Sample records for reegle structured tagging

  1. REEGLE - Clean Energy Information Gateway | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product: WindProrenerElectricREEGLE -

  2. The rotational order–disorder structure of the reversibly photoswitchable red fluorescent protein rsTagRFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletnev, Sergei, E-mail: pletnevs@mail.nih.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: pletnevs@mail.nih.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of the reversibly photoswitchable red fluorescent protein rsTagRFP is presented. The rotational order–disorder (OD) structure of the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsTagRFP is discussed in detail. The structure is composed of tetramers of 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different orientations rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis and with tetramer axes coinciding with the crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates the rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry. Despite order–disorder pathology, the structure of rsTagRFP has electron-density maps of good quality for both non-overlapping and overlapping parts of the model. The crystal contacts, crystal internal architecture and a possible mechanism of rotational OD crystal formation are discussed.

  3. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, W; Guzey, V; Higinbotham, D W; Hyde, C; Kuhn, S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Park, K; Sargsian, M; Strikman, M; Weiss, C

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x more »frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.« less

  4. Tag: volunteer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying

  5. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, W; Guzey, V; Higinbotham, D W; Hyde, C; Kuhn, S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Park, K; Sargsian, M; Strikman, M; Weiss, C

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < p_R << several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  6. Tag: NFRR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex.

    tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix">

    Tags 

    ...

  7. Tag: STEM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in February.

    tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix">

    Tags 

    ...

  8. Tag: ESH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office.

    tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix">

    Tags 

    ...

  9. REEGLE | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to: navigation, search Tool

  10. OpenEI Community - REEGLE

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedriving data

  11. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baillie, N; Zhang, J; Bosted, P; Bultmann, S; Christy, M E; Fenker, H; Griffioen, K A; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, S E; Melnitchouk, W; Tvaskis, V; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfini, M; Arrington, J; Avakian, H; Baghdasaryan, H; Battaglieri, M; Biselli, A A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D' Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Domingo, J; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hungerford, E; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ispiryan, M; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Kalantarians, N; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, I; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S; Stepanyan, S S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zana, L

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ? 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 2 2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less than a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ?< x ?< 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.

  12. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baillie, N; Zhang, J; Bosted, P; Bultmann, S; Christy, M E; Fenker, H; Griffioen, K A; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, S E; Melnitchouk, W; et al

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ? 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 2 2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less thanmore »a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ?« less

  13. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Baillie; S. Tkachenko; J. Zhang; P. Bosted; S. Bultmann; M. E. Christy; H. Fenker; K. A. Griffioen; C. E. Keppel; S. E. Kuhn; W. Melnitchouk; V. Tvaskis; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; M. Anghinolfini; J. Arrington; H. Avakian; H. Baghdasaryan; M. Battaglieri; A. S. Biselli; 5 D. Branford; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; A. Daniel; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; B. Dey; C. Djalali; G. Dodge; J. Domingo; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; A. Fradi; M. Y. Gabrielyan; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; L. Graham; B. Guegan; M. Guidal; N. Guler; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; D. Heddle; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; E. Hungerford; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; M. Ispiryan; E. L. Isupov; S. S. Jawalkar; H. S. Jo; N. Kalantarians; M. Khandaker; P. Khetarpal; A. Kim; W. Kim; P. M. King; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; A. Klimenko; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; N. D. Kvaltine; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I . J . D. MacGregor; Y. Mao; N. Markov; B. McKinnon; T. Mineeva; B. Morrison; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; P. Nadel-Turonski; A. Ni; S. Niccolai; I. Niculescu; G. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. Pappalardo; K. Park; S. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Anefalos Pereira; S. Pisano; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; B. A. Raue; G. Ricco; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatie; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; Y. G. Sharabian; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. Stepanyan; S. S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; W. Tang; M. Ungaro; M. F. Vineyard; E. Voutier; D. P. Watts; L. B. Weinstein; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; L. Zana; B. Zhao

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to < 100 MeV and their angles to < 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of Bjorken x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less than a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 < x < 0.8 with little uncertainty due to nuclear effects.

  14. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, N; Zhang, J; Bosted, P; Bultmann, S; Christy, M E; Fenker, H; Griffioen, K A; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, S E; Melnitchouk, W; Tvaskis, V; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfini, M; Arrington, J; Avakian, H; Baghdasaryan, H; Battaglieri, M; Biselli, A A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D& #x27; Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Domingo, J; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hungerford, E; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ispiryan, M; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Kalantarians, N; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, I; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S; Stepanyan, S S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zana, L

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ?< 100 MeV and their angles to ?> 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less than a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ?< x ?< 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.

  15. Friction Induced Skin Tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Duplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,Friction Induced Skin Tags Francisco Allegue MD 1 , Carmenetiopathogenic role for friction. Introduction Skin tags (

  16. Tag: ATLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumber of Water8

  17. Tag: CNS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumber of

  18. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

  19. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

  20. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic $^2$H(e, e'p)X scattering with CLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tkachenko; N. Baillie; S. E. Kuhn; J. Zhang; J. Arrington; P. Bosted; S. Bültmann; M. E. Christy; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. Fenker; K. A. Griffioen; M. Ispiryan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; W. Melnitchouk; V. Tvaskis; K. P. Adhikari; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; J. A. Fleming; B. Garillon; N. Gevorgyan; Y. Ghandilyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C . E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; H. S. Jo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; P. M. King; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; P. Lenisa; S. Lewis; K. Livingston; H. Lu; M. MacCormick; I. J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; H. Moutarde; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J . R. Puckett; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatié; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; I. Senderovich; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. Stepanyan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; W. Tang; M. Ungaro; A. V. Vlassov; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D. Watts; X. Wei; L. B. Weinstein; M. H. Wood; L. Zana; I. Zonta

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. The Barely Off-shell Nucleon Structure (BONuS) experiment at Jefferson Lab measured the inelastic electron deuteron scattering cross section, tagging spectator protons in coincidence with the scattered electrons. This method reduces nuclear binding uncertainties significantly and has allowed for the first time a (nearly) model independent extraction of the neutron structure function. A novel compact radial time projection chamber was built to detect protons with momentum between 70 and 150 MeV/c. For the extraction of the free neutron structure function $F_{2n}$, spectator protons at backward angle and with momenta below 100 MeV/c were selected, ensuring that the scattering took place on a nearly free neutron. The scattered electrons were detected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS spectrometer. The extracted neutron structure function $F_{2n}$ and its ratio to the deuteron structure function $F_{2d}$ are presented in both the resonance and deep inelastic regions. The dependence of the cross section on the spectator proton momentum and angle is investigated, and tests of the spectator mechanism for different kinematics are performed. Our data set can be used to study neutron resonance excitations, test quark hadron duality in the neutron, develop more precise parametrizations of structure functions, as well as investigate binding effects (including possible mechanisms for the nuclear EMC effect) and provide a first glimpse of the asymptotic behavior of d/u as x goes to 1.

  1. Vibrational spectra and structures of bare and Xe-tagged cationic Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savoca, Marco; Langer, Judith; Dopfer, Otto, E-mail: dopfer@physik.tu-berlin.de, E-mail: fielicke@physik.tu-berlin.de; Fielicke, André, E-mail: dopfer@physik.tu-berlin.de, E-mail: fielicke@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Harding, Dan J. [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Tammannstr. 6, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrational spectra of Xe-tagged cationic silicon oxide clusters Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} with n = 3–5 and m = n, n ± 1 in the gas phase are obtained by resonant infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} clusters are produced in a laser vaporization ion source and Xe complexes are formed after thermalization to 100 K. The clusters are subsequently irradiated with tunable light from an IR free electron laser and changes in the mass distribution yield size-specific IR spectra. The measured IRMPD spectra are compared to calculated linear IR absorption spectra leading to structural assignments. For several clusters, Xe complexation alters the energetic order of the Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} isomers. Common structural motifs include the Si{sub 2}O{sub 2} rhombus, the Si{sub 3}O{sub 2} pentagon, and the Si{sub 3}O{sub 3} hexagon.

  2. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  3. Tag: security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1security Tag:

  4. Project Name Project Number Tagging Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Name Project Number Primary Tagging Type Secondary Tagging Type Fish Species Tagging/ Secondary Legal Driver (BiOp, MOA, Accord, etc.) Tagging Purpose Funded Entity Tagging Location Retrieval CWT Recovery Project 2010-036-00 CWT PIT Chinook, coho retrieval, analysis, address PSMFC sampling

  5. Tags vs Shelves: From Social Tagging to Social Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    mechanism and (iii) existing classification systems such as the Library of Congress Classification System libraries and librarians have performed the task of classification for centuries, the process of man- uallyTags vs Shelves: From Social Tagging to Social Classification Arkaitz Zubiaga NLP & IR Group

  6. Tag: employees | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 - 10

  7. Tag: manufacturing | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 -

  8. Tag: partnerships | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1

  9. Tag: transformation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying

  10. LHCb Tag Collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuente Fernàndez, P; Cousin, N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with software management and Nightly Build programs is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  11. Quantum tagging for tags containing secret classical data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, Adrian [Centre for Quantum Information and Foundations, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom) and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Various authors have considered schemes for quantum tagging, that is, authenticating the classical location of a classical tagging device by sending and receiving quantum signals from suitably located distant sites, in an environment controlled by an adversary whose quantum information processing and transmitting power is potentially unbounded. All of the schemes proposed elsewhere in the literature assume that the adversary is able to inspect the interior of the tagging device. All of these schemes have been shown to be breakable if the adversary has unbounded predistributed entanglement. We consider here the case in which the tagging device contains a finite key string shared with distant sites but kept secret from the adversary, and show this allows the location of the tagging device to be authenticated securely and indefinitely. Our protocol relies on quantum key distribution between the tagging device and at least one distant site, and demonstrates a new practical application of quantum key distribution. It also illustrates that the attainable security in position-based cryptography can depend crucially on apparently subtle details in the security scenario considered.

  12. Named entity tagged language models. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotoh, Yoshihiko; Renals, Steve; Williams, Gethin

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce Named Entity (NE) Language Modelling, a stochastic finite state machine approach to identifying both words and NE categories from a stream of spoken data. We provide an overview of our approach to NE tagged language model (LM...

  13. Tag: Community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumber ofCommunity Tag:

  14. Tag: GTRI | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumberGTRI Tag: GTRI

  15. Tag: News | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumberGTRI Tag:News

  16. Tag: Safety | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 - 10 of 19...

  17. Tag: UPF | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 - 10 of 19...UPF

  18. Tag: VPP | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 - 10 of

  19. Tag: careers | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 - 10 ofcareers

  20. Fish Tagging Forum Draft Compilation of Tagging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lifecycle stages. We have populated the diagram with example content that was either discussed, or clarify. The ultimate work product needs to reflect the knowledge of the Forum participants. A couple where the fish are handled throughout the tagging lifecycle. 4. Labor has not been explicitly

  1. Tag: nuclear deterrence | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 -deterrence Tag:

  2. BIOSIGNAL 2002 Tagged cardiac MR images analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Histace, Aymeric

    in cardiac tagged MR images analysis. 1 Introduction The non invasive assessment of the cardiac functionBIOSIGNAL 2002 Tagged cardiac MR images analysis A. HISTACE, L. HERMAND, C. CAVARO-MENARD LISA used by tagged MRI displays a deformable dark grid which sticks to the contraction of myocardium (fig.1

  3. `YOU GOT TAGGED!': The city as a playground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and instant fun of `playground tag' (Opie and Opie, 1969). We have further developed the `tag' concept

  4. Measurement of the nearly free neutron structure function using spectator tagging in inelastic 2H(e,e'p s)X scattering with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Baillie, Nathan; Kuhn, Sebastian; Zhang, J; Arrington, John; Bosted, Peter; Bueltmann, Stephen; Christy, Michael; Fenker, Howard; Griffioen, Keith; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keppel, Cynthia; Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr; Tvaskis, Vladas; Adhikari, Krishna; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Biselli, Angela; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Charles, Gabriel; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Egiyan, Hovanes; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fleming, Jamie; Garillon, Brice; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guo, Lei; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Keller, Dustin; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Lewis, Stefanie; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, H; MacCormick, Marion; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Eugene; Phillips, J J; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, J W; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Senderovich, Igor; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strauch, Steffen; Tang, Wei; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; VOUTIER, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Wei, Xiangdong; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wood, Michael; Zana, Lorenzo; Zonta, Irene

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  5. Tag: One Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumberGTRI

  6. REEGLE - Clean Energy Information Gateway | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary

  7. Infrared tag and track technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Slater, John (Albuquerque, NM); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of covertly tagging an object for later tracking includes providing a material capable of at least one of being applied to the object and being included in the object, which material includes deuterium; and performing at least one of applying the material to the object and including the material in the object in a manner in which in the appearance of the object is not changed, to the naked eye.

  8. Tag: ESH | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tag: ESH Displaying 1 - 8 of 8... Category: News Morris named NPO assistant manager for Environment, Safety Health and Quality Susan Morris has been named Assistant Manager for...

  9. Tag: health | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    health Tag: health Displaying 1 - 3 of 3... Category: Employees & Retirees CNS Running Crew conquers marathon "Amazing" is how Y-12 employee Barbara King described her first...

  10. Tag: community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    community Tag: community Displaying 1 - 10 of 57... Category: Employees & Retirees CNS Running Crew conquers marathon "Amazing" is how Y-12 employee Barbara King described her...

  11. Tags | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesStateTags Home > Community

  12. Tag: nuclear nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 -deterrence

  13. Tag: technology transfer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1security

  14. Satellite Tagging and Cardiac Physiology Reveal Niche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    the movements and habitats of most species are unknown. We used a satellite tag attached to the dorsal fin (SPOT), designed with a small Argos trans- mitter, that permits direct attachment to the shark_s dorsal fin (Fig. 1). This tag enables the tracking of sharks with near­real-time positions for multiple years

  15. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS [Marine Biological Laboratoryj WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL A, Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner CORROSION RESISTANCE were tagged with nickel and Type 304 stainless steel pins to compare the corrosion resistance

  16. Communication methods, systems, apparatus, and devices involving RF tag registration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burghard, Brion J. (W. Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    One technique of the present invention includes a number of Radio Frequency (RF) tags that each have a different identifier. Information is broadcast to the tags from an RF tag interrogator. This information corresponds to a maximum quantity of tag response time slots that are available. This maximum quantity may be less than the total number of tags. The tags each select one of the time slots as a function of the information and a random number provided by each respective tag. The different identifiers are transmitted to the interrogator from at least a subset of the RF tags.

  17. A new generation of lock and tag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, P.A.; Bickford, J.C.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety culture of an organization needs to change to achieve full implementation of Chapter 9, ``Lockout and Tagouts`` of DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities (DOE 1990). You can implement this change of culture through Conduct of Operations training in the classroom, in organized group discussions, and with on-the-job training. In many facilities, lock and tag is viewed as an administration function that is not directly tied to individual employee safety. Often, lock and tag is seen as an obstacle to getting the job done, a roadblock in the way of progress that has been placed there by unseen forces for unknown reasons. Because lock and tag is not always viewed as part of the personal safety standards of the employee, the necessary attention to detail is lacking. We are presenting you with three useful methods for introducing and reinforcing a new generation of safety culture and lock and tag safety. The method will help your fellow workers view lock and tag and as a safety tool. Lock and tag will become part of their safety foundation. However, you may need to do some foundation building regarding safety, personal standards, and worker attitude before the principles of lock and tag training can become an integral part of your safety culture.

  18. A new generation of lock and tag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, P.A.; Bickford, J.C.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety culture of an organization needs to change to achieve full implementation of Chapter 9, Lockout and Tagouts'' of DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities (DOE 1990). You can implement this change of culture through Conduct of Operations training in the classroom, in organized group discussions, and with on-the-job training. In many facilities, lock and tag is viewed as an administration function that is not directly tied to individual employee safety. Often, lock and tag is seen as an obstacle to getting the job done, a roadblock in the way of progress that has been placed there by unseen forces for unknown reasons. Because lock and tag is not always viewed as part of the personal safety standards of the employee, the necessary attention to detail is lacking. We are presenting you with three useful methods for introducing and reinforcing a new generation of safety culture and lock and tag safety. The method will help your fellow workers view lock and tag and as a safety tool. Lock and tag will become part of their safety foundation. However, you may need to do some foundation building regarding safety, personal standards, and worker attitude before the principles of lock and tag training can become an integral part of your safety culture.

  19. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7.9% respectively). No acoustic transmitters were shed by yearling fish during the course of the 90 day study. Up to 7.8% of subyearling fish expelled transmitters. Tags were expelled from 5 to 63 days post-surgery. The average time to expulsion was 27 days; few fish expelled transmitters within 14 days of implantation or less. Histological results suggest that inflammation associated with implantation of an acoustic transmitter can produce fibrous tissue which can invade and possibly damage internal organs soon after implantation. Reactions severe enough to damage organs however, were limited to only ~20% of subyearling Chinook salmon, all of which were under 101mm and 12g at tagging. The infiltration of the fibrous tissue into organs was observed most often in fish held for 21 days and appeared to decrease in subsequent holding times.

  20. Power Margin Reduction in Linear passive UHF RFID tag arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qi; Crisp, Michael; White, Ian H.; Penty, Richard V.

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    two tags with a separation of less than 3cm. Detuning is caused by the power loss due to a mismatch between the tag antenna and IC, which originates from the impedance change of the tag antenna when one tag approaches another. Tanaka et al...

  1. Performance of a Passive UHF RFID Tag in Reflective Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    with Impinj chip, RSI IN-38 with NXP ucode gen 2 chip and self made bowtie type tag with Impinj Monza chip to right ad- 222, RSI ID Technologies IN-38, Bowtie) Results The power transmission between the tag of bowtie tag in an anechoic chamber is presented in Fig.3 and threshold powers for all three tags

  2. Tag: Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Tag: Security Displaying 1 - 6 of 6... Category: Security Sheltering in Place If you are advised to shelter-in-place by local news or our website, please follow these...

  3. Fish Tagging Forum March 22, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Predation, and Population Status Recovery. o For each Tab, there are columns listing: Column A: numbered, such as primary, secondary or tertiary interest. o Other less commonly used tag types will be cons

  4. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  5. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  6. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  7. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the alpha-particle spectrometer concept, and outlines challenges involved in the magnetic field design. Tagged photon interrogation: • We investigated a method for discriminating fissile from benign cargo-material response to an energy-tagged photon beam. The method relies upon coincident detection of the tagged photon and a photoneutron or photofission neutron produced in the target material. The method exploits differences in the shape of the neutron production cross section as a function of incident photon energy in order to discriminate photofission yield from photoneutrons emitted by non-fissile materials. Computational tests of the interrogation method as applied to material composition assay of a simple, multi-layer target suggest that the tagged-photon information facilitates precise (order 1% thickness uncertainty) reconstruction of the constituent thicknesses of fissile (uranium) and high-Z (Pb) constituents of the test targets in a few minutes of photon-beam exposure. We assumed an 18-MeV endpoint tagged photon beam for these simulations. • The report addresses several candidate design and data analysis issues for beamline infrastructure required to produce a tagged photon beam in a notional AI-dedicated facility, including the accelerator and tagging spectrometer.

