National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reegle structured tagging

  1. tagging API | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    REEEP REEGLE structured tagging API Reegle and OpenEI share the vision that easy access to energy information will help drive future developments in clean energy development....

  2. Reegle mentions OpenEI in video on new Content Pool API | OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    featured in the video, describes how the reegle tagging api structures and enriches big, unstructured data, turning data into knowledge. The tagging API analyzes documents,...

  3. structured | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    REEEP REEGLE structured tagging API Reegle and OpenEI share the vision that easy access to energy information will help drive future developments in clean energy development....

  4. REEGLE - Clean Energy Information Gateway | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gateway (Redirected from Reegle Search Engine for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: reegle.info - clean...

  5. REEGLE - Clean Energy Information Gateway | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: reegle.info - clean energy information portal AgencyCompany Organization: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership...

  6. LOD Workshop Wrap-up courtesy of REEGLE | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D.C. to discuss the enormous potential of LOD in supporting the transition to a cleaner energy economy. This blog post is courtesy of the REEGLE blog. REEGLE and OpenEI share the...

  7. Tags | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    local utility grid lagi green apps blog department of energy wind vision logo software solar land use REEEP REEGLE Texas contest Database gateway pv land use Colorado GIS tcdb...

  8. The structure of the SBP-Tagstreptavidin complex reveals a novel helical scaffold bridging binding pockets on separate subunits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H.; Wu, Sau-Ching; Tjia, Wai-Mui; Wong, Sui-Lam; Ng, Kenneth K. S.

    2013-05-01

    The structure of the SBP-Tagstreptavidin complex reveals a novel mode of peptide recognition in which a single peptide binds simultaneously to biotin-binding pockets from adjacent subunits of streptavidin. The molecular details of peptide recognition suggest how the SBP-Tag can be further modified to become an even more useful tag for a wider range of biotechnological applications. The 38-residue SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin more tightly (K{sub d} ? 2.54.9 nM) than most if not all other known peptide sequences. Crystallographic analysis at 1.75 resolution shows that the SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin in an unprecedented manner by simultaneously interacting with biotin-binding pockets from two separate subunits. An N-terminal HVV peptide sequence (residues 1214) and a C-terminal HPQ sequence (residues 3133) form the bulk of the direct interactions between the SBP-Tag and the two biotin-binding pockets. Surprisingly, most of the peptide spanning these two sites (residues 1728) adopts a regular ?-helical structure that projects three leucine side chains into a groove formed at the interface between two streptavidin protomers. The crystal structure shows that residues 110 and 3538 of the original SBP-Tag identified through in vitro selection and deletion analysis do not appear to contact streptavidin and thus may not be important for binding. A 25-residue peptide comprising residues 1134 (SBP-Tag2) was synthesized and shown using surface plasmon resonance to bind streptavidin with very similar affinity and kinetics when compared with the SBP-Tag. The SBP-Tag2 was also added to the C-terminus of ?-lactamase and was shown to be just as effective as the full-length SBP-Tag in affinity purification. These results validate the molecular structure of the SBP-Tagstreptavidin complex and establish a minimal bivalent streptavidin-binding tag from which further rational design and optimization can proceed.

  9. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleusmore » rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.« less

  10. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  11. An active sitetail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 resolution contains tailactive site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that close the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an open structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active sitetail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  12. Tag: technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tags

    technology<...

  13. REEGLE | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    workshop, last week REEEP and NREL ran a clean energy workshop in Washington, D.C. to discuss the enormous potential of LOD in supporting the transition to a cleaner energy economy...

  14. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baillie, N.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.; Bosted, P.; Bültmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S. E.; et al

    2012-04-01

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ≈< 100 MeV and their angles to ≈> 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less thanmore » a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ≈< x ≈< 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.« less

  15. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, N.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.; Bosted, P.; Bltmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S. E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Tvaskis, V.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Arrington, J.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Domingo, J.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hungerford, E.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ispiryan, M.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Kalantarians, N.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, I.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Pisano, S.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-04-01

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ?< 100 MeV and their angles to ?> 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less than a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ?< x ?< 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.

  16. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1996-12-17

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

  17. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1996-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

  18. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  19. Bisfuel links - Photosynthesis tag

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photosynthesis tag http://biofuels.asu.edu/biomimetic.shtml" target="_blank">Artificial Photosynthesis http://bioenergy.asu.edu/photosyn/photoweb/" target="_blank">Photosynthesis online http://bioenergy.asu.edu/photosyn/references.html" target="_blank">Photosynthesis Reference sources http://bioenergy.asu.edu/photosyn/education/learn.html" target="_blank">What is photosynthesis?

  20. Tagging explosives with sulfur hexafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Russell N.; Cote, Edgar A.; Vogel, William; Dempsey, John C.

    1976-11-16

    Method and apparatus for tagging explosives with a source of SF.sub.6 permitting the detection of their presence utilizing sensitive sniffing apparatus.

  1. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer; Deland, Sharon M.

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  2. Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons Authors: Taddeucci, Terry N 1 + Show Author ...

  3. Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons You are accessing a document from the ...

  4. SRNL Tagging and Tracking Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2016-06-15

    SRNL generates a next generation satellite base tracking system. The tagging and tracking system can work in remote wilderness areas, inside buildings, underground and other areas not well served by traditional GPS. It?s a perfect response to customer needs and market demand.

  5. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic H2 ( e, e'ps ) X scattering with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tkachenko, S.; Baillie, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Zhang, J.; Arrington, J.; Bosted, P.; Bültmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; et al

    2014-04-24

    In this study, much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  6. Measurement of the nearly free neutron structure function using spectator tagging in inelastic 2H(e,e'p s)X scattering with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Baillie, Nathan; Kuhn, Sebastian; Zhang, J; Arrington, John; Bosted, Peter; Bueltmann, Stephen; Christy, Michael; Fenker, Howard; Griffioen, Keith; et al

    Much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  7. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  8. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1995-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

  9. Infrared tag and track technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Stone, Mark L.; Slater, John; Davidson, James R.

    2007-12-04

    A method of covertly tagging an object for later tracking includes providing a material capable of at least one of being applied to the object and being included in the object, which material includes deuterium; and performing at least one of applying the material to the object and including the material in the object in a manner in which in the appearance of the object is not changed, to the naked eye.

  10. Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of sinistral fault systems, resulting in localized crustal extension and enhanced permeability. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling...

  11. Passive wireless sensing tags NASA inflatable structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-03-01

    This report gives a description of several types of wireless, unpowered remote sensors. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were coupled with conventional sensors to create entirely new types of sensors. These sensors report physically measurable data in the same manner as the conventional sensors, but they do it remotely and without any local power source. The sensors are measured remotely using a radar-like interrogation device, and the sensors and their related communication electronics draw all of the power needed for communicating from the radar pulse. The report covers only a description of prototype sensors and not of the manufacturing requirements of these devices.

  12. Power Tagging Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Superior, Colorado Zip: 80027 Product: Colorado-based developer of advanced digital signal processing technologies that enable real-time "power tagging" on the grid....

  13. Tag: manufacturing | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manufacturing Tag: manufacturing Displaying 1 - 8 of 8... Category: News Tool of tomorrow today Y-12 and other Nuclear Security Enterprise sites investigate industry's next...

  14. Tag: Suppliers | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tag: Suppliers Displaying 1 - 10 of 38... Category: Suppliers Container Technologies Industries, LLC receives small business award CNS recently honored Container Technologies...

  15. Tag: History | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Tag: History Displaying 1 - 10 of 119... Category: About Deputy Secretary meets two calutron girls When the Deputy Secretary of Energy, Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, was in...

  16. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Tag Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database Tag Cloud This tag cloud is a specific type of weighted list that provides a quick look at the content of the DOE R&D Accomplishments database. It can be easily browsed because terms are in alphabetical order. With this tag cloud, there is a direct correlation between font size and quantity. The more times a term appears in the bibliographic citations, the larger the font size. This tag cloud is also interactive. Clicking on a term will activate a search for that term. Search

  17. To tag or not to tag: animal welfare, conservation and stakeholder considerations in fish tracking studies that use electronic tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Murchie, Karen J.; Thiem, Jason D.; Donaldson, Michael R.; Hinch, Scott G.; Brown, Richard S.; Fisk, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    The advent and widespread adoption of electronic tags (including biotelemetry and biologging devices) for tracking animals has provided unprecedented information on the biology, management, and conservation of fish in the world’s oceans and inland waters. However, use of these tools is not without controversy. Even when scientific and management objectives may best be achieved using electronic tags, it is increasingly important to further consider other factors such as the welfare of tagged animals (i.e., the role of training and science-based surgical guidelines, anesthetic use, inability to maintain sterile conditions in field environments), the ethics of tagging threatened species vs. using surrogates, stakeholder perspectives on tagging (including aboriginals), as well as use of data emanating from such studies (e.g., by fishers to facilitate exploitation). Failure to do so will have the potential to create conflict and undermine scientific, management and public confidence in the use of this powerful tool. Indeed, there are already a number of examples of where tracking studies using electronic tags have been halted based on concerns raised by researchers, authorities, or stakeholders. Here we present a candid evaluation of several factors that should be considered when determining when to tag or not to tag fish with electronic devices. It is not our objective to judge the merit of previous studies. Rather, we hope to stimulate debate and discussion regarding the use of electronic tags to study fish. Relatedly, there is a need for more research to address these questions (e.g., what level of cleanliness is needed when conducting surgeries, what type of training should be required for fish surgery) including human dimensions studies to understand perspectives of different actors including society as a whole with respect to tagging and tracking studies.

  18. Communication methods, systems, apparatus, and devices involving RF tag registration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burghard, Brion J.; Skorpik, James R.

    2008-04-22

    One technique of the present invention includes a number of Radio Frequency (RF) tags that each have a different identifier. Information is broadcast to the tags from an RF tag interrogator. This information corresponds to a maximum quantity of tag response time slots that are available. This maximum quantity may be less than the total number of tags. The tags each select one of the time slots as a function of the information and a random number provided by each respective tag. The different identifiers are transmitted to the interrogator from at least a subset of the RF tags.

  19. Tag gas capsule with magnetic piercing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ira V.

    1976-06-22

    An apparatus for introducing a tag (i.e., identifying) gas into a tubular nuclear fuel element. A sealed capsule containing the tag gas is placed in the plenum in the fuel tube between the fuel and the end cap. A ferromagnetic punch having a penetrating point is slidably mounted in the plenum. By external electro-magnets, the punch may be caused to penetrate a thin rupturable end wall of the capsule and release the tag gas into the fuel element. Preferably the punch is slidably mounted within the capsule, which is in turn loaded as a sealed unit into the fuel element.

  20. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7

  1. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  2. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US.

  3. Tag: environment | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environment Tag: environment Displaying 1 - 7 of 7... Category: News Y-12 completes waste removal project two years ahead of schedule Y-12 completed disposition of 2,247 containers ...

  4. Tag: careers | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    careers Tag: careers Displaying 1 - 9 of 9... Category: Careers West Point cadet, one of a kind summer intern He sets his sights high and goes after what he wants. I. Greer is now ...

  5. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Wilbur L.; Schenter, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  6. b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Many high p{sub T} physics analyses at the Tevatron contain a b-quark and hence a b-jet in the final states. We report on the b-jet identification methods in D0 and their performance. For 0.5% of light jet tagging rate, 40 or 45% of b-jet tagging efficiency is achieved for jets with 35 < E{sub T} < 55 GeV and |{eta}| < 1.2.

  7. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Laug, Matthew T.; Lambert, John D. B.; Herzog, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  8. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  9. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  10. A brief examination of optical tagging technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Cahill, Paul A. (Aspecular Optics, Dayton, OH); Drummond, Timothy J.; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick

    2003-07-01

    Presented within this report are the results of a brief examination of optical tagging technologies funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was performed during the summer months of 2002 with total funding of $65k. The intent of the project was to briefly examine a broad range of approaches to optical tagging concentrating on the wavelength range between ultraviolet (UV) and the short wavelength infrared (SWIR, {lambda} < 2{micro}m). Tagging approaches considered include such things as simple combinations of reflective and absorptive materials closely spaced in wavelength to give a high contrast over a short range of wavelengths, rare-earth oxides in transparent binders to produce a narrow absorption line hyperspectral tag, and fluorescing materials such as phosphors, dies and chemically precipitated particles. One technical approach examined in slightly greater detail was the use of fluorescing nano particles of metals and semiconductor materials. The idea was to embed such nano particles in an oily film or transparent paint binder. When pumped with a SWIR laser such as that produced by laser diodes at {lambda}=1.54{micro}m, the particles would fluoresce at slightly longer wavelengths, thereby giving a unique signal. While it is believed that optical tags are important for military, intelligence and even law enforcement applications, as a business area, tags do not appear to represent a high on return investment. Other government agencies frequently shop for existing or mature tag technologies but rarely are interested enough to pay for development of an untried technical approach. It was hoped that through a relatively small investment of laboratory R&D funds, enough technologies could be identified that a potential customers requirements could be met with a minimum of additional development work. Only time will tell if this proves to be correct.

  11. B mixing and flavor tagging at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ, James S.; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2004-12-01

    The CDF Collaboration has made a preliminary measurement of B{sub d} mixing as a first step toward measuring mixing in the B{sub s} system. Flavor tagging using opposite-side jets and muons as well as same-side tagging schemes have been applied. Results agree well with precise results from the B-factories. They use these results to estimate CDF's B{sub s} mixing range using the present data set ({approx} 250 pb{sup -1}) and extrapolate to the potential from larger data sets in future running.

  12. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  13. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  14. eTag 1.8.2 - January 14, 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are able to fill in some details for this project. As previously communicated, the migration to eTag spec 1.8.2 is scheduled for midnight CST on 33115. Tag submitted before...

  15. Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2008-10-01

    In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

  16. Tag: Partnerships | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnerships Tag: Partnerships Displaying 1 - 10 of 38... Category: Partnerships Building virtual connections, saving real money Y-12 is talking robotics with college students a state away. More... Category: Partnerships Competing for a grade and our nuclear security UT students and Y-12 nuclear security subject matter experts conduct a battle board challenge in Oak Ridge. More... Category: Partnerships CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium CNS was well represented at the first

  17. Tag: VPP | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VPP Tag: VPP Displaying 1 - 4 of 4... Category: News Y-12 receives two significant safety awards For the tenth consecutive year, Y-12 received the National Safety Council's Occupational Excellence Achievement award. More... Category: About Voluntary Protection Program Protection against preventable illness and injury is not new to Y-12. Excellent tools already function toward keeping us healthy and safe on the job, and in June, Y-12 received the U.S. More... Category: About VPP Awareness Spring

  18. Tag: partnerships | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partnerships Tag: partnerships Displaying 1 - 10 of 35... Category: Community Blount Partnership tours Y-12 Members of the Blount Partnership Chamber of Commerce toured the Y-12 National Security Complex. More... Category: Partnerships CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium CNS was well represented at the first National Energetic Materials Consortium. More... Category: Partnerships Burn to Learn CNS fire protection engineers recently visited Oak Ridge Fire Department to "Burn to

  19. Scanning Cargo Containers with Tagged Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viesti, G.; Botosso, C.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Zenoni, A.; Donzella, A.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A.; Szabo, J.-L.; Sannie, G.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Nad, K.; Peerani, P.; Sequeira, V.

    2007-10-26

    A new Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) able to detect illicit materials such as explosives and narcotics in cargo containers has been developed within the EURopean Illicit TRAfficing Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project. After the R and D phase, the inspection portal has been installed and commissioned at the Rijeka seaport in Croatia, where it has been operated in connection with the existing X-ray scanner for a first two-month demonstration campaign. Results obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. Tag: Awards | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards Tag: Awards Displaying 1 - 10 of 10... Category: News BES Technologies receives DOE small business award Mentor-Protégé relationship continues to receive Federal accolades. More... Category: News Y-12 honors its inventors with Technology Transfer awards Y-12 recently recognized 29 inventors at their annual Tech Transfer award ceremony. The group was awarded 13 patents and submitted more than 30 invention disclosures in the past year. More... Category: News Y-12 garners six NNSA

  1. Tag: Pantex | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pantex Tag: Pantex Displaying 1 - 6 of 6... Category: News Construction Begins on New Administrative Support Complex at Pantex Groundbreaking ceremony for 343,000 square foot facility. More... Category: Community CNS-sponsored teams compete at DOE's National Science Bowl Our nation's capital recently played host to the country's future science and technology leaders during the U.S. Department of Energy's 26th National Science Bowl®. More... Category: News Pantex and Y-12: where science and

  2. Tag: construction | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    construction Tag: construction Displaying 1 - 10 of 14... Category: News Construction Begins on New Administrative Support Complex at Pantex Groundbreaking ceremony for 343,000 square foot facility. More... Category: News Y-12 Construction maintains 'superb' safety performance At a recent celebration, B&W Y-12's Direct-Hire Construction team was honored for two major safety achievements: more than one million hours worked without a lost-time accident and zero recordable injuries throughout

  3. Tags, wireless communication systems, tag communication methods, and wireless communications methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott; Jeff W. , Pratt; Richard M.

    2006-09-12

    Tags, wireless communication systems, tag communication methods, and wireless communications methods are described. In one aspect, a tag includes a plurality of antennas configured to receive a plurality of first wireless communication signals comprising data from a reader, a plurality of rectifying circuits coupled with. respective individual ones of the antennas and configured to provide rectified signals corresponding to the first wireless communication signals, wherein the rectified signals are combined to produce a composite signal, an adaptive reference circuit configured to vary a reference signal responsive to the composite signal, a comparator coupled with the adaptive reference circuit and the rectifying circuits and configured to compare the composite signal with respect to the reference signal and to output the data responsive to the comparison, and processing circuitry configured to receive the data from the comparator and to process the data.

  4. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, T.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.

    1998-01-06

    A method and system are disclosed for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established. 6 figs.

  5. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ting; Gross, Kenny C.; Wegerich, Stephan

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established.

  6. Information Technology Advisory Group (iTAG) | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees Information Technology Advisory Group (iTAG) The Information Technology Advisory Group (iTAG) is a standing Ames Laboratory committee consisting of Ames Lab scientists and IT professionals working together to look at and advise the computing needs for researchers. iTAG Charter The committee consists of: Diane Den Adel (Information Services Representative) Terry Herrman (Engineering Services Group Representative) Linlin Wang (Science and Technology Representative) Cynthia Jenks

  7. Gift tag drive benefits local children and seniors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all issues All Issues submit Gift tag drive benefits local children and seniors Each year, Lab employees and contractors work to make the holidays...

  8. Polarized light ions and spectator nucleon tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzey, Vadim; Higinbotham, Dougas W.; Hyde, Charles; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A.; Park, Kijun; Sargsian, Misak M.; Strikman, Mark; Weiss, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x ll 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < p(R) < several 100MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  9. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  10. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1985-01-01

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  11. Online b-jets tagging at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarsa, M.; Ristori, L.; Amerio, S.; Lucchesi, D.; Pagan Griso, S.; Torre, S.T.; Cortiana, G.; /Padua U., Astron. Dept.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a method to identify b-quark jets at trigger level which exploits recently increased CDF trigger system capabilities. b-quark jets identification is of central interest for the CDF high-P{sub T} physics program, and the possibility to select online b-jets enriched samples can extend the physics reaches especially for light Higgs boson searches where the H {yields} b{bar b} decay mode is dominant. Exploiting new trigger primitives provided by two recent trigger upgrades, the Level2 XFT stereo tracking and the improved Level2 cluster-finder, in conjunction with the existing Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT), we design an online trigger algorithm aimed at selecting good purity b-jets samples useful for many physics measurements, the most important being inclusive H {yields} b{bar b} searches. We discuss the performances of the proposed b-tagging algorithm which must guarantee reasonable trigger rates at luminosity greater than 2 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and provide high efficiency on H {yields} b{bar b} events.

  12. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  13. Methyl-CpG island-associated genome signature tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a method for analyzing the organismic complexity of a sample through analysis of the nucleic acid in the sample. In the disclosed method, through a series of steps, including digestion with a type II restriction enzyme, ligation of capture adapters and linkers and digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme, genome signature tags are produced. The sequences of a statistically significant number of the signature tags are determined and the sequences are used to identify and quantify the organisms in the sample. Various embodiments of the invention described herein include methods for using single point genome signature tags to analyze the related families present in a sample, methods for analyzing sequences associated with hyper- and hypo-methylated CpG islands, methods for visualizing organismic complexity change in a sampling location over time and methods for generating the genome signature tag profile of a sample of fragmented DNA.

  14. Conference Poster and Name Tag Templates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications, Exhibits, & Logos » Templates » Conference Poster and Name Tag Templates Conference Poster and Name Tag Templates The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has developed templates for posters and nametags for use at conferences. They were designed to provide EERE staff and contractors with basic templates for conference materials with a unified EERE look and feel. The templates are InDesign files. Poster Illustration of the blue conference poster template

  15. Title Tags for Websites Outside of the Energy.gov Drupal Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These standards are required when coding title tags on websites and applications outside the Energy.gov Drupal environment.

  16. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XVI; Alternative Designs for Future Adult PIT-Tag Detection Studies, 2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Comas, Jose A.; Skalski, John R.

    2000-09-25

    In the advent of the installation of a PIT-tag interrogation system in the Cascades Island fish ladder at Bonneville Dam (BON), and other CRB dams, this overview describes in general terms what can and cannot be estimated under seven different scenarios of adult PIT-tag detection capabilities in the CRB. Moreover, this overview attempted to identify minimal adult PIT-tag detection configurations required by the ten threatened Columbia River Basin (CRB) chinook and steelhead ESUs. A minimal adult PIT-tag detection configuration will require the installation of adult PIT-tag detection facilities at Bonneville Dam and another dam above BON. Thus, the Snake River spring/summer and fall chinook salmon, and the Snake River steelhead will require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities to guarantee estimates of ''ocean survival'' and at least of one independent, in-river returning adult survival (e.g., adult PIT-tag detection facilities at BON and LGR dams and at any other intermediary dam such as IHR). The Upper Columbia River spring chinook salmon and steelhead will also require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and two other dams on the BON-WEL reach. The current CRB dam system configuration and BPA's and COE's commitment to install adult PIT-tag detectors only in major CRB projects will not allow the estimation of an ''ocean survival'' and of any in-river adult survival for the Lower Columbia River chinook salmon and steelhead. The Middle Columbia River steelhead ESU will require a minimum of two dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and another upstream dam on the BON-McN reach. Finally, in spite of their importance in terms of releases, PIT-tag survival studies for the Upper Willamette chinook and Upper Willamette steelhead ESUs cannot be perform with the current CRB dam system configuration and PIT-tag detection capabilities.

  17. Tag: Nuclear Deterrence | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Deterrence Tag: Nuclear Deterrence Displaying 1 - 10 of 13... Category: Nuclear Deterrence Completing the connection A team from Malmstrom Air Force Base recently toured Y-12's production facilities. More... Category: Nuclear Deterrence Sharing resources: the benefits of consolidation Three Y-12 employees recently completed temporary assignments at Pantex. More... Category: Nuclear Deterrence Support Facilities The Y-12 site comprises more than 250 non-production facilities that help

  18. Tag: technology transfer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology transfer Tag: technology transfer Displaying 1 - 10 of 12... Category: News CNS, UT chemical sensing technology wins R&D 100 Award An inexpensive, small and portable chemical sensor developed by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC researchers at the Y-12 National Security Complex and the University of Tennessee received a pres More... Category: News CNS research teams named 2015 R&D 100 Award finalists CNS partners with universities on significant technology advances. More...

  19. Anatomic and Functional Imaging of Tagged Molecules in Animals - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Anatomic and Functional Imaging of Tagged Molecules in Animals Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Contact TJNAF About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA novel functional imaging system for use in the imaging of unrestrained and non-anesthetized small animals or other subjects and a method for acquiring such images and further registering them with anatomical X-ray images previously or subsequently acquired.DescriptionThe apparatus comprises a

  20. Tag: Emergency Management | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Management Tag: Emergency Management Displaying 1 - 4 of 4... Category: News Y-12 to conduct June 8 Emergency Management exercise People in the vicinity of the Y-12 NSC may observe personnel simulating response activities and performing environmental monitoring or sampling. More... Category: News Oak Ridge Reservation Emergency Sectors Changing The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency realigns boundaries to improve response More... Category: News Sirens to sound for August 14 Y-12

  1. Tag: small business | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    small business Tag: small business Displaying 1 - 4 of 4... Category: News BES Technologies receives DOE small business award Mentor-Protégé relationship continues to receive Federal accolades. More... Category: News CNS reinforces commitment to small businesses Small businesses represent the backbone of our economy and the backbone of our success at CNS. More... Category: News CNS presents small business awards Consolidated Nuclear Security presented small business awards Friday, Sept. 18, at

  2. Tag: uranium processing facility | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uranium processing ... Tag: uranium processing facility Displaying 1 - 3 of 3... Category: News UPF Project celebrates changing the Y-12 skyline Groundbreaking Ceremony Held for the Construction Support Building More... Category: News From aging infrastructure to the unaparalleled UPF The proposed Uranium Processing Facility upgrades most Building 9212 processes to modern equipment and complies with today's nuclear safety and security standards. More... Category: Nuclear Deterrence Processing

  3. Believing Your Eyes: Strengthening the Reliability of Tags and Seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Denlinger, Laura S.

    2013-07-01

    NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) is working together with scientific experts at the DOE national laboratories to develop the tools needed to safeguard and secure nuclear material from diversion, theft, and sabotage--tasks critical to support future arms control treaties that may involve the new challenge of monitoring nuclear weapons dismantlement. Use of optically stimulated luminescent material is one method to enhance the security and robustness of existing tamper indicating devices such as tags and seals.

  4. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  5. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  6. Stable isotope, site-specific mass tagging for protein identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Xian

    2006-10-24

    Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily dependent upon the mass accuracy and sequence coverage of the fragment ions generated by peptide ionization. The present invention describes a method for increasing the specificity, accuracy and efficiency of the assignments of particular proteolytic peptides and consequent protein identification, by the incorporation of selected amino acid residue(s) enriched with stable isotope(s) into the protein sequence without the need for ultrahigh instrumental accuracy. Selected amino acid(s) are labeled with .sup.13C/.sup.15N/.sup.2H and incorporated into proteins in a sequence-specific manner during cell culturing. Each of these labeled amino acids carries a defined mass change encoded in its monoisotopic distribution pattern. Through their characteristic patterns, the peptides with mass tag(s) can then be readily distinguished from other peptides in mass spectra. The present method of identifying unique proteins can also be extended to protein complexes and will significantly increase data search specificity, efficiency and accuracy for protein identifications.

  7. Secure optionally passive RFID tag or sensor with external power source and data logging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nekoogar, Faranak; Reynolds, Matthew; Lefton, Scott; Dowla, Farid; Twogood, Richard

    2016-05-31

    A secure optionally passive RFID tag or sensor system comprises a passive RFID tag having means for receiving radio signals from at least one base station and for transmitting radio signals to at least one base station, where the tag is capable of being powered exclusively by received radio energy, and an external power and data logging device having at least one battery and electronic circuitry including a digital memory configured for storing and recalling data. The external power and data logging device has a means for powering the tag, and also has a means.

  8. Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2013-06-12

    Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the Cormack–Jolly–Seber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 80–89 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

  9. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Robert L.; Isaac, Dennis L.; Lewis, Mark A.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries. To accomplish this goal. We are tagging missing production groups within hatcheries to assure each production group is identifiable to allow future evaluation upon recovery of tag data.

  10. Methods And System Suppressing Clutter In A Gain-Block, Radar-Responsive Tag System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2006-04-18

    Methods and systems reduce clutter interference in a radar-responsive tag system. A radar transmits a series of linear-frequency-modulated pulses and receives echo pulses from nearby terrain and from radar-responsive tags that may be in the imaged scene. Tags in the vicinity of the radar are activated by the radar's pulses. The tags receive and remodulate the radar pulses. Tag processing reverses the direction, in time, of the received waveform's linear frequency modulation. The tag retransmits the remodulated pulses. The radar uses a reversed-chirp de-ramp pulse to process the tag's echo. The invention applies to radar systems compatible with coherent gain-block tags. The invention provides a marked reduction in the strength of residual clutter echoes on each and every echo pulse received by the radar. SAR receiver processing effectively whitens passive-clutter signatures across the range dimension. Clutter suppression of approximately 14 dB is achievable for a typical radar system.

  11. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  12. Preliminary evaluation of a fluorescence and radioisotope nuclear smuggling deterrence tag - final report (IL500E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Delmastro, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the efforts completed in identifying candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a developing tagging system. The tagging system is being developed as a deterrent to nuclear smuggling, by providing a means of: (1) tracing materials and pilferers to the facility of origin for any recovered special nuclear materials, (2) inventory control of long-term stored items containing special nuclear materials, and (3) tracking materials transferred between facilities. The system uses three types of materials to cover a range of applications intended to prevent the pilfering of special nuclear materials. One material, fluorescent compounds which are invisible without ultraviolet or near-infrared detection systems, is marked on controlled items with a tracking pattern that corresponds to a specified item in a specified location in the data control system. The tagging system uses an invisible, fluorescent dusting powder to mark equipment and personnel who inappropriately handle the tagged material. The tagging system also uses unique combinations of radionuclides to identify the facility of origin for any special nuclear material. This report also summarizes the efforts completed in identifying hardware that will be used for the tagging system. This hardware includes the devices for applying the tagging materials, the commercially available fluorescence detection systems, and gamma ray detection systems assembled from existing, commercially available technologies.

  13. PbTe/TAGS RTG Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A. )

    1993-01-10

    The paper describes the results of studies on an RTG option for powering the global network of unmanned landers for NASA's Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission. RTGs are essentially unaffected by diurnal and seasonal variations, Martian sandstorms, and landing site latitudes, and their waste heat can stabilize the temperatures of the landers and their payload. The RTG designs described in this paper are based on PbTe/TAGS thermoelectric elements, in contast to the SiGe-based RTGs the author described in previous publications. The presently described RTGs differ not only in the choice of thermoelectric materials but also in the use of much lower operating temperatures, conductive rather than radiative heat transfer, an inert cover gas instead of vacuum in the RTG's converter, and fibrous instead of multifoil thermal insulation. As in a previous Teledyne design, the Fairchild designs described in this paper employ flight-proven General Purpose Source modules and Close-Pack Arrays of thermoelectric converter modules. Illustrative point designs of RTGs producing 41 and 51 watts(e) at 28 volts are presented. The presented performance parameters were derived by detailed thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analyses (including radiator geometry optimization) described in the paper. The Fairchild study showed that, with appropriate modifications, the Teledyne design can be scaled up to higher power levels, and it identified solutions to ensure adequate fuel clad ductility at launch temperatures and adequate thermal conductance from the thermoelectric cold ends to the RTG housing.

  14. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasability of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report, 1986-1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Flagg, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    In 1983, a multi-year project to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of adapting a new identification system to salmonids was established. The system is based upon a miniaturized passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag. This report discusses the work completed and is divided into laboratory studies, field studies, and systems development. All studies were conducted using a glass-encapsulated tag implanted into the body cavity of test fish via a 12-gauge hypodermic needle. Laboratory studies with juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, showed that retention of glass-encapsulated PIT tags was 99-100% in fish weighing 3 g (mean weight) or larger. No adverse tissue response to the tag was noted. The survival of fish 5 g (mean weight) or larger was usually greater than 99%. However, fish ranging in weight from 2 to 4 g, or fish undergoing a physiological change such as smoltification may have a low mortality (usually less than 5.0%) after tagging. The mortality rate in the smaller fish was dependent upon tagging skill whereas mortality in smolting fish seemed dependent upon the level of stress. Growth comparisons between tagged and control fish indicated PIT-tagged fish had a slightly depressed growth rate at some measurement periods. The operational life of glass-encapsulated PIT tags implanted in fish was good, with 100% of the tags operating after 401 days. No tags were rejected from the fish during the observation period.

  15. Advancing the surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish: a gap analysis and research agenda based on a review of trends in intracoelomic tagging effects studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2011-03-08

    Early approaches to surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish were often through trial and error, however, in recent years there has been an interest in using scientific research to identify techniques and procedures that improve the outcome of surgical procedures and determine the effects of tagging on individuals. Here we summarize the trends in 108 peer-reviewed electronic tagging effect studies focused on intracoleomic implantation to determine opportunities for future research. To date, almost all of the studies have been conducted in freshwater, typically in laboratory environments, and have focused on biotelemetry devices. The majority of studies have focused on salmonids, cyprinids, ictalurids and centrarchids, with a regional bias towards North America, Europe and Australia. Most studies have focused on determining whether there is a negative effect of tagging relative to control fish, with proportionally fewer that have contrasted different aspects of the surgical procedure (e.g., methods of sterilization, incision location, wound closure material) that could advance the discipline. Many of these studies included routine endpoints such as mortality, growth, healing and tag retention, with fewer addressing sublethal measures such as swimming ability, predator avoidance, physiological costs, or fitness. Continued research is needed to further elevate the practice of electronic tag implantation in fish in order to ensure that the data generated are relevant to untagged conspecifics (i.e., no long-term behavioural or physiological consequences) and the surgical procedure does not impair the health and welfare status of the tagged fish. To that end, we advocate for i) rigorous controlled manipulations based on statistical designs that have adequate power, account for inter-individual variation, and include controls and shams, ii) studies that transcend the laboratory and the field with more studies in marine waters, iii) incorporation of knowledge and

  16. Large-scale purification and crystallization of the endoribonuclease XendoU: troubleshooting with His-tagged proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renzi, Fabiana; Panetta, Gianna; Vallone, Beatrice; Brunori, Maurizio; Arceci, Massimo; Bozzoni, Irene; Laneve, Pietro; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2006-03-01

    Recombinant His-tagged XendoU, a eukaryotic endoribonuclease, appeared to aggregate in the presence of divalent cations. Monodisperse protein which yielded crystals diffracting to 2.2 Å was obtained by addition of EDTA. XendoU is the first endoribonuclease described in higher eukaryotes as being involved in the endonucleolytic processing of intron-encoded small nucleolar RNAs. It is conserved among eukaryotes and its viral homologue is essential in SARS replication and transcription. The large-scale purification and crystallization of recombinant XendoU are reported. The tendency of the recombinant enzyme to aggregate could be reversed upon the addition of chelating agents (EDTA, imidazole): aggregation is a potential drawback when purifying and crystallizing His-tagged proteins, which are widely used, especially in high-throughput structural studies. Purified monodisperse XendoU crystallized in two different space groups: trigonal P3{sub 1}21, diffracting to low resolution, and monoclinic C2, diffracting to higher resolution.

  17. A Comparison of Hyperelastic Warping of PET Images with Tagged MRI for the Analysis of Cardiac Deformation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Klein, Gregory; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Tmore » he objectives of the following research were to evaluate the utility of a deformable image registration technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle through the analysis of clinical, gated PET image datasets.wo normal human male subjects were sequentially imaged with PET and tagged MRI imaging. Strain predictions were made for systolic contraction using warping analyses of the PET images and HARP based strain analyses of the MRI images. Coefficient of determination R 2 values were computed for the comparison of circumferential and radial strain predictions produced by each methodology.here was good correspondence between the methodologies, with R 2 values of 0.78 for the radial strains of both hearts and from an R 2 = 0.81 and R 2 = 0.83 for the circumferential strains.he strain predictions were not statistically different ( P ≤ 0.01 ) . A series of sensitivity results indicated that the methodology was relatively insensitive to alterations in image intensity, random image noise, and alterations in fiber structure.his study demonstrated that warping was able to provide strain predictions of systolic contraction of the LV consistent with those provided by tagged MRI Warping.« less

  18. Method of remote powering and detecting multiple UWB passive tags in an RFID system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Benzel, David M.; Dallum, Gregory E.; Spiridon, Alex

    2012-05-29

    A new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), tracking, powering apparatus/system and method using coded Ultra-wideband (UWB) signaling is introduced. The proposed hardware and techniques disclosed herein utilize a plurality of passive UWB transponders in a field of an RFID-radar system. The radar system itself enables multiple passive tags to be remotely powered (activated) at about the same time frame via predetermined frequency UWB pulsed formats. Once such tags are in an activated state, an UWB radar transmits specific "interrogating codes" to put predetermined tags in an awakened status. Such predetermined tags can then communicate by a unique "response code" so as to be detected by an UWB system using radar methods.

  19. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Washington Missing Production Groups, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuss, Howard J.; Hammer, Stanley A.; Kimbel, Mark A. (Washington Department of Fisheries, Olympia, WA)

    1994-03-01

    The intent of this project is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time.

  20. Reminder of eTag 1.8.2 Migration - March 13, 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eTag-1.8.2-Migration---March-13,-2015 Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Doing Business Expand Doing Business Customer Involvement Expand Customer...

  1. The US TAG What is it, Why Should I care? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The US TAG What is it, Why Should I care? The US TAG What is it, Why Should I care? Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado pvmrw13_ps3_powermark_mikonowicz.pdf (269.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Technical Standards Newsletter - December 2002 Agenda for the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado Solar America Board for Codes and Standards-- 2013 Progress Update

  2. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded "D" character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the "D" interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available.

  3. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, M.A.

    1997-01-07

    A system and method are disclosed for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded ``D`` character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the ``D`` interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available. 5 figs.

  4. Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security - SBIR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twogood, Richard E

    2015-01-27

    This is the Final Report for the DOE Phase II SBIR project “Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security.” The topics covered herein include technical progress made, progress against the planned milestones and deliverables, project outcomes (results, collaborations, intellectual property, etc.), and a discussion on future expectations of deployment and impacts of the results of this work. In brief, all planned work for the project was successfully completed, on or ahead of schedule and on budget. The major accomplishment was the successful development of a very advanced passive ultra-secure RFID tag system with combined security features unmatched by any commercially available ones. These tags have high-level dynamic encrypted authentication, a novel tamper-proofing mechanism, system software including graphical user interfaces and networking, and integration with a fiber-optic seal mechanism. This is all accomplished passively (with no battery) by incorporating sophisticated hardware in the tag which harvests the energy from the RFID readers that are interrogating the tag. Based on initial feedback (and deployments) at DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), it is anticipated these tags and their offspring will meet DOE and international community needs for highly secure RFID systems. Beyond the accomplishment of those original objectives for the ultra-secure RF tags, major new spin-off thrusts from the original work were identified and successfully pursued with the cognizance of the DOE sponsor office. In particular, new classes of less sophisticated RFID tags were developed whose lineage derives from the core R&D thrusts of this SBIR. These RF “tag variants” have some, but not necessarily all, of the advanced characteristics described above and can therefore be less expensive and meet far wider markets. With customer pull from the DOE and its national laboratories, new RFID tags and systems (including custom readers and software) for

  5. An evaluation of the maximum tag burden for implantation of acoustic transmitters in juvenile Chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-04-01

    Abstract.—The influence of a surgically implanted acoustic micro-transmitter and passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag on the growth and survival of hatchery-reared juvenile Chinook salmon was examined. Growth and survival were compared between treatment (implanted) and control fish within three fork length (FL) size groups (80-89, 90-99, and 100-109 mm). The acoustic micro-transmitter and PIT tag implanted in our study had a combined weight of 0.74 g. Weights of study fish ranged from 4.7 to 16.3 g for treatment fish and from 5.1 to 16.8 g for control fish. The burden for the combined acoustic and PIT tag experienced by implanted fish ranged from 8.8% to 15.7% for the 80-89 mm FL group, 6.0-10.9% for the 90-99 mm FL group, and 4.5-8.6% for the 100-109 mm FL group. Results indicated that growth and survival were size-dependent among implanted juvenile Chinook salmon. Significant differences in growth rate and survival were observed between treatment and control fish in the 80-89 mm FL group. Within this group, growth of fish smaller than 88.5 mm FL (tag burden > 10.0%) was negatively affected by the implantation or presence of an acoustic micro-transmitter and PIT tag. Survival of fish in the 90-99 mm FL group did not differ between treatment and control fish. However, survival of implanted fish within this size group that were smaller than 97.2 mm FL (tag burden > 7.4%) was negatively influenced. These results indicate that the burden of an acoustic micro-transmitter and PIT tag should be maintained at or below about 7.0% for studies that use hatchery-reared juvenile Chinook salmon.

  6. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe{sup +44}) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10{sup 12} bit/cm{sup 2}). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development.

  7. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  8. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.

    1994-07-26

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as background'' gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a fuzzy'' set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements. 14 figs.

  9. Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as "background" gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a "fuzzy" set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements.

  10. Store operation with conditional push of a tag value to a queue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-07-28

    According to one embodiment, a method for a store operation with a conditional push of a tag value to a queue is provided. The method includes configuring a queue that is accessible by an application, setting a value at an address in a memory device including a memory and a controller, receiving a request for an operation using the value at the address and performing the operation. The method also includes the controller writing a result of the operation to the address, thus changing the value at the address, the controller determining if the result of the operation meets a condition and the controller pushing a tag value to the queue based on the condition being met, where the tag value in the queue indicates to the application that the condition is met.

  11. Optimized Design and Synthesis of Cell Permeable Biarsenical Cyanine Probe for Imaging Tagged Cytosolic Bacterial Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Na; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C.

    2013-02-01

    To optimize cellular delivery and specific labeling of tagged cytosolic proteins by biarsenical fluorescent probes build around a cyanine dye scaffold, we have systematically varied the polarity of the hydrophobic tails (i.e., 4-5 methylene groups appended by a sulfonate or methoxy ester moiety) and arsenic capping reagent (ethanedithiol versus benzenedithiol). Targeted labeling of the cytosolic proteins SlyD and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase engineered with a tetracysteine tagging sequences demonstrate the utility of the newly synthesized probes for live-cell visualization, albeit with varying efficiencies and background intensities. Optimal routine labeling and visualization is apparent using the ethanedithiol capping reagent with the uncharged methoxy ester functionalized acyl chains. These measurements demonstrate the general utility of this class of photostable and highly fluorescent biarsenical reagents based on the cyanine scaffold for in vivo targeting of tagged cellular proteins for live cell measurements of protein dynamics.

  12. A comparison of implantation methods for large PIT tags or injectable acoustic transmitters in juvenile Chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Katrina V.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Klett, Ryan S.; Li, Huidong; Seaburg, Adam; Eppard, M. B.

    2014-04-15

    The miniaturization of acoustic transmitters may allow greater flexibility in terms of the size and species of fish available to tag. New downsized injectable acoustic tags similar in shape to passive integrated transponder tags can be rapidly injected rather than surgically implanted through a sutured incision, as is current practice. Before wide-scale field use of these injectable transmitters, standard protocols to ensure the most effective and least damaging methods of implantation must be developed. Three implantation methods were tested in various sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha. Methods included a needle bevel-down injection, a needle bevel-up injection with a 90-degree rotation, and tag implantation through an unsutured incision. Tagged fish were compared to untagged control groups. Weight and wound area were measured at tagging and every week for 3 weeks; holding tanks were checked daily for mortalities and tag losses. No differences among treatments were found in growth, tag loss, or survival, but wound area was significantly reduced among incision-treated fish. The bevel-up injection had the worst results in terms of tag loss and wound area and also had high mortality. Implantation through an incision resulted in the lowest tag loss but the highest mortality. Fish from the bevel-down treatment group had the least mortality; wound areas also were smaller than the bevel-up treatment group. Cumulatively, the data suggest that the unsutured incision and bevel-down injection methods were the most effective; the drawbacks of both methods are described in detail. However, we further recommend larger and longer studies to find more robust thresholds for tagging size that include more sensitive measures.

  13. Technical description of candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a nuclear smuggling deterrence tag (IL500E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report summarizes the efforts completed in identifying candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a developing tagging system. The tagging system is being developed as a deterrent to nuclear smuggling, by providing a means of: (1) tracing materials and pilferers to the facility of origin for any recovered special nuclear materials; (2) inventory control of long-term stored items containing special nuclear materials; and (3) tracking materials transferred between facilities. The tagging system uses four types of tagging materials to cover a range of applications intended to prevent the pilfering of special nuclear materials. One material, fluorescent compounds which are invisible without ultraviolet or near-infrared detection systems, is marked on controlled items with a tracking pattern that corresponds to a specified item in a specified location in the data control system. The tagging system uses an invisible, fluorescent dusting powder to mark equipment and personnel who inappropriately handle the tagged material. The tagging system also uses unique combinations of radionuclides to identify the facility of origin for any special nuclear material. Currently, 18 long-lived radioisotopes, 38 short-live radioisotopes and 10 fluorescent compounds have been selected as candidate materials for the tagging system.

  14. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  15. TAGS 85/2N RTG Power for Viking Lander Capsule

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1969-08-01

    Results of studies performed by Isotopes, Inc., Nuclear Systems Division, to optimize and baseline a TAGS 85/2N RTG for the Viking Lander Capsule prime electrical power source are presented. These studies generally encompassed identifying the Viking RTG mission profile and design requirements, and establishing a baseline RTG design consistent with these requirements.

  16. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

    1999-01-01

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  17. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Washington Missing Production Groups, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuss, Howard J.; Ashbrook, Charmane; Doty, Daniel (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1994-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ``Annual Coded Wire Tag Program -- Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries`` project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) [formerly the Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) and the Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW)], Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time. Data generated by this project contributes to WDFW`s obligations for representative tagging under the Endangered. Species Act (ESA) permit for operating Columbia Basin facilities. WDFW facilities operating outside the Snake River basin are required to have a Section 10, ``Incidental Take`` permit. Consistent with special conditions within this permit, WDFW has now reached it`s objective to tag representative groups from all WDFW Columbia Basin releases.

  18. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  19. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen J.T.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.

  20. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    2009-07-21

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  1. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. More than 100,000 fish per group are usually marked at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  2. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program : Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1995-12-01

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. It can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened or endangered stocks. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. Between 120,000 and 200,000 fish are marked for groups at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  3. Surgically Implanted JSATS Micro-Acoustic Transmitters Effects on Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Tag Expulsion and Survival, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Royer, Ida M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Kim, Jin A.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-09-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival model assumptions associated with a concurrent study - Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics at John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2010 by Thomas Carlson and others in 2010 - in which the Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The micro-acoustic transmitter used in these studies is the smallest acoustic transmitter model to date (12 mm long x 5 mm wide x 4 mm high, and weighing 0.43 g in air). This study and the 2010 study by Carlson and others were conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet requirements set forth by the 2008 FCRPS Biological Opinion. In 2010, we compared survival, tag burden, and tag expulsion in five spring groups of yearling Chinook salmon (YCH) and steelhead (STH) and five summer groups of subyearling Chinook salmon (SYC) to evaluate survival model assumptions described in the concurrent study. Each tagging group consisted of approximately 120 fish/species, which were collected and implanted on a weekly basis, yielding approximately 600 fish total/species. YCH and STH were collected and implanted from late April to late May (5 weeks) and SYC were collected and implanted from mid-June to mid-July (5 weeks) at the John Day Dam Smolt Monitoring Facility. The fish were collected once a week, separated by species, and assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) Control (no surgical treatment), (2) Sham (surgical implantation of only a passive integrated transponder [PIT] tag), and (3) Tagged (surgical implantation of JSATS micro-acoustic transmitter [AT] and PIT tags). The test fish were held for 30 days in indoor

  4. Quantitative NO{sub 2} molecular tagging velocimetry at 500 kHz frame rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Naibo; Nishihara, Munetake; Lempert, Walter R.

    2010-11-29

    NO{sub 2} molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) is demonstrated at repetition rates as high as 500 kHz in a laboratory scale Mach 5 wind tunnel. A pulse burst laser and a home built optical parametric oscillator system were used to simultaneously generate the required 355 and 226 nm wavelengths for NO{sub 2} photodissociation (tagging) and NO planar laser induced fluorescence imaging (interrogation), respectively. NO{sub 2} MTV images were obtained both in front and behind the characteristic bow shock from a 5 mm diameter cylinder. From Gaussian curve fitting, an average free stream flow velocity of 719 m/s was obtained. Absolute statistical precision in velocity of {approx}11.5 m/s was determined, corresponding to relative precision of 1.6%-5%, depending upon the region of the flow probed.

  5. An Integrated RFID and Barcode Tagged Item Inventory System for Deployment at New Brunswick Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, James R; Kuhn, Michael J; Gradle, Colleen; Preston, Lynne; Thomas, Brigham B.; Laymance, Leesa K; Kuziel, Ron

    2012-01-01

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has a numerous inventory containing thousands of plutonium and uranium certified reference materials. The current manual inventory process is well established but is a lengthy process which requires significant oversight and double checking to ensure correctness. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has worked with NBL to develop and deploy a new inventory system which utilizes handheld computers with barcode scanners and radio frequency identification (RFID) readers termed the Tagged Item Inventory System (TIIS). Certified reference materials are identified by labels which incorporate RFID tags and barcodes. The label printing process and RFID tag association process are integrated into the main desktop software application. Software on the handheld computers syncs with software on designated desktop machines and the NBL inventory database to provide a seamless inventory process. This process includes: 1) identifying items to be inventoried, 2) downloading the current inventory information to the handheld computer, 3) using the handheld to read item and location labels, and 4) syncing the handheld computer with a designated desktop machine to analyze the results, print reports, etc. The security of this inventory software has been a major concern. Designated roles linked to authenticated logins are used to control access to the desktop software while password protection and badge verification are used to control access to the handheld computers. The overall system design and deployment at NBL will be presented. The performance of the system will also be discussed with respect to a small piece of the overall inventory. Future work includes performing a full inventory at NBL with the Tagged Item Inventory System and comparing performance, cost, and radiation exposures to the current manual inventory process.

  6. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  7. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish-Tagging System : Annual Report 1998-1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.; Peterson, Bradley W.; Nunnallee, Edmund P.; Jonasson, Bruce F.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers our work during 1998 and 1999 (FY99) on a project to expand and improve technology for passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted the work. Timely and accurate information derived from PIT-tag technology is increasingly critical to resource stakeholders in assessing the effectiveness of efforts to enhance survival of juvenile and adult salmonids. Continued development of PIT-tag technology will enable researchers and fisheries managers to address issues expressed in the NMFS biological opinions for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and the proposed Snake River Recovery Plan. The FY99 work was divided into individual projects that are covered separately in this report.

  8. Top quark pair production cross section in the lepton+jets channel using b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, H.D.; /Brown U.

    2008-05-01

    The top quark pair production cross section measurement in the lepton+jets channel with b-tagging algorithm is described. About 900 pb{sup -1} data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron are used for this analysis. In this thesis, event selection, background estimation, and cross section calculation are discussed in detail. In addition, calibration of the Luminosity Monitor readout electronics and a new b-tagging algorithm, the SLTNN tagger, are also discussed in this thesis.

  9. Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System, 1998-2000 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.

    2001-05-01

    Since 1984, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has conducted an ongoing research and development project to expand and improve technology for Passive-Integrated-Transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB). Work conducted as part of this project during 1999-2000 was divided into six individual projects, which are covered separately in this report.

  10. Tag: partnership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    newspress-releasescns-research-teams-named-2015-rd-100-award-finalists

  11. Tag: technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    newspress-releasescns-research-teams-named-2015-rd-100-award-finalists

  12. Tag: community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    able to serve a record breaking 2,808 children, providing necessary school supplies to students in 29 area schools in a 345-square-mile service area.

  13. Tag: engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24all en CNS employees blaze through certification exam http:www.y12.doe.govemployees-retireescns-employees-blaze-through-certification-exam

  14. Tag: employees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    46all en CNS donations help lower-income Appalachian families http:www.y12.doe.govcommunitycns-donations-help-lower-income-appalachian-families

  15. Tag: partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    07 May 2014 21:28:16 +0000 pam 1264 at http:www.y12.doe.gov Kids vs. Mercury: Food fight at the creek http:www.y12.doe.govnewsy-12-reportkids-vs-mercury-food-fight-creek...

  16. Tag: careers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    07 May 2014 21:31:05 +0000 pam 1265 at http:www.y12.doe.gov Kids vs. Mercury: Food fight at the creek http:www.y12.doe.govnewsy-12-reportkids-vs-mercury-food-fight-creek...

  17. Tag: History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    http:www.y12.doe.govnewsy-12-reporthunch-about-hunley

  18. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Passive Integrated Transponder Tag Technology, 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.; Nunnallee, Edmund P.

    2009-04-03

    Since 1984, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has conducted a research project to develop and evaluate technology for passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB). Work conducted as part of this project between October 2000 and September 2002 (FY01 and FY02) was divided into seven individual elements, which are covered separately in this report. The efforts by personnel associated with this project have produced and will continue to produce products that aid resource stakeholders in assessing the effectiveness of actions taken to enhance the survival of juvenile and adult salmonids. These products and their uses include: (1) Survival and migration timing information on stocks to evaluate water management strategies and fish passage/collection facilities; (2) Data needed for the management and restoration of salmonids and other fish stocks listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA); (3) Information required for the management of multiple species in a variety of habitats; and (4) Tools that enable fisheries researchers and managers to address previously unanswerable questions and critical uncertainties These products are also used in genetic, physiology, behavior, and captive broodstock research on endangered species. The continued development of PIT-tag technology will enable researchers and fisheries managers to address issues expressed in both of NMFS biological opinions for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS)(NMFS 1995a, 2000) and the proposed Snake River Recovery Plan (NMFS 1995b; tasks 2.1.d, 2.3.b.4, 2.4.a, 2.6.c.2, and 2.9.d).

  20. A panel of sequence tagged sites for chromosome band 11q23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tunnacliffe, A.; Perry, H. ); Radice, P. Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S. )

    1993-09-01

    A panel of sequence tagged sites (STSs) representing 30 markers previously assigned to human chromosome band 11q23 has been assembled. Eleven STSs represent cloned genes, and the remainder are from anonymous DNA segments. The STSs have been used in PCR experiments to localize their cognate sequences further with respect to five translocation breakpoints that define three intervals in 11q23. Two of these translocation breakpoints have been mapped more precisely by the STS assignments. The STS panel will form a useful starting point for the generation of a genomic contig of band 11q23. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. {CP} Violation in Flavor Tagged $B_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhoul, Khaldoun; /MIT

    2009-06-01

    In this dissertation, we present the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays performed with the use of initial-state flavor tagging. CP violation is observed in this mode through the interference of decay without net mixing and decay with net mixing, that is, B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} and B{sub s} {yields} {bar B}{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The time-dependent angular analysis is used to extract the decay widths of the heavy and light B{sub s} eigenstates and the difference between these decay widths {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} {triple_bond} {Lambda}{sub s}{sup L}-{Lambda}{sub s}{sup H}. Initial-state flavor tagging is used to determine the matter-antimatter content of the B{sub s} mesons at production time. We combine flavor tagging with the angular analysis, which statistically determines the contributions of the CP-even and CP-odd components at decay time, to measure the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub s}. The phase {beta}{sub s} is expressed in terms of elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix as {beta}{sub s} {triple_bond} arg (-V{sub ts}V*{sub tb}/V{sub cs}V*{sub cb}), and is predicted by the Standard Model to be close to zero, {beta}{sub s}{sup SM} = 0.02. In the measurement of {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s}, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of luminosity, collected at the CDF experiment from proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. In the measurement of {beta}{sub s}, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.3 fb{sup -1} of collected luminosity. We measure {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} = (0.071{sub -0.059}{sup +0.064} {+-} 0.007) ps{sup -1} using the time-dependent angular analysis. Combining the angular analysis with flavor-tagging, we find that assuming the Standard Model predictions of {beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 33%. We obtain a suite of associated results which are discussed

  2. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  3. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic H2 ( e, e'ps ) X scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkachenko, S.; Baillie, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Zhang, J.; Arrington, J.; Bosted, P.; Bltmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Tvaskis, V.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zonta, I.

    2014-04-24

    In this study, much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  4. The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume II: Experiment Salmonid Survival with Combined PIT-CWT Tagging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, Ken

    1997-06-01

    Experiment designs to estimate the effect of transportation on survival and return rates of Columbia River system salmonids are discussed along with statistical modeling techniques. Besides transportation, river flow and dam spill are necessary components in the design and analysis otherwise questions as to the effects of reservoir drawdowns and increased dam spill may never be satisfactorily answered. Four criteria for comparing different experiment designs are: (1) feasibility, (2) clarity of results, (3) scope of inference, and (4) time to learn. In this report, alternative designs for conducting experimental manipulations of smolt tagging studies to study effects of river operations such as flow levels, spill fractions, and transporting outmigrating salmonids around dams in the Columbia River system are presented. The principles of study design discussed in this report have broad implications for the many studies proposed to investigate both smolt and adult survival relationships. The concepts are illustrated for the case of the design and analysis of smolt transportation experiments. The merits of proposed transportation studies should be measured relative to these principles of proper statistical design and analysis.

  5. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2010-08-17

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  6. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report 1990-1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Maynard, D.J.; Downing, S.L. (and others)

    1994-01-01

    In 1983, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) began a multiyear cooperative research program with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to evaluate a new miniaturized identification system that could be used with salmonids. The system is referred to as the passive-integrated-transponder (PIT) tagging and interrogation system. The program has focused on determining the effects of PIT tags on juvenile and adult salmonids, as well as the development and evaluation of tagging and interrogation methods. Earlier results of the program have been reported in annual reports and journal articles cited in this report. This report covers the work per formed from 1990 through 1993. For convenience, the report is divided into three sections: (1) Interrogation and separation systems at Columbia River Basin dams; (2) Systems development and evaluation; and (3) Information and technology transfer.

  7. DNA attachment to support structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balhorn, Rodney L.; Barry, Christopher H.

    2002-01-01

    Microscopic beads or other structures are attached to nucleic acids (DNA) using a terminal transferase. The transferase adds labeled dideoxy nucleotide bases to the ends of linear strands of DNA. The labels, such as the antigens digoxigenin and biotin, bind to the antibody compounds or other appropriate complementary ligands, which are bound to the microscopic beads or other support structures. The method does not require the synthesis of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe. The method can be used to tag or label DNA even when the DNA has an unknown sequence, has blunt ends, or is a very large fragment (e.g., >500 kilobase pairs).

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  9. Method of preparing gas tags for identification of single and multiple failures of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, Norman J.

    1976-01-01

    For use in the identification of failed fuel assemblies in a nuclear reactor, the ratios of the tag gas isotopic concentrations are located on curved surfaces to enable the ratios corresponding to failure of a single fuel assembly to be distinguished from those formed from any combination of two or more failed assemblies.

  10. Remote Monitoring and Tracking of UF6 Cylinders Using Long-Range Passive Ultra-wideband (UWB) RFID Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2007-06-06

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on Techniques for IAEA Verification of Enrichment Activities identified 'smart tags' as a technology that should be assessed for tracking and locating UF6 cylinders. Although there is vast commercial industry working on RFID systems, the vulnerabilities of commercial products are only beginning to emerge. Most of the commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) RFID systems operate in very narrow frequency bands, making them vulnerable to detection, jamming and tampering and also presenting difficulties when used around metals (i.e. UF6 cylinders). Commercial passive RFID tags have short range, while active RFID tags that provide long ranges have limited lifetimes. There are also some concerns with the introduction of strong (narrowband) radio frequency signals around radioactive and nuclear materials. Considering the shortcomings of commercial RFID systems, in their current form, they do not offer a promising solution for continuous monitoring and tracking of UF6 cylinders. In this paper, we identify the key challenges faced by commercial RFID systems for monitoring UF6 cylinders, and introduce an ultra-wideband approach for tag/reader communications that addresses most of the identified challenges for IAEA safeguards applications.

  11. The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-05-01

    Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

  12. Tagging Juvenile Pacific Lamprey with Passive Integrated Transponders: Methodology, Short-Term Mortality, and Influence on Swimming Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-05-31

    Populations of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River basin have declined drastically over the past 20 years. Possible causes include habitat degradation and instream flow obstacles, such as the mainstem hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River. To determine why lamprey populations have declined a monitoring system to track their movements was needed to determine possible impacts. Juvenile lamprey were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and their detection rates determined while migrating through fish bypass facilities at McNary in 2001 and 2005 and John Day Dam in 2002. Juvenile Pacific lamprey (115–178 mm) were obtained from the John Day Dam fish collection facility, transported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and surgically PIT-tagged. Lamprey were allowed to recover for 3 to 4 days following PIT tag implantation and subsequently were released upstream of the PIT tag detectors at both dams. Primary detector efficiency was 98% at McNary Dam and 97% at John Day Dam. Average in-river travel time for fish released at McNary Dam and detected at John Day Dam was 16.1 d in 2001 and 10 d in 2005. Mean detection rates at McNary Dam varied from 74% for gatewell releases to 69% for the collection channel. Follow up tests in 2005 at McNary Dam showed detections rates near 100% from collection channel releases. Detection rates from forebay releases at McNary Dam were lower, ranging from 0% to 38% (mean = 21%). Mean travel times from release point to the primary detectors at McNary Dam were; forebay (492 min), gatewell (323 min), and collection channel (245 min). The detection efficiency at the primary detectors was similar to that of PIT-tagged smolts and travel time within the bypass system showed that lamprey can hold in the bypass system for prolonged periods.

  13. Development of a Time-tagged Neutron Source for SNM Detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Wallig, Joe; Waldron, Will; Tinsley, Jim

    2015-06-18

    Associated particle imaging (API) is a powerful technique for special nuclear material (SNM) detection and characterization of fissile material configurations. A sealed-tube neutron generator has been under development by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to reduce the beam spot size on the neutron production target to 1 mm in diameter for a several-fold increase in directional resolution and simultaneously increases the maximum attainable neutron flux. A permanent magnet 2.45 GHz microwave-driven ion source has been adopted in this time-tagged neutron source. This type of ion source provides a high plasma density that allows the use of a sub-millimeter aperture for themore » extraction of a sufficient ion beam current and lets us achieve a much reduced beam spot size on target without employing active focusing. The design of this API generator uses a custom-made radial high voltage insulator to minimize source to neutron production target distance and to provide for a simple ion source cooling arrangement. Preliminary experimental results showed that more than 100 µA of deuterium ions have been extracted, and the beam diameter on the neutron production target is around 1 mm.« less

  14. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Hu; Zhou, Wenhao; Wei, Liming; Zhong, Fan; Yang, Yi

    2010-01-08

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  15. Validation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Small Proteins by AMT Tag-based Proteome Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romine, Margaret F.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Fang, Ruihua; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-09-01

    Using stringent criteria for protein identification by accurate mass and time (AMT) tag mass spectrometric methodology, we detected 36 proteins <101 amino acids in length, including 10 that were annotated as hypothetical proteins, in 172 global tryptic digests of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 proteins analyzed. Peptides that map to the conserved, but functionally uncharacterized proteins SO4134 and SO2787, were the most frequently detected small proteins in these samples, while hypotheticals SO2669 and SO2063, conserved hypotheticals SO0335 and SO2176, and the SlyX protein (SO1063) were observed at frequencies similar to small expected abundant ribosomal proteins and translation initiation factor IF-1 and consequently, likely to encode important cellular functions. In addition, 30 proteins including three of the small proteins that map to genes predicted to encode frameshifts, point mutations, or recoding signals were detected. Of these 30 genes, peptides that map to positions beyond internal stop codons were detected in 13 genes (SO0101, SO0419, SO0590, SO0738, SO1113, SO1211, SO3079, SO3130, SO3240, SO4231, SO4328, SO4422, and SO4657). While expression of the full-length formate dehydrogenase encoded by SO0101 can be explained by incorporation of selenocysteine at the internal stop codon, the mechanism of translating downstream sequences in the remaining genes remains unknown.

  16. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  17. Chemical tagging of chlorinated phenols for their facile detection and analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdez, Carlos A.; Leif, Roald N.

    2015-03-22

    A derivatization method that employs diethyl (bromodifluoromethyl) phosphonate (DBDFP) to efficiently tag the endocrine disruptor pentachlorophenol (PCP) and other chlorinated phenols (CPs) along with their reliable detection and analysis by NMR is presented. The method accomplishes the efficient alkylation of the hydroxyl group in CPs with the difluoromethyl (CF2H) moiety in extremely rapid fashion (5 min), at room temperature and in an environmentally benign manner. The approach proved successful in difluoromethylating a panel of 18 chlorinated phenols, yielding derivatives that displayed unique 1H, 19F NMR spectra allowing for the clear discrimination between isomerically related CPs. Due to its biphasic nature, the derivatization can be applied to both aqueous and organic mixtures where the analysis of CPs is required. Furthermore, the methodology demonstrates that PCP along with other CPs can be selectively derivatized in the presence of other various aliphatic alcohols, underscoring the superiority of the approach over other general derivatization methods that indiscriminately modify all analytes in a given sample. The present work demonstrates the first application of NMR on the qualitative analysis of these highly toxic and environmentally persistent species.

  18. Lateral diffusion contributes to FRET from lanthanide-tagged membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Tien-Hung; Wu, Guangyu; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2015-08-14

    Diffusion can enhance Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) when donors or acceptors diffuse distances that are similar to the distances separating them during the donor's excited state lifetime. Lanthanide donors remain in the excited state for milliseconds, which makes them useful for time-resolved FRET applications but also allows time for diffusion to enhance energy transfer. Here we show that diffusion dramatically enhances FRET between membrane proteins labeled with lanthanide donors. This phenomenon complicates interpretation of experiments that use long-lived donors to infer association or proximity of mobile membrane proteins, but also offers a method of monitoring diffusion in membrane domains in real time in living cells. - Highlights: • Diffusion enhances TR-FRET from membrane proteins labeled with lanthanide donors. • Diffusion-dependent FRET can overshadow FRET due to oligomerization or clustering. • FRET studies using lanthanide-tagged membrane proteins should consider diffusion. • FRET from lanthanide donors can be used to monitor membrane protein diffusion.

  19. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  20. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; Kirton, Edward S.; He, Shaomei; Woyke, Tanja; Lee, Janey; Chen, Feng; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as wellmore » as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.« less

  1. Development of a Time-tagged Neutron Source for SNM Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Wallig, Joe; Waldron, Will; Tinsley, Jim

    2015-06-18

    Associated particle imaging (API) is a powerful technique for special nuclear material (SNM) detection and characterization of fissile material configurations. A sealed-tube neutron generator has been under development by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to reduce the beam spot size on the neutron production target to 1 mm in diameter for a several-fold increase in directional resolution and simultaneously increases the maximum attainable neutron flux. A permanent magnet 2.45 GHz microwave-driven ion source has been adopted in this time-tagged neutron source. This type of ion source provides a high plasma density that allows the use of a sub-millimeter aperture for the extraction of a sufficient ion beam current and lets us achieve a much reduced beam spot size on target without employing active focusing. The design of this API generator uses a custom-made radial high voltage insulator to minimize source to neutron production target distance and to provide for a simple ion source cooling arrangement. Preliminary experimental results showed that more than 100 µA of deuterium ions have been extracted, and the beam diameter on the neutron production target is around 1 mm.

  2. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  3. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of PIT-Tagged Spring/Summer Chinook and Summer Steelhead : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comparative Survival Study Oversight Committee and Fish Passage Center

    2008-12-02

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS; BPA Project 199602000) began in 1996 with the objective of establishing a long term dataset of the survival rate of annual generations of salmon from their outmigration as smolts to their return to freshwater as adults to spawn (smolt-to-adult return rate; SAR). The study was implemented with the express need to address the question whether collecting juvenile fish at dams and transporting them downstream in barges and trucks and releasing them downstream of Bonneville Dam was compensating for the effect of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on survival of Snake Basin spring/summer Chinook salmon migrating through the hydrosystem. The Completion of this annual report for the CSS signifies the 12th outmigration year of hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon marked with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags as part of the CSS and the 9th complete brood year return as adults of those PIT-tagged fish (report covers adult returns from 1997-2006 hatchery Chinook juvenile migrations). In addition, the CSS has provided PIT-tags to on-going tagging operations for wild Chinook since 2002 (report covers adult returns from 1994-2006 wild Chinook juvenile migrations). The CSS tags wild steelhead on the lower Clearwater River and utilized wild and hatchery steelhead from other tagging operations in evaluations of transportation (report covers adult returns from 1997-2005 wild and hatchery steelhead migrations). The primary purpose of this report is to update the time series of smolt-to-adult survival rate data and related parameters with additional years of data since the completion of the CSS 10-yr retrospective analysis report (Schaller et al 2007). The 10-yr report provided a synthesis of the results from this ongoing study, the analytical approaches employed, and the evolving improvements incorporated into the study as reported in CSS annual progress reports. This current report specifically addresses the constructive

  4. Help:External SPARQL integration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Integrating with Reegle logo.png OpenEI is engaged in an ongoing linked open data collaboration with Reegle1. This page serves to document a few of the...

  5. Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a “hands-on” assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

  6. Dynamic MRI of Grid-Tagged Hyperpolarized Helium-3 for the Assessment of Lung Motion During Breathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M.; Mugler, John P.; Lange, Eduard E. de; Cates, Gordon D.; Miller, G. Wilson

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tagging technique using hyperpolarized helium-3 (HP He-3) to track lung motion. Methods and Materials: An accelerated non-Cartesian k-space trajectory was used to gain acquisition speed, at the cost of introducing image artifacts, providing a viable strategy for obtaining whole-lung coverage with adequate temporal resolution. Multiple-slice two-dimensional dynamic images of the lung were obtained in three healthy subjects after inhaling He-3 gas polarized to 35%-40%. Displacement, strain, and ventilation maps were computed from the observed motion of the grid peaks. Results: Both temporal and spatial variations of pulmonary mechanics were observed in normal subjects, including shear motion between different lobes of the same lung. Conclusion: These initial results suggest that dynamic imaging of grid-tagged hyperpolarized magnetization may potentially be a powerful tool for observing and quantifying pulmonary biomechanics on a regional basis and for assessing, validating, and improving lung deformable image registration algorithms.

  7. Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

    2011-09-01

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

  8. Method to produce acetyldiacylglycerols (ac-TAGs) by expression of an acetyltransferase gene isolated from Euonymus alatus (burning bush)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durrett, Timothy; Ohlrogge, John; Pollard, Michael

    2016-05-03

    The present invention relates to novel diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes and proteins, and methods of their use. In particular, the invention describes genes encoding proteins having diacylglycerol acetyltransferase activity, specifically for transferring an acetyl group to a diacylglycerol substrate to form acetyl-Triacylglycerols (ac-TAGS), for example, a 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the transferase, as well as mutants and variant forms. The present invention also relates to methods of using novel diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes and proteins, including their expression in transgenic organisms at commercially viable levels, for increasing production of 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols in plant oils and altering the composition of oils produced by microorganisms, such as yeast, by increasing ac-TAG production. Additionally, oils produced by methods of the present inventions comprising genes and proteins are contemplated for use as biodiesel fuel, in polymer production and as naturally produced food oils with reduced calories.

  9. First observation of dijet events with an antiproton tag at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV using the D0 Forward Proton Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strang, Michael Allen

    2005-07-01

    The Forward Proton Detector (FPD) is a new sub-system of the D0 detector, a 5000 ton particle physics detector located at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The FPD was implemented for the Tevatron Run II and gives access to a wide range of diffractive scattering processes, where one or both of the beam particles remain intact. The analysis described in this thesis makes use of the dipole spectrometer of the FPD to tag outgoing antiprotons in events that have a dijet signature in the central D0 calorimeter. Properties of jets with a diffractive tag signature are compared to jets without such a signature yielding the first observation of tagged diffractive dijets at a 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  10. Development of an instrument for non-destructive identification of Unexploded Ordnance using tagged neutrons - a proof of concept study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitra, S.; Dioszegi, I.

    2011-10-23

    Range clearance operations at munitions testing grounds must discriminate Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) from clutter items and distinguish UXO filled with High Explosives (HE) from those with inert fillers. Non-destructive technologies are thus necessary for the cost-effective disposal of UXO during remediation of such sites. The only technique showing promise so far for the non-destructive elemental characterization of UXO fillers utilizes neutron interactions with the material to detect carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) which have unique ratios in HE. However, several unresolved issues hinder the wide application of this potentially very suitable technique. The most important one is that neutrons interact with all surrounding matter in addition to the interrogated material, leading to a very high gamma-ray background in the detector. Systems requiring bulky shielding and having poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for measuring elements are unsuitable for field deployment. The inadequacies of conventional neutron interrogation methods are overcome by using the tagged-neutron approach, and the availability of compact sealed neutron generators exploiting this technique offers field deployment of non-intrusive measurement systems for detecting threat materials, like explosives and drugs. By accelerating deuterium ions into a tritium target, the subsequent fusion reaction generates nearly back-to-back emissions of neutrons and alpha particles of energy 14.1 and 3.5 MeV respectively. A position-sensitive detector recognizes the associated alpha particle, thus furnishing the direction of the neutron. The tagged neutrons interact with the nuclei of the interrogated object, producing element-specific prompt gamma-rays that the gamma detectors recognize. Measuring the delay between the detections of the alpha particle and the gamma-ray determines where the reaction occurred along the axis of the neutron beam (14.1 MeV neutrons travel at 5 cm/nanosecond, while gamma rays

  11. Pair-Trawl Detection of PIT-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids Migrating in the Columbia River Estuary, 2008 Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magie, Robert J.; Morris, Matthew S.; Ledgerwood, Richard D.

    2009-06-03

    In 2008, we sampled migrating juvenile Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags using a surface pair trawl in the upper Columbia River estuary (rkm 61-83). The cod-end of the trawl was replaced with a cylindrical PIT-tag detection antenna with an 86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening and two detection coils connected in series. The pair trawl was 105 m long with a 91.5-m opening between the wings and a sample depth of 4.9 m. Also during 2008, we finalized the development of a prototype 'matrix' antenna, which was larger than previous antennas by a considerable magnitude. The matrix antenna consisted of 6 coils: a 3-coil front component and a 3-coil rear component, which were separated by 1.5-m of net mesh. The fish-passage opening was 2.5 m wide by 3.0 m tall and was attached to a standard-size pair trawl net. Intermittent sampling with a single crew began on 7 March and targeted yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. Daily sampling using two crews began on 30 April and continued through 14 June; during this period we detected 2.7% of all juvenile salmonids previously detected at Bonneville Dam--a measure of sample efficiency. Sampling with a single crew continued through 20 August and targeted subyearling Chinook salmon. We detected 7,397 yearling Chinook salmon, 2,735 subyearling Chinook salmon, 291 coho salmon O. kisutch, 5,950 steelhead, and 122 sockeye salmon O. nerka in the upper estuary. We deployed the matrix antenna system and the older, cylindrical antenna system (86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening) simultaneously in mid-May 2008 to test matrix detection efficiency. The cylindrical antenna system had been used successfully in 2007 and early 2008. Because distribution of migrating salmonids in the estuary changes rapidly, we felt that a tandem sampling effort between the two systems was the only way to truly evaluate comparative detection efficiency. We deployed both systems within 1

  12. Exchange of Type II Dockerin-Containing Subunits of the C. thermocellum Cellulosome as Revealed by SNAP-tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waller, Benjamin; Olson, Daniel G.; Currie, Devin; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium which efficiently hydrolyzes and metabolizes cellulose to ethanol through the action of its cellulosome, a multiprotein enzymatic complex. A fluorescent protein probe, consisting of a type II dockerin module fused to a SNAP-tag, was developed in order to gain insight into the quaternary configuration of the cellulosome and to investigate the effect of deleting cipA, the protein scaffold on which the cellulosome is built. Fluorescence microscopy suggested that the probe had localized to polycellulosomal protuberances on the cell surface. Surprisingly, fluorescence intensity did not substantially change in the cipA deletion mutants. Sequential labeling experiments suggested that this was a result of bound type II dockerins from CipA being replaced by unbound type II dockerins from the fluorophore-SNAP-XDocII probe. This mechanism of dockerin exchange could represent an efficient means for modifying cellulosome composition.

  13. Optically resonant subwavelength films for tamper-indicating tags and seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2015-05-23

    We present the design, modeling and performance of a proof-of-concept tamper indicating approach that exploits newly-developed subwavelength-patterned films. These films have a nanostructure-dependent resonant optical reflection that is wavelength, angle, and polarization dependent. As such, they can be tailored to fabricate overlay transparent films for tamper indication and authentication of sensitive or controlled materials not possible with currently-known technologies. An additional advantage is that the unique optical signature is dictated by the geometry and fabrication process of the nanostructures in the film, rather than on the material used. The essential structure unit in the subwavelength resonant coating is a nanoscale Open-Ring Resonator (ORR). This building block is fabricated by coating a dielectric nanoscale template with metal to form a hemispherical shell-like structure. This curved metallic shell structure has a cross-section with an intrinsic capacitance and inductance and is thus the optical equivalent to the well-known “LC” circuit where the capacitance and inductance are determined by the nanoshell dimensions. For structures with sub 100 nm scale, this resonance occurs in the visible electromagnetic spectrum, and in the IR for larger shells. Tampering of the film would be visible though misalignment of the angular dependence of the features in the film. It is additionally possible to add in intrinsic oxidation and strain sensitive matrix materials to further complicate tamper repair and counterfeiting. Cursory standoff readout would be relatively simple using a combination of a near-infrared (or visible) LED flashlight and polarizer or passively using room lighting illumination and a dispersive detector.

  14. Measurement of WZ and ZZ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8\\,\\text {TeV} $$ in final states with b-tagged jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-07

    Measurements are reported of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV in final states where one Z boson decays to b-tagged jets. The other gauge boson, either W or Z, is detected through its leptonic decay (either $$W \\to e\

  15. An introduction to the practical and ethical perspectives on the need to advance and standardize the intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.; Murchie, Karen J.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags (including radio and acoustic telemetry transmitters, passive integrated transponders and archival biologgers) is frequently used for conducting studies on fish. Electronic tagging studies provide information on the spatial ecology, behavior and survival of fish in marine and freshwater systems. However, any surgical procedure, particularly one where a laparotomy is performed and the coelomic cavity is opened, has the potential to alter the survival, behavior or condition of the animal which can impair welfare and introduce bias. Given that management, regulatory and conservation decisions are based on the assumption that fish implanted with electronic tags have similar fates and behavior relative to untagged conspecifics, it is critical to ensure that best surgical practices are being used. Also, the current lack of standardized surgical procedures and reporting of specific methodological details precludes cross-study and cross-year analyses which would further progress the field of fisheries science. This compilation of papers seeks to identify the best practices for the entire intracoelomic tagging procedure including pre- and post-operative care, anesthesia, wound closure, and use of antibiotics. Although there is a particular focus on salmonid smolts given the large body of literature available on that group, other life-stages and species of fish are discussed where there is sufficient knowledge. Additional papers explore the role of the veterinarian in fish surgeries, the need for minimal standards in the training of fish surgeons, providing a call for more complete and transparent procedures, and identifying trends in procedures and research needs. Collectively, this body of knowledge should help to improve data quality (including comparability and repeatability), enhance management and conservation strategies, and maintain the welfare status of tagged fish.

  16. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using the Invariant Mass of Lepton Pairs in Soft Muon b-tagged Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of t{bar t} {yields} {ell}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}q{bar q} events (where {ell} = e, {mu}) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons (soft muon b-tagging). The p{bar p} collision data used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2 fb{sup -1} and was collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is based on a novel technique exploiting the invariant mass of a subset of the decay particles, specifically the lepton from the W boson of the t {yields} Wb decay, and the muon from a semileptonic b decay. We fit template histograms, derived from simulation of t{bar t} events and a modeling of the background, to the mass distribution observed in the data and measure a top quark mass of 180.5 {+-} 12.0(stat.) {+-} 3.6(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, consistent with the current world average.

  17. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protective thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.

  18. Application of ISO-TAG4 to the reporting of limit of error on the inventory difference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdock, C.; Suda, S.

    1993-07-01

    A standard reference does not exist for evaluating and expressing systematic and random uncertainty, thus, there is no basis for comparing measurement uncertainties at different facilities. Based on recommendations of the International Committee for Weights and Measures, the National Center for Standards and Certification Information, which is responsible for information on standardization programs and related activities, has published ISO-TAG4, Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (1993). The guide establishes general rules for evaluating and expressing uncertainty in physical measurements by presenting definitions, basic concepts and examples. it focuses on the methods of evaluating uncertainty components rather than categorizing the components, thus avoiding the ambiguity encountered when categorizing uncertainty components as ``random`` and ``systematic.`` This paper presents an overview of the terms specific to the guide, including standard and combined standard uncertainty, Type A and Type B evaluation, expanded uncertainty, and coverage factor. It illustrates Type A and Type B evaluation of random and systematic errors in forms relating to nuclear material accountability work. This guide could be adapted by the MC&A community.

  19. Measurement of the ttbar Production Cross Section in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV using Soft Electron b-Tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel, consisting of e{nu}+jets and {mu}{nu}+jets final states. The dominant background is the production of W bosons in association with multiple jets. To suppress this background, we identify electrons from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor jets ('soft electron tags'). From a sample of 2196 candidate events, we obtain 120 tagged events with a background expectation of 51 {+-} 3 events, corresponding to a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.8 {+-} 2.4 (stat) {+-} 1.6 (syst) {+-} 0.5 (lumi) pb. We assume a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of the t{bar t} cross section with soft electron tags in Run II of the Tevatron.

  20. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The resultsmore » are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.« less

  1. 18 Sco: A solar twin rich in refractory and neutron-capture elements. Implications for chemical tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meléndez, Jorge; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabrício C.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob; Bergemann, Maria; Do Nascimento, José-Dias Jr.; Castro, Matthieu; Bazot, Michael; Alves-Brito, Alan

    2014-08-10

    We study with unprecedented detail the chemical composition and stellar parameters of the solar twin 18 Sco in a strictly differential sense relative to the Sun. Our study is mainly based on high-resolution (R ∼ 110,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (800-1,000) Very Large Telescope UVES spectra, which allow us to achieve a precision of about 0.005 dex in differential abundances. The effective temperature and surface gravity of 18 Sco are T{sub eff} = 5823 ± 6 K and log g = 4.45 ± 0.02 dex, i.e., 18 Sco is 46 ± 6 K hotter than the Sun and log g is 0.01 ± 0.02 dex higher. Its metallicity is [Fe/H] = 0.054 ± 0.005 dex, and its microturbulence velocity is +0.02 ± 0.01 km s{sup –1} higher than solar. Our precise stellar parameters and differential isochrone analysis show that 18 Sco has a mass of 1.04 ± 0.02 M{sub ☉} and that it is ∼1.6 Gyr younger than the Sun. We use precise High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) radial velocities to search for planets, but none are detected. The chemical abundance pattern of 18 Sco displays a clear trend with condensation temperature, thus showing higher abundances of refractories in 18 Sco than in the Sun. Intriguingly, there are enhancements in the neutron-capture elements relative to the Sun. Despite the small element-to-element abundance differences among nearby n-capture elements (∼0.02 dex), we successfully reproduce the r-process pattern in the Solar System. This is independent evidence for the universality of the r process. Our results have important implications for chemical tagging in our Galaxy and nucleosynthesis in general.

  2. Tag: Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all en K is for Kennedy http:www.y12.doe.govemployees-retireesk-kennedy-0

  3. Tag: technology transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17all en CNS, UT chemical sensing technology wins R&D 100 Award http:www.y12.doe.govnewspress-releasescns-ut-chemical-sensing-technology-wins-rd-100-award

  4. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  5. Tag: fire protection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    essee-new-graduate-level-engineering-program

  6. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  7. Overview of the Performance of PIT-Tag Interrogation Systems for Adult Salmonids at Bonneville and McNary Dams, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.

    2003-06-01

    During winter 2001, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) installed a prototype orifice-based PIT-tag interrogation system into the Washington Shore Ladder at Bonneville Dam (BWSL). Detectors were installed into 12 weirs: 4 downstream (Weirs 334-337) and 8 upstream (Weirs 352-359) from the fish release point (i.e., the exit ladder for the Adult Fish Facility). NOAA Fisheries (National Marine Fisheries Service--NMFS) tagged and released salmonids during 2001 to determine tag-reading efficiencies for different salmonid populations. Data analyses focused on the upper eight weirs. The 2001 tagging results for spring chinook salmon indicated that having detectors in four consecutive weirs would have been sufficient to yield a reading efficiency of 95%. The BWSL orifice-based system performed well until the coho and fall chinook salmon migrations began. Coho and fall chinook salmon appeared to use the weir overflows, and thus avoid detection, at much higher rates than biologists expected. During 2001, technology advances led to the development of significantly larger antennas than had been available earlier, and thus it was possible to build antennas of approximately 2 x 6 ft. Consequently, it became feasible to design interrogation systems for ladder locations where all fish would have to go through the antennas and thus could not avoid detection by using the weir overflows (Fig. 1). Destron Technologies by Digital Angel designed a prototype interrogation system with two antennas that was installed into the counting-window area in the Oregon Ladder at McNary Dam, where its performance could then be directly compared to that of the orifice-based system in the same ladder. Although the orifice-based systems appeared less effective than the fisheries community wanted for fall chinook and coho salmon, the decision was made to proceed with installations planned for Bonneville and McNary Dams because valuable data would still be

  8. Statistical Survival Analysis of Fish and Wildlife Tagging Studies; SURPH.1 Manual - Analysis of Release-Recapture Data for Survival Studies, 1994 Technical Manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, John R.; Schelechte, J. Warren

    1994-12-01

    Program SURPH is the culmination of several years of research to develop a comprehensive computer program to analyze survival studies of fish and wildlife populations. Development of this software was motivated by the advent of the PIT-tag (Passive Integrated Transponder) technology that permits the detection of salmonid smolt as they pass through hydroelectric facilities on the Snake and Columbia Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Repeated detections of individually tagged smolt and analysis of their capture-histories permits estimates of downriver survival probabilities. Eventual installation of detection facilities at adult fish ladders will also permit estimation of ocean survival and upstream survival of returning salmon using the statistical methods incorporated in SURPH.1. However, the utility of SURPH.1 far exceeds solely the analysis of salmonid tagging studies. Release-recapture and radiotelemetry studies from a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic species have been analyzed using SURPH.1 to estimate discrete time survival probabilities and investigate survival relationships. The interactive computing environment of SURPH.1 was specifically developed to allow researchers to investigate the relationship between survival and capture processes and environmental, experimental and individual-based covariates. Program SURPH.1 represents a significant advancement in the ability of ecologists to investigate the interplay between morphologic, genetic, environmental and anthropogenic factors on the survival of wild species. It is hoped that this better understanding of risk factors affecting survival will lead to greater appreciation of the intricacies of nature and to improvements in the management of wild resources. This technical report is an introduction to SURPH.1 and provides a user guide for both the UNIX and MS-Windows{reg_sign} applications of the SURPH software.

  9. Demonstration of the BNL Continuous Dual Trap Analyzer to Detect Perfluorocarbon Tracers for the Tag, Track and Location Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.H.; Adams, J.; Dietz, R..; Milian, L.; Watson, T.

    2008-10-07

    The Tag, Track and Location System (TTL) Program is investigating methods of tracking an asset using perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT). The success of any TTL method requires sound detection/location instrumentation. Tracer Detection Technologies Corp (TDT), through a contract with the Office of Naval Research (ONR), is investigating different detection systems. The detections systems generally fall into two categories; proximity detectors and standoff detectors. Proximity detectors, as the name implies, need to be in close proximity (e.g., meter to 10's of meters) to the PFT source. Standoff detection searches for the PFT from a greater distance away from the source (e.g., 100's of meters to kilometers). Gas Chromatographs (GC) are generally considered a proximity detection systems, but in the case of PFTs should be considered for both proximity and standoff detection with the caveat that in standoff use the GC needs to be somewhere in the PFT plume, i.e., generally downwind of the source. With a properly sized PFT source, the right GC can afford fairly large standoff (distance from the source) distances; 100's of meters to kilometers downwind. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has such a GC system and offered to demonstrate the CDTA for TTL as a no cost addition to the TDTTTL project, of which BNL was a participant. BNL is a leading authority on the sampling, collection, release and detection of PFTs. In addition, the BNL team has extensive background in atmospheric dispersion, the application of PFTs to such studies and the development of applications utilizing PFTs such as building infiltration measurements, control room integrity determination, leak location and environmental investigations. This experience and expertise is essential in developing any PFT application were dispersion, dilution and overcoming environmental conditions and interferences are integral to success. BNL has developed sophisticated gas chromatography methods and instruments that allow

  10. STRUCtural Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    STRUC-ANL is a derivative of the FLUSTR-ANL finite element code. It contains only the structural capabilities of the original fluid-structural FLUSTR code.

  11. Structural Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in ...

  12. TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE COS TIME-TAG CAPABILITY: OBSERVATIONS OF PULSATING HOT DQ WHITE DWARFS AND DISCOVERY OF A NEW ONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufour, P.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Beland, S. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Chayer, P., E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: sbeland@colorado.edu, E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    We present an analysis of the ultraviolet light curves of five Hot DQ white dwarfs recently observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These light curves were constructed by extracting the time-tag information from the FUV and NUV spectroscopic data. Single-color light curves were thus produced in 60 s time bins. The Fourier analysis of these data successfully recovers the main pulsation modes of the three stars previously known to be variable from ground-based observations. We also report the discovery of pulsations in another object, SDSS J1153+0056, making it only the fifth member of the new class of variable Hot DQ stars and the first pulsating white dwarf to be discovered from space-based observations. The relatively high amplitudes of the modes observed in the FUV (2-4 times that observed in the optical) as well as the high fraction of stars variable in our sample suggest that most, if not all, Hot DQ white dwarfs might be pulsating at some level when observed at high enough sensitivity. Our results also underline the vast potential of the time-tag capability of the HST/COS combination.

  13. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R.

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT

  14. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile

  15. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison H.A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao

    2014-12-15

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile

  16. Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formation properties versus depth in a borehole. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Well logging, also known as wireline logging, is a method of data collection in the...

  17. Data Acquisition-Manipulation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    signals and numeric values that can be stored and manipulated in a useful manner by a computer program. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Data acquisition and...

  18. OpenEI International Sponsors and Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with OpenEI. Below is a list of OpenEI sponsor organizations, partnerships and notable data consumers. Sponsors Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Reegle...

  19. Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Exploration drilling is an...

  20. Geysers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a column of hot water and steam into the air. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles...

  1. Hot Spot | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot...

  2. Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles...

  3. Leach Capping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    silica Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Relict Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Silica Deposition Carbonate...

  4. Non-Tectonic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot...

  5. Silicification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    surface Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Relict Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Silica Deposition Carbonate...

  6. Template:Definition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and spins the blades of a turbine, which, when connected to a generator, generates electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle List of existing terms:...

  7. Flat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Flat Dictionary.png Flat: A relatively smooth landscape with no topographic relief Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features...

  8. Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioenergy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bioenergy: Energy produced from organic materials from plants or animals. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle 1 This article...

  9. Training and Learning Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    homeowners and small businesses. Educational resources for students on wind, solar, hydrogen, geothermal and biomass energy are also featured. Reegle Search Engine for...

  10. Hot Springs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of hot water, heated by geothermal processes in the subsurface, and typically having a temperature greater than 37C. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal...

  11. Belarus: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    photovoltaic modules) Reegle logo.png Policy and Regulatory Overview 3 Expression error: Unexpected > operator. SWERA logo.png SWERA View the Solar and Wind Energy Resource...

  12. Democratic Republic of Congo: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D Reegle Clean Energy Datasets The Democratic Republic of the Congo is a country in Africa. External Links Democratic Republic of Congo Renewable Energy Data from IEA...

  13. Burkina Faso: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World Factbook, Appendix D Reegle Clean Energy Datasets Burkina Faso is a country in Africa. External Links Burkina Faso Renewable Energy Data from IEA Burkina Faso Contacts...

  14. Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Mercury is a natural byproduct of mantle or deep-crustal derived fluids, high concentrations can be...

  15. Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    intersections between the overlapping fault strands results in increased fracture density that enhances hydrothermal fluid flow. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling...

  16. Measurement of the t anti-t Production Cross Section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using Lepton + Jets Events with Jet Probability b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. A b-tagging algorithm based on the probability of displaced tracks coming from the event interaction vertex is applied to identify b quarks from top decay. Using 318 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector, they measure the t{bar t} production cross section in events with at least one restrictive (tight) b-tagged jet and obtain 8.9{sub -1.0}{sup +1.0}(stat.){sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(syst.) pb. The cross section value assumes a top quark mass of m{sub t} is presented in the paper. This result is consistent with other CDF measurements of the t{bar t} cross section using different samples and analysis techniques, and has similar systematic uncertainties. They have also performed consistency checks by using the b-tagging probability function to vary the signal to background ratio and also using events that have at least two b-tagged jets.

  17. Structural Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Materials Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in extreme environments (high-temperature, high-stress, erosive, and corrosive environments, including the performance of materials in contact with molten slags and salts). Research includes materials design and discovery, materials processing and manufacturing, and service-life prediction of materials

  18. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick; Petrosky, Charlie; Schaller, Howard

    2002-02-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to

  19. Using an Explicit Emission Tagging Method in Global Modeling of Source-Receptor Relationships for Black Carbon in the Arctic: Variations, Sources and Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-27

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions makes it straightforward to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways, providing a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to produce a detailed characterization of the destiny of regional BC emissions and the potential for mitigation actions. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Distant sources contribute to BC in remote regions mostly in the mid- and upper troposphere, having much less impact on lower-level concentrations (and deposition) than on burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic burden. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for major non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source-dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions. The

  20. Organizational Structure | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizational Structure Organizational Structure

  1. Text and Structural Data Mining of Influenza Mentions in Web and Social Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Cook, Diane; Mikler, Armin R.; Singh, Karan P.

    2010-02-22

    Text and structural data mining of Web and social media (WSM) provides a novel disease surveillance resource and can identify online communities for targeted public health communications (PHC) to assure wide dissemination of pertinent information. WSM that mention influenza are harvested over a 24-week period, 5-October-2008 to 21-March-2009. Link analysis reveals communities for targeted PHC. Text mining is shown to identify trends in flu posts that correlate to real-world influenza-like-illness patient report data. We also bring to bear a graph-based data mining technique to detect anomalies among flu blogs connected by publisher type, links, and user-tags.

  2. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  3. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Lukyanov, Sergey; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  4. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  5. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jetmore » from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.« less

  6. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2008-12-30

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  7. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  8. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group IIVI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  9. Terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frank; Allais, Arnaud; Mirebeau, Pierre; Ganhungu, Francois; Lallouet, Nicolas

    2009-10-20

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  10. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  11. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  12. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-01

    Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV05/08/2014A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  13. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Yun; Doherty, Sarah J.; Dang, Cheng; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fu, Qiang

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA and West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.

  14. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore » West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  15. Search for the Higgs boson in the ZH->nunubb channel: Development of a b-tagging method based on soft muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamin, David; ,

    2010-10-01

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson generates elementary particle masses. Current theoretical and experimental constraints lead to a Higgs boson mass between 114.4 and 158 GeV with 95% confidence level. Moreover, Tevatron has recently excluded the mass ranges between 100 and 109 GeV, 158 and 175 GeV with 95% confidence level. These results gives a clear indication to search for a Higgs boson at low mass. The D0 detector is located near Chicago, at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider with an energy in the center of mass of 1.96 TeV. The topic of this thesis is the search for a Higgs boson in association with a Z boson. This channel is sensitive to low mass Higgs boson (<135 GeV) which has a branching ratio H {yields} bb varies between 50% and 90% in this mass range. The decay channel ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} studied has in the final state 2 heavy-flavor jets and some missing transverse energy due to escaping neutrinos. The heavy-flavor jets identification ('b-tagging') is done with a new algorithm (SLTNN) developped specifically for semi-leptonic decay of b quarks. The Higgs boson search analysis was performed with 3 fb{sup -1} of data. The use of SLTNN increases by 10% the Higgs boson signal efficiency. The global analysis sensitivity improvement, however, is rather low (<1%) after taking into account the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties.

  16. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore » Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  17. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D

  18. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

    1998-01-01

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  19. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  20. Armor structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung [Idaho Falls, ID; Lacy, Jeffrey M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-04-01

    An armor structure includes first and second layers individually containing a plurality of i-beams. Individual i-beams have a pair of longitudinal flanges interconnected by a longitudinal crosspiece and defining opposing longitudinal channels between the pair of flanges. The i-beams within individual of the first and second layers run parallel. The laterally outermost faces of the flanges of adjacent i-beams face one another. One of the longitudinal channels in each of the first and second layers faces one of the longitudinal channels in the other of the first and second layers. The channels of the first layer run parallel with the channels of the second layer. The flanges of the first and second layers overlap with the crosspieces of the other of the first and second layers, and portions of said flanges are received within the facing channels of the i-beams of the other of the first and second layers.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, resistivity, and electronic structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthesis, crystal structure, resistivity, and electronic structure of the U(V) quaternary ... and electronic structure of the U(V) quaternary polyselenide Ba8PdU2Se12(Se2)2 ...

  2. Stormwater Control Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. ...

  3. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health Monitoring is the process of implementing a damage detection strategy for...

  4. Application of the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach to the Proteome Analysis of Sub-cellular Fractions Obtained from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 Aerobic and Photosynthetic Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callister, Stephen J.; Dominguez, Migual; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Tavano, Christine; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-08-04

    Abstract The high-throughput accurate mass and time tag (AMT) proteomic approach was utilized to characterize the proteomes for cytoplasm, cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane fractions from aerobic and photosynthetic cultures of the gram-nagtive bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. In addition, we analyzed the proteins within purified chromatophore fractions that house the photosynthetic apparatus from photosynthetically grown cells. In total, 8300 peptides were identified with high confidence from at least one sub-cellular fraction from either cell culture. These peptides were derived from 1514 genes or 35% percent of proteins predicted to be encoded by the genome. A significant number of these proteins were detected within a single sub-cellular fraction and their localization was compared to in-silico predictions. However, the majority of proteins were observed in multiple sub-cellular fractions, and the most likely sub-cellular localization for these proteins was investigated using a Z-score analysis of peptide abundance along with clustering techniques. Good (81%) agreement was observed between the experimental results and in-silico predictions. The AMT tag approach provides localization evidence for those proteins that have no predicted localization information, those annotated as putative proteins, and/or for those proteins annotated as hypothetical and conserved hypothetical.

  5. Magnetic multilayer structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

    2016-07-05

    A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

  6. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  7. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0?J/ ?? in 8 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?sJ/??, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb? accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163+0.065?0.064 ps? and ?sJ/??=?0.55+0.38?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  8. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  9. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  10. A Measurement of the production cross section of top-antitop pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass of 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb is measured.

  11. Variably porous structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul V.; Yu, Xindi

    2011-01-18

    A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

  12. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops & Summer Schools Summer Students Structural Molecular Biology Illuminating ... major experimental driver for structural biology research, serving the needs of a large ...

  13. Quark-hadron duality in the free neutron F2 structure function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niculescu, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) experiment BONuS used a novel spectator-tagging technique to measure the inclusive electron-free neutron scattering cross section and extract the F2 structure function. This data was used to reconstruct moments of F2 in the three prominent resonance region and the moments integrated over the entire resonance region. Comparisons of the experimental results with moments obtained from global parton distribution function parametrization seem to suggest that the quark-hadron duality hypothesis holds locally for the neutron in the second and third resonance regions down to Q2 of 1 GeV2; with up to 20% violations observed in the first resonance region.

  14. coherent-structures-html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Role of Coherent Structures in Scour Process Around Bridge Piers and Abutments

  15. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D

  16. OpenEI Community - power user

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    helpful information for OpenEI wiki authors

    Enabling developers to use energy web services on OpenEI, REEGLE.info, Data.gov and across the web. We help developers...

  17. author | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data, and helpful information for OpenEI wiki authors Enabling developers to use energy web services on OpenEI, REEGLE.info, Data.gov and across the web. We help developers find...

  18. power user | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data, and helpful information for OpenEI wiki authors Enabling developers to use energy web services on OpenEI, REEGLE.info, Data.gov and across the web. We help developers find...

  19. Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    heating andor cooling system that takes advantage of the relatively constant year-round ground temperature to pump heat to or from the ground. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle...

  20. OpenEI Community - wiki

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    helpful information for OpenEI wiki authors

    Enabling developers to use energy web services on OpenEI, REEGLE.info, Data.gov and across the web. We help developers...

  1. wiki | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data, and helpful information for OpenEI wiki authors Enabling developers to use energy web services on OpenEI, REEGLE.info, Data.gov and across the web. We help developers find...

  2. Mali: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CIA World Factbook, Appendix D Reegle Clean Energy Datasets Mali is a country in Africa. External Links Mali Renewable Energy Data from IEA Mali Contacts from Climate-Eval...

  3. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  4. Civil Engineer (Structural)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in Structural Design (TELD). The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a senior engineer responsible for loading, design, and analysis of all structures on BPA's...

  5. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae; Angel, Marian; Bement, Matthew; Salvino, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  6. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  7. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  8. Computational Structural Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    load-2 TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computational Structural Mechanics Overview of CSM Computational structural mechanics is a well-established methodology for the design and analysis of many components and structures found in the transportation field. Modern finite-element models (FEMs) play a major role in these evaluations, and sophisticated software, such as the commercially available LS-DYNA® code, is

  9. Cambridge Structural Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cambridge Structural Database Cambridge Structural Database Los Alamos researchers can access WebCSD from offsite via Remote Access. Question? 667-5809 Email Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) includes bibliographic, chemical, and crystallographic information for organic molecules and metal-organic compounds. The crystal structure data comes from the open literature or direct deposits by researchers. The CSD System incorporations a suite of flexible search and analysis tools. The Research

  10. Stormwater Control Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. Structures trap sediment, keep water on-site, slow water flow and redirect water around problem areas. Rock check dams Rock check dams Silt tence Silt fence Sediment trap Sediment trap Wood mulch and native seed Wood mulch and native seed Gabion Gabion Concrete lined swales Concrete lined swales Hydroseeding Hydroseeding

  11. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  12. Railway vehicle body structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The strength and durability of railway vehicle structures is a major topic of engineering research and design. To reflect this importance the Railway Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers organised a conference to discuss all matters relating to railway vehicle design. This book presents the papers discussed in that conference. The contents include: Vehicle body design and the UIC's international contribution; LUL prototype 1986 stock - body structure; vehicle structure for the intermediate capacity transmit system vehicles; car body technology of advanced light rapid transit vehicles; concepts, techniques and experience in the idealization of car body structures for finite element analysis; Calcutta metropolitan railway; design for a lightweight diesel multiple unit body; the design of lightweight inter-city coal structures; the BREL international coach body shell structure; new concepts and design techniques versus material standards; structures of BR diesel electric freight locomotives; structural design philosophy for electric locomotives; suspension design for a locomotive with low structural frequencies; freight wagon structures; a finite element study of coal bodyside panels including the effects of joint flexibility; a fresh approach to the problem of car body design strength; energy absorption in automatic couplings and draw gear; passenger vehicle design loads and structural crashworthiness; design of the front part of railway vehicles (in case of frontal impact); the development of a theoretical technique for rail vehicle structural crashworthiness.

  13. Vitrified underground structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Mark T.; Buelt, James L.; Stottlemyre, James A.; Tixier, Jr., John S.

    1992-01-01

    A method of making vitrified underground structures in which 1) the vitrification process is started underground, and 2) a thickness dimension is controlled to produce substantially planar vertical and horizontal vitrified underground structures. Structures may be placed around a contaminated waste site to isolate the site or may be used as aquifer dikes.

  14. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in themore » observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  15. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. 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A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  16. Structure and proposed mechanism of α-glycerophosphate oxidase from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elkhal, Callia K.; Kean, Kelsey M.; Parsonage, Derek; Maenpuen, Somchart; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Claiborne, Al; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-03-14

    In this study, the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) by the FAD-dependent α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), is important for the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The structurally known GlpO from Streptococcus sp. (SspGlpO) is similar to the pneumococcal protein (SpGlpO) and provides a guide for drug design against that target. However, M. pneumoniae GlpO (MpGlpO), having <20% sequence identity with structurally known GlpOs, appears to represent a second type of GlpO we designate as Type II GlpOs. Here, the recombinant His-tagged MpGlpO structure is described at ~2.5 Å resolution, solved by molecular replacement using as a search model themore » Bordetella pertussis protein 3253 (Bp3253) a protein of unknown function solved by structural genomics efforts. Recombinant MpGlpO is an active oxidase with a turnover number of ~580 min⁻¹ while Bp3253 showed no GlpO activity. No substantial differences exist between the oxidized and dithionite-reduced MpGlpO structures. Although, no liganded structures were determined, a comparison with the tartrate-bound Bp3253 structure and consideration of residue conservation patterns guided the construction of a model for α-glycerophosphate (Glp) recognition and turnover by MpGlpO. The predicted binding mode also appears relevant for the type I GlpOs (such as SspGlpO) despite differences in substrate recognition residues, and it implicates a histidine conserved in type I and II Glp oxidases and dehydrogenases as the catalytic acid/base. This work provides a solid foundation for guiding further studies of the mitochondrial Glp dehydrogenases as well as for continued studies of M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae glycerol metabolism and the development of novel therapeutics targeting MpGlpO and SpGlpO.« less

  17. BOMB STABILIZING STRUCTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, J.L.; Runyan, C.E.

    1963-12-10

    A stabilizinig structure capable of minimizing deviations of a falling body such as a bomb from desired trajectory is described. The structure comprises a fin or shroud arrangement of double-wedge configuration, the feeding portion being of narrow wedge shape and the after portion being of a wider wedge shape. The structure provides a force component for keeping the body on essentially desired trajectory throughout its fall. (AEC)

  18. Undergraduate Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salary Structure Undergraduate Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0964 Email Undergraduate salary determination process Salaries are evaluated from students' current transcripts based on college academic progression and hours completed in a degree program. Professional Salary Structure Years

  19. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  20. Effective Incentive Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an in-depth look at effective incentive structures, how to clarify your program goals, and tips to plan for the long term.

  1. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  2. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and ...

  3. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  4. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Reversal Acoustics LANL also investigates the applicability of time reversal concept in modern acoustics to structural damage identification. In the time reversal...

  5. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a team of scientists from the ALS and Germany characterized the electronic band structure and successfully controlled the gap...

  6. Tapered structure construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Eric D.; Takata, Rosalind K.; Slocum, Alexander H.; Nayfeh, Samir A.

    2016-04-05

    Feeding stock used to form a tapered structure into a curving device such that each point on the stock undergoes rotational motion about a peak location of the tapered structure; and the stock meets a predecessor portion of stock along one or more adjacent edges.

  7. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  8. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R. F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2004-10-05

    An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

  9. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... LA-UR-14-21085 16 Parameter name: Mode Shapes * Description: Structural modes of vibration computed using the modal residues according to a user-selected method. * Type: - ...

  10. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Biology Group hosted a 3-day comprehensive workshop on the use of non-crystalline small-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques in structural biology research. ...

  11. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Science Highlights Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase For approximately 2,000 years, the Chinese have been ...

  12. Structured Innovation Initiative Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following Water Power Week in Washington, D.C, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct a workshop on the Structured Innovation Initiative, similar to the workshop recently held in Edinburgh, Scotland during ICOE 2016.

  13. Tag: GTRI | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: News Y-12 fulfills major milestone in fuel conversion commitment for Jamaican research reactor Y-12 fulfills major milestone in fuel conversion commitment for Jamaican...

  14. Tag: Safety | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the purification facility. More... Category: About Best Practices Workshop for Safety Culture A two-day Safety Culture workshop featured more than two dozen presentations on...

  15. Tag: employees | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or ADFAC's, School Supply Program was able to serve a record breaking 2,808 children, providing necessary school supplies to st More... Category: Community Looking back...

  16. Invisible-fluorescent identification tags for materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Linda A.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Smithwick, III, Robert W.

    2013-03-26

    A taggant composition including a taggant material that is invisible in light of the visible spectrum and fluoresces under a non-visible excitation energy, a binder, and a solvent in which the taggant material and the binder are dissolved. The taggant composition can be printed or otherwise applied to a material such as fabric to provide a detectable and identifiable indicium. A method and apparatus for detecting and decoding the taggant indicium are also provided.

  17. Tag: transformation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under budget and 11 months ahead of schedule. More... Category: About Y-12 hosts NNSA Aging Infrastructure Workshop Integrated Facility Aging Management is looking through the...

  18. Tag: security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our website, please follow these instructions. More... Category: Security Emergency Vocabulary These are terms you might hear during an emergency situation. More... Category:...

  19. Tag: technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    benefits and uses. More... Category: Partnerships Tropexx(tm) and Extrans(tm) Inventor Russell Hallman talks about the benefits of Tropexx(tm) and Extrans(tm). More......

  20. Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Russell N.; Senum, Gunnar I.

    1981-01-01

    A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

  1. Tag: News | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office more than doubles Feds Feed Families campaign goal Employees of the NNSA Production Office (NPO) have donated 28,605 pounds of food as part of the annual "Feds...

  2. Property:Event/Tagged | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    +, CLEAN +, ... 15th International Business Forum: Low Carbon High Growth - Business Models for a Changing Climate + LEDS +, training +, CLEAN + 18th Africa Partnership Forum...

  3. Firefox Extension Framework for News Article Tagging

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-08

    FEFNAT is a Firefox extension that is used to collect information about user interests when viewing new articles. When a user is reading a news article on a web-page, he can vote whether the article was interesting or not interesting by clicking the appropriate button on the extension's tool-bar. The purpose of this extension is to collet user interests and behavior while viewing new articles so that it can be used in my research formore » predicting how interesting future news article may be for the user.« less

  4. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, R.A.; Huang, X.C.; Quesada, M.A.

    1995-07-25

    A DNA sequencing method is described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in the lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radioisotope labels. 5 figs.

  5. Tag: UPF | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: News UPF Project celebrates changing the Y-12 skyline Groundbreaking Ceremony Held for the Construction Support Building More... Category: About UPF Forecast UPF ...

  6. Tag: STEM | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More... Category: Careers CNS employees volunteer at robotics competition CNS employees ... CNS is a gold sponsor of this year's Tennessee Science Bowl. More... Category: Careers ...

  7. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A.; Huang, Xiaohua C.; Quesada, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A DNA sequencing method described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in said lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radio-isotope labels.

  8. Tag: Careers | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to tour a nuclear reactor. More... Category: Careers CNS employees volunteer at robotics competition CNS employees volunteer at robotics competition More... Category: Careers...

  9. Tag: engineering | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were once done and the advances that have followed. More... Category: News Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day at Y-12 Y-12 recently held its second annual Introduce a Girl to...

  10. Tag: About | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Deputy Secretary meets two calutron girls When the Deputy Secretary of Energy, Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, was in town, she met two "Calutron Girls." More... Category: About...

  11. Tag: Library | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technical reports to save time and space; some are used also in correspondence and in speaking. More... Category: Library Images Browse through images of our mission-related...

  12. Tag: Community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: Community Hundreds tour Y-12 during Secret City Festival Tours of Y-12 brought ... competition CNS team achieves top 50 ranking at the FIRST Robotics Championship in St. ...

  13. Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

  14. Tag: community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Counties', or ADFAC's, School Supply Program was able to serve a record breaking 2,808 children, providing necessary school supplies to st More... Category: Community Looking...

  15. Graduate Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salary Structure Graduate Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email GRA salary determination process Salaries are determined by evaluating students' current transcripts using the following criteria: Salaries for graduate students are based on completion of 12 credit hours annually for the

  16. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenstreet, B.L.

    1963-12-31

    A system for maintaining the alignment of moderator block structures in reactors is presented. Integral restraining grids are placed between each layer of blocks in the moderator structure, at the top of the uppermost layer, and at the bottom of the lowermost layer. Slots are provided in the top and bottom surfaces of the moderator blocks so as to provide a keying action with the grids. The grids are maintained in alignment by vertical guiding members disposed about their peripheries. (AEC)

  17. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  18. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's

  19. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  20. Pion structure function from leading neutron electroproduction and SU(2) flavor asymmetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McKenney, Joshua R.; Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, we examine the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA and themore » $$\\bar{d}-\\bar{u}$$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed $$\\chi^2$$ analysis of the ZEUS and H1 cross sections, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. The analysis disfavors several models of the pion flux used in the literature, and yields an improved extraction of the pion structure function and its uncertainties at parton momentum fractions in the pion of $$4 \\times 10^{-4} \\lesssim x_\\pi \\lesssim 0.05$$ at a scale of $Q^2$=10 GeV$^2$. Also, we provide estimates for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments on the deuteron with forward protons, based on the fit results, at Jefferson Lab.« less

  1. Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode ...

  2. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  3. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  4. Fire protection for relocatable structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This standard supersedes DOE/EV-0043, ``Standard on Fire Protection for Portable Structures.`` It was revised to address the numerous types of relocatable structures, such as trailers, tension-supported structures, and tents being used by DOE and contractors.

  5. Module 2- Work Breakdown Structure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This module defines and illustrates the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), WBS dictionary, Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS) and Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RAM).

  6. Structural Genomics: Expectations and Reality

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... TB Structural Genomics Consortium, http:www.doe-mbi.ucla.eduTB (TB) Structures of M. tuberculosis proteome, with emphasis on functionally important proteins. Non-PSI ...

  7. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

    2005-03-08

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  8. Acicular photomultiplier photocathode structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, Richard A.; Bliss, Mary

    2003-09-30

    A method and apparatus for increasing the quantum efficiency of a photomultiplier tube by providing a photocathode with an increased surface-to-volume ratio. The photocathode includes a transparent substrate, upon one major side of which is formed one or more large aspect-ratio structures, such as needles, cones, fibers, prisms, or pyramids. The large aspect-ratio structures are at least partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material, i.e., a material that emits a photoelectron upon absorption of an optical photon. The large aspect-ratio structures may be substantially composed of the photoelectron emitting material (i.e., formed as such upon the surface of a relatively flat substrate) or be only partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material (i.e., the photoelectron emitting material is coated over large aspect-ratio structures formed from the substrate material itself.) The large aspect-ratio nature of the photocathode surface allows for an effective increase in the thickness of the photocathode relative the absorption of optical photons, thereby increasing the absorption rate of incident photons, without substantially increasing the effective thickness of the photocathode relative the escape incidence of the photoelectrons.

  9. Direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the free neutron F2 structure function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niculescu, I.; Niculescu, G.; Melnitchouk, W.; Arrington, J.; Christy, M. E.; Ent, R.; Griffioen, K. A.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-21

    Using data from the recent BONuS experiment at Jefferson Lab, which utilized a novel spectator tagging technique to extract the inclusive electron-free neutron scattering cross section, we obtain the first direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the neutron F2 structure function. In addition, the data are used to reconstruct the lowest few (N = 2, 4 and 6) moments of F2 in the three prominent nucleon resonance regions, as well as the moments integrated over the entire resonance region. Comparison with moments computed from global parametrizations of parton distribution functions suggest that quark--hadron duality holds locally for the neutron in the second and third resonance regions down to Q2 ≈ 1 GeV2, with violations possibly up to 20% observed in the first resonance region.

  10. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  11. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  12. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  13. Core assembly storage structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  14. Portable solar heater structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holley, D.; Holley, D.E.

    1981-09-08

    Portable solar heater structure is described. A substantially rectangular frame has a back with openings therethrough for permitting air to be drawn into the solar heater. A layer of insulating materials is in contact with the back. A plurality of cupshaped solar collectors open toward the front of the solar heater structure are positioned adjacent the insulating material. A cover is over the front of the solar heater having openings therein adjacent the top thereof through which air heated by the solar heater is passed. A passage is between the openings in the back and cover of the solar heater through which relatively cool air is drawn through the openings in the back over the collectors to be heated for subsequent withdrawal through the openings in the cover.

  15. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  16. NEUTRON-IRRADIATED STRUCTURES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, E.L.; Ashley, J.W.; Bowker, H.W.; Hall, R.H.; Kendall, J.W.

    1959-02-01

    A moderator structure is described for a nuclear reactor of the heterogensous type wherein a large mass of moderator is provided with channels therethrough for the introduction of uranium serving as nuclear fuel and for the passage of a cooling fluid. The structure is comprised of blocks of moderator material in superposed horizontal layers, the blocks of each layer being tied together with spaces between them and oriented to have horizontal Wigner growth. The ties are strips of moderator material, the same as the blocks, with transverse Wigner growth, disposed horizontally along lines crossing at vertical axes of the blocks. The blocks are preferably rectangular with a larger or length dimension transverse to the directions of Wiguer growth and are stood on end to provide for horizontal growth.

  17. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

    1963-08-01

    An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

  18. Structural design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, P.; Chang, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is one of seven presented at a special OTC session on international standards for the design of offshore platforms for earthquakes. Companion papers describe an overview of proposed ISO provisions, seismic exposure, foundation design, performance characteristics, a site-specific example, and probability-based LRFD. The focus of this paper is upon results of interest to structural designers, such as: simplified load and resistance factors; lifetime reliability estimates; ductility analysis using API jolts; and example North Sea application.

  19. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Usages LANL/UCSD Engineering Institute LA-CC-14-046 LA-UR-14-21093 c Copyright 2014, Los Alamos National Security, LLC All rights reserved. May 30, 2014 Example Usages Contents Data Set Descriptions Integrating Examples Modal Analysis Condition-Based Monitoring Active Sensing Outlier Detection Data Set Descriptions Experimental Procedure Description of the 3-Story Structure Experimental Procedure Description of the Condition-Based Monitoring Example Data Integrating Examples Example

  20. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  1. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  2. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  3. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  4. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  5. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  6. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  7. Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  8. Structured Multifrontal Sparse Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    StruMF is an algebraic structured preconditioner for the interative solution of large sparse linear systems. The preconditioner corresponds to a multifrontal variant of sparse LU factorization in which some dense blocks of the factors are approximated with low-rank matrices. It is algebraic in that it only requires the linear system itself, and the approximation threshold that determines the accuracy of individual low-rank approximations. Favourable rank properties are obtained using a block partitioning which is amore » refinement of the partitioning induced by nested dissection ordering.« less

  9. Boundary Layer Structure:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Structure: a comparison between methods and sites Thiago Biscaro Suzane de Sá Jae-In Song Shaoyue "Emily" Qiu Mentors: Virendra Ghate and Ewan O'Connor July 24 2015 1 st ever ARM Summer Training Outline * IntroducQon * Methodology * Results - SGP - MAO - Comparison between the 2 sites * Conclusions INTRODUCTION Focus: esQmates of PBL height Boundary Layer: "The boUom layer of the troposphere that is in contact with the surface of the earth." (AMS, Glossary of

  10. Structured wafer for device processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  11. Structured wafer for device processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  12. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Threading Method (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation

  13. Structure and proposed mechanism of α-glycerophosphate oxidase from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkhal, Callia K.; Kean, Kelsey M.; Parsonage, Derek; Maenpuen, Somchart; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Claiborne, Al; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-03-14

    In this study, the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) by the FAD-dependent α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), is important for the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The structurally known GlpO from Streptococcus sp. (SspGlpO) is similar to the pneumococcal protein (SpGlpO) and provides a guide for drug design against that target. However, M. pneumoniae GlpO (MpGlpO), having <20% sequence identity with structurally known GlpOs, appears to represent a second type of GlpO we designate as Type II GlpOs. Here, the recombinant His-tagged MpGlpO structure is described at ~2.5 Å resolution, solved by molecular replacement using as a search model the Bordetella pertussis protein 3253 (Bp3253) a protein of unknown function solved by structural genomics efforts. Recombinant MpGlpO is an active oxidase with a turnover number of ~580 min⁻¹ while Bp3253 showed no GlpO activity. No substantial differences exist between the oxidized and dithionite-reduced MpGlpO structures. Although, no liganded structures were determined, a comparison with the tartrate-bound Bp3253 structure and consideration of residue conservation patterns guided the construction of a model for α-glycerophosphate (Glp) recognition and turnover by MpGlpO. The predicted binding mode also appears relevant for the type I GlpOs (such as SspGlpO) despite differences in substrate recognition residues, and it implicates a histidine conserved in type I and II Glp oxidases and dehydrogenases as the catalytic acid/base. This work provides a solid foundation for guiding further studies of the mitochondrial Glp dehydrogenases as well as for continued studies of M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae glycerol metabolism and the development of novel therapeutics targeting MpGlpO and SpGlpO.

  14. Supercomputing and nonlinear seismic structural response of freeway structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudreau, G.L.; Kay, G.; McCallen, D.; Schauer, D.; Logan, R.

    1990-11-01

    The Loma Prieta earthquake stimulated a major reassessment of Bay Area structures to consider much larger earthquakes than originally designed for. The supercomputers of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were used to demonstrate the feasibility of nonlinear structural time history analysis to assess likelihood of failure of critical structures.

  15. Structural Simulation Toolkit. Lunch & Learn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Branden J.; Voskuilen, Gwendolyn Renae; Rodrigues, Arun F.; Hammond, Simon David; Hemmert, Karl Scott

    2015-09-01

    This is a presentation outlining a lunch and learn lecture for the Structural Simulation Toolkit, supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  16. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  17. Structural model of uramarsite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Sidorenko, G. A.; Ivanova, A. G.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-09-15

    The structural model of uramarsite, a new mineral of the uran-mica family from the Bota-Burum deposit (South Kazakhstan), is determined using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The parameters of the triclinic unit cell are as follows: a = 7.173(2) A, b = 7.167(5) A, c = 9.30(1) A, {alpha} = 90.13(7){sup o}, {beta} = 90.09(4){sup o}, {gamma} = 89.96(4){sup o}, and space group P1. The crystal chemical formula of uramarsite is: (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[AsO{sub 4}][PO{sub 4},AsO{sub 4}][NH{sub 4}][H{sub 3}O] . 6H{sub 2}O (Z = 1). Uramarsite is the second ammonium-containing mineral of uranium and an arsenate analogue of uramphite. In the case of uramarsite, the lowering of the symmetry from tetragonal to triclinic, which is accompanied by a triclinic distortion of the tetragonal unit cell, is apparently caused by the ordering of the As and P atoms and the NH{sub 4}, H{sub 3}O, and H{sub 2}O groups.

  18. Vessel structural support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jenko, James X.; Ott, Howard L.; Wilson, Robert M.; Wepfer, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Vessel structural support system for laterally and vertically supporting a vessel, such as a nuclear steam generator having an exterior bottom surface and a side surface thereon. The system includes a bracket connected to the bottom surface. A support column is pivotally connected to the bracket for vertically supporting the steam generator. The system also includes a base pad assembly connected pivotally to the support column for supporting the support column and the steam generator. The base pad assembly, which is capable of being brought to a level position by turning leveling nuts, is anchored to a floor. The system further includes a male key member attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a female stop member attached to an adjacent wall. The male key member and the female stop member coact to laterally support the steam generator. Moreover, the system includes a snubber assembly connected to the side surface of the steam generator and also attached to the adjacent wall for dampening lateral movement of the steam generator. In addition, the system includes a restraining member of "flat" attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a bumper attached to the adjacent wall. The flat and the bumper coact to further laterally support the steam generator.

  19. Structure of the CRA-2014: Structure of the CRA-2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of the CRA-2014 United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Structure of the CRA-2014 Table of Contents Structure of the CRA-2014 List of Figures Figure STRUCT- 1. CRA-2014 Pictorial Roadmap This page intentionally left blank. Acronyms and Abbreviations CCA Compliance Certification Application CFR Code of Federal Regulations CRA Compliance Recertification Application DOE U.S.

  20. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to ... The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind ...

  1. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universitt Gttingen, Tammannstrae 4, Gttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as a CIF) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  2. Dissipative structures and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langhorst, Benjamin R; Chu, Henry S

    2013-11-05

    Dissipative structures include at least one panel and a cell structure disposed adjacent to the at least one panel having interconnected cells. A deformable material, which may comprise at least one hydrogel, is disposed within at least one interconnected cell proximate to the at least one panel. Dissipative structures may also include a cell structure having interconnected cells formed by wall elements. The wall elements may include a mesh formed by overlapping fibers having apertures formed therebetween. The apertures may form passageways between the interconnected cells. Methods of dissipating a force include disposing at least one hydrogel in a cell structure proximate to at least one panel, applying a force to the at least one panel, and forcing at least a portion of the at least one hydrogel through apertures formed in the cell structure.

  3. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined A team of physicists propose a new model that expands on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  4. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print Wednesday, 26 April 2006 00:00 The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of

  5. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved Print Wednesday, 30 April 2008 00:00 Establishment of neural connections at specialized intercellular junctions called synapses is critical for proper brain function, and errors in the process are thought to be associated with autism and other disorders. Researchers from Stanford University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have reported high-resolution, three-dimensional structures of the

  6. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Myles A.; Morris, Robert S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  7. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul Joseph; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2011-11-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of quasicrystalline structures. In preferred embodiments, the stopgap structure is more spherically symmetric than periodic structures facilitating the formation of stopgaps in nearly all directions because of higher rotational symmetries. More particularly, the invention relates to the use of quasicrystalline structures for optical, mechanical, electrical and magnetic purposes. In some embodiments, the invention relates to manipulating, controlling, modulating and directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for a pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating in multiple directions.

  8. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul J; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2013-12-03

    This invention relates generally to the field of quasicrystalline structures. In preferred embodiments, the stopgap structure is more spherically symmetric than periodic structures facilitating the formation of stopgaps in nearly all directions because of higher rotational symmetries. More particularly, the invention relates to the use of quasicrystalline structures for optical, mechanical, electrical and magnetic purposes. In some embodiments, the invention relates to manipulating, controlling, modulating and directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating in multiple directions.

  9. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

  10. Appendix C Conducting Structured Walkthroughs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This guide describes how to conduct a structured walkthroughs during the lifecycle stages of software engineering projects, regardless of hardware platform.

  11. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  12. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  13. Shell structures for biogas plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasse, L.

    1982-01-01

    The shell structures designed for biogas plants of the fixed-dome type by the Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association are described. Biogas digesters of the design described have been successfully tested in Rwanda and India without structural or contractural problems.

  14. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Stanley W.

    1977-03-08

    Herein is disclosed a flat plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  15. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, S.W.

    1975-06-03

    Herein is disclosed a flate plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support, and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  16. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Graves, H.L. III

    1994-12-31

    Research is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of safety-related concrete structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Program accomplishments have included development of the Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, performance assessments of reinforced concrete structures in several United Kingdom nuclear power facilities, evaluation of European and North American repair practices for concrete, an evaluation of factors affecting the corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and application of the time-dependent reliability methodology to reinforced concrete flexure and shear structural elements to investigate the role of in-service inspection and repair on their probability of failure.

  17. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    Research is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of safety-related concrete structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Program accomplishments have included development of the Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information of the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors of aging factors, performance assessments of reinforced concrete structures in several United Kingdom nuclear power facilities, evaluation of European and North American repair practices for concrete, an evaluation of factors affecting the corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and application of the time-dependent reliability methodology to reinforced concrete flexure and shear structural elements to investigate the role of in-service inspection and repair on their probability of failure.

  18. Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS - ... Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring ...

  19. Structural study of ammonium metatungstate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Joel B. Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2008-08-15

    Several techniques have been used to study the structure of the Keggin-type polyoxometalate salt ammonium metatungstate (AMT)-(NH{sub 4}){sub 6}[H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]*nH{sub 2}O, a potential fuel cell catalyst. The dehydrated salt is comprised of a mixture of crystallites of different unit cells in a centered eutactic cubic configuration, with an average unit cell of a{approx_equal}12.295. Varied orientations of the Keggin ions in the cubic arrangement create the differences, and orientational variation within each unit cell size represents an energy well. Progressive hydration of each crystallite leads to expansion of the lattice, with the degree of expansion depending on the locations of the water added in relation to the Keggin ion, which is influenced by cation location and hydrogen bonding. The structural hypothesis is supported by electron diffraction of single and multicrystal samples, by powder density measurements, X-ray powder diffraction studies, synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, and a priori structural modeling studies. Based on the structure, projected active site densities are compared with nanostructured platinum catalysts for fuel cell application. - Graphical abstract: The structure of ammonium metatungstate powders are highly dependent on hydration and POM molecule rotation, with cation and hydrogen bonding forces directing a mixture of structures that have been studied with bulk and single-crystal methods. The illustration shows Monte Carlo simulated anion structural disorder for the fully dehydrated form of the title compound.

  20. Functional Insights from Structural Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forouhar,F.; Kuzin, A.; Seetharaman, J.; Lee, I.; Zhou, W.; Abashidze, M.; Chen, Y.; Montelione, G.; Tong, L.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts have produced structural information, either directly or by modeling, for thousands of proteins over the past few years. While many of these proteins have known functions, a large percentage of them have not been characterized at the functional level. The structural information has provided valuable functional insights on some of these proteins, through careful structural analyses, serendipity, and structure-guided functional screening. Some of the success stories based on structures solved at the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) are reported here. These include a novel methyl salicylate esterase with important role in plant innate immunity, a novel RNA methyltransferase (H. influenzae yggJ (HI0303)), a novel spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferase (B. subtilis PaiA), a novel methyltransferase or AdoMet binding protein (A. fulgidus AF{_}0241), an ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (B. subtilis YvqK), a novel carboxysome pore (E. coli EutN), a proline racemase homolog with a disrupted active site (B. melitensis BME11586), an FMN-dependent enzyme (S. pneumoniae SP{_}1951), and a 12-stranded {beta}-barrel with a novel fold (V. parahaemolyticus VPA1032).

  1. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  2. SSI (soil-structure interactions) and structural benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, ''Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes'', currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to ''cut-off'' depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  4. Thermal control structure and garment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W.; Cameron, Christopher Stan

    2012-03-13

    A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

  5. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli, determined by a Berkeley-Berlin collaboration to a resolution of 3.5 , the highest...

  6. Nuclear Structure - Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Structure depiction of giant resonance modes (ref. Xinfeng Chen, "Giant Resonance Study By 6Li Scattering" Nuclear structure studies at the Institute explore a wide range of single-particle and collective properties of the nucleus. The most extensive study in this area is centered about the determination of the nuclear compressibility with measurements of the properties of giant resonance states in a variety of nuclei. The nuclear compressibility is a quantity of great

  7. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures Structures 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Project Kick-Off Principle Investigator: Dr. Stephen Grot Presenter: Dr. Walther Grot Ion Power, Inc September 28, 2010 September 28, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information t Overview Timeline * Start Sept 1, 2010 E d A 31 2013 * End August 31, 2013 * 0% Complete Budget * * Total project funding Total

  8. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  9. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli,

  10. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved Print Establishment of neural connections at specialized intercellular junctions called synapses is critical for proper brain function, and errors in the process are thought to be associated with autism and other disorders. Researchers from Stanford University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have reported high-resolution, three-dimensional structures of the proteins, called neuroligin-1 and neurexin-1β, that form this connection.

  11. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved Print Establishment of neural connections at specialized intercellular junctions called synapses is critical for proper brain function, and errors in the process are thought to be associated with autism and other disorders. Researchers from Stanford University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have reported high-resolution, three-dimensional structures of the proteins, called neuroligin-1 and neurexin-1β, that form this connection.

  12. Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Synaptic Connectors Solved Print Establishment of neural connections at specialized intercellular junctions called synapses is critical for proper brain function, and errors in the process are thought to be associated with autism and other disorders. Researchers from Stanford University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have reported high-resolution, three-dimensional structures of the proteins, called neuroligin-1 and neurexin-1β, that form this connection.

  13. Bridge Structural Analysis Using CSM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bridge Structural Analysis Using Computational Structural Mechanics Background Bridge failure due to wind has been observed as far back as 1823. The latest concept for an efficient and cost-effective bridge design is the cable-stayed bridge. Bridge stay cables, however, have exhibited large-amplitude vibrations as a result of wind loadings, sometimes in combination with rain. In recent years, attempts have been made to model this problem both in the laboratory and on the computer. Several wind

  14. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  15. Advanced strategic interceptor composite structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ennis, D.H.; Patty, C.E. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Launch mass reduction, stiffness increase, and primary bending mode frequency increase remain the prime focus of the US Army Strategic Defense Command (USASDC) advanced composite material development and testing program. The initial activity was directed toward fabrication of a demonstration structure consistent with the Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) ERIS flight design. The objectives of this phase of the work were three-fold: selection of the optimum composite materials; concurrent bonding and joining technology development; evaluation of the performance of each test structure relative to its metal counterpart and relative to alternative composites. The effort exceeded model predictions. The resin matrix composite structure mass was 52% lower than the metal design. Modal testing demonstrated a 200% increase in stiffness and a 41% gain in first mode bending frequency. Given the demonstrated level of success, an additional element was added to the task focus: cost-effective, mass quantity fabrication techniques. Single step technology has been successfully applied to a relatively simple thermoset based bridge structure. Two step molding and assembly have been demonstrated for a GBI-X class thermoplastic structure. Preliminary testing has been completed to isolate and resolve problems associated with single step fabrication of the more complex GBI-X class structure. Fabrication of an appropriate test article as preparation for modal survey evaluation of the latter is in progress. Results are presented. Future program directions are summarized.

  16. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D.

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  17. Outmigration of landlocked Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts and effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small scale hydroelectric facility. [Salmo salar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettles, D.C.; Gloss, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Modes of downstream passage (penstock, spillway, diversion chute) by Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts were monitored using radio telemetry to assess the effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small hydroelectric dam on the Boquet River, New York. Telemetry of 170 Atlantic salmon smolts and visual observations of stocked smolts were used to determine aspects of Atlantic salmon outmigration behavior. Smolts initiated mass migrations after river temperatures reached or exceeded 10/sup 0/C. Many radio-tagged smolts interrupted movements upon reaching ponded waters and/or the dam. River flow did not (P > .05) affect the frequency of migratory movements, passages, or rate of movement. Migrations were of approximately 30 days duration. Passages at the dam occurred primarily at night (61%) with diurnal passages (17%) and crepuscular passages (17%) of secondary importance. Timing of 5% of the passages was undetermined. All passages which occurred when angled trash racks were in place were through the bypass or over the spillway. Six (6) passages occurred when trash racks perpendicular to the penstock were in place: 3 of these were penstock passages. The angled trash rack and bypass structure served to reduce entrainment.

  18. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

    2001-01-05

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

  19. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2012-10-09

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  20. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  1. Hydrophilic structures for condensation management in appliances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuehl, Steven John; Vonderhaar, John J.; Wu, Guolian; Wu, Mianxue

    2016-02-02

    An appliance that includes a cabinet having an exterior surface; a refrigeration compartment located within the cabinet; and a hydrophilic structure disposed on the exterior surface. The hydrophilic structure is configured to spread condensation. The appliance further includes a wicking structure located in proximity to the hydrophilic structure, and the wicking structure is configured to receive the condensation.

  2. Measurements of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in Lepton + Jets Final States using a Topological Multivariate Technique as well as Lifetime b-Tagging in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV with the D0 Detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golling, Tobias F

    2005-01-01

    Two alternative measurements of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions in the lepton+jets channel are presented. The t{bar t} production cross section is extracted by combining the kinematic event information in a multivariate discriminant. The measurement yields {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 5.13{sub -1.57}{sup +1.76}(stat){sub -1.10}{sup +0.96}(syst) {+-} 0.33 (lumi) pb in the muon+jets channel, using 229.1 pb{sup -1}, and in the combination with the electron+jets channel 226.3 pb{sup -1} {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 6.60{sub -1.28}{sup +1.37}(stat){sub -1.11}{sup +1.25}(syst) {+-} 0.43 (lumi) pb. The second measurement presented reconstructs explicitly secondary vertices to d lifetime b-tagging. The measurement combines the muon+jets and the electron+jets channel, using 158.4 pb{sup -1} and 168.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively: {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 8.24{sub -1.25}{sup +1.34}(stat){sub -1.63}{sup +1.89}(syst) {+-} 0.54 (lumi) pb.

  3. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  4. Method for fabricating beryllium structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    Thin-walled beryllium structures are prepared by plasma spraying a mixture of beryllium powder and about 2500 to 4000 ppm silicon powder onto a suitable substrate, removing the plasma-sprayed body from the substrate and placing it in a sizing die having a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of the beryllium, exposing the plasma-sprayed body to a moist atmosphere, outgassing the plasma-sprayed body, and then sintering the plasma-sprayed body in an inert atmosphere to form a dense, low-porosity beryllium structure of the desired thin-wall configuration. The addition of the silicon and the exposure of the plasma-sprayed body to the moist atmosphere greatly facilitate the preparation of the beryllium structure while minimizing the heretofore deleterious problems due to grain growth and grain orientation.

  5. Quasicrystalline structures and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinhardt, Paul Joseph; Chaikin, Paul Michael; Man, Weining

    2013-08-13

    This invention relates generally to devices constructed from quasicrystalline heterostructures. In preferred embodiments, two or more dielectric materials are arranged in a two- or three-dimensional space in a lattice pattern having at least a five-fold symmetry axis and not a six-fold symmetry axis, such that the quasicrystalline heterostructure exhibits an energy band structure in the space, the band structure having corresponding symmetry, which symmetry is forbidden in crystals, and which band structure comprises a complete band gap. The constructed devices are adapted for manipulating, controlling, modulating, trapping, reflecting and otherwise directing waves including electromagnetic, sound, spin, and surface waves, for a pre-selected range of wavelengths propagating within or through the heterostructure in multiple directions.

  6. Thermographic inspection of massive structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Guimaraes, Maria; Scott, David B.

    2014-02-18

    Nondestructive Evaluation of concrete structures is a growing concern for the nuclear industry as well as for many other industries. As critical concrete components continue to age, the ability to assess the health and suitability for continued service has become a key consideration. In some cases, repair of these structures is difficult and expensive, while replacement is prohibitively expensive or, in some cases, not feasible. Therefore, the ability to inspect these key assets is a primary concern, especially in the nuclear industry. Due to the large size of containment buildings, cooling towers, and other large concrete assets, the ability to rapidly inspect for defects of concern is very desirable. Thermographic inspection appears to have the required ability to rapidly inspect large structures to ascertain the location and size of many of the defects of concern. This ability was demonstrated by performing a thermographic inspection of a large concrete dam in 2 days.

  7. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  8. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popeneciu, Horea Dumitru, Ristoiu; Tripon, Carmen Borodi, Gheorghe Pop, Mihaela Maria

    2015-12-23

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}ClF{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  9. Collective network for computer structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Coteus, Paul W.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  10. Electronically- and crystal-structure-driven magnetic structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The synthesis of the new equiatomic RScSb ( R La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) compounds has ... (La-Nd, Sm) and the CeFeSi-type (P4 nmm) structure for the heavier R ( R Gd-Tm, Lu, Y). ...

  11. Method of making diode structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Gupta, Akhlesh

    2006-11-28

    A method of making a diode structure includes the step of depositing a transparent electrode layer of any one or more of the group ZnO, ZnS and CdO onto a substrate layer, and depositing an active semiconductor junction having an n-type layer and a p-type layer onto the transparent electrode layer under process conditions that avoid substantial degradation of the electrode layer. A back electrode coating layer is applied to form a diode structure.

  12. Method for protein structure alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blankenbecler, Richard; Ohlsson, Mattias; Peterson, Carsten; Ringner, Markus

    2005-02-22

    This invention provides a method for protein structure alignment. More particularly, the present invention provides a method for identification, classification and prediction of protein structures. The present invention involves two key ingredients. First, an energy or cost function formulation of the problem simultaneously in terms of binary (Potts) assignment variables and real-valued atomic coordinates. Second, a minimization of the energy or cost function by an iterative method, where in each iteration (1) a mean field method is employed for the assignment variables and (2) exact rotation and/or translation of atomic coordinates is performed, weighted with the corresponding assignment variables.

  13. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic Carbonates and Esters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: ...

  14. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in ...

  15. Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Wednesday, 26 August 2009 00:00 Rotaxanes are...

  16. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation ... Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the ...

  17. Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach for small, simplified solar installations or retrofits. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural ...

  18. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine ...

  19. Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries Lithium-ion battery ...

  20. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. Made of foam insulation sandwiched between two layers of ...

  1. Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks Authors: Deka, ...

  2. Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading Authors: Liu, Xin ; ...

  3. Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks You are accessing a document from ...

  4. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural ... external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. ...

  5. Investigations of Interfacial Structure in Thermoelectric Tellurides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigations of Interfacial Structure in Thermoelectric Tellurides Discusses examples of work on the investigation of atomic structure of interfaces in thermoelectric tellurides ...

  6. Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Prev Next Title: Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Authors: Nayak, J. ; Maniraj, M. ; Rai, Abhishek ; Singh, Sanjay ; ...

  7. Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Authors: Nayak, J. ; Maniraj, M. ; Rai, Abhishek ; ...

  8. P-Glycoprotein Structure and Chemotherapy Resistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P-Glycoprotein Structure and Chemotherapy Resistance P-Glycoprotein Structure and Chemotherