. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1342 (United States) Theoretical Astrophysics Center, Institute for Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)); Nayfonov, A. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1342 (United States) IGPP, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States))

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

s091.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

c c I (J P ) = 0(0 - ) I, J, P need confirmation. Quantum numbers shown are quark-model predictions. B ± c MASS B ± c MASS B ± c MASS B ± c MASS VALUE (GeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 6.2745± 0.0018 OUR AVERAGE 6.2745± 0.0018 OUR AVERAGE 6.2745± 0.0018 OUR AVERAGE 6.2745± 0.0018 OUR AVERAGE 6.2737± 0.0013 ± 0.0016 1 AAIJ 12AV LHCB p p at 7 TeV 6.2756± 0.0029 ± 0.0025 2 AALTONEN 08M CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 6.300 ± 0.014 ± 0.005 2 ABAZOV 08T D0 p p at 1.96 TeV 6.4 ± 0.39 ± 0.13 3 ABE 98M CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 6.2857± 0.0053 ± 0.0012 2 ABULENCIA 06C CDF Repl. by AALTONEN 08M 6.32 ± 0.06 4 ACKERSTAFF 98O OPAL e + e - → Z 1 AAIJ 12AV uses the B(c) + → J/ψ π + mode and also measures the mass difference M(B(c) + ) - M(B + ) = 994.6 ± 1.3 ± 0.6 MeV/c 2 . 2 Measured using a fully reconstructed decay mode of B c → J/ψ π. 3 ABE 98M observed 20.4 + 6.2 - 5.5 events

112

s035.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J = 1 2 τ discovery paper was PERL 75. e + e - → τ + τ - cross-section threshold behavior and magnitude are consistent with pointlike spin- 1/2 Dirac particle. BRANDELIK 78 ruled out pointlike spin-0 or spin-1 particle. FELDMAN 78 ruled out J = 3/2. KIRKBY 79 also ruled out J=integer, J = 3/2. τ MASS τ MASS τ MASS τ MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1776.82± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.82± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.82± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.82± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.68± 0.12 ± 0.41 682k 1 AUBERT 09AK BABR 423 fb -1 , E ee cm =10.6 GeV 1776.81 + 0.25 - 0.23 ± 0.15 81 ANASHIN 07 KEDR 6.7 pb -1 , E ee cm = 3.54-3.78 GeV 1776.61± 0.13 ± 0.35 1 BELOUS 07 BELL 414 fb -1 E ee cm =10.6 GeV 1775.1 ± 1.6 ± 1.0 13.3k 2 ABBIENDI 00A OPAL 1990-1995 LEP runs 1778.2 ± 0.8 ± 1.2 ANASTASSOV 97 CLEO E ee cm = 10.6 GeV 1776.96 + 0.18 - 0.21 + 0.25 - 0.17 65 3 BAI 96 BES E ee cm = 3.54-3.57 GeV 1776.3 ± 2.4 ± 1.4 11k 4 ALBRECHT

113

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Lower prices and a report of another considerable net injection to stocks were featured in last week's gas markets. As of Friday, May 11, 2001, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.24 from the previous Friday to $4.25 per MMBtu. The NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.212 for the week to $4.278 per MMBtu. A record-setting 108 Bcf was added to natural gas stocks for the week ended May 4, 2001. The demand for cooling is still somewhat limited as mild temperatures prevailed around most of the country. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Prices Mid-week prices were at the lowest level since early August. Even with an end-of-the-week influence from the futures market that caused a slight upturn, spot prices at the major supply hubs were $0.25 to $0.65 cents per MMBtu lower on a week-to-week basis with Katy, Texas ending at $4.23; the Henry Hub, Louisiana at $4.25; Midcon, Oklahoma at $4.11; and Opal, Wyoming at $3.30. Prices at the Chicago and New York citygates were lower as well, registering $4.35 and $4.65 at week's end, off a respective $0.27 and $0.20 per MMBtu for the week. SoCal provided the only exception to the generally lower trend as demand increased because of warmer temperatures. Natural gas prices receded before temperatures did, though. The effect of unscheduled maintenance on the PG&E Gas Transmission system was imperceptible to PG&E's large-volume purchasers. By Friday, the PG&E customers were paying $3.51 less at $4.18 while SoCal's citygate price was only $0.47 lower at $11.92.

114

s086.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 B 0 s I (J P ) = 0(0 - ) I , J, P need confirmation. Quantum numbers shown are quark- NODE=S086 model predictions. B 0 s MASS B 0 s MASS B 0 s MASS B 0 s MASS NODE=S086M NODE=S086M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5366.77 ± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.77 ± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.77 ± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.77 ± 0.24 OUR FIT 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5366.7 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.3. See the ideogram below. 5366.90 ± 0.28 ± 0.23 1 AAIJ 12E LHCB p p at 7 TeV 5364.4 ± 1.3 ± 0.7 LOUVOT 09 BELL e + e - → Υ(5S) 5366.01 ± 0.73 ± 0.33 2 ACOSTA 06 CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 5369.9 ± 2.3 ± 1.3 32 3 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV 5374 ± 16 ± 2 3 ABREU 94D DLPH e + e - → Z 5359 ± 19 ± 7 1 3 AKERS 94J OPAL e + e - → Z 5368.6 ± 5.6 ± 1.5 2 BUSKULIC 93G ALEP e + e - → Z * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5370 ± 1 ± 3 DRUTSKOY 07A BELL Repl. by LOUVOT 09 OCCUR=2

115

A Multi-Layer Phoswich Radioxenon Detection System  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory radioactive sources were used to characterize the phoswich detector. The CaF{sub 2} scintillator has a low light-yield and slow decay time, thus produces very small signals due to low-energy gamma rays or X-rays. Therefore, detection of 30 keV X-rays (from the xenon radioisotopes) using this layer and discriminating its very small signals from electronic noise was a challenging task. Several solutions were considered and experimentally evaluated. We found that the best solution would be extending the fast triangular filter from 10 taps to 30 taps. This will extend the peaking time of this filter from 25 nsec to 75 nsec. The digital filter is implemented in FPGA on our DPP2.0 and is used to trigger the detection system. Functionality of the new filter in capturing and discriminating 30 keV X-rays was confirmed by using a {sup 133}Ba gamma-ray source. Development of the DPP GUI software has continued with the addition of two new panels to display histograms of beta/gamma and beta/x-ray coincidence events. This includes coincidence events from a single channel, as well as two-channel, coincidence event. A pileup rejection algorithm has been implemented in the FPGA code, and controls to adjust its sensitivity have been added to the GUI. Work has begun on a new prototype system to develop a USB host interface between the PC and the FPGA to end reliance on Opal Kelly prototyping boards; the hardware for this system has been completely assembled, and the PC-side software is currently in development.

David M. Hamby

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot spring deposits in the Roosevelt thermal area consist of opaline sinter, and siliceous-sinter-cemented alluvium. Alluvium, granite to granodiorite plutonic rocks, and amphibolite facies gneiss have been altered by acid-sulfate water to alunite and opal at the surface, and to kaolinite, alunite, montmorillonite, and muscovite to a depth of 60 m. Marcasite and pyrite occur below the water table at about 30m. Deeper alteration sampled to a depth of 2.26 km consists of muscovite, chlorite, calcite, K-feldspar, albite, and epidote with pyrite and sparse chalcopyrite. Thermal water is dilute (ionic strength 0.1 to 0.2) sodium chloride brine. Surface water contains 10 times as much calcium and 100 times as much magnesium as the deep water. Sulfate varies from 48 to 200 mg/l. Present-day spring temperature is 25/sup 0/C but in 1950 the spring temperature was 85/sup 0/C. Computed Na-K-Ca temperature is 241/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 274/sup 0/C for a well and 283/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. Quartz saturation temperatures are 170/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 283/sup 0/C for the well, and 213/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. A plausible model for development of the near-surface alteration consists of hydrothermal fluid which convectively rises along major fractures. Water cools by conduction and steam separation, and hydrogen ion is produced by oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. The low pH water percolates from the surface downward and reacts with rocks to produce alunite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and muscovite as hydrogen is consumed.

Parry, W.T.; Bryant, N.L.; Dedolph, R.E.; Ballantyne, J.M.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Rohrs, D.T.; Mason, J.L.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Models for Solar Abundance Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations: Application to M67 and NGC188  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionary models taking into account radiative accelerations, thermal diffusion, and gravitational settling for 28 elements, including all those contributing to OPAL stellar opacities, have been calculated for solar metallicity stars of 0.5 to 1.4 solar masses. The Sun has been used to calibrate the models. Isochrones are fitted to the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of M67 and NGC188, and ages of 3.7 and 6.4 Gyr are respectively determined. Convective core overshooting is not required to match the turnoff morphology of either cluster, including the luminosity of the gap in M67, because central convective cores are larger when diffusive processes are treated. This is due mainly to the enhanced helium and metal abundances in the central regions of such models. The observation of solar metallicity open clusters with ages in the range 4.8--5.7Gyr would further test the calculations of atomic diffusion in central stellar regions: according to non-diffusive isochrones, clusters should not have gaps near their main-sequence turnoffs if they are older than ~4.8Gyr, whereas diffusive isochrones predict that gaps should persist up to ages of ~5.7Gyr. Surface abundance isochrones are also calculated. In the case of M67 and NGC188, surface abundance variations are expected to be small. Abundance differences between stars of very similar Teff are expected close to the turnoff, especially for elements between P and Ca. Moreover, in comparison with the results obtained for giants, small generalized underabundances are expected in main-sequence stars. The lithium to beryllium ratio is discussed briefly and compared to observations.

G. Michaud; O. Richard; J. Richer; Don A. VandenBerg

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith (Opal RT Technologies, Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

s035.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

35 35 τ J = 1 2 τ discovery paper was PERL 75. e + e - → τ + τ - cross-section NODE=S035 threshold behavior and magnitude are consistent with pointlike spin- 1/2 Dirac particle. BRANDELIK 78 ruled out pointlike spin-0 or spin-1 particle. FELDMAN 78 ruled out J = 3/2. KIRKBY 79 also ruled out J=integer, J = 3/2. τ MASS τ MASS τ MASS τ MASS NODE=S035M NODE=S035M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1776.82 ± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.82 ± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.82 ± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.82 ± 0.16 OUR AVERAGE 1776.68 ± 0.12 ± 0.41 682k 1 AUBERT 09AK BABR 423 fb -1 , E ee cm =10.6 GeV 1776.81 + 0.25 - 0.23 ± 0.15 81 ANASHIN 07 KEDR 6.7 pb -1 , E ee cm = 3.54-3.78 GeV 1776.61 ± 0.13 ± 0.35 1 BELOUS 07 BELL 414 fb -1 E ee cm =10.6 GeV 1775.1 ± 1.6 ± 1.0 13.3k 2 ABBIENDI 00A OPAL 1990-1995 LEP runs 1778.2 ± 0.8 ± 1.2 ANASTASSOV 97 CLEO E ee cm = 10.6 GeV 1776.96 + 0.18 - 0.21 + 0.25 - 0.17 65 3 BAI 96 BES E ee cm = 3.54-3.57

120

Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a relative uncertainty of about 50% and found to be less than 285 GeV at 95% confidence level.

Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

Joseph N. Moore

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I site in the Pena Blanca uranium district has a number of geologic and hydrologic similarities to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, making it a useful analogue to evaluate process models for radionuclide transport. The PB-1 well was drilled in 2003 at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a DOE-sponsored natural analogue study to constrain processes affecting radionuclide transport. The well penetrates through the Tertiary volcanic section down to Cretaceous limestone and intersects the regional aquifer system. The well, drilled along the margin of the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, thus providing an opportunity to document the local stratigraphy. Detailed observations of these units were afforded through petrographic description and rock-property measurements of the core, together with geophysical logs of the well. The uppermost unit encountered in the PB-1 well is the Nopal Formation, a densely welded, crystal-rich, rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. This cored section is highly altered and devitrified, with kaolinite, quartz, chlorite, and montmorillonite replacing feldspars and much of the groundmass. Breccia zones within the tuff contain fracture fillings of hematite, limonite, goethite, jarosite, and opal. A zone of intense clay alteration encountered in the depth interval 17.45-22.30 m was interpreted to represent the basal vitrophyre of this unit. Underlying the Nopal Formation is the Coloradas Formation, which consists of a welded lithic-rich rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. The cored section of this unit has undergone devitrification and oxidation, and has a similar alteration mineralogy to that observed in the Nopal tuff. A sharp contact between the Coloradas tuff and the underlying Pozos Formation was observed at a depth of 136.38 m. The Pozos Formation consists of poorly sorted conglomerate containing clasts of subangular to subrounded fragments of volcanic rocks, limestone, and chert. Three thin (2-6 m) intervals of intercalated pumiceous tuffs were observed within this unit. The contact between the Pozos Formation and the underlying Cretaceous limestone basement was observed at a depth of 244.40 m. The water table is located at a depth of {approx}223 m. Several zones with elevated radioactivity in the PB-1 core are located above the current water table. These zones may be associated with changes in redox conditions that could have resulted in the precipitation of uraninite from downward flowing waters transporting U from the overlying Nopal deposit. All of the intersected units have low (typically submillidarcy) matrix permeability, thus fluid flow in this area is dominated by fracture flow. These stratigraphic and rock-property observations can be used to constrain flow and transport models for the Pena Blanca natural analogue.

Dobson, P.; Fayek, M.; Goodell, P.; Ghezzehei, T.; Melchor, F.; Murrell, M.; Oliver, R.; Reyes-Cortes, I.A.; de la Garza, R.; Simmons, A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when they are opened. As a result of this effort, we have devised a new design and have filed for a patent on a method of control which is believed to overcome this problem. The engine we have been working with originally had a single camshaft which controlled both the intake and exhaust valves. Single cycle lift and timing control was demonstrated with this system. (3) Large eddy simulations and KIVA based simulations were used in conjunction with flow visualizations in an optical engine to study fuel air mixing. During this effort we have devised a metric for quantifying fuel distribution and it is described in several of our papers. (4) A control system has been developed to enable us to test the benefits of the various technologies. This system used is based on Opal-RT hardware and is being used in a current DOE sponsored program.

Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Search for new physics in electron-tau final states in proton - antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

During the last decades, particle physicists have studied the tiniest building blocks of matter--the quarks and the leptons--and the forces between them in great detail. From these experiments, a theoretical framework has been built that describes the observed results with high precision. The achievement of this theory, which is referred to as the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, was the elaboration of a unified description of the strong, weak and electromagnetic forces in the framework of quantum gauge-field theories. Moreover, the Standard Model combines the weak and electromagnetic forces in a single electroweak gauge theory. The fourth force which is realized in nature, gravity, is too weak to be observable in laboratory experiments carried out in high-energy particle physics and is not part of the Standard Model. Although the Standard Model has proven highly successful in correlating a huge amount of experimental results, a key ingredient is as yet untested: the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. Currently, the only viable ansatz that is compatible with observation is the Higgs mechanism. It predicts the existence of a scalar particle, called the Higgs boson, and the couplings to the fundamental Standard Model particles, however not its mass. An upper limit on the mass of the Higgs boson of {approx} 1 TeV can be inferred from unitarity arguments. One of the key tasks of particle physics in the next years will be to verify the existence of this particle. The introduction of an elementary scalar particle in a quantum field theory is highly problematic. The Higgs boson mass is subject to large quantum corrections, which makes it difficult to understand how its mass can be less than a TeV as required by theory. In addition, the Standard Model does not provide an answer to fundamental questions like the values of free parameters of the model, the pending integration of gravity or the evolution of the coupling constants of the fundamental forces at large energy regimes. Hence there are strong reasons to believe that the Standard Model is only a low-energy approximation to a more fundamental theory. One of the best studied candidates for an extension of the Standard Model is supersymmetry, which predicts the existence of a supersymmetric partner for each fundamental particle that differs only in spin. To allow different masses for Standard Model particles and their corresponding supersymmetric partners, supersymmetry must be broken. The mechanism behind supersymmetry breaking is currently unknown, however, various hypotheses exist. Supersymmetric models do not only solve the problem of the large quantum corrections to the Higgs boson mass, but they also allow the unification of the coupling constants at a common scale. In addition, certain supersymmetric models provide a suitable candidate for cold dark matter, which represents a large fraction of mass in our universe. Searches for supersymmetric particles have been performed by the four LEP experiments (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) up to the kinematic limit. Since no evidence for supersymmetric particles has been found, lower limits on their masses have been derived. The search for supersymmetry is now continuing at the Tevatron collider, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. Two dedicated detector systems, CDF and D0, are installed at the Tevatron to analyze proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. A particular promising discovery channel for supersymmetry within the Tevatron energy range is the trilepton channel. In this channel, the lighter supersymmetric partners of the Higgs and gauge bosons, the charginos and neutralinos, decay into final states with leptons or hadrons and missing energy. Using the leptonic final states, the signal can be separated from the large Standard Model background. Supersymmetry requires an extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector, leading to more than one neutral Higgs boson. Enhanced couplings result in sizable cross sections for Higgs boson production, an

Noeding, Carsten; /Freiburg U.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

technical report and journal articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: This project seeks to improve the application of noble gas isotope studies to multiphase fluid processes in the Earth's crust by (1) identifying the important noble gas carrier phases in sediments to address the processes that have led to the observed enrichment and depletion patterns in sedimentary rocks and fluids, (2) examine the mechanisms by which such noble gas patterns are acquired, trapped and subsequently released to mobile crustal fluids, and (3) evaluate the time and length scales for the transport of noble gas components, such as radiogenic 4He, through the continental crust.. Project Description: Sedimentary rocks and oil field gases typically are enriched in heavy noble gases: Xe/Ar ratios of ~10-10,000 times the ratio in air have been observed that cannot be explained by adsorption hypotheses. Laboratory experiments designed to isolate sedimentary phases for noble gas analysis are conducted to identify the carrier phase(s). It has been observed that radiogenic 4He accumulates in confined aquifer waters at rates that exceed the rate of local production and approaching the whole crustal production rate. A literature evaluation of 4He, 3He crustal fluxes is being conducted to evaluate crustal scale mass transport in terms of the rate, mechanisms, temporal and spatial variability and the role played by tectonic processes. Results: The laboratory study has concentrated on noble gas abundances in a variety of sedimentary silica samples. We have found that, in general, samples of inorganic silica have noble gas abundances that are consistent with occlusion of air-saturated water in fluid inclusions and lack requisite enrichment/depletion factors needed to explain the noble gas inventory in oil field fluids. However, numerous replicate analyses of noble gases extracted from silica spicules from live sponges (Calyxnicaeensis) show significantly enriched Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations ([iNg]sample/[iNg]asw > 1), but with very little if any mass dependence in the acquisition and trapping of Ar, Kr and Xe. Noble gases in silica samples from the (diatomaceous) Monterey Formation (Elk Hills oil field, CA) and an Atlantic box core were found to be somewhat depleted with respect to the sponge spicule, fractionated in a fashion favoring the heavy noble gases, and approach the compositions that have been observed in bulk deep sea sediments. We suspect that the differences in noble gas absolute and relative abundances between the sponge spicule samples and the more evolved diatomaceous samples are related to either (1) fundamental differences in the biologically controlled mineralization or (2) postdepositional effects related to the progressive crystallization of amorphous silica (e.g. opal-A) to more ordered structures. Laboratory cultured diatoms and box core sea sediment samples collected as a function of depth within the sediment column have been processed for analysis of the silica phases to address these questions. Through a statistical evaluation using a global data base covering many geologic environments, we have determined that the log normal mean of the radiogenic 4He flux across the Earth??s continental crust is 4.18 x 1010 4He atoms m-2 s-1. Furthermore, it was found that the range of the continental 4He degassing flux increases with decreasing time and space scales. The statistics can be interpreted as reflecting natural variability and suggest that the mechanisms transporting the crustal helium degassing flux contain a high degree of both spatial and temporal variability. This estimate of the log normal mean of the continental degassing flux of 4He is approximately equivalent to the radiogenic production rate for 4He in the whole crust. Large scale vertical mass transport in continental crust is estimated as scaled values of the order 10-5 cm2s-1 for helium (over 2Byr and 40km vertically) vs. 10-2 cm2s-1 for heat. This rate of mass transport requires not only release of He from the solid phase via diffusion, fracturing or comminution; but also an enhanced rate of mass transport facili

Thomas Torgersen and others

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z