  8. A brief examination of optical tagging technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Cahill, Paul A. (Aspecular Optics, Dayton, OH); Drummond, Timothy J.; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented within this report are the results of a brief examination of optical tagging technologies funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was performed during the summer months of 2002 with total funding of $65k. The intent of the project was to briefly examine a broad range of approaches to optical tagging concentrating on the wavelength range between ultraviolet (UV) and the short wavelength infrared (SWIR, {lambda} < 2{micro}m). Tagging approaches considered include such things as simple combinations of reflective and absorptive materials closely spaced in wavelength to give a high contrast over a short range of wavelengths, rare-earth oxides in transparent binders to produce a narrow absorption line hyperspectral tag, and fluorescing materials such as phosphors, dies and chemically precipitated particles. One technical approach examined in slightly greater detail was the use of fluorescing nano particles of metals and semiconductor materials. The idea was to embed such nano particles in an oily film or transparent paint binder. When pumped with a SWIR laser such as that produced by laser diodes at {lambda}=1.54{micro}m, the particles would fluoresce at slightly longer wavelengths, thereby giving a unique signal. While it is believed that optical tags are important for military, intelligence and even law enforcement applications, as a business area, tags do not appear to represent a high on return investment. Other government agencies frequently shop for existing or mature tag technologies but rarely are interested enough to pay for development of an untried technical approach. It was hoped that through a relatively small investment of laboratory R&D funds, enough technologies could be identified that a potential customers requirements could be met with a minimum of additional development work. Only time will tell if this proves to be correct.

  9. Tag: Global Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumberGTRI Tag:

  10. Tag: global security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1 - 10global

  11. Identifying Nuclear Materials Using Tagged Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Morris; J. D. Bacon; K. Borodzin; J. M. Durham; J. M. Fabritius II; E. Guardincerri; A. Hecht; E. C. Milner; H. Miyadera; J. O. Perry; D. Poulson

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by stopped cosmic-ray muons to identify nuclear materials are described. The neutrons are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of uranium objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects. The specificity of the technique to significant quantities of nuclear material along with its insensitivity to spatial details may provide a new method for the task of warhead verification for future arms reduction treaties.

  12. Identifying Nuclear Materials Using Tagged Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, C L; Borodzin, K; Durham, J M; Fabritius, J M; Guardincerri, E; Hecht, A; Milner, E C; Miyadera, H; Perry, J O; Poulson, D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by stopped cosmic-ray muons to identify nuclear materials are described. The neutrons are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of uranium objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects. The specificity of the technique to significant quantities of nuclear material along with its insensitivity to spatial details may provide a new method for the task of warhead verification for future arms reduction treaties.

  13. Tags to Track Illicit Uranium and Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haire, Marvin Jonathan [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the expansion of nuclear power, it is essential to avoid diversion of nuclear materials into the hands of 'rogue nations,' terrorists, and other opportunists. This paper describes (1) the use of a detection tag to make it easier to detect smuggled material by creating a nuclear fingerprint and (2) the use of attribution tags to enable law enforcement to determine where any recovered stolen nuclear materials came from, identify the individuals responsible for the unlawful diversion, and reduce future loss of nuclear materials.

  14. Low-cost electromagnetic tagging : design and implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Richard R. (Richard Ribon)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several implementations of chipless RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tags are presented and discussed as low-cost alternatives to chip-based RFID tags and sensors. An overview of present-day near-field electromagnetic ...

  15. Tag der offenen Tr 2012 auf dem Campus Garching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Tag der offenen Tür 2012 auf dem Campus Garching Programm der Fakultät für Informatik 11-18 Uhr 27.Oktober2012 11 bis 18 Uhr Forschung live.Tag der offenen Tür. Wissenschaft in Garching. www.forschung-garching

  16. Enhanced Topic Distillation using Text, Markup Tags, and Hyperlinks Soumen Chakrabarti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Soumen

    Enhanced Topic Distillation using Text, Markup Tags, and Hyperlinks Soumen Chakrabarti Mukul Joshi Vivek Tawde IIT Bombay ABSTRACT Topic distillation is the analysis of hyperlink graph structure to authorities). Topic distillation is becoming common in Web search engines, but the best-known algorithms model

  17. Page 1 of 5 Fish Tagging Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the tasks assigned to them by the FTF Committee during August 2012. The Subcommittee did some small group on the Hydro tab, they populated the tag type associated with the various indicators using designations and corrected the majority of the Hydro tab. Items that were brought up for further consideration: #12;Page 2

  18. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  19. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  20. Contribution ID : 133 The TAG Collector -A Tool for Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHEP04 Contribution ID : 133 The TAG Collector - A Tool for Atlas Code Release Management Thursday 30 Sep 2004 at 10:00 (00h00') The Tag Collector is a web interfaced database application for release distributed geographically. The Tag Collector was designed and implemented during the summer of 2001

  1. CS229 Project Report: Automated photo tagging in Facebook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    CS229 Project Report: Automated photo tagging in Facebook Sebastian Schuon, Harry Robertson, Hao identifying and tagging users in photos on a social networking environment known as Facebook. The presented au- tomatic facial tagging system is split into three subsys- tems: obtaining image data from Facebook

  2. Accurate Visual Features for Automatic Tag Correction in Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accurate Visual Features for Automatic Tag Correction in Videos Hoang-Tung Tran, Elisa Fromont-Etienne, Fr Abstract. We present a new system for video auto tagging which aims at correcting the tags provided by users for videos uploaded on the In- ternet. Unlike most existing systems, in our proposal, we

  3. High-ThroughputTagging of Arabidopsis Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Citovsky, Vitaly

    ­0124 (N.C., G.D., N.V.R.); and The Arabidopsis Information Resource (S.L., S.Y.R.) and Carnegie Institution of Washington (S.L., D.E., S.Y.R), Stanford, California 94305 We developed a high their chromogenic reac- tion products (Taylor, 1997). The use of antigenic tags, such as the T7 or HA epitopes

  4. Scanning Cargo Containers with Tagged Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viesti, G.; Botosso, C.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S. [INFN and Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Zenoni, A.; Donzella, A. [INFN and Universita di Brescia, 38 Via Branze 25123 Brescia (Italy); Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Szabo, J.-L.; Sannie, G. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Nad, K. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, 54 Bijenicka c. 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Peerani, P.; Sequeira, V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, I-21020 Ispra (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) able to detect illicit materials such as explosives and narcotics in cargo containers has been developed within the EURopean Illicit TRAfficing Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project. After the R and D phase, the inspection portal has been installed and commissioned at the Rijeka seaport in Croatia, where it has been operated in connection with the existing X-ray scanner for a first two-month demonstration campaign. Results obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  5. Tags, wireless communication systems, tag communication methods, and wireless communications methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott; Jeff W. (Pasco, WA), Pratt; Richard M. (Richland, WA)

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Tags, wireless communication systems, tag communication methods, and wireless communications methods are described. In one aspect, a tag includes a plurality of antennas configured to receive a plurality of first wireless communication signals comprising data from a reader, a plurality of rectifying circuits coupled with. respective individual ones of the antennas and configured to provide rectified signals corresponding to the first wireless communication signals, wherein the rectified signals are combined to produce a composite signal, an adaptive reference circuit configured to vary a reference signal responsive to the composite signal, a comparator coupled with the adaptive reference circuit and the rectifying circuits and configured to compare the composite signal with respect to the reference signal and to output the data responsive to the comparison, and processing circuitry configured to receive the data from the comparator and to process the data.

  6. {alpha} decay and recoil decay tagging studies of {sup 183}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raddon, P.M.; Jenkins, D.G.; O'Leary, C.D.; Simons, A.J.; Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Andreyev, A.N.; Page, R.D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Carpenter, M.P. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kondev, F.G. [Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Enqvist, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)] [and others

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-spin states in the nucleus {sup 183}Tl have been studied using the recoil decay tagging and recoil tagging techniques. The data have enabled new structures to be identified which are believed to be based on prolate f{sub 7/2}, h{sub 9/2}, and oblate h{sub 9/2} configurations. In addition, the prolate i{sub 3/2} structure has also been extended. The systematics of the newly identified structures will be discussed. The {alpha} decay of {sup 183}Tl has also been investigated. Examination of both delayed and prompt {gamma} rays in coincidence with the prominent 6333-keV {alpha} decay, together with an investigation of the effects of the summing of L electrons, allow assignment of transitions and the construction of tentative low-spin decay schemes for {sup 179}Au and {sup 175}Ir.

  7. Report of the Event Tag Review and Recommendation Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Group; Assamagan, K.A.; Barberis, D.; Bentvelsen, S.; Brooijmans, G.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Farbin, A.; Froidevaux, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; LeCompte, T.; Maeno, T.; Malon, D.; Paige, F.; Polesello, G.; Quarrie, D.; Rousseau, D.; Schaffer, R.D.; Smizanska, M.; Unal, G.; Voss, K.; Wielers, M.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to facilitate access to the large volumes of data (multiple petabytes per year) which will be produced during data taking and Monte Carlo production at ATLAS, work has proceeded on building a system of event-level metadata to allow selections of a subset of events to use as input to an analysis. This was included in the ATLAS Computing Model and was first studied and implemented by the Physics Analysis Tools group based on the decisions of the ESD/AOD Task Force. They used tools developed and supported by the CERN IT group and the ATLAS Database group. During 2005 this structure was put through various tests and evaluations. Also, work by physicists on reconstruction and analysis led to an improved understanding of the requirements on the TAG. This report addresses the effect of these new inputs on the previous work with regard to content and the infrastructure needed to support it.

  8. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, T.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are disclosed for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established. 6 figs.

  9. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ting (Chicago, IL); Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan (Glendale Heights, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established.

  10. Polarized light ions and spectator nucleon tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzey, Vadim [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300, Russia; Higinbotham, Dougas W. [JLAB; Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A. [JLAB; Park, Kijun [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA; Sargsian, Misak M. [Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA; Strikman, Mark [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA; Weiss, Christian [JLAB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x ll 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < p(R) < several 100MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  11. Relationship between Frequency of RFID Tags and Its Ability to Penetrate Fresh Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridharan, Rajasekaran

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    were from TI the UHF tag was from Identec solutions. The RI-TRP-R9TD-30 120 mm cylindrical tags from Texas Instruments were used for the LF range. This tag operated at the 134.2 KHz range. The RI-TH1-CB1A-00 card 18 transponder from Texas... placed as LF tag, UHF tag and HF tag. This ensures that there was sufficient distance between any two LF tags. The location of tags are shown in Fig. 4.1. 19 FIG. 4.1. Location of tags 4.6 RFID Reader The reader that was used...

  12. activation tagging element: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    181 Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Security Tag for Eyeglasses Materials Science Websites Summary: Works and detailed Finite Element Analysis was...

  13. MFR PAPER 1070 Anchor tags show ment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hlllrdl. Demand of the marl-.lng program reqUired that the tag prOVide identiAcatlon of each crab. have\\l:nt:.-I\\\\P aJu l1 J...lng crah~ (in - LiuJ ing H, t.lggeJ anJ In cI' n trol ~) \\\\erc placcJ In 1\\\\11 (,- n-It 14- Inch J...lng crah pot\\. 1 hc pot. Ihelr tunncl entrance\\ c\\owJ With hanJ \\C\\\\ n n\\ Ion nell In g

  14. Property:Event/Tagged | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationTypeEstimatedCostMedianUSD Jump to:EstimatedTimeMedianTagged Jump

  15. Tag: CNS | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &8-5070P3. U.S.7.Tables,CNS Tag:

  16. Measurement of the nearly free neutron structure function using spectator tagging in inelastic 2H(e,e'p s)X scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Baillie, Nathan; Kuhn, Sebastian; Zhang, J; Arrington, John; Bosted, Peter; Bueltmann, Stephen; Christy, Michael; Fenker, Howard; Griffioen, Keith; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keppel, Cynthia; Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr; Tvaskis, Vladas; Adhikari, Krishna; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Biselli, Angela; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Charles, Gabriel; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Egiyan, Hovanes; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fleming, Jamie; Garillon, Brice; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guo, Lei; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Keller, Dustin; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Lewis, Stefanie; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, H; MacCormick, Marion; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Eugene; Phillips, J J; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, J W; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Senderovich, Igor; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strauch, Steffen; Tang, Wei; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; VOUTIER, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Wei, Xiangdong; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wood, Michael; Zana, Lorenzo; Zonta, Irene

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  17. Multi-Tag Radio Frequency Identification Systems Leonid Bolotnyy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Gabriel

    numerous useful applications (e.g., supply chain management, inventory tracking, ac- cess control-active. Active tags can initi- ate transmission on their own. Passive and semi-active tags rely on power from: inductive coupling and electromagnetic backscattering, or far-field propagation. In inductive cou- pling

  18. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  19. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  20. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Simple conjugation and outgrowth procedures for tagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    wild-type marine bacteria with gfp. Methods and Results: Escherichia coli strain CC118kpir carrying-tagged marine vibrios following the conjugative transfer of gfp from E. coli. Significance and Impact, but not the E. coli donor, to allow powerful enrichment of gfp-tagged wild-type vibrios from mating mixes. Forty

  2. ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 8 ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM............................................................8-13 Tables: 8-1 Accident Prevention Sign Requirements..........................8-17 8-2 Accident.......................................8-24 8-9 Accident Prevention Tags.............................................8-25 #12;EM 385-1-1 XX

  3. Retention of passive integrated transponder tags in largemouth bass brood fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, W.D.; Campbell, D.L. (Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept., Austin (USA))

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags were injected into 22 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) brood fish to determine the retention rate of the tags, the effect on spawning success, and the utility of the tags as a means of individual fish identification. Fish were evaluated 12, 17, and 24 months after implantation. All tags were retained and all tagged fish were recognized. Tag injection and retention had no discernible effect on spawning success.

  4. Flavor Tagging at Tevatron incl. calibration and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulik, T.; /Kansas U.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the flavor tagging techniques developed at the CDF and D0 experiments. Flavor tagging involves identification of the B meson flavor at production, whether its constituent is a quark or an anti-quark. It is crucial for measuring the oscillation frequency of neutral B mesons, both in the B{sup 0} and B{sub S} system. The two experiments have developed their unique approaches to flavor tagging, using neural networks, and likelihood methods to disentangle tracks from b decays from other tracks. This report discusses these techniques and the measurement of B{sup 0} mixing, as a means to calibrate the taggers.

  5. acid-containing structured triacylglycerols: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of triacylglycerol (TAG). Several groups have demonstrated that R. opacus ... MacEachran, Daniel P. 10 Structure of Docosahexaenoic Acid-Containing Phospholipid Bilayers as Studied...

  6. The Case for Multi-Tag RFID Systems Leonid Bolotnyy and Gabriel Robins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Gabriel

    . Passive and semi- passive tags rely on power from a reader to engage in communication. Semi-passive tags-passive tags: inductive cou- pling and electromagnetic backscattering (or far-field propagation). In inductive coupling the reader creates a magnetic field between itself and the tags, which in turn derive power from

  7. Tags are markers placed on or in animals to identify an individual.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Roto" or "Jumbo" fin tags (8%/yr for school shark; 6%/yr for gummy shark). For either species of shark, the shedding rate of dart tags anchored in the basal cartilage of the dorsal fin was about half that of dart with both tags as a func- Estimation of instantaneous rates of tag shedding for school shark, Galeorhinus

  8. Experimental investigations of micro-scale flow and heat transfer phenomena by using molecular tagging techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koochesfahani, Manoochehr M.

    and accretion processes as water droplets impinge onto cold wind turbine blades. Keywords: molecular tagging

  9. Reducing Delay and Power Consumption of the Wakeup Logic through Instruction Packing and Tag Memoization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarev, Dmitry V.

    the energy dissipated in driving the tag lines. Our first approach reduces the effective length of the tag approach avoids the power dissipated in driving the tag lines by not driving the higher order bits the delay and power dissipation standpoints. The delay and energy requirement of driving the result tags

  10. PIT Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_PIT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A hydro passage performance Hydro passage conditions adult passage standards and targets Conditions of in

  11. Temperature dependence of ssrA-tag mediated protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purcell, Oliver

    Building synthetic gene networks with highly transient dynamics requires rapid protein degradation. We show that the degradation conferred by two commonly used ssrA tags is highly temperature dependent. Synthetic gene ...

  12. Methyl-CpG island-associated genome signature tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for analyzing the organismic complexity of a sample through analysis of the nucleic acid in the sample. In the disclosed method, through a series of steps, including digestion with a type II restriction enzyme, ligation of capture adapters and linkers and digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme, genome signature tags are produced. The sequences of a statistically significant number of the signature tags are determined and the sequences are used to identify and quantify the organisms in the sample. Various embodiments of the invention described herein include methods for using single point genome signature tags to analyze the related families present in a sample, methods for analyzing sequences associated with hyper- and hypo-methylated CpG islands, methods for visualizing organismic complexity change in a sampling location over time and methods for generating the genome signature tag profile of a sample of fragmented DNA.

  13. ahsg tag single: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells (4, 5) or molecules (6). RNA from Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu 5 Probing the Higgs Boson via VBF with Single Jet Tagging at the LHC CERN Preprints Summary: The signature...

  14. Low-Cost, Ubiquitous RFID-Tag-Antenna-Based Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) has been well established as an effective technology for track and trace applications. In this paper, we go beyond the ID in RFID, and discuss the potential for RFID tags to be used ...

  15. TRUMAN LOGO NAME BADGE ORDER FORM Example of Name Tag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    TRUMAN LOGO NAME BADGE ORDER FORM Example of Name Tag To place an order for Truman Logo name badges department. Price includes 2-color Truman State University logo badge, up to three lines of engraving (36

  16. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  17. Playing Tag with ANN: Boosted Top Identification with Pattern Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro G. Almeida; Mihailo Backovic; Mathieu Cliche; Seung J. Lee; Maxim Perelstein

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Many searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) rely on top tagging algorithms, which discriminate between boosted hadronic top quarks and the much more common jets initiated by light quarks and gluons. We note that the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) effectively takes a "digital image" of each jet, with pixel intensities given by energy deposits in individual HCAL cells. Viewed in this way, top tagging becomes a canonical pattern recognition problem. With this motivation, we present a novel top tagging algorithm based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), one of the most popular approaches to pattern recognition. The ANN is trained on a large sample of boosted tops and light quark/gluon jets, and is then applied to independent test samples. The ANN tagger demonstrated excellent performance in a Monte Carlo study: for example, for jets with p_T in the 1100-1200 GeV range, 60% top-tag efficiency can be achieved with a 4% mis-tag rate. We discuss the physical features of the jets identified by the ANN tagger as the most important for classification, as well as correlations between the ANN tagger and some of the familiar top-tagging observables and algorithms.

  18. Reegle mentions OpenEI in video on new Content Pool API | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReactionEnergyRedwood Electric

  19. LOD Workshop Wrap-up courtesy of REEGLE | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNL Energy FlowLOD WorkshopLODLOD

  20. Acoustic Tag Usage Discussion Brad Eppard of USACE (see PowerPoint for more details)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    below). 7. In response to a question of whether or not there is competition between tagging technologies data, USACE does not favor open access. 8. Tag loss was evaluated in 2007 and 2008 and did not indicate

  1. When Waste Becomes Intelligent: Assessing the Environmental Impact of Microchip Tagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Waste Becomes Intelligent: Assessing the Environmental Impact of Microchip Tagging Claudia Binder1 , Svetlana Domnitcheva2 1 Natural and Social Science Interface Department of Environmental recognition of several tags. Many shops are already successfully using such systems as prevention

  2. A battery-free tag for wireless monitoring of heart sounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandal, Soumyajit

    We have developed a wearable, battery-free tag that monitors heart sounds. The tag powers up by harvesting ambient RF energy, and contains a low-power integrated circuit, an antenna and up to four microphones. The chip, ...

  3. One source of uncertainty in fishery assessments based on tag release and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tagging experi- ment in which 504 skipjack tuna, Kat- suwonus pelamis, were double tagged, by using pelamis, off the Maldives M. Shiham Adam Renewable Resources Assessment Group T. H. Huxley School

  4. Application of the accurate mass and time tag approach in studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accurate mass and time tag approach in studies of the human blood lipidome. Application of the accurate mass and time tag approach in studies of the human blood lipidome. Abstract:...

  5. Process design and modeling for the production of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Neidi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oleaginous microorganism Rhodococcus opacus PD630 was used to study the characteristics and kinetics of the accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in cells. In this process, accumulation of TAG is stimulated when a ...

  6. Three types of RFID tags Passive / Active / Semi-Active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Gabriel

    Observation: Passive RFID tags can communicate with each other through the reader. Problem Statement The goal and powerful Key Idea: Construct a circular chain of mutually dependent message authentication code (MAC signal Inductive Coupling Far-Field Propagation signal Future ResearchFuture Research Anti-RFID Faraday

  7. Coded Wire Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_CWT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon 3A tubes and in fishways Salmon and steelhead juvenile and adult hydro passage performance Hydro passage

  8. Using DEDICOM for completely unsupervised part-of-speech tagging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, Peter A.; Bader, Brett William; Rozovskaya, Alla (University of Illinois, Urbana, IL)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard and widespread approach to part-of-speech tagging is based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). An alternative approach, pioneered by Schuetze (1993), induces parts of speech from scratch using singular value decomposition (SVD). We introduce DEDICOM as an alternative to SVD for part-of-speech induction. DEDICOM retains the advantages of SVD in that it is completely unsupervised: no prior knowledge is required to induce either the tagset or the associations of terms with tags. However, unlike SVD, it is also fully compatible with the HMM framework, in that it can be used to estimate emission- and transition-probability matrices which can then be used as the input for an HMM. We apply the DEDICOM method to the CONLL corpus (CONLL 2000) and compare the output of DEDICOM to the part-of-speech tags given in the corpus, and find that the correlation (almost 0.5) is quite high. Using DEDICOM, we also estimate part-of-speech ambiguity for each term, and find that these estimates correlate highly with part-of-speech ambiguity as measured in the original corpus (around 0.88). Finally, we show how the output of DEDICOM can be evaluated and compared against the more familiar output of supervised HMM-based tagging.

  9. Temperature Sensor Tag for Passive UHF RFID Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Temperature Sensor Tag for Passive UHF RFID Systems Juha Virtanen, Leena Ukkonen, Toni Björninen of Mississippi University, MS 38677, USA atef@olemiss.edu Abstract--This paper presents a novel temperature is used as the temperature sensitive material instead of the more traditional semi-conducting materials

  10. Development of an Automated Tracking System of Tagged Wild Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of an Automated Tracking System of Tagged Wild Animals Mariya Ishutkina1 Timothy Chan2 and there are about a hundred of them living in the wild. For tracking purposes, each animal is outfitted remaining animals and established a captive-breeding program to restore red wolves in the wild. As pointed

  11. Supplementary Material for Satellite Tagging and Cardiac Physiology Reveal Niche Expansion in Salmon Sharks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    musculature of the shark at the base of the first dorsal fin. A plastic loop secured the PAT tag in p the period on board the vessel. SPOT tags were attached to the dorsal fin such that the antenna and conductivity switch of the tag would be exposed in air when the animal swam at the surface with the dorsal fin

  12. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Security Tag for Eyeglasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2011 Security Tag for Eyeglasses Overview The purpose of this project is to design a new security tag for eyeglass products that is more of eyeglass products · Tag housing must be made from a low cost, yet durable plastic like ABS. · Pre

  13. Design and Comparison Between Two General Purpose Dipole Type UHF RFID Tag Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    are show in Figures 1 and 2. The tag in Fig. 1 is a modification of a bowtie antenna and the second one (Fig. 2) is modified from a traditional rectangular dipole tag. Bowtie is a cross section of a shell the frequency independency is lost to great extent, bowtie tag still proved to possesses rather wide band

  14. TRACKING TONGUE MOTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS USING TAGGED MR IMAGES Xiaofeng Liu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prince, Jerry L.

    TRACKING TONGUE MOTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS USING TAGGED MR IMAGES Xiaofeng Liu1 , Maureen Stone3 and strain analysis of tagged magnetic res- onance (MR) imaging [1]. It was originally applied to car- diac This research was supported by NIH grants R01 HL047405 and R01 DC001758 (a) (b) Fig. 1. (a) A tagged MR image

  15. PCB: Physically Changeable Bit for Preserving Privacy in Low-End RFID Tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Cliff C.

    of consumers, e.g., "smart" home appliances that can automatically check and alert users of food-frequency identification (RFID) tags in consumer market. To tackle this privacy issue, a simple and ef- fective approach-end RFID tags in consumer market, where each tag is supposed to be 5 cents or less, it is very hard to use

  16. Tag: STEM | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE

  17. Tag: About | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumber of Water8About

  18. Tag: Partnerships | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumberGTRIPartnerships

  19. Identification of Fissionable Materials Using the Tagged Neutron Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.P. Keegan, J.P. Hurley, J.R. Tinsley, R. Trainham

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary describes experiments to detect and identify fissionable materials using the tagged neutron technique. The objective of this work is to enhance homeland security capability to find fissionable material that may be smuggled inside shipping boxes, containers, or vehicles. The technique distinguishes depleted uranium from lead, steel, and tungsten. Future work involves optimizing the technique to increase the count rate by many orders of magnitude and to build in the additional capability to image hidden fissionable materials. The tagged neutron approach is very different to other techniques based on neutron die-away or photo-fission. This work builds on the development of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) [1]. Similar investigations have been performed by teams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia, and by the EURITRACK collaboration in the European Union [2,3,4].

  20. Believing Your Eyes: Strengthening the Reliability of Tags and Seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Denlinger, Laura S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) is working together with scientific experts at the DOE national laboratories to develop the tools needed to safeguard and secure nuclear material from diversion, theft, and sabotage--tasks critical to support future arms control treaties that may involve the new challenge of monitoring nuclear weapons dismantlement. Use of optically stimulated luminescent material is one method to enhance the security and robustness of existing tamper indicating devices such as tags and seals.

  1. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  2. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    can be calculated as M = ?nullN 2 tanh( ?nullB 0 2kT ) (2.3) In a biological sample that contains about 1mL of water, there are about 10 22 hydrogen nuclei, and at the room... population that is frequently in need of quality tomographic images for the assessment of congenital heart defects. MRI can characterize myocardial function through the use of cine MRI and tagged MRI. The latter provides a means to assess wall motion...

  3. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  4. Gift tag drive benefits local children and seniors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics Acrobat XGettingGift Tag Drive

  5. Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the Cormack–Jolly–Seber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 80–89 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

  6. The Practicality of Multi-Tag RFID Systems Leonid Bolotnyy, Scott Krize, and Gabriel Robins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Gabriel

    -collision 1 Introduction Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) uses radio communication to uniquely identify-passive tags: inductive coupling and electromagnetic backscattering (i.e., far-field propagation). In inductive coupling the reader creates a magnetic field between itself and the tags which in turn derive power from

  7. Enabling Implicit Human Computer Interaction A Wearable RFID-Tag Reader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Albrecht

    that supplies energy to the tags for a short time and then communicates with the tag. There are many different during access by the reader via electromagnetic induction. The reader is an electronic componentKeyTM transponder reader module and added a power regulation and a TTL to RS232 converter to the module. The module

  8. Challenge: Ultra-Low-Power Energy-Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zussman, Gil

    Challenge: Ultra-Low-Power Energy-Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs) Maria Gorlatova, Peter posed by a new class of ultra-low-power devices referred to as Energy-Harvesting Ac- tive Networked Tags), and determining locations of disaster sur- vivors. Recent advances in ultra-low-power wireless communica- tions

  9. A Battery-Free Tag for Wireless Monitoring of Heart Sounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    A Battery-Free Tag for Wireless Monitoring of Heart Sounds Soumyajit Mandal, Lorenzo Turicchia that monitors heart sounds. The tag powers up by harvesting ambient RF energy, and contains a low measure heart rate at distances up to 7m from an FCC-compliant RF power source. We also suggest how delays

  10. Ultrafast MR Grid-Tagging Sequence for Assessment of Local Mechanical Properties of the Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napadow, Vitaly

    Ultrafast MR Grid-Tagging Sequence for Assessment of Local Mechanical Properties of the Lungs Qun in MR imaging of lung parenchyma. In this study, a fast MR grid-tagging technique is described deformation of the lung. Quantitative analysis of the data shows that this method is capable of assessing

  11. Methods And System Suppressing Clutter In A Gain-Block, Radar-Responsive Tag System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems reduce clutter interference in a radar-responsive tag system. A radar transmits a series of linear-frequency-modulated pulses and receives echo pulses from nearby terrain and from radar-responsive tags that may be in the imaged scene. Tags in the vicinity of the radar are activated by the radar's pulses. The tags receive and remodulate the radar pulses. Tag processing reverses the direction, in time, of the received waveform's linear frequency modulation. The tag retransmits the remodulated pulses. The radar uses a reversed-chirp de-ramp pulse to process the tag's echo. The invention applies to radar systems compatible with coherent gain-block tags. The invention provides a marked reduction in the strength of residual clutter echoes on each and every echo pulse received by the radar. SAR receiver processing effectively whitens passive-clutter signatures across the range dimension. Clutter suppression of approximately 14 dB is achievable for a typical radar system.

  12. Efficient Missing Tag Detection in RFID Systems Wen Luo Shigang Chen Tao Li Shiping Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shigang

    wirelessly over a distance. Today's passive RFID tags harvest energy from a reader's radio waves and use to a fraction of what is currently needed. Second, we study the missing-tag detection problem from a new energy flexibility for the practitioners to meet their energy and time requirements. I. INTRODUCTION RFID (radio

  13. Logo-Antenna Based RFID Tags for Advertising Application Khaled ElMahgoub 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Logo-Antenna Based RFID Tags for Advertising Application Khaled ElMahgoub 1 , Tamer Elsherbeni 1 to the 866 MHz and 915 MHz operating frequencies, respectively, were designed based on the logos of two advertising propagation. Thus, the purpose of Logo-RFID tags is to stimulate an emotional reaction

  14. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  15. Design and Characterization of a Novel Battery-less, Solar Powered Wireless Tag for Enhanced-Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Design and Characterization of a Novel Battery-less, Solar Powered Wireless Tag for Enhanced.Vyas@gatech.edu Abstract-- In this paper, a novel wireless "Battery-less Solar Powered Wireless Tag" with an enhanced range" and "ubiquitous wireless networks". This paper introduces a novel battery-less solar powered wireless tag

  16. Design and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification of Specific Proteins in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    for selective enrichment of tag peptides. Another cysteine peptide enrichment and isotope tagging scheme hasDesign and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification spectrometry is most useful when quantitative data is also obtained. We recently introduced isotope

  17. Efficiency measurement of b-tagging algorithms developed by the CMS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saptaparna Bhattacharya; for the CMS collaboration

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of jets originating from b quarks (b-tagging) is a key element of many physics analyses at the LHC. Various algorithms for b-tagging have been developed by the CMS experiment to identify b-tagged jets with a typical efficiency between 40% and 70% while keeping the rate of misidentified light quark jets between 0.1% and 10%. An important step, in order to be able to use these tools in physics analysis, is the determination of the efficiency for tagging b-jets. Several methods to measure the efficiencies of the lifetime based b-tagging algorithms are presented. Events that have jets with muons are used to enrich a jet sample in heavy flavor content. The efficiency measurement relies on the transverse momentum of the muon relative to the jet axis or on solving a system of equations which incorporate two uncorrelated taggers. Another approach uses the number of b-tagged jets in top pair events to estimate the efficiency. The results obtained in 2010 data and the uncertainties obtained with the different techniques are reported. The rate of misidentified light quarks have been measured using the "negative" tagging technique.

  18. B-tagging and the search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlon, Tim; /Imperial Coll., London

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons and work relating to the improvement of the b-tagging and trigger capabilities at the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider is presented. The search for evidence of the Higgs sector in the Standard Model (SM) and supersymmetric extensions of the SM are a high priority for the D0 collaboration, and b-tagging and good triggers are a vital component of these searches. The development and commissioning of the first triggers at D0 which use b-tagging is outlined, along with the development of a new secondary vertex b-tagging tool for use in the Level 3 trigger. Upgrades to the Level 3 trigger hit finding code, which have led to significant improvements in the quality and efficiency of the tracking code, and by extension the b-tagging tools, are also presented. An offline Neural Network (NN) b-tagging tool was developed, trained on Monte Carlo and extensively tested and measured on data. The new b-tagging tool significantly improves the b-tagging performance at D0, for a fixed fake rate relative improvements in signal efficiency range from {approx} 40% to {approx} 15%. Fake rates, for a fixed signal efficiency, are typically reduced to between a quarter and a third of their value. Finally, three versions of the search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons are presented. The latest version of the analysis makes use of almost 1 fb{sup -1} of data, the new NN b-tagger and the new b-tagging triggers, and has set one of the world's best limits on the supersymmetric parameter tan{beta} in the mass range 90 to 150 GeV.

  19. Short Specialist Review Gene structure prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendel, Volker

    Short Specialist Review Gene structure prediction in plant genomes Volker Brendel Iowa State) within most genes makes the problem of computational gene structure prediction distinct from (and harder prediction in vertebrates. The second reason is pragmatic. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) sequencing and whole

  20. Sub-wavelength plasmonic readout for direct linear analysis of optically tagged DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varsanik, Jonathan S.

    This work describes the development and fabrication of a novel nanofluidic flow-through sensing chip that utilizes a plasmonic resonator to excite fluorescent tags with sub-wavelength resolution. We cover the design of the ...

  1. EPC RFID Tag Security Weaknesses and Defenses: Passport Cards, Enhanced Drivers Licenses, and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuoka, Yoky

    , Washington, USA balkan@cs.washington.edu Tadayoshi Kohno University of Washington Seattle, Washington, USA of 2008, incorporates an EPC tag. This identity document was is- sued in response to the Western

  2. A Low-Power, Battery-Free Tag for Body Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandal, Soumyajit

    A new tag for pervasive sensing applications consists of a custom integrated circuit, an antenna for radio frequency energy harvesting, and sensors for monitoring physiological parameters. This paper presents a wearable ...

  3. CP violation in flavor-tagged Bs? --> J/[psi][phi] decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makhoul, Khaldoun

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we present the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of Bs -+ J/,0 decays performed with the use of initial-state flavor tagging. CP violation is observed in this mode through the interference ...

  4. A Cost-Effective Tag Design for Memory Data Authentication in Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    -chip memory. We aim to develop a cost effective tag design to counter physical attacks on the insecure off University of New South Wales, Australia {meihong,huig}@cse.unsw.edu.au Technical Report UNSW-CSE-TR-201209

  5. Method of remote powering and detecting multiple UWB passive tags in an RFID system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Nekoogar, Faranak (San Ramon, CA); Benzel, David M. (Livermore, CA); Dallum, Gregory E. (Livermore, CA); Spiridon, Alex (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), tracking, powering apparatus/system and method using coded Ultra-wideband (UWB) signaling is introduced. The proposed hardware and techniques disclosed herein utilize a plurality of passive UWB transponders in a field of an RFID-radar system. The radar system itself enables multiple passive tags to be remotely powered (activated) at about the same time frame via predetermined frequency UWB pulsed formats. Once such tags are in an activated state, an UWB radar transmits specific "interrogating codes" to put predetermined tags in an awakened status. Such predetermined tags can then communicate by a unique "response code" so as to be detected by an UWB system using radar methods.

  6. 7th International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management 1 Semantic tags for generative multiview product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    7th International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management 1 Semantic tags for generative. Conf. Product Lifecycle Management. Biographical notes: Thomas Paviot is an Assistant Professor and the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) strategy are solutions allowing to achieve objectives of cost

  7. CargoNet : micropower sensate tags for supply-chain management and security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malinowski, Mateusz Ksawery

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of a system of sensate active RFID tags for supply-chain management and security applications, necessitated by the current lack of commercial platforms capable of monitoring the state ...

  8. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, Michael A. (Manteca, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded "D" character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the "D" interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available.

  9. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, M.A.

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded ``D`` character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the ``D`` interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available. 5 figs.

  10. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe{sup +44}) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10{sup 12} bit/cm{sup 2}). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development.

  11. Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

  12. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  13. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as background'' gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a fuzzy'' set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements. 14 figs.

  14. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as "background" gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a "fuzzy" set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements.

  15. Feasibility of using neural networks as a level 2 calorimeter trigger for jet tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handler, T.; Neis, E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Glover, C.; Gabriel, T.; Saini, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of expected decay modes of the Higgs particle will result in jet formation. We propose to incorporate a second level trigger into the SDC detector, using neural network VSLI hardware, to tag such Higgs decay modes. The input to the neural network will be the energy depositions in both the barrel and endcap regions of the calorimeter. The neural network`s output would be a value representing the degree of correlation between the observed energy distribution and the type of physical scattering that has occurred. Preliminary results indicate that neural networks may be of use in tagging jet decays of the Higgs particle.

  16. Feasibility of using neural networks as a level 2 calorimeter trigger for jet tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handler, T.; Neis, E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics); Glover, C.; Gabriel, T.; Saini, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of expected decay modes of the Higgs particle will result in jet formation. We propose to incorporate a second level trigger into the SDC detector, using neural network VSLI hardware, to tag such Higgs decay modes. The input to the neural network will be the energy depositions in both the barrel and endcap regions of the calorimeter. The neural network's output would be a value representing the degree of correlation between the observed energy distribution and the type of physical scattering that has occurred. Preliminary results indicate that neural networks may be of use in tagging jet decays of the Higgs particle.

  17. Tree Slotted Aloha: a New Protocol for Tag Identification in RFID Networks Maurizio A. Bonuccelli and Francesca Lonetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheuermann, Peter

    Tree Slotted Aloha: a New Protocol for Tag Identification in RFID Networks Maurizio A. Bonuccelli In this paper, we approach the problem of identifying a set of objects in an RFID network. We propose a modified version of Slotted Aloha protocol to reduce the number of transmission collisions. All tags select a slot

  18. Power Electronics Design of a Solar Powered In-car Wireless Tag for Asset Tracking and Parking Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    description Figure 1 shows the system block diagram. Maximum output power of the solar cell is extractedPower Electronics Design of a Solar Powered In-car Wireless Tag for Asset Tracking and Parking and testing of a power conditioning circuit for a solar powered in-car wireless tag for asset tracking

  19. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore »reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  20. Molecular Constraints on Synaptic Tagging and Maintenance of Long-Term Potentiation: A Predictive Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smolen; Douglas A. Baxter; John H. Byrne

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein synthesis-dependent, late long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) at glutamatergic hippocampal synapses are well characterized examples of long-term synaptic plasticity. Persistent increased activity of the enzyme protein kinase M (PKM) is thought essential for maintaining LTP. Additional spatial and temporal features that govern LTP and LTD induction are embodied in the synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross capture hypotheses. Only synapses that have been "tagged" by an stimulus sufficient for LTP and learning can "capture" PKM. A model was developed to simulate the dynamics of key molecules required for LTP and LTD. The model concisely represents relationships between tagging, capture, LTD, and LTP maintenance. The model successfully simulated LTP maintained by persistent synaptic PKM, STC, LTD, and cross capture, and makes testable predictions concerning the dynamics of PKM. The maintenance of LTP, and consequently of at least some forms of long-term memory, is predicted to require continual positive feedback in which PKM enhances its own synthesis only at potentiated synapses. This feedback underlies bistability in the activity of PKM. Second, cross capture requires the induction of LTD to induce dendritic PKM synthesis, although this may require tagging of a nearby synapse for LTP. The model also simulates the effects of PKM inhibition, and makes additional predictions for the dynamics of CaM kinases. Experiments testing the above predictions would significantly advance the understanding of memory maintenance.

  1. Summary Description of BEF's Green Tag Product1 February 22, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity annually, would create no air pollution. An average fossil fuel conventional, polluting power plants with the output from a new, non-polluting renewable power plant, 7 tons of NOx, and varying amounts of CO, mercury, particulates and other pollutants. The green tags

  2. SpiritTagger: A Geo-Aware Tag Suggestion Tool Mined from Flickr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    , of a city or region. Experiments on a data set consisting of over 100,000 Flickr photos in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara manj@ece.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT Geographically referenced, or "geo-tagged," photo data sets based on ge- ographic context with content-based image analysis we are able to suggest geographically

  3. The Core Degree Based Tag Reduction on Chip Multiprocessor to Balance Energy Saving and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Core Degree Based Tag Reduction on Chip Multiprocessor to Balance Energy Saving and Performance on a single-core processor. In this paper, we further investigate the problem on balancing energy saving such that the best balance of energy and performance can be achieved. In particular, as the basis

  4. Extracting Attack Knowledge Using Principal-subordinate Consequence Tagging Case Grammar and Alerts Semantic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansari, Nirwan

    Extracting Attack Knowledge Using Principal-subordinate Consequence Tagging Case Grammar and Alerts networks from Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks has become a critical issue that must be tackled, the overwhelming volume of alerts makes it difficult for security administrators to analyze and extract the attack

  5. TAGS 85/2N RTG Power for Viking Lander Capsule

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1969-08-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of studies performed by Isotopes, Inc., Nuclear Systems Division, to optimize and baseline a TAGS 85/2N RTG for the Viking Lander Capsule prime electrical power source are presented. These studies generally encompassed identifying the Viking RTG mission profile and design requirements, and establishing a baseline RTG design consistent with these requirements.

  6. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny (Bolingbrook, IL); Lambert, John (Wheaton, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  7. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  8. Demo: Organic Solar Cell-equipped Energy Harvesting Active Networked Tag (EnHANT) Prototypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    Demo: Organic Solar Cell-equipped Energy Harvesting Active Networked Tag (EnHANT) Prototypes Gerald harvesting and communications hardware, namely organic solar cells and ultra-wide-band impulse radio (UWB harvesting, organic solar cells, ultra-low-power com- munications, ultra-wideband impulse radio, energy

  9. DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200358 Surface-Attached Polyhistidine-Tag Proteins Characterized by FTIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    without. The group of Vogel modified Ge and ZnSe in- ternal reflection elements (IREs) by gold or chemical by a polyhistidine tag.[14] During the last years SEIRA (surface-enhanced infrared absorp- tion) spectroscopy near-field of the rough gold surface might hamper quantitative analysis, be- cause the enhancement

  10. Energy-Aware Tag Anti-Collision Protocols for RFID Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    requiring mobile readers, however, energy has become an important resource to conserve, if and when possible1 Energy-Aware Tag Anti-Collision Protocols for RFID Systems Vinod Namboodiri, Member, IEEE, Lixin Gao, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract-- Energy consumption of portable RFID readers is be- coming

  11. Myocardial Elastography Comparison to Results Using MR Cardiac Tagging E. E. Konofagou1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Myocardial Elastography ­ Comparison to Results Using MR Cardiac Tagging E. E. Konofagou1,2 , W. Manning4 , K. Kissinger4 and S. D. Solomon3 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University shown that axial displacement and strain could be estimated and utilizing B- scan ultrasonography [1

  12. TagParser: well on the way to ISO-TC37 conformance Gil FRANCOPOULO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TagParser: well on the way to ISO-TC37 conformance Gil FRANCOPOULO TAGMATICA 126 rue de Picpus that are currently under development within ISO-TC37. Then as an example of application of these ISO specifications and research teams. Officially recognized specifications are needed. The ISO-TC37 work started from the GENELEX

  13. tt Production Cross Section Measurement using Soft Electron Tagging in pp Collisions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weitz, David

    V A thesis presented by John Paul Chou to The Department of Physics in partial fulfillment, Massachusetts September 2008 #12;c 2008 - John Paul Chou All rights reserved. #12;Thesis advisor Author Melissa Franklin John Paul Chou tt Production Cross Section Measurement using Soft Electron Tagging in pp

  14. 36 Oceanus Magazine Vol. 50, No. 2, Summer 2013 | www.whoi.edu/oceanus ike most fathers, Simon Thorrold plays tag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Donald M.

    year, but certainly tens of millions of sharks are killed annually--most of those just for fins, bodies with a tag attached into muscle tissue just below the dorsal fin. After months or a year, the tag Institution, also plays tag with 30-foot-long whale sharks, like this one looking straight at you. Give us

  15. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  16. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program : Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. It can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened or endangered stocks. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. Between 120,000 and 200,000 fish are marked for groups at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  17. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. More than 100,000 fish per group are usually marked at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  18. Measuring the $b$-jet tagging efficiency on $c$-jets containing $D^{*+}$ mesons with ATLAS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferretto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of jets originating from $b$-quarks ($b$-tagging) is a crucial tool for the LHC physics program, both for precision measurements and in searches for new particles. One important ingredient when using $b$-tagging in physics analyses is the determination of the probability to mistakenly $b$-tag a jet originating from a $c$-quark ($c$-tag efficiency). The optimal sample for the measurements of the $c$-tag efficiency would be a clean sample of jets originating from $c$-quarks. The sample of jets associated to reconstructed $D^{?+}$ mesons (through the decay chain $D^{*+} \\rightarrow D^0 \\pi^+ \\rightarrow K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$) is quite close to this ideal case since most $D^{*+}$ mesons originate from $c$-quark hadronization. The $c$-tag efficiency has been measured by comparing the reduction in the yield of $D^{*+}$ mesons before and after the $b$-tagging requirement of the associated jet. The contamination from $D^{*+}$ mesons that originate from $b$-hadron decays has been taken into account usi...

  19. Measuring the $b$-jet tagging efficiency on $c$-jets containing $D^{*+}$ mesons with ATLAS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferretto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of jets originating from $b$-quarks ($b$-tagging) is a crucial tool for the LHC physics program, both for precision measurements and in searches for new particles. One important ingredient when using $b$-tagging in physics analyses is the determination of the probability to mistakenly $b$-tag a jet originating from a $c$-quark ($c$-tag efficiency). The optimal sample for the measurements of the $c$-tag efficiency would be a clean sample of jets originating from $c$-quarks. The sample of jets associated to reconstructed $D^{*+}$ mesons (through the decay chain $D^{*+}\\to D^0\\pi^+\\to K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$) is quite close to this ideal case since most $D^{*+}$ mesons originate from $c$-quark hadronization. The $c$-tag efficiency has been measured by comparing the reduction in the yield of $D^{*+}$ mesons before and after the $b$-tagging requirement of the associated jet. The contamination from $D^{*+}$ mesons that originate from $b$-hadron decays has been taken into account using a fit to the $D^0$ p...

  20. Tag: ES&H | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumber ofCommunity

  1. Tag: Employees & Retirees | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE CreatingTotalImportsNumberNumber

  2. TagMe: an easy-to-use toolkit for turning the personal environment into an extended communications interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benavides Palos, Xavier

    In this paper we present an end-user toolkit for easy creation of responsive objects and environments. TagMe consists of a wearable device that recognizes the object or surface the user is touching. The user can make ...

  3. An Integrated RFID and Barcode Tagged Item Inventory System for Deployment at New Brunswick Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL; Gradle, Colleen [New Brunswick Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Preston, Lynne [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security; Thomas, Brigham B. [ORNL; Laymance, Leesa K [ORNL; Kuziel, Ron [DOE SC - Chicago Office

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has a numerous inventory containing thousands of plutonium and uranium certified reference materials. The current manual inventory process is well established but is a lengthy process which requires significant oversight and double checking to ensure correctness. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has worked with NBL to develop and deploy a new inventory system which utilizes handheld computers with barcode scanners and radio frequency identification (RFID) readers termed the Tagged Item Inventory System (TIIS). Certified reference materials are identified by labels which incorporate RFID tags and barcodes. The label printing process and RFID tag association process are integrated into the main desktop software application. Software on the handheld computers syncs with software on designated desktop machines and the NBL inventory database to provide a seamless inventory process. This process includes: 1) identifying items to be inventoried, 2) downloading the current inventory information to the handheld computer, 3) using the handheld to read item and location labels, and 4) syncing the handheld computer with a designated desktop machine to analyze the results, print reports, etc. The security of this inventory software has been a major concern. Designated roles linked to authenticated logins are used to control access to the desktop software while password protection and badge verification are used to control access to the handheld computers. The overall system design and deployment at NBL will be presented. The performance of the system will also be discussed with respect to a small piece of the overall inventory. Future work includes performing a full inventory at NBL with the Tagged Item Inventory System and comparing performance, cost, and radiation exposures to the current manual inventory process.

  4. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  5. Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

  6. CDF/PHYS/TOP/PUBLIC/7245 Top Quark Mass Measurement in Non-tagged Lepton+Jets Events at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    CDF/PHYS/TOP/PUBLIC/7245 Top Quark Mass Measurement in Non-tagged Lepton+Jets Events at CDF The CDF of the top quark mass in non-tagged sample of lep- ton+4 jet events from p#22;p collisions at p s=1.96 Te as a superposition of top and W+jet events. The signal-constrained #12;t imposing a signal of 15.5#6;3.2 events

  7. DNA attachment to support structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balhorn, Rodney L. (Livermore, CA); Barry, Christopher H. (Fresno, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic beads or other structures are attached to nucleic acids (DNA) using a terminal transferase. The transferase adds labeled dideoxy nucleotide bases to the ends of linear strands of DNA. The labels, such as the antigens digoxigenin and biotin, bind to the antibody compounds or other appropriate complementary ligands, which are bound to the microscopic beads or other support structures. The method does not require the synthesis of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe. The method can be used to tag or label DNA even when the DNA has an unknown sequence, has blunt ends, or is a very large fragment (e.g., >500 kilobase pairs).

  8. Web Structure Analysis for Information Mining Lakshmi Vijjappu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Ah-Hwee

    Web Structure Analysis for Information Mining Lakshmi Vijjappu1 , Ah-Hwee Tan2 , and Chew-Lim Tan1 tagged training documents and learned rules for extraction. Craven et al. [4] reported that greater training data and the lack of corpora annotated with the appropriate semantic and domain- specific

  9. Development and Evaluation of Passive Integrated Transponder Tag Technology, 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.; Nunnallee, Edmund P. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1984, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has conducted a research project to develop and evaluate technology for passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB). Work conducted as part of this project between October 2000 and September 2002 (FY01 and FY02) was divided into seven individual elements, which are covered separately in this report. The efforts by personnel associated with this project have produced and will continue to produce products that aid resource stakeholders in assessing the effectiveness of actions taken to enhance the survival of juvenile and adult salmonids. These products and their uses include: (1) Survival and migration timing information on stocks to evaluate water management strategies and fish passage/collection facilities; (2) Data needed for the management and restoration of salmonids and other fish stocks listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA); (3) Information required for the management of multiple species in a variety of habitats; and (4) Tools that enable fisheries researchers and managers to address previously unanswerable questions and critical uncertainties These products are also used in genetic, physiology, behavior, and captive broodstock research on endangered species. The continued development of PIT-tag technology will enable researchers and fisheries managers to address issues expressed in both of NMFS biological opinions for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS)(NMFS 1995a, 2000) and the proposed Snake River Recovery Plan (NMFS 1995b; tasks 2.1.d, 2.3.b.4, 2.4.a, 2.6.c.2, and 2.9.d).

  10. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  11. Prompt and delayed spectroscopy of {sup 142}Tb using recoil-isomer tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, P. J. R.; Cullen, D. M.; Kishada, A. M.; Rigby, S. V.; Varley, B. J. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Scholey, C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Maentyniemi, K.; Nieminen, P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)] (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recoil-isomer tagging has been used to characterize the states built upon an I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} isomer in {sup 142}Tb. High-spin states of the neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 142}Tb were populated using an {sup 54}Fe beam, accelerated onto a {sup 92}Mo target of thickness {approx}500 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} at energies of 245, 252, and 265 MeV using the K130 cyclotron at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Use of the JUROGAM target-position Ge-detector array coupled with the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer at the RITU gas-filled recoil separator has significantly increased the efficiency of the isomer-tagging technique. The rotational band built upon the I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} isomeric state was established with isomer-tagged {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data and angular distributions were measured for some of the more intensely populated states. Two previously unobserved bands that bypass the isomer were also established. The new data have been interpreted within the framework of the cranked-shell model. The data show good agreement with the calculated triaxial nuclear shape with {gamma}=-30 deg. for the {sup 142m2}Tb isomeric state. The B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios, nuclear alignment, signature splitting, and reduced transition probability, B(E1), of the isomeric state have been systematically compared with those of the neighboring nuclei. These comparisons give further evidence for the {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2} configuration of the isomer.

  12. {CP} Violation in Flavor Tagged $B_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhoul, Khaldoun; /MIT

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we present the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays performed with the use of initial-state flavor tagging. CP violation is observed in this mode through the interference of decay without net mixing and decay with net mixing, that is, B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} and B{sub s} {yields} {bar B}{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The time-dependent angular analysis is used to extract the decay widths of the heavy and light B{sub s} eigenstates and the difference between these decay widths {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} {triple_bond} {Lambda}{sub s}{sup L}-{Lambda}{sub s}{sup H}. Initial-state flavor tagging is used to determine the matter-antimatter content of the B{sub s} mesons at production time. We combine flavor tagging with the angular analysis, which statistically determines the contributions of the CP-even and CP-odd components at decay time, to measure the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub s}. The phase {beta}{sub s} is expressed in terms of elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix as {beta}{sub s} {triple_bond} arg (-V{sub ts}V*{sub tb}/V{sub cs}V*{sub cb}), and is predicted by the Standard Model to be close to zero, {beta}{sub s}{sup SM} = 0.02. In the measurement of {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s}, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of luminosity, collected at the CDF experiment from proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. In the measurement of {beta}{sub s}, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.3 fb{sup -1} of collected luminosity. We measure {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} = (0.071{sub -0.059}{sup +0.064} {+-} 0.007) ps{sup -1} using the time-dependent angular analysis. Combining the angular analysis with flavor-tagging, we find that assuming the Standard Model predictions of {beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 33%. We obtain a suite of associated results which are discussed in detail in this dissertation alongside the main results.

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  14. Tag: transformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    span>

  1. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report 1990-1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Maynard, D.J.; Downing, S.L. (and others)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1983, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) began a multiyear cooperative research program with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to evaluate a new miniaturized identification system that could be used with salmonids. The system is referred to as the passive-integrated-transponder (PIT) tagging and interrogation system. The program has focused on determining the effects of PIT tags on juvenile and adult salmonids, as well as the development and evaluation of tagging and interrogation methods. Earlier results of the program have been reported in annual reports and journal articles cited in this report. This report covers the work per formed from 1990 through 1993. For convenience, the report is divided into three sections: (1) Interrogation and separation systems at Columbia River Basin dams; (2) Systems development and evaluation; and (3) Information and technology transfer.

  2. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2?? with a New Tagging Method at the ?(5S) Resonance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stani?, S.; Stari?, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2?? at the ?(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-? tagging.” In ?(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/?K0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the ?(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-?? and B?? tagged J/?K0S yields, we determine sin2??=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The results are based on 121 fb?¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e?e? collider.

  3. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  4. Steps for Chemical "Hazardous Waste" Removal 1. Complete a Green Hazardous Waste tag and attach to waste container. This is required for each individual item to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Steps for Chemical "Hazardous Waste" Removal 1. Complete a Green Hazardous Waste tag and attach by calling 5-8200 or by e-mailing waste_tech@cornell.edu ) 2. Place all Hazardous Waste containers into a UN. Leave top copy of Hazardous Waste tag in the box with the items to be removed 4. Submit a request

  5. 2374 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 7, JULY 2009 LabVIEW-Based UHF RFID Tag Test and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    the construction of our system, show its operation with real tag measurement examples, and draw general conclusions. Index Terms--Radio-frequency identification (RFID), tags, testing and measurement. I. INTRODUCTION RADIO://ieeexplore.ieee.org. Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TIE.2009.2018434 6) cost effective (one-time-only hardware investment

  6. Remote Monitoring and Tracking of UF6 Cylinders Using Long-Range Passive Ultra-wideband (UWB) RFID Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on Techniques for IAEA Verification of Enrichment Activities identified 'smart tags' as a technology that should be assessed for tracking and locating UF6 cylinders. Although there is vast commercial industry working on RFID systems, the vulnerabilities of commercial products are only beginning to emerge. Most of the commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) RFID systems operate in very narrow frequency bands, making them vulnerable to detection, jamming and tampering and also presenting difficulties when used around metals (i.e. UF6 cylinders). Commercial passive RFID tags have short range, while active RFID tags that provide long ranges have limited lifetimes. There are also some concerns with the introduction of strong (narrowband) radio frequency signals around radioactive and nuclear materials. Considering the shortcomings of commercial RFID systems, in their current form, they do not offer a promising solution for continuous monitoring and tracking of UF6 cylinders. In this paper, we identify the key challenges faced by commercial RFID systems for monitoring UF6 cylinders, and introduce an ultra-wideband approach for tag/reader communications that addresses most of the identified challenges for IAEA safeguards applications.

  7. Design of a Novel, Battery-less, Solar Powered Wireless Tag for Enhanced Range Remote Tracking Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    of a regulated battery supply. The design utilizes super capacitors, which are much cleaner to dispose output voltage. In the absence of batteries, the solar energy was to be collected in a capacitor (charge tank) for use by the tag. A higher solar cell output voltage across the capacitor would provide

  8. Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop-up satellite archival tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop depths were signifi- cantly correlated with light penetration as measured by the diffuse attenuation words: Atlantic Ocean, deep sound scattering layer, diel migration, Pacific Ocean, satellite tags

  9. Jitter Analysis of an MMPP2 Tagged Stream in the presence of an MMPP2 Background Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perros, Harry

    Jitter Analysis of an MMPP­2 Tagged Stream in the presence of an MMPP­2 Background Stream G. Geleji the jitter, defined as a percentile of the inter­departure time. The formulation is exact, but the solution approximation and verify it by simulation. Keywords: single queue, tandem queueing network, multi­class, jitter

  10. Instructions for Tagging Videos 1. Go to the VAT page where you can look up clips. (http://soe-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Instructions for Tagging Videos 1. Go to the VAT page where you can look up clips. (http://soe- server.hunter.cuny.edu:8080/vat/library/library.html). Click on "Find a video clip in the library". 2 Disabilities programs, which cross subject areas. #12;4. You can then click on a clip and the video will appear

  11. Preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0} - {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} mixing with kaon and charge dipole tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report two preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0}- B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing using novel techniques with a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup O} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC. B decay vertices are reconstructed inclusively with a topological technique and the B hadron flavor at production is determined by exploiting the large left-right forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup O} {r_arrow} b {bar b} decays in combination with a jet charge technique. Two methods are used to tag the B flavor at decay. The first uses the charge of kaons attached to the B decay vertex and identified with the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. The second measurement is based on the construction of a charge dipole of the topological vertices to separate the B{sub d}{sup O}/B{sub d}{sup 0} decays by exploiting the B {r_arrow} D cascade charge structure. The measurement of the oscillation frequency yields {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.58 {+-} 0.07(stat){+-}0.08(syst) ps{sup -1} and 0.56 {+-} 0.08(stat){+-}0.04(syst) ps{sup {minus}1} for the kaon and dipole tags respectively.

  12. A Dual Resonant Microstrip UHF RFID " Cargo" Tag with a CPW Structure for the Feed and Matching Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aroor, Supreetha Rao

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    #1; #1; #2;#1;#3;#4;#5;#6;#1;#7;#8; #11;#5;#11;#12;#1; #14;#15;#16; #12;#16;#14;#17;#1;#18;#19;#20;#1;#7;#20;#21;#3;#1;#22;#23;#5;#16;#24; #1;#25;#5;#24;#26;#1;#27;#14;#12;#28;#1;#5;#1;#23;#29;#30;#1; #31;#12;#16;#4;#15;#12;#4;#16;#8;#1; #16;#1...;#12;#28;#8;#1;#20;#8;#8;!#1;#5;#11;!#1; #5;#12;#15;#28;#14;#11;#24;#1;#23;#14;#16;#15;#4;#14;#12;#1; #1; #1;#2;#3;#4;#5;#5;#6;#7;#8; #4;#11;#11;#4; #1; #1; #2;#3;#4;#5;#6;#7;#7;#8; #1;#7; #1;#7;#11;#8;#1;#12;#8; #14;#15;#7;#5;#8;#16;#7;#1; #17;#1;#18...

  13. A unique radioisotopic label as a new concept for safeguarding and tagging of long-term stored items and waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dina Chernikova; Kare Axell

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper discuss a novel method of tagging and labeling of waste casks, copper canisters, spent fuel containers, mercury containers, waste pack- ages and other items. In particular, it is related to the development of new long-term security identification tags/labels that can be applied to articles for carrying information about the content, inventory tracking, prevention of falsifi- cation and theft etc. It is suggested to use a unique combination of radioisotopes with different predictable length of life, as a label of the items. The possibil- ity to realize a multidimensional bar code symbology is proposed as an option for a new labeling method. The results of the first tests and evaluations of this are shown and discussed in the paper. The invention is suitable for use in items assigned to long-term (hundreds of years) storing or for final repositories. Alternative field of use includes fresh nuclear fuel handling and shipment of goods.

  14. Analysis of a set of Australian northern brown bandicoot expressed sequence tags with comparison to the genome sequence of the South American grey short tailed opossum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Michelle L.

    Background: Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) have been used for rapid gene discovery in a variety of organisms and provide a valuable resource for whole genome annotation. Although the genome of one marsupial, the opossum ...

  15. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B(s) Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giurgiu, Gavril A.; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons using semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} > 7.7 ps{sup -1} at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B {yields} {mu}X decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B{sub s}{sup 0} flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B{sup 0} and B{sup +} semileptonic B{sup 0/+} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays. The oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d} in semileptonic B{sup 0} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays is measured to be {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.501 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.)) ps{sup -1}.

  16. The Parent Populations of 6 groups identified from Chemical Tagging in the Solar neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quillen, Alice C; De Silva, Gayandhi; Freeman, Ken; Zucker, Dan B; Minchev, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the size and distribution of the parent populations for the 6 largest (at least 20 stars in the Solar neighborhood) chemical groups identified in the Chemical Tagging experiment by Mitschang et al.~2014. Stars in the abundance groups tend to lie near a boundary in angular momentum versus eccentricity space where the probability is highest for a star to be found in the Solar neighborhood and where orbits have apocenter approximately equal to the Sun's galactocentric radius. Assuming that the parent populations are uniformly distributed at all azimuthal angles in the Galaxy, we estimate that the parent populations of these abundance groups contain at least 200,000 members. The spread in angular momentum of the groups implies that the assumption of a uniform azimuthal distribution only fails for the two youngest groups and only for the highest angular momentum stars in them. The parent populations of three thin disk groups have narrow angular momentum distributions, but tails in the eccentricity and ...

  17. Neutron Structure — New Results with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements using the 6 GeV continuous electron beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab have collected information on the form factors and the unpolarized structure functions of the neutron, with minimal uncertainty from nuclear binding effects. One experiment has also tried to measure these binding effects more directly, using the method of ''spectator tagging''. These experiments are forerunners for an extensive program with the energy-upgraded 12 GeV accelerator at Jefferson Lab.

  18. In Medium Nucleon Structure Functions, SRC, and the EMC effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Hen; L. B. Weinstein; S. Gilad; S. A. Wood

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposal approved by the Jefferson Lab PAC to study semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) off the deuteron, tagged with high momentum recoiling protons or neutrons emitted at large angle relative to the momentum transfer. This experiment aims at studying the virtuality dependence of the bound nucleon structure function as a possible cause to the EMC effect and the EMC-SRC correlations. The experiment was approved in 2011 for a total run time of 40 days.

  19. Grid Development and a Study of B-flavour tagging at D�

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Philip William; /Imperial Coll., London

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Run IIa of the D0 experiment at the Tevatron took place between Spring 2002 and Spring 2006, collecting approximately 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data. A fundamental principal of the D0 computing model is the utilization of globally distributed computing resources as part of a grid. In particular use is made of the 'SAMGrid'. The first part of this thesis describes the work undertaken at Imperial College on several D0 distributed computing projects. These included the deployment and development of parts of the SAMGrid software suite, and participation in the Winter 2003/2004 data reprocessing effort. One of the major goals of the D0 experiment is the observation of mixing in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-meson system. The measurement of the mixing frequency is important as it can be used to constrain the CKM matrix, which describes CP violation in the Standard Model. The second part of this thesis describes the development of an opposite side flavour tagging algorithm and its calibration using B{sup +} and B{sub d}{sup 0} meson decays. The application of this algorithm to an analysis of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson system is then described, which lead to the world's first two-sided limit on the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson oscillation frequency ({Delta}m{sub s}) which was measured to lie in the interval between 17 ps{sup -1} and 21 ps{sup -1} at the 90% confidence level.

  20. Using quantum dots to tag subsurface damage in lapped and polished glass samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Wesley B.; Mullany, Brigid A.; Parker, Wesley C.; Moyer, Patrick J.; Randles, Mark H.

    2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Grinding, lapping, and polishing are finishing processes used to achieve critical surface parameters in a variety of precision optical and electronic components. As these processes remove material from the surface through mechanical and chemical interactions, they may induce a damaged layer of cracks, voids, and stressed material below the surface. This subsurface damage (SSD) can degrade the performance of a final product by creating optical aberrations due to diffraction, premature failure in oscillating components, and a reduction in the laser induced damage threshold of high energy optics. As these defects lie beneath the surface, they are difficult to detect, and while many methods are available to detect SSD, they can have notable limitations regarding sample size and type, preparation time, or can be destructive in nature. The authors tested a nondestructive method for assessing SSD that consisted of tagging the abrasive slurries used in lapping and polishing with quantum dots (nano-sized fluorescent particles). Subsequent detection of fluorescence on the processed surface is hypothesized to indicate SSD. Quantum dots that were introduced to glass surfaces during the lapping process were retained through subsequent polishing and cleaning processes. The quantum dots were successfully imaged by both wide field and confocal fluorescence microscopy techniques. The detected fluorescence highlighted features that were not observable with optical or interferometric microscopy. Atomic force microscopy and additional confocal microscope analysis indicate that the dots are firmly embedded in the surface but do not appear to travel deep into fractures beneath the surface. Etching of the samples exhibiting fluorescence confirmed that SSD existed. SSD-free samples exposed to quantum dots did not retain the dots in their surfaces, even when polished in the presence of quantum dots.

  1. Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a “hands-on” assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

  2. Genetically Encoded Short Peptide Tags for Orthogonal Protein Labeling by Sfp and AcpS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Jun

    synthases (PKSs), and fatty acid synthases (FASs) (3­6). In order for those biosynthetic enzymatic assembly structures to the tar- get proteins with high efficiency and specificity. ARTICLE www

  3. Phase modulation in RF tag | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding...

  4. Development of an instrument for non-destructive identification of Unexploded Ordnance using tagged neutrons - a proof of concept study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitra, S.; Dioszegi, I.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Range clearance operations at munitions testing grounds must discriminate Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) from clutter items and distinguish UXO filled with High Explosives (HE) from those with inert fillers. Non-destructive technologies are thus necessary for the cost-effective disposal of UXO during remediation of such sites. The only technique showing promise so far for the non-destructive elemental characterization of UXO fillers utilizes neutron interactions with the material to detect carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) which have unique ratios in HE. However, several unresolved issues hinder the wide application of this potentially very suitable technique. The most important one is that neutrons interact with all surrounding matter in addition to the interrogated material, leading to a very high gamma-ray background in the detector. Systems requiring bulky shielding and having poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for measuring elements are unsuitable for field deployment. The inadequacies of conventional neutron interrogation methods are overcome by using the tagged-neutron approach, and the availability of compact sealed neutron generators exploiting this technique offers field deployment of non-intrusive measurement systems for detecting threat materials, like explosives and drugs. By accelerating deuterium ions into a tritium target, the subsequent fusion reaction generates nearly back-to-back emissions of neutrons and alpha particles of energy 14.1 and 3.5 MeV respectively. A position-sensitive detector recognizes the associated alpha particle, thus furnishing the direction of the neutron. The tagged neutrons interact with the nuclei of the interrogated object, producing element-specific prompt gamma-rays that the gamma detectors recognize. Measuring the delay between the detections of the alpha particle and the gamma-ray determines where the reaction occurred along the axis of the neutron beam (14.1 MeV neutrons travel at 5 cm/nanosecond, while gamma rays cover 30 cm/nanosecond). The main advantage of the technique is its ability to simultaneously provide 2D and 3D imaging of objects and their elemental composition. This work reports on the efficacy of using 14 MeV neutrons tagged by the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique (APnTOF) to extract neutron induced characteristic gamma-rays from an object-of-interest with high SNR and without interference from nearby clutter.

  5. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP­DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. ­ Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  6. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reniers, Michel

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  7. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots Min-kyung So, Hequan Yao 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Jianghong

    ], peptides [19­20], or nucleic acids [21], fol- lowed by further functionalization with biorecognition step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps on the size of the nanoparticles--larger size produces longer emission wave- length [10]. All these potential

  8. Flavor tagged time-dependent angular analysis of the B[0 over s] ? J/?? decay and extraction of ??[subscript s] and the weak phase ?[subscript s] in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the B[0 over s] ? J/?? decay parameters, updated to include flavor tagging is reported using 4.9??fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector from ?s = 7??TeV pp collisions ...

  9. Steps for Chemical "Hazardous Waste" Removal 1. Complete a green Hazardous Waste tag. Peel and stick the bottom copy to the waste container. This is required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Steps for Chemical "Hazardous Waste" Removal 1. Complete a green Hazardous Waste tag. Peel Hazardous Waste containers into a UN rated DOT box with proper styrofoam or cardboard inserts. DOT boxes for your use are located at: -Bard / Kimball / Thurston: B60a Bard Hall -Biotech / Weill / Corson Mudd

  10. An introduction to the practical and ethical perspectives on the need to advance and standardize the intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.; Murchie, Karen J.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags (including radio and acoustic telemetry transmitters, passive integrated transponders and archival biologgers) is frequently used for conducting studies on fish. Electronic tagging studies provide information on the spatial ecology, behavior and survival of fish in marine and freshwater systems. However, any surgical procedure, particularly one where a laparotomy is performed and the coelomic cavity is opened, has the potential to alter the survival, behavior or condition of the animal which can impair welfare and introduce bias. Given that management, regulatory and conservation decisions are based on the assumption that fish implanted with electronic tags have similar fates and behavior relative to untagged conspecifics, it is critical to ensure that best surgical practices are being used. Also, the current lack of standardized surgical procedures and reporting of specific methodological details precludes cross-study and cross-year analyses which would further progress the field of fisheries science. This compilation of papers seeks to identify the best practices for the entire intracoelomic tagging procedure including pre- and post-operative care, anesthesia, wound closure, and use of antibiotics. Although there is a particular focus on salmonid smolts given the large body of literature available on that group, other life-stages and species of fish are discussed where there is sufficient knowledge. Additional papers explore the role of the veterinarian in fish surgeries, the need for minimal standards in the training of fish surgeons, providing a call for more complete and transparent procedures, and identifying trends in procedures and research needs. Collectively, this body of knowledge should help to improve data quality (including comparability and repeatability), enhance management and conservation strategies, and maintain the welfare status of tagged fish.

  11. Structural relaxation of polydisperse hard spheres: comparison of the mode-coupling theory to a Langevin dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Weysser; A. M. Puertas; M. Fuchs; Th. Voigtmann

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the slow, glassy structural relaxation as measured through collective and tagged-particle density correlation functions obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations for a polydisperse system of quasi-hard spheres in the framework of the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition (MCT). Asymptotic analyses show good agreement for the collective dynamics when polydispersity effects are taken into account in a multi-component calculation, but qualitative disagreement at small $q$ when the system is treated as effectively monodisperse. The origin of the different small-$q$ behaviour is attributed to the interplay between interdiffusion processes and structural relaxation. Numerical solutions of the MCT equations are obtained taking properly binned partial static structure factors from the simulations as input. Accounting for a shift in the critical density, the collective density correlation functions are well described by the theory at all densities investigated in the simulations, with quantitative agreement best around the maxima of the static structure factor, and worst around its minima. A parameter-free comparison of the tagged-particle dynamics however reveals large quantiative errors for small wave numbers that are connected to the well-known decoupling of self-diffusion from structural relaxation and to dynamical heterogeneities. While deviations from MCT behaviour are clearly seen in the tagged-particle quantities for densities close to and on the liquid side of the MCT glass transition, no such deviations are seen in the collective dynamics.

  12. Modular Semantic Tagging of Medline Abstracts and its Use in Inferring Regulatory Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhagen, Marc; Pustejovsky, James; Taylor, Ronald C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe MedstractPlus, a resource for mining relations from the Medline bibliographic database that is currently under construction. It was built on the remains of Medstract, a previously created resource that included a biorelation server and an acronym database. MedstractPlus uses simple and scalable natural language processing modules to structure text, is designed with reusability and extendibility in mind, and adheres to the philosophy of the Linguistic Annotation Framework. We show how MedstractPlus has been used to provide seeds for a novel approach to inferring transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data.

  13. Observation of top-quark production in the forward region with LHCb together with $(b,c)$-jet tagging and $W + (b, c)$ jets production measurements @7 and 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coco, Victor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of top-quark production in the forward region with LHCb together with $(b,c)$-jet tagging and $W + (b, c)$ jets production measurements @7 and 8 TeV

  14. Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

  15. Measurement of B0(s) mixing parameters from the flavor-tagged decay B0(s) ---> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Simon Fraser U.; Ahn, S.H.; /Korea U., KODEL; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From an analysis of the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} they obtain the width difference between the B{sub s}{sup 0} light and heavy mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} {triple_bond} {Lambda}{sub L} - {Lambda}{sub H} = 0.19 {+-} 0.07(stat){sub -0.01}{sup +0.02}(syst) ps{sup -1}, and the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s} = -0.57{sub -0.30}{sup +0.24}(stat){sub -0.02}{sup +0.07}(syst). The allowed 90% C.L. intervals of {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and {phi}{sub s} are 0.06 < {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} < 0.30 ps{sup -1} and -1.20 < {phi}{sub s} < 0.06, respectively. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  16. Measurement of the ttbar Production Cross Section in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV using Soft Electron b-Tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel, consisting of e{nu}+jets and {mu}{nu}+jets final states. The dominant background is the production of W bosons in association with multiple jets. To suppress this background, we identify electrons from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor jets ('soft electron tags'). From a sample of 2196 candidate events, we obtain 120 tagged events with a background expectation of 51 {+-} 3 events, corresponding to a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.8 {+-} 2.4 (stat) {+-} 1.6 (syst) {+-} 0.5 (lumi) pb. We assume a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of the t{bar t} cross section with soft electron tags in Run II of the Tevatron.

  17. Overview of the Performance of PIT-Tag Interrogation Systems for Adult Salmonids at Bonneville and McNary Dams, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During winter 2001, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) installed a prototype orifice-based PIT-tag interrogation system into the Washington Shore Ladder at Bonneville Dam (BWSL). Detectors were installed into 12 weirs: 4 downstream (Weirs 334-337) and 8 upstream (Weirs 352-359) from the fish release point (i.e., the exit ladder for the Adult Fish Facility). NOAA Fisheries (National Marine Fisheries Service--NMFS) tagged and released salmonids during 2001 to determine tag-reading efficiencies for different salmonid populations. Data analyses focused on the upper eight weirs. The 2001 tagging results for spring chinook salmon indicated that having detectors in four consecutive weirs would have been sufficient to yield a reading efficiency of 95%. The BWSL orifice-based system performed well until the coho and fall chinook salmon migrations began. Coho and fall chinook salmon appeared to use the weir overflows, and thus avoid detection, at much higher rates than biologists expected. During 2001, technology advances led to the development of significantly larger antennas than had been available earlier, and thus it was possible to build antennas of approximately 2 x 6 ft. Consequently, it became feasible to design interrogation systems for ladder locations where all fish would have to go through the antennas and thus could not avoid detection by using the weir overflows (Fig. 1). Destron Technologies by Digital Angel designed a prototype interrogation system with two antennas that was installed into the counting-window area in the Oregon Ladder at McNary Dam, where its performance could then be directly compared to that of the orifice-based system in the same ladder. Although the orifice-based systems appeared less effective than the fisheries community wanted for fall chinook and coho salmon, the decision was made to proceed with installations planned for Bonneville and McNary Dams because valuable data would still be collected. During the winter of 2002, the Corps and BPA installed PIT-tag interrogation systems into the Bradford Island and Cascades Island Fish Ladders at Bonneville Dam and into the Washington and Oregon Ladders at McNary Dam. Like BWSL in 2001, these ladders had eight weirs (16 orifices) outfitted with fiberglass antennas. Douglas County Public Utility District also installed an orifice-based system into its ladders at Wells Dam, but they were able to use weirs with no overflow sections wherein all fish had to swim through the orifice antennas. Thus, 2002 was the first year that the fisheries community had PIT-tag detection of adult salmonids at Bonneville, McNary, Wells, and Lower Granite Dams (Fig. 2). This overview will provide information on how well the systems at Bonneville and McNary Dams performed.

  18. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross-section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanov, Alexander

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in the lepton+jets channels with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the lifetime-tagging techniques is presented. The t{bar t} cross section is estimated from the combination of the e+jets and {mu}+jets channels. The obtained result {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.47{sub -1.14}{sup +1.22}(stat){sub -1.03}{sup +1.65}(syst) {+-} 0.49(lumi) pb is consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

  19. Tag: nuclear deterrence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    class"field-item even" property"content:encoded">

    The National Nuclear Security Administration has completed a major capital improvement project that has...

  20. Tag: global security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49all en Alarm Response Training ribbon cutting http:www.y12.doe.govnewspress-releasesalarm-response-training-ribbon-cutting

  1. Tag: technology transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a>

    • Wed, 07 May 2014 21:32:52 +0000 pam 1266 at http:www.y12.doe.gov Hog wild http:www.y12.doe.govnewsy-12-reporthog-wild
    • Bisfuel links - Photosynthesis tag

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable

    • Study of Bs mixing at the CDFII experiment with a newly developed opposite side b-flavour tagging algorithm using kaons

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Salamanna, Giuseppe; /INFN, Rome

      2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

      This thesis describes the development, calibration and performance evaluation of an Opposite-side b flavor tagger using K mesons at a p{bar p} hadron collider. In particular, this work is performed using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the Run II of the Tevatron hadron collider running at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. b flavor tagging consists of the determination of the flavor of the b quark contained within a hadron. This information is vital to perform any time-dependent measurement involving flavor asymmetries in b hadron decays and flavor oscillations, where it is necessary to know whether a b or {bar b} was contained in a hadron when it was produced. Although at a hadron collider the biggest challenge is probably to perform an effective selection of interesting events in real time and with the best signal-to-background ratio, the statistical significance of any time-dependent measurement is proportional to the effectiveness with which the selected data sample is tagged.

    • Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

      2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

      The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

    • Ninebrane structures

      E-Print Network [OSTI]

      Hisham Sati

      2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

      String structures in degree four are associated with cancellation of anomalies of string theory in ten dimensions. Fivebrane structures in degree eight have recently been shown to be associated with cancellation of anomalies associated to the NS5-brane in string theory as well as the M5-brane in M-theory. We introduce and describe "Ninebrane structures" in degree twelve and demonstrate how they capture some anomaly cancellation phenomena in M-theory. Along the way we also define certain variants, considered as intermediate cases in degree nine and ten, which we call "2-Orientation" and "2-Spin structures", respectively. As in the lower degree cases, we also discuss the natural twists of these structures and characterize the corresponding topological groups associated to each of the structures, which likewise admit refinements to differential cohomology.

    • Text and Structural Data Mining of Influenza Mentions in Web and Social Media

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Corley, Courtney D.; Cook, Diane; Mikler, Armin R.; Singh, Karan P.

      2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

      Text and structural data mining of Web and social media (WSM) provides a novel disease surveillance resource and can identify online communities for targeted public health communications (PHC) to assure wide dissemination of pertinent information. WSM that mention influenza are harvested over a 24-week period, 5-October-2008 to 21-March-2009. Link analysis reveals communities for targeted PHC. Text mining is shown to identify trends in flu posts that correlate to real-world influenza-like-illness patient report data. We also bring to bear a graph-based data mining technique to detect anomalies among flu blogs connected by publisher type, links, and user-tags.

    • Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

      2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

      Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

    • We Can Remember It for You Wholesale: Implications of Data Remanence on the Use of RAM for True Random Number Generation on RFID Tags (RFIDSec 2009)

      E-Print Network [OSTI]

      Saxena, Nitesh

      2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

      Random number generation is a fundamental security primitive for RFID devices. However, even this relatively simple requirement is beyond the capacity of today's average RFID tag. A recently proposed solution, Fingerprint Extraction and Random Number Generation in SRAM (FERNS) [14, 15], involves the use of onboard RAM as the source of "true" randomness. Unfortunately, practical considerations prevent this approach from reaching its full potential. First, this method must compete with other system functionalities for use of memory. Thus, the amount of uninitialized RAM available for utilization as a randomness generator may be severely restricted. Second, RAM is subject to data remanence; there is a time period after losing power during which stored data remains intact in memory. This means that after a portion of memory has been used for entropy collection once it will require a relatively extended period of time without power before it can be reused. In a usable RFID based security application, which require...

    • Branching Fraction for B+ -> pi0 l+ nu, Measured in Upsilon (4S) -> BBbar Events Tagged by B- -> D0 l- nubar (X) Decays

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

      2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

      We report a preliminary branching fraction of (1.80 {+-} 0.37{sub stat.} {+-} 0.23{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} for the charmless exclusive semileptonic B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decay, where {ell} can be either a muon or an electron. This result is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 81 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses B{bar B} events that are tagged by a B meson reconstructed in the semileptonic B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}(X) decays, where X can be either a {gamma} or a {pi}{sup 0} from a D* decay.

    • CP, T, and CPT tests in neutral Kaon decays using tagged {ital K}{sup 0}, {ital K}{sup 0}at LEAR

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Adler, R.; Alhalel, T. [University of Basle (Switzerland); Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A. [University of Athens (Greece); Aslanides, E. [CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite d`Aix-Marseille II (France); Backenstoss, G. [University of Basle (Switzerland); Bee, C.P. [CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite d`Aix-Marseille II (France); Behnke, O. [ETH-ITP Zuerich (Switzerland); Bennet, J. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bertin, V. [CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite d`Aix-Marseille II (France); Blanc, F. [University of Fribourg (Germany)]|[Paul-Scherrer-Institut (??); Bloch, P. [CERN (Switzerland); Bula, C. [Paul-Scherrer-Institut (??); Carlson, P. [KTH Stockholm (Sweden); Carroll, M. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Carvalho, J. [LIP and University of Coimbra (Portugal); Cawley, E. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Charalambous, S.; Chardalas, M. [University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Chardin, G. [DAPNIA/SPP, CE Saclay (France); Chertok, M.B. [Boston University (United States); Danielsson, M. [KTH Stockholm (Sweden); Cody, A. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Dedoussis, S. [University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Dejardin, M. [CERN (Switzerland); Derre, J. [DAPNIA/SPP, CE Saclay (France); Dodgson, M. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Duclos, J. [DAPNIA/SPP, CE Saclay (France); Ealet, A. [CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite d`Aix-Marseille II (France); Eckart, B. [University of Basle (Switzerland); Eleftheriadis, C. [University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Evangelou, I. [University of Ioannina (??); Faravel, L. [University of Fribourg (Germany)]|[CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite d`Aix-Marseille II (France); Fassnacht, P. [CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite d`Aix-Marseille II (France); Faure, J.L. [DAPNIA/SPP, CE Saclay (France); Felder, C. [University of Basle (Switzerland); Ferreira-Marques, R. [LIP and University of Coimbra (Portugal); Fetscher, W. [ETH-ITP Zuerich (Switzerland); Fidecaro, M.

      1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

      The CPLEAR experiment at CERN measures particle-antiparticle asymmetries of strangeness-tagged {ital K}{sup 0}, {ital K}{sup 0} decays to two-pion, three-pion, and semileptonic final states. The technique of CPLEAR is an alternative approach to previous CP-violation studies. It provides complementary information with different systematics and gives access to novel measurements. The precision of the CP-violation parameters {eta}{sub +{minus}} for {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {eta}{sub +{minus}0} for {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and of the T-violation parameter {epsilon}{sub {ital T}} for {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}{ital e}{sup {minus_plus}}{nu} will be discussed for the data taken between 1990--1992. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

    • Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0?J/ ?? in 8 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

      2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

      We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?sJ/??, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb?¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163+0.065?0.064 ps?¹ and ?sJ/??=?0.55+0.38?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

    • Deployable structures

      E-Print Network [OSTI]

      Hernández Merchan, Carlos Henrique

      1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

      This thesis has the purpose of describing the meaning and applications of deployable structures (making emphasis in the scissor-hinged and sliding mechanisms.) and the development of new geometries, details, and mechanisms ...

    • Structured Finance

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening aStructure ofof the CompleteStructure

    • Nanocrystal structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Eisler, Hans J. (Stoneham, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (Stoneham, MA); Walsh, Michael E. (Everett, MA); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Bawendi, Moungi G. (Cambridge, MA); Smith, Henry I. (Sudbury, MA)

      2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

      A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

    • Nanocrystal structures

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

      2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

      A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

    • Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

      2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

      The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

    • Superconducting structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

      2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

      A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

    • Terminal structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE); Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Mirebeau, Pierre (Villebon sur Yvette, FR); Ganhungu, Francois (Vieux-Reng, FR); Lallouet, Nicolas (Saint Martin Boulogne, FR)

      2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

      A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

    • Superconducting Structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

      2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

      A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

    • Airfoil structure

      DOE Patents [OSTI]

      Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

      1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

      Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  1. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Gary A. (Poway, CA); Twardochleb, Christopher Z. (Alpine, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  2. High x Structure Function of the Virtually Free Neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosyn, Wim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pole extrapolation method is applied for the first time to data on semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off the deuteron with tagged spectator protons to extract the high Bjorken x structure function of the neutron. This approach is based on the extrapolation of the measured cross sections at different momenta of the detected spectator proton to the non-physical pole of the bound neutron in the deuteron. The advantage of the method is that it makes it possible to suppress nuclear effects in a maximally model independent way. The neutron structure functions obtained in this way demonstrate surprising x dependence at x> 0.6, indicating the possibility of a rise in the neutron to proton structure function ratio. Such a rise may indicate new dynamics in the generation of high x quarks in the nucleon. One such mechanism we discuss is the possible dominance of short-range isosinglet quark-quark correlations that can enhance the d-quark distribution in the proton resulting in d/u -> 1.

  3. Search for the Higgs boson in the ZH->nunubb channel: Development of a b-tagging method based on soft muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamin, David; /Marseille, CPPM; ,

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson generates elementary particle masses. Current theoretical and experimental constraints lead to a Higgs boson mass between 114.4 and 158 GeV with 95% confidence level. Moreover, Tevatron has recently excluded the mass ranges between 100 and 109 GeV, 158 and 175 GeV with 95% confidence level. These results gives a clear indication to search for a Higgs boson at low mass. The D0 detector is located near Chicago, at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider with an energy in the center of mass of 1.96 TeV. The topic of this thesis is the search for a Higgs boson in association with a Z boson. This channel is sensitive to low mass Higgs boson (<135 GeV) which has a branching ratio H {yields} bb varies between 50% and 90% in this mass range. The decay channel ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} studied has in the final state 2 heavy-flavor jets and some missing transverse energy due to escaping neutrinos. The heavy-flavor jets identification ('b-tagging') is done with a new algorithm (SLTNN) developped specifically for semi-leptonic decay of b quarks. The Higgs boson search analysis was performed with 3 fb{sup -1} of data. The use of SLTNN increases by 10% the Higgs boson signal efficiency. The global analysis sensitivity improvement, however, is rather low (<1%) after taking into account the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties.

  4. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Phys. Inst. (Armenia)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV05/08/2014A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  5. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  6. Modeling Tag Dependencies in Tagged Documents Timothy N. Rubin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Tim

    ACID RAIN 11 AGNI MISSILE 1 party .014 iran .021 abortion .098 acid .070 missile .032 government .014 arms .019 court .033 rain .067 india .031 political .011 reagan .014 abortions .028 lakes .028

  7. Supporting Information Tagged Simulation Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Deposition (Mg a-1 ) fd (%) Gross fd (%) Net Present- day Sectors: Industrial processes 53% Power plant processes 33% Power plant combustion 38% Residential/industrial fuel 29% Speciation: 45% Hg0 , 47% HgII , 8 Sectors: Industrial processes 31% Power plant combustion 49% Residential/industrial fuel 20% Speciation

  8. Variably porous structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul V. (Savoy, IL); Yu, Xindi (Urbana, IL)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

  9. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, R.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

  10. Direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the free neutron F_2 structure function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niculescu, I; Melnitchouk, W; Arrington, J; Christy, M E; Ent, R; Griffioen, K A; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, S; Tkachenko, S; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the recent BONuS experiment at Jefferson Lab, which utilized a novel spectator tagging technique to extract the inclusive electron-free neutron scattering cross section, we obtain the first direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the neutron F_2 structure function. The data are used to reconstruct the lowest few (N=2, 4 and 6) moments of F_2 in the three prominent nucleon resonance regions, as well as the moments integrated over the entire resonance region. Comparison with moments computed from global parametrizations of parton distribution functions suggest that quark--hadron duality holds locally for the neutron in the second and third resonance regions down to Q^2 ~ 1 GeV^2, with violations possibly up to 20% observed in the first resonance region.

  11. Direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the free neutron F_2 structure function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Niculescu; G. Niculescu; W. Melnitchouk; J. Arrington; M. E. Christy; R. Ent; K. A. Griffioen; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; S. Kuhn; S. Tkachenko; J. Zhang

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the recent BONuS experiment at Jefferson Lab, which utilized a novel spectator tagging technique to extract the inclusive electron-free neutron scattering cross section, we obtain the first direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the neutron F_2 structure function. The data are used to reconstruct the lowest few (N=2, 4 and 6) moments of F_2 in the three prominent nucleon resonance regions, as well as the moments integrated over the entire resonance region. Comparison with moments computed from global parametrizations of parton distribution functions suggest that quark--hadron duality holds locally for the neutron in the second and third resonance regions down to Q^2 ~ 1 GeV^2, with violations possibly up to 20% observed in the first resonance region.

  12. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

  13. Development of lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs) as powerful and versatile peptides for use in studies of proteins and protein interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Langdon James

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine the function of proteins of interest, chemical biologists employ their full panoply of techniques, including X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy for structural information, and luminescence spectroscopy ...

  14. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  15. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  16. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using missing E(T) + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV which uses events with an inclusive signature of significant missing transverse energy and jets. This is the first measurement which makes no explicit lepton identification requirements, so that sensitivity to W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays is maintained. Heavy flavor jets from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 311 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab they measure a production cross section of 5.8 {+-} 1.2(stat.){sub -0.7}{sup +0.9}(syst.) pb for a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with previous determinations and standard model predictions.

  17. A Measurement of the production cross section of top-antitop pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass of 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the t{bar t} pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb is measured.

  18. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0?J/ ?? in 8 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?sJ/??, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb?¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163+0.065?0.064 ps?¹ and ?sJ/??=?0.55+0.38?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  19. Structuring beyond architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxe, David M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the layering and negotiation of structural devices in urban settings. Its point of departure is a series of patterns of how structural design and urban design interact and overlap, from which are ...

  20. Crystal Structure of Cascade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ribbon-like structure (Figure 1). This structure is facilitated by rotation of nucleotides out of the duplex region at six base pair intervals and stabilized by the highly...

  1. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  2. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  3. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  4. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  5. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  6. Structural genomics - A goldmine of blueprints for structure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - A goldmine of blueprints for structure-based drug design. Structural genomics - A goldmine of blueprints for structure-based drug design. Abstract: In late 2007 the National...

  7. Identifying structural damage from images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, ZhiQiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor-based structural health monitoring: Framework,al. , 2003), and structural health monitoring (e.g. Gandhiintroduction to structural health monitoring. Philosophical

  8. An overview of wireless structural health monitoring for civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    An overview of wireless structural health monitoring for civil structures BY JEROME PETER LYNCH health monitoring systems that interrogate structural data for signs of damage. After the hardware computing; wireless telemetry; structural health monitoring 1. Introduction Society's built environment

  9. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  10. Cosmogony of Generic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchert

    1994-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of formation of generic structures in the Universe is addressed, whereby first the kinematics of inertial continua for coherent initial data is considered. The generalization to self--gravitating continua is outlined focused on the classification problem of singularities and metamorphoses arising in the density field. Self--gravity gives rise to an internal hierarchy of structures, and, dropping the assumption of coherence, also to an external hierarchy of structures dependent on the initial power spectrum of fluctuations.

  11. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Biology Crystallography NMR Spectroscopy Protein Informatics Structural Bioinformatics Computational Structural Biology Protein Engineering Protein Design Drug Design Molecular Modeling Proteomics Structural Weissig (Eds) Structural bioinformatics Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley-Liss, 2003. Jenny Gu, Philip Bourne (Eds

  12. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  13. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has...

  14. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  15. Effective Incentive Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an in-depth look at effective incentive structures, how to clarify your program goals, and tips to plan for the long term.

  16. Mitotic chromosome structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heermann, Dieter W., E-mail: heermann@tphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  17. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Structures & Applications Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser...

  18. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regarding the integrity of the structure. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  19. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  20. Piecewise training for structured prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Charles; McCallum, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    margin methods for structured prediction. In Internationalaccuracy computational gene prediction. PLoS Computationaltraining for structured prediction Charles Sutton · Andrew

  1. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

  2. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  3. STELLAR STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    STELLAR STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION O.R. Pols September 2009 #12;#12;Preface These lecture notes application to the theory of stellar structure and evolution, at a level appro- priate for a third and Evolution, 1990, Springer-Verlag, ISBN 3-540-50211-4 (KIPPENHAHN; K&W) Some sections of this book are still

  4. & Education Structure 2 Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Cinema East Hall University Technology Services Honors Stratford Building Parkway Science Building 1N Kononia House Fourth Ave Building Art Building Science & Education Center Parking Structure 2 Helen Gordon Child Center Science Research & Teaching Center Parking Structure 3 Ho man Hall West

  5. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into $WW$, $WZ$, or $ZZ$ boson pairs using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted $W$ or $Z$ boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the $WZ$ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the $WZ$ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, $W'$, and for the $WW$ and $ZZ$ final states of Kaluza--Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall--Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. $W'$ bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  6. Essays on market structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Feng

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most important work in the development of economic theory is associated with the study of market structure. In essence, most markets are two-sided. For example, product markets connect tens of thousands of ...

  7. Optimization of outrigger structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lame, Ali

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing a high rise building has its challenges. Different structural systems have been developed to control the lateral displacement of high rise buildings. One of these systems is called the outrigger which decreases ...

  8. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  9. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  10. Studies of the Electromagnetic Structure of Mesons at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Daniel, S.

    2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Laboratory Hall B PrimEx Collaboration is using tagged photons to perform an absolute 1.4% level cross section measurement of the photoproduction of neutral pions in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. The absolute cross section for this process is directly proportional to the neutral pion radiative decay width and consequently the uncertainty in the luminosity is directly reflected in the final error bar of the measurement. The PI has taken primary responsibility for the photon flux determination and in this technical report, we outline the steps taken to limit the uncertainty in the tagged photon flux to the 1% level. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and updated procedures for postbremsstrahlung electron counting. The photon tagging technique has been used routinely in its various forms to provide quasimonochromatic photons for absolute photonuclear cross section measurements. The analysis of such experiments in the context of bremsstrahlung photon tagging was summarized by Owens in 1990. Since then, a number of developments have made possible significant improvements in the implementation of this technique. Here, we describe the steps taken by the PrimEx Collaboration in Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory to limit the systematic uncertainty in the absolute photon flux to 1%. They include an absolute flux calibration at low intensity with a total absorption counter, online relative flux monitoring with a pair spectrometer, and the use of multihit time to digital converters for post bremsstrahlung electron counting during production data runs. While this discussion focuses on the analysis techniques utilized by the PrimEx Collaboration which involves a bremsstrahlung based photon tagging system to measure the neutral pion lifetime, the methods described herein readily apply to other types of photon tagging systems.

  11. Fire protection for relocatable structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard supersedes DOE/EV-0043, ``Standard on Fire Protection for Portable Structures.`` It was revised to address the numerous types of relocatable structures, such as trailers, tension-supported structures, and tents being used by DOE and contractors.

  12. Investigating the durability of structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saba, Dana (Dana Walid)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of structures is one of primary concerns in the engineering industry. Poor durability in design may result in a structure losing its performance to the extent where structural integrity is no longer satisfied ...

  13. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  14. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  15. Tailoring PDC speckle structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Brida; M. Genovese; A. Meda; I. Ruo-Berchera; E. Predazzi

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Speckle structure of parametric down conversion light has recently received a large attention due to relevance in view of applications to quantum imaging The possibility of tailoring the speckle size by acting on the pump properties is an interesting tool for the applications to quantum imaging and in particular to the detection of weak object under shot-noise limit. Here we present a systematic detailed experimental study of the speckle structure produced in type II PDC with particular attention to its variation with pump beam properties.

  16. Tailoring PDC speckle structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brida, G; Meda, A; Predazzi, E; Ruo-Berchera, I

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Speckle structure of parametric down conversion light has recently received a large attention due to relevance in view of applications to quantum imaging The possibility of tailoring the speckle size by acting on the pump properties is an interesting tool for the applications to quantum imaging and in particular to the detection of weak object under shot-noise limit. Here we present a systematic detailed experimental study of the speckle structure produced in type II PDC with particular attention to its variation with pump beam properties

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF A NICKEL(II)-TRIPEPTIDE MIMIC OF NICKEL SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Amanda M.

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The tripeptide asparagine-cysteine-cysteine (NCC) was found by the J. Laurence lab to bind nickel very tightly. In fact, NCC was serendipitously discovered as a metal-abstraction peptide tag (MAP-tag) because it was stripping nickel from a standard...

  18. System and damage identification of civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Structural Health Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6based approach to the structural health monitoring benchmarkapproach for ASCE structural health monitoring benchmark

  19. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gene R. (Albuquerque, NM); Armendariz, Marcelino G. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Johnny R.F. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Carson, Richard F. (Albuquerque, NM); Duckett, III, Edwin B. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick B. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Gregory V. (Kansas City, MO); Peterson, David W. (Sandia Park, NM); Smith, Terrance T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  20. Search for Turing structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borckmans, P.; Dewel, G.; Walgraef, D.; Katayama, Y.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Albeit their prediction by Turing, chemical periodic stationary patterns under far from equilibrium conditions, which are considered as prototypes of dissipative structures, have not yet been observed in a clear-cut way. The authors here assess the situation and discuss the perturbative influence of convection on their formation and selection mechanisms.

  1. Biomembrane Structure Unit, Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Anthony

    and membrane proteins. However, the lack of essential high-resolution structural details at the molecular level Watts Abstract | Observing drugs and ligands at their site of action in membrane proteins is now targets in the future will be membrane proteins. This is, perhaps, not surprising, as most (~85

  2. Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth responses · Structural monitoring structural health monitoring: ­ Very few structural "health" monitoring and buildings · Future directions and technology trends Structural Monitoring SystemsStructural Monitoring

  3. Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  4. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Momyer, William R. (Palo Alto, CA); Littauer, Ernest L. (Los Altos Hills, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  5. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  6. Structured wafer for device processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  7. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs.

  8. Herpetological PIT Tag Migration in Seaturtle Flippers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyneken, Wyneken Jeanette

    Marine Fisheries Service, 75 Virginia Beach Dr Miami, Florida 33149, USA e-mail: sheryan.epperly@noaa.gov BEN HIGGINS National Marine Fisheries Service, 4700 Ave U Galveston, Texas 77551, USA e-mail: Ben 33431, USA e-mail: emcmicha@fau.edu CONNIE MERIGO New England Aquarium, Rescue Department Central Wharf

  9. Tag: UT | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosting foreign educators We recently welcomed a group of professors from Indonesia. More... Category: News Grad Assistants Make Their Mark UT students work with the...

  10. Part of speech tagging of Levantine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monirabbassi, Azadeh

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) [14], consisting of 625,000Treebank (LATB), also from the LDC. ATB is morphologicallywas collected as part of the LDC CALL HOME project [5]. The

  11. Atomic force microscopy of biochemically tagged DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogletree, D.F.; Kolbe, W.; Spengler, S.; Salmeron, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)); Hansma, H.G.; Bezanilla, M. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)); Sano, T.; Smith, C.S.; Cantor, C.R. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small fragments of DNA of known length were made with the polymerase chain reaction. These fragments had biotin molecules covalently attached at their ends. They were subsequently labeled with a chimeric protein fusion between streptavidin and two immunoglobulin G-binding domains of staphyloccocal protein A. This tetrameric species was expected to bind up to four DNA molecules via their attached biotin moieties. The DNA-protein complex was deposited on mica and imaged with an atomic force microscope. The images revealed the protein chimera at the expected location at the ends of the strands of DNA as well as the expected dimers, trimers, and tetramers of DNA bound to a single protein. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Tag: Library | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lives of East Tennesseans changed after the U.S. declared war following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. More... Category: Library Y-12, Making the World a Safer Place A look...

  13. Tag: History | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lives of East Tennesseans changed after the U.S. declared war following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. More... Category: About A Nuclear Family: The Manhattan District...

  14. Tag: technology | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: News Omni Jaw 5(tm) licensed, headed to market Our portable, high-powered hydraulic tool invented for use in demolition projects is moving to market. More... Category:...

  15. RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

  16. USE OF DYNAMITE TO RECOVER TAGGED SALMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that dynamite is an effective means of killing salmon and that the direction and lethal range of the blast can Page The effect of dynamite on salmon 2 Description and results of variables tested 3 Effect of water depth on lethal range 3 Effect of varying charge strength on the lethal range 3 Effect of reflectors

  17. ITEM QUANTITY LOCATION RPI Tag AC Connectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Accelerometer Demo 2 2C21 Shelf J, bottom Adjusting Screws 2C41 Drawer 181 Air Flow Indicator 2C41 Drawer 171 Air Hockey Table 1 2C21 Under table, rear Air Pucks - Small Plastic 12 2C21 Shelf D, two from top Air Pucks - Spark Paper 6 2C21 Shelf D, one from top Air Track - 5' 2C21 Center, on floor Air Track - 5

  18. tagging API | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home

  19. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Tag Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The

  20. Power Tagging Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation,Power Rental Market Size HomeSources Inc

  1. OpenEI Community - tagging API

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0Agency (DLA) RFP -

  2. Tag: ATLC | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &8-5070P3. U.S.7.Tables,

  3. Tag: volunteer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &8-5070P3.

  4. Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka Charles University Prague Joint work with Jarik Nesetril Workshop on Homogeneous Structures 2011 Jan Hubicka Explicit construction of universal Explicit construction of universal structures #12;Universal relational structures By relational structures

  5. Regulation of Tall Structures (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permit from the Department of Transportation is required for the construction or alteration of any structure higher than 200 feet above ground level, or structures near airports, highways,...

  6. Design approaches to structural optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tayar, Memduh Ali

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to develop design approaches to structural optimization. In the example of three-dimensional grid structures, widely known as 'space frames', possible configurations are explored which ...

  7. A survey of structures on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Suhyoung

    Euclidean geometry Spherical geometry Manifolds with geometric structures: manifolds need some canonical canonical descriptions.. Manifolds with (real) projective structures Outline Survey: Classical geometries's philosphy) Spherical geometry: Greek astronomy, Gauss, Riemann Hyperbolic geometry: Bolyai, Lobachevsky

  8. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Crystallography NMR Spectroscopy Protein Informatics Structural Bioinformatics Computational Structural Biology/ Proteins Alberts B, et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. Proteins TTCCPSIVARSNFNVCRLPGTPEAICATYTGCIIIPGATCPGDYAN Hartl F.U. et al., Nature, 2011 Proteins Protein Science Biochemistry Biophysics Molecular Biology

  9. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Informatics Structural Bioinformatics Computational Structural Biology Protein Engineering Protein Design Drug/ Proteins Alberts B, et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. Proteins TTCCPSIVARSNFNVCRLPGTPEAICATYTGCIIIPGATCPGDYAN Protein Science Biochemistry Biophysics Molecular Biology Crystallography NMR Spectroscopy Protein

  10. Work breakdown structure guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of the work breakdown structure (WBS) technique is an effective aid in managing Department of Energy (DOE) programs and projects. The technique provides a framework for project management by focusing on the products that are being developed or constructed to solve technical problems. It assists both DOE and contractors in fulfilling their management responsibilities. This document provides guidance for use of the WBS technique for product oriented work identification and definition. It is one in a series of policy and guidance documents supporting DOE's project manaagement system.

  11. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northernDetermination ofTest Structures

  12. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

  13. Vacuum Structure and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on overall experimental observations, especially the pair processes, I developed a model structure of the vacuum along with a basic-particle formation scheme begun in 2000 (with collaborator P-I Johansson). The model consists in that the vacuum is, briefly, filled of neutral but polarizable vacuuons, consisting each of a p-vaculeon and n- vaculeon of charges $+e$ and $-e$ of zero rest masses but with spin motions, assumed interacting each other with a Coulomb force. The model has been introduced in full in a book (Nova Sci, 2005) and referred to in a number of journal/E-print papers. I outline in this easier accessible paper the detailed derivation of the model and a corresponding quantitative determination of the vacuuon size.

  14. Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoli, Ivan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Viola, E. , “Structural Health Monitoring of Multi-wireEncyclopedia of Structural Health Monitoring, C. Boller, F-D.L. (2001) “Structural health monitoring system based on

  15. Effective Health Monitoring Strategies for Complex Structures /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Colin Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Optimization in Structural Health Monitoring, Proc. Worldaxioms of structural health monitoring, Proc. R. Soc. A.the future of structural health monitoring, Phil. Trans. R.

  16. Introduction to Structure and Dynamics: Inaugural Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.; Manlove, Robert; Colby, B. N.; Garfias, Robert; Bell, Duran

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the premier issue of Structure and Dynamics, an electronicFor this great boon, Structure and Dynamics in particular iselectronic journals, Structure and Dynamics will be widely

  17. Structure of the CRA-2014: Structure of the CRA-2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of the CRA-2014 List of Figures Figure STRUCT- 1. CRA-2014 Pictorial Roadmap This page intentionally left blank. Acronyms and Abbreviations CCA Compliance...

  18. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  19. Damage Detection in Plate Structures using Guided Ultrasonic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarmer, Gregory James Sylvester

    Guided Wave Structural Health Monitoring. ” Ultrasonics 50 (to Structural Health Monitoring. ” Philosophicalfor Guided-wave Structural Health Monitoring. ” Structural

  20. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul J; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the field of quasicrystalline structures. In preferred embodiments, the stopgap structure is more spherically symmetric than periodic structures facilitating the formation of stopgaps in nearly all directions because of higher rotational symmetries. More particularly, the invention relates to the use of quasicrystalline structures for optical, mechanical, electrical and magnetic purposes. In some embodiments, the invention relates to manipulating, controlling, modulating and directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating in multiple directions.

  1. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul Joseph (Princeton, NJ); Chaikin, Paul Michael (New York, NY); Man, Weining (San Francisco, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the field of quasicrystalline structures. In preferred embodiments, the stopgap structure is more spherically symmetric than periodic structures facilitating the formation of stopgaps in nearly all directions because of higher rotational symmetries. More particularly, the invention relates to the use of quasicrystalline structures for optical, mechanical, electrical and magnetic purposes. In some embodiments, the invention relates to manipulating, controlling, modulating and directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for a pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating in multiple directions.

  2. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  3. Appendix C Conducting Structured Walkthroughs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide describes how to conduct a structured walkthroughs during the lifecycle stages of software engineering projects, regardless of hardware platform.

  4. STRICTLY CONVERGENT ANALYTIC STRUCTURES 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a new notion of strictly convergent analytic structure (consisting of .... the solutions of certain systems of equations may have power series solutions ...

  5. Scaling of structural failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  6. Structural model of uramarsite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Sidorenko, G. A. [All-Russia Research Institute of Mineral Resources (VIMS) (Russian Federation); Ivanova, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Chukanov, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural model of uramarsite, a new mineral of the uran-mica family from the Bota-Burum deposit (South Kazakhstan), is determined using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The parameters of the triclinic unit cell are as follows: a = 7.173(2) A, b = 7.167(5) A, c = 9.30(1) A, {alpha} = 90.13(7){sup o}, {beta} = 90.09(4){sup o}, {gamma} = 89.96(4){sup o}, and space group P1. The crystal chemical formula of uramarsite is: (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[AsO{sub 4}][PO{sub 4},AsO{sub 4}][NH{sub 4}][H{sub 3}O] . 6H{sub 2}O (Z = 1). Uramarsite is the second ammonium-containing mineral of uranium and an arsenate analogue of uramphite. In the case of uramarsite, the lowering of the symmetry from tetragonal to triclinic, which is accompanied by a triclinic distortion of the tetragonal unit cell, is apparently caused by the ordering of the As and P atoms and the NH{sub 4}, H{sub 3}O, and H{sub 2}O groups.

  7. Vessel structural support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jenko, James X. (N. Versailles, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Twp., Allegheny County, PA); Wilson, Robert M. (Plum Boro, PA); Wepfer, Robert M. (Murrysville, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vessel structural support system for laterally and vertically supporting a vessel, such as a nuclear steam generator having an exterior bottom surface and a side surface thereon. The system includes a bracket connected to the bottom surface. A support column is pivotally connected to the bracket for vertically supporting the steam generator. The system also includes a base pad assembly connected pivotally to the support column for supporting the support column and the steam generator. The base pad assembly, which is capable of being brought to a level position by turning leveling nuts, is anchored to a floor. The system further includes a male key member attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a female stop member attached to an adjacent wall. The male key member and the female stop member coact to laterally support the steam generator. Moreover, the system includes a snubber assembly connected to the side surface of the steam generator and also attached to the adjacent wall for dampening lateral movement of the steam generator. In addition, the system includes a restraining member of "flat" attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a bumper attached to the adjacent wall. The flat and the bumper coact to further laterally support the steam generator.

  8. Structural Genomics and Structural Proteomics: A Global Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Joel L.

    -genome information and the success of high-throughput (HTP) methods in DNA sequencing. It was envisaged that similar HTP methods could be applied to deter- mining the 3-D structures of "all" the proteins (the "proteome, automated technologies for implementing a HTP pipeline approach to structure determination; a focus on novel

  9. WIRELESS SENSING FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF CIVIL STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    communication of response measurements but also for power efficiency. The performance of the sensing unit in structural monitoring systems. The prototype wireless sensing unit is intended to 1) collect measurement data from the sensors installed on a structure, 2) store, manage and locally process the measurement data

  10. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions. Abstract:...

  11. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  12. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  13. Convergent evolution of protein structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Daniel

    , well-defined, three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a protein dictates the way in which it performs its bi- ological function. Knowing the 3-D structure of a pro- tein allows researchers to gain insight on the active site of the protein or on the way it interacts with small molecules and other proteins. Thus, 3-D

  14. OPTIMAL OPERATION USING STRUCTURAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    structure and heat exchanger areas. In addition to structure and areas, the stream data (heat capacity to controlling the target temperatures, minimizes the utility consumption. The method results in a decentralized, such as variations in supply temperatures, flowrates and possibly in heat transfer coefficients are given. The goal

  15. Cluster structures in Oxygen isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Furutachi; M. kimura; A. Doté; Y. Kanada-En'yo; S. oryu

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster structure of 16O,18O and 20O is investigated by the antisymmettrized molecular dynamics (AMD) plus generator coordinate method (GCM). We have found the K^{\\pi}=0$_2^+$ and 0$_1^-$ rotational bands of 18O that have the prominent 14C+\\alpha cluster structure. Clustering systematics becomes richer in 20O. We suggest the K^{\\pi}=0$_2^+$ band that is the mixture of the 12C+\\alpha+4n and 14C+6He cluster structures, and the K^{\\pi}=0$_1^-$ band that has the 14C+6He cluster structure. The K^{\\pi}=0$_3^+$ and 0$_2^-$ bands that have the prominent 16C+\\alpha cluster structure are also found.

  16. Phase-space structures II: Hierarchical Structure Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Maciejewski; S. Colombi; V. Springel; C. Alard; F. R. Bouchet

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multi-dimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in 6D phase-space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in 3D position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognise other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 % of the halo mass are found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 % of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Bound structures typically make only up to 6 orbits inside the main halo. Still, HSF can identify at the present time at least 80 % of the original content of structures with a redshift of infall as high as z space.

  17. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  18. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  19. CABM Symposium Applications of NMR to structure-based drug design in structural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    CABM Symposium Applications of NMR to structure-based drug design in structural genomics Robert, structure-based drug design, structural genomics Abstract Structural genomics is poised to have a tremendous design in the era of structural genomics. Introduction Structure-based drug design has established itself

  20. Fish Tagging Forum Draft Compilation of Tagging Data Collection and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is consistent with our Charter's requirement to assess lifecycle tracking. The diagrams are populated with example content for: a) data collection and management information across the lifecycle; and b) flow

  1. Thermal control structure and garment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Cameron, Christopher Stan (Sanford, NC)

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

  2. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar Cells ImpedesStructureStructure of

  3. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar Cells ImpedesStructureStructure

  4. STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, MECHANICS AND MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    of companies worldwide; cladding effects on, and hybrid control of, the response of tall buildings Buildings · Masonry Structures · Nano/Microstructure of Cement-based Materials · Polymeric Composite Systems · Reliable Engineering Computing · Risk Analysis · Seismic Hazard Mitigation · Smart Materials

  5. 2014 GRADUATE STUDIES STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    , the response of tall buildings to earthquake and wind; steel connection design and behavior; and structural engineering and mechanics · Advanced Applied Mathematics in Engineering · Advanced Dynamics and Smart Environments · High-performance Concrete and Steel · Horizontally Curved Bridges · Industrial Buildings

  6. Water intrusion in underground structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarchuk, Alex

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a study of the permissible groundwater infiltration rates in underground structures, the consequences of this leakage and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. Design guides and codes do not restrict, ...

  7. Structure and Information Stephen Binns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binns, Stephen

    of a Turing Machine. Stephen Binns Structure and Information #12;Alan Turing's Machines A Turing machine (TM and Information #12;Alan Turing's Machines A Turing machine (TM) consists of an infinite (in one direction) tape

  8. Geometric algorithms for reconfigurable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benbernou, Nadia M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study three problems related to geometric algorithms of reconfigurable structures. In the first problem, strip folding, we present two universal hinge patterns for a strip of material that enable the ...

  9. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman 2012 BINF 731 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Increase catalytic activity Change substrate binding site to increase specificity Change the thermal stability Increase proteins resistance to proteases Change codon composition Protein Engineering

  10. Fracture of aluminum naval structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galanis, Konstantinos, 1970-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural catastrophic failure of naval vessels due to extreme loads such as underwater or air explosion, high velocity impact (torpedoes), or hydrodynamic loads (high speed vessels) is primarily caused by fracture. ...

  11. Emergent Leadership Structures in Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slaughter, Andrew

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A social network approach was used to investigate the structural features of various emergent leadership systems in a large financial organization (n = 137), including transactional and transformational-style leadership relations. Results indicate...

  12. Wide-span cable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoso, Katherina, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the application of cable structures in buildings has gained huge popularities. Although cable technology has been established since the 1950s, there is suddenly a surge in the number of its building ...

  13. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa...

  14. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman 2012 BINF 731 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Increase catalytic activity Change substrate binding site to increase specificity Change the thermal Engineering Protein Engineering #12;Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Protein

  15. Time Structure of Muonic Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cazon; R. A. Vazquez; A. A. Watson; E. Zas

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical description of the time structure of the pulses induced by muons in air showers at ground level is deduced assuming the production distance distribution for the muons can be obtained elsewhere. The results of this description are compared against those obtained from simulated showers using AIRES. Major contributions to muon time delays are identified and a relation between the time structure and the depth distribution is unveiled.

  16. Hypertext navigation by network structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peart, Sheila Ann

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Usenet. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION Page 1. 1 Statement of the Problem . 1. 2 Research Objectives 1. 3 Research Methodology 2. HYPERTEXT AND ELECTRONIC COMMUMCATION . . 13 2. 1 Hypertext 2. 2 Unix Network News 2. 3 Super... Argument/Position(s) conversation structure . . 27 . . 29 . . 30 . . 31 4. 1 Original Usenet conversation structure . . 38 4. 2 Modification of Usenet conversations to the gIBIS format . . 39 4. 3 SuperCard Translation window 4. 4 SuperCard g...

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  18. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  19. STRUCTURED TEXT RETRIEVAL MODELS Djoerd Hiemstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    and manipulating content and hierarchical structure such as the parsed strings model [10], PAT expressions [15STRUCTURED TEXT RETRIEVAL MODELS Djoerd Hiemstra University of Twente http DEFINITION Structured text retrieval models provide a formal definition or mathematical framework

  20. Analysis of deployable strut roof structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Maxwell H. (Maxwell Henry)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployable structures are structures that can change shape from a compact to an expanded form. Thus, their advantage over conventional structures is adaptability, whether in the sense of adapting to changing environmental ...

  1. Electrochemical, Structural and Surface Characterization of Nickel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrochemical, Structural and Surface Characterization of NickelZirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes in Coal Gas Containing Electrochemical, Structural and Surface...

  2. Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bulk High Performance Materials for Energy Conversion Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of...

  3. Optimization Online - Structural optimization of the Ziegler's ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg N. Kirillov

    2010-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 24, 2010 ... Abstract: Structural optimization of non-conservative systems with ... with important applications in fluid-structure interactions, friction-induced ...

  4. Review: Structuring an Energy Technology Revolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structuring an Energy Technology Revolution By Charles WeissB. Structuring an Energy Technology Revolution. Cambridge,increases in spending on energy technology and innovation,

  5. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  6. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms . Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms . Abstract: Biofilms...

  7. Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries. Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries....

  8. CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

  9. Thermographic inspection of massive structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Guimaraes, Maria; Scott, David B. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive Evaluation of concrete structures is a growing concern for the nuclear industry as well as for many other industries. As critical concrete components continue to age, the ability to assess the health and suitability for continued service has become a key consideration. In some cases, repair of these structures is difficult and expensive, while replacement is prohibitively expensive or, in some cases, not feasible. Therefore, the ability to inspect these key assets is a primary concern, especially in the nuclear industry. Due to the large size of containment buildings, cooling towers, and other large concrete assets, the ability to rapidly inspect for defects of concern is very desirable. Thermographic inspection appears to have the required ability to rapidly inspect large structures to ascertain the location and size of many of the defects of concern. This ability was demonstrated by performing a thermographic inspection of a large concrete dam in 2 days.

  10. Relativisticlike structure of classical thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez; Alejandro Vazquez

    2014-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze in the context of geometrothermodynamics a Legendre invariant metric structure in the equilibrium space of an ideal gas. We introduce the concept of thermodynamic geodesic as a succession of points, each corresponding to a state of equilibrium, so that the resulting curve represents a quasi-static process. A rigorous geometric structure is derived in which the thermodynamic geodesics at a given point split the equilibrium space into two disconnected regions separated by adiabatic geodesics. This resembles the causal structure of special relativity, which we use to introduce the concept of adiabatic cone for thermodynamic systems. This result might be interpreted as an alternative indication of the inter-relationship between relativistic physics and classical thermodynamics.

  11. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  12. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  13. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul Joseph; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to devices constructed from quasicrystalline heterostructures. In preferred embodiments, two or more dielectric materials are arranged in a two- or three-dimensional space in a lattice pattern having at least a five-fold symmetry axis and not a six-fold symmetry axis, such that the quasicrystalline heterostructure exhibits an energy band structure in the space, the band structure having corresponding symmetry, which symmetry is forbidden in crystals, and which band structure comprises a complete band gap. The constructed devices are adapted for manipulating, controlling, modulating, trapping, reflecting and otherwise directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for a pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating within or through the heterostructure in multiple directions.

  14. Interface dynamics for layered structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takao Ohta; David Jasnow

    1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamics of large scale and slow deformations of layered structures. Starting from the respective model equations for a non-conserved system, a conserved system and a binary fluid, we derive the interface equations which are a coupled set of equations for deformations of the boundaries of each domain. A further reduction of the degrees of freedom is possible for a non-conserved system such that internal motion of each domain is adiabatically eliminated. The resulting equation of motion contains only the displacement of the center of gravity of domains, which is equivalent to the phase variable of a periodic structure. Thus our formulation automatically includes the phase dynamics of layered structures. In a conserved system and a binary fluid, however, the internal motion of domains turns out to be a slow variable in the long wavelength limit because of concentration conservation. Therefore a reduced description only involving the phase variable is not generally justified.

  15. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom [St.-Petersburg State University, Physics Faculty, Ulianovskaya 1, Peterhof, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  16. Chapter 8: Tension Structures Section 8.3: Tensegrity Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Snelson and David Georges Emmerich. All three applied for a patent with different wordings a special Issue of the International Journal of Space Structures [8.3.1]. David Georges Emmerich was very that it was dealing with tensegrity systems, even if David Georges Emmerich called them "Systèmes autotendants

  17. Quasar Structure and Cosmological Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Elvis

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from quasars and AGNs is being invoked frequently in several cosmological settings. Currently, order of magnitude, or more, uncertainties in the structure of both the wind and the 'obscuring torus' make predictions highly uncertain. To make testable models of this 'cosmological feedback' it is essential to understand the detailed structure of AGNs sufficiently well to predict their properties for the whole quasar population, at all redshifts. Progress in both areas is rapid, and I describe the near-term prospects for reducing these uncertainties for 'slow' (non-relativistic) AGN winds and the obscuring torus.

  18. Method of making diode structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Gupta, Akhlesh

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a diode structure includes the step of depositing a transparent electrode layer of any one or more of the group ZnO, ZnS and CdO onto a substrate layer, and depositing an active semiconductor junction having an n-type layer and a p-type layer onto the transparent electrode layer under process conditions that avoid substantial degradation of the electrode layer. A back electrode coating layer is applied to form a diode structure.

  19. Method for protein structure alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blankenbecler, Richard; Ohlsson, Mattias; Peterson, Carsten; Ringner, Markus

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method for protein structure alignment. More particularly, the present invention provides a method for identification, classification and prediction of protein structures. The present invention involves two key ingredients. First, an energy or cost function formulation of the problem simultaneously in terms of binary (Potts) assignment variables and real-valued atomic coordinates. Second, a minimization of the energy or cost function by an iterative method, where in each iteration (1) a mean field method is employed for the assignment variables and (2) exact rotation and/or translation of atomic coordinates is performed, weighted with the corresponding assignment variables.

  20. On Tailoring PDC speckle structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brida, G; Meda, A; Ruo-Berchera, I; Predazzi, E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Speckle structure of parametric down conversion light has recently received a large attention due to relevance in view of applications to quantum imaging The possibility of tailoring the speckle size by acting on the pump properties is an interesting tool for the applications to quantum imaging and in particular to the detection of weak object under shot-noise limit. Here we present a systematic detailed experimental study of the speckle structure produced in type II PDC with particular attention to its variation with pump beam properties.

  1. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar Cells ImpedesStructure ofHumanto

  2. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar Cells ImpedesStructure

  3. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening aStructure of All-PolymerStructure

  4. Sensor data analysis and information extraction for structural health monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Linjun

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, StanfordA Review of Structural Health Monitoring Literature: 1996-workshop on structural Health Monitoring: Structural Health

  5. Diffeomorphism Algebra Structure and Membrane Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Hoppe; Mariusz Hynek

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Explicit structure constants are calculated for certain Lie algebras of vectorfields on 2-dimensional compact manifolds.

  6. Social Structure [ Construction no. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Social Structure [ Construction no. 1 ] Foster Gallery, LSU SEPTEMBER 6-9 Reception 6-8 pm, Sept 8 [ Construction no. 1 ] is an interactive audiovisual performance for voice, social media, interactive media, and constructed speaker blocks in which social media artifacts (tweets, Facebook statuses, 4Square locales, Flickr

  7. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  8. Structural Biochemistry I General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Structural Biochemistry I Fall 2007 General Information Lectures: Room 147, Nanaline Duke Building August 27 - October 12, 2007 MWF 3:05-3:55 PM Course Website: http-1235 (Lab 1); 660-1634 (Lab 2) Office hours: Mondays ­ 5 ­ 6pm ­ Room 247 Nanaline Duke Text: Branden

  9. Nucleon Transverse Structure at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour Makke

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPASS is a fixed target experiment at CERN. Part of its physics programme is dedicated to study the transverse spin and the transverse momentum structure of the nucleon using SIDIS. For these measurements, data have been collected using transversely polarised proton and deuteron targets. A selection of recent measurements of azimuthal asymmetries using data collected with transversely polarised protons is presented.

  10. Structural Analysis of Combustion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tóth, J; Zsély, I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ReactionKinetics, a Mathematica based package a few dozen detailed models for combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methanol are investigated. Essential structural characteristics are pulled out, and similarities and differences of the mechanisms are highlighted. These investigations can be used before or parallel with usual numerical investigations, such as pathway analysis, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, or simulation.

  11. Synthesis and structure of perfluorocongressane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Han-Chao; Corbelin, S.; Lagow, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct fluorination of inorganic, organometallic and organic compounds, employing the LaMar method, has impacted the synthesis of structurally unusual fluorinated compounds over the past 25 years. Perfluorocongressane was synthesized using elemental fluorine and characterized by mass spectra, {sup 19}F NMR, and X-ray crystallography. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Variable Structure Control of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    . INTRODUCTION Modelling and control of flexible link manipulators have been studied intensively controller for regulation of a flexible beam. Due to its simplicity and robustness to parametricVariable Structure Control of a Distributed-Parameter Flexible Beam S. S. Ge,* T. H. Lee, G. Zhu, F

  13. Structurally Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Structurally connected secondary mirror EMFF secondary mirror EMFF Design Electromagnetic Formation for a smaller, simpler system. µEMFF investigates the use of conventional conductors, capacitors, and solar propellants that often limit lifetime, the EMFF system uses solar power to energize a magnetic field

  14. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman 2009 BINF 731 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Increase catalytic activity Change substrate binding site to increase specificity Change the thermal152S -1.08 1goj S152T 1.12 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering #12;Protein Engineering Protein

  15. Hyperons: Insights into baryon structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, J.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon octet is composed mainly of hyperons. Modern high energy hyperon beams provide a tool for the study of hyperon static properties and interactions. Experiments with these beams have provided new insights into hyperon rare decays, magnetic moments, and interactions. These experiments provide us with insights into the strong, weak, and electromagnetic structure of the baryons. 65 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

  17. DNA Structural Nanotechnology Duke University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    DNA Structural Nanotechnology John Reif Duke University Graduate Students: Harish Chandran&Caltech Tube Lattices #12;Ned Seeman New York University, USA Ned Seeman: Father of DNA Nanotechnology His Initial Ideas & Motivation for DNA Nanotechnology #12;Cube Chen & Seeman, Nature350:631 (1991) Truncated

  18. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.] President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  19. Heat pipe wick with structural enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andraka, Charles E.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Moreno, James B.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Showalter, Steven K.; Moss, Timothy A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pipe wick structure wherein a stout sheet of perforated material overlays a high performance wick material such as stainless steel felt affixed to a substrate. The inventive structure provides a good flow path for working fluid while maintaining durability and structural stability independent of the structure (or lack of structure) associated with the wick material. In one described embodiment, a wick of randomly laid .about.8 micron thickness stainless steel fibers is sintered to a metal substrate and a perforated metal overlay.

  20. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the context of structural stiffness reductions and impact damage. A method by which the sensitivity to damage could be increased for simple structures was presented, and the challenges of applying that technique to a more complex structure were identi fi ed. The structural dynamic changes in a weak adhesive bond were investigated, and the results showed promise for identifying weak bonds that show little or no static reduction in stiffness. To address these challenges in identifying highly localized impact damage, the possi- bility of detecting damage through nonlinear dynamic characteristics was also identi fi ed, with a proposed technique which would leverage impact location estimates to enable the detection of impact damage. This nonlinear damage identi fi cation concept was evaluated on a composite panel with a substructure disbond, and the results showed that the nonlinear dynamics at the damage site could be observed without a baseline healthy reference. By further developing impact load identi fi cation technology and combining load and damage estimation techniques into an integrated solution, the challenges associated with impact detection in composite struc- tures can be effectively solved, thereby reducing costs, improving safety, and enhancing the operational readiness and availability of high value assets.

  1. Structure/Function Relationships in Nickel-Peptide Complexes: Impact of the Primary Coordination Sphere on Square-Planar Nickel Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    -cancer therapeutic, whereas nickel generates a catalytic antioxidant. The advantage of this tag is that it is extremely small, is composed of naturally occurring amino acids, and binds metal with unique geometry. Metal binds irreversibly at physiological p...

  2. Collective network for computer structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  3. Process to make structured particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Angela Michelle; Richard, Monique N; Luhrs, Claudia; Blada, Timothy; Phillips, Jonathan

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains structured particles. The process includes providing a first precursor in the form of a dry precursor powder, a precursor liquid, a precursor vapor of a liquid and/or a precursor gas. The process also includes providing a plasma that has a high field zone and passing the first precursor through the high field zone of the plasma. As the first precursor passes through the high field zone of the plasma, at least part of the first precursor is decomposed. An aerosol having a second precursor is provided downstream of the high field zone of the plasma and the decomposed first material is allowed to condense onto the second precursor to from structured particles.

  4. Sandwich Construction Solar Structural Facets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diver, R. B.; Grossman, J.W.

    1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, they started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible.

  5. Structure of plant bile pigments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  6. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bezryadin, Alexey (Champaign, IL); Remeika, Mikas (Urbana, IL)

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  7. Plated lamination structures for integrated magnetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Bucknell C.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor integrated magnetic devices such as inductors, transformers, etc., having laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are provided, wherein the laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are formed using electroplating techniques. For example, an integrated laminated magnetic device includes a multilayer stack structure having alternating magnetic and insulating layers formed on a substrate, wherein each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by an insulating layer, and a local shorting structure to electrically connect each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to an underlying magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to facilitate electroplating of the magnetic layers using an underlying conductive layer (magnetic or seed layer) in the stack as an electrical cathode/anode for each electroplated magnetic layer in the stack structure.

  8. Experimental data confronts nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical content of experimental data for a variety of excitation energies and angular momenta is summarized. The specific nuclear structure questions which these data address are considered. The specific regions discussed are: low-spin data near the particle separation thresholds; low-spin data at intermediate excitation energies; high-spin, near-yrast data and high-spin data at larger excitation energies. 63 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

  10. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front D. Skolnik,Introduction: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems

  11. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front D. Skolnik,Introduction: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems

  12. Measurements of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in Lepton + Jets Final States using a Topological Multivariate Technique as well as Lifetime b-Tagging in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV with the D0 Detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golling, Tobias F

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two alternative measurements of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions in the lepton+jets channel are presented. The t{bar t} production cross section is extracted by combining the kinematic event information in a multivariate discriminant. The measurement yields {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 5.13{sub -1.57}{sup +1.76}(stat){sub -1.10}{sup +0.96}(syst) {+-} 0.33 (lumi) pb in the muon+jets channel, using 229.1 pb{sup -1}, and in the combination with the electron+jets channel 226.3 pb{sup -1} {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 6.60{sub -1.28}{sup +1.37}(stat){sub -1.11}{sup +1.25}(syst) {+-} 0.43 (lumi) pb. The second measurement presented reconstructs explicitly secondary vertices to d lifetime b-tagging. The measurement combines the muon+jets and the electron+jets channel, using 158.4 pb{sup -1} and 168.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively: {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 8.24{sub -1.25}{sup +1.34}(stat){sub -1.63}{sup +1.89}(syst) {+-} 0.54 (lumi) pb.

  13. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J.D. Achenbach, Structural health monitoring and damagein fatigue, Structural Health Monitoring, 7(1), 37-49, 2008.and J.D. Achenbach, Structural health monitoring and damage

  14. Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

  15. Structured video content analysis : learning spatio-temporal and multimodal structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yale

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Video data exhibits a variety of structures: pixels exhibit spatial structure, e.g., the same class of objects share certain shapes and/or colors in image; sequences of frames exhibit temporal structure, e.g., dynamic ...

  16. Structure of the CRA-2014: Structure of the CRA-2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar CellsMinimal Requirements for

  17. Modelling intonational structure using hidden markov models. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Helen; Taylor, Paul A

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for using hidden Markov models (HMMs) to model intonational structure. HMMs are probabilistic and can capture the variability in structure which previous finite state network models lack. We show ...

  18. Effect of high pressure on structural oddities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Russell D. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the effect of pressure on crystal structures that are in some way unusual. The aim was to investigate whether pressure could be used to force these ‘structural oddities’ to conform to more conventional ...

  19. Structural analysis and assessment of Guastavino vaulting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Megan L

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies the behavior and pathologies of the masonry tile structures built by the R. Guastavino Company in order to provide recommendations on their analysis and assessment. Structural analyses of two specific ...

  20. Understanding molecular crystal structures at extreme conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funnell, Nicholas Paul

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure of matter in the solid state could be considered as being one of ‘the big questions’ in chemistry. Whereas the structural behaviour of molecules in the gas phase is relatively well-understood, ...

  1. Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 (HSS CRAD 64-15, Rev. 0) Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 (HSS CRAD 64-15, Rev....

  2. Damaged reinforced concrete structures in fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervine, Adam

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is crucial for a building to maintain structural stability when subjected to multiple and sequential extreme loads. Safety and economic considerations dictate that structures are built to resist extreme events, such ...

  3. The design and construction of fabric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Rosemarie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In its short history, fabric structures have fascinated architects and engineers alike. Architects appreciate their unusual shapes and forms while engineers delight in their "pure" structural expression. Capable of spanning ...

  4. Thermoplastic active fiber composites for structural actuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Christopher Thomas, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of piezoelectric actuators into a structure can lead to an active structural surface that can adapt by bending or straining to different operational conditions. This can be used to tune desired properties ...

  5. Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

  6. Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

  7. RM methods for multiple fare structure environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kayser, Matthew R. (Matthew Russell)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid growth of Low Cost Carriers (LCC) and their simplified fare structures has created "semi-restricted" fare structures where lower classes are undifferentiated except for price, while higher fare classes are still ...

  8. EVA: evaluation of protein structure prediction servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    day, sequences of newly available protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are sent performance of protein structure prediction servers through a battery of objective measures for prediction

  9. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanisms leading to fusion, nuclear structure is affectingknoi,. A [he "nuclear structure" in fusion will consist ofCI i CO I0 + Be fusion I0 ' -cm Nuclear reaction S-factors

  10. Single Molecule Probes of Lipid Membrane Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livanec, Philip W.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological membranes are highly heterogeneous structures that are thought to use this heterogeneity to organize and modify the function of membrane constituents. Probing membrane organization, structure, and changes therein ...

  11. Past and future of grid shell structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paoli, Céline (Céline Aude)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their original organic shape and the column free space that they provide, the design of grid shell structures challenges architects and structural engineers in more than one way. Very few grid shell building ...

  12. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  13. Adding structure to agent programming languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Adding structure to agent programming languages Peter Novák, Jürgen Dix

  14. Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure in Genotoxicity Studies to Support Engineering Development of Emission Controls Preserving Diesel Exhaust...

  15. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  16. Structure determination of enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (Sentinext)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease but may induce fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 crystallized in a body-centered orthorhombic space group with two particles in general orientations in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Determination of the particle orientations required that the locked rotation function excluded the twofold symmetry axes from the set of icosahedral symmetry operators. This avoided the occurrence of misleading high rotation-function values produced by the alignment of icosahedral and crystallographic twofold axes. Once the orientations and positions of the particles had been established, the structure was solved by molecular replacement and phase extension.

  17. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Donald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Holdaway, Ray F. (Clinton, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  18. Convectively cooled electrical grid structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.W.

    1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor. The conductors are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages in the flexible support elements. The grid may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

  19. Structural studies of bee melittin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, D.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Tsui, F.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of how proteins refold in passing from an aqueous phase to an amphipathic environment such as a membrane is beig addressed by a structural study of bee melittin. Melittin is the toxic, main protein of bee venom, and has been shown by others to integrate into natural and synthetic membranes and to lyse a variety of cells. This function is presumably related to its unusual sequence. Except for charges at the N-terminus and at lysine 7, the first 20 residues are largely apolar. In contrast, the last six residues contain four charges and two polar residues.

  20. Photonic Structures Inspired by Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolle, Mathias

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    the surprising helplessness that overwhelms you when you try to eat and identify food and wine purely by taste in a pitch-black environment where your sense of vision is completely useless. Not easy at all. It is truly a refreshing, fantastic experience [1]. 1... 2 01 11 Theoretical aspects of photonic structures has been used, essentially signifying the conservation of energy upon reflection and refraction. Finally the reflectivity of a thin layer is given by R = ArA ? r = r201 + 2r01r12 cos 2? + r 2 12 1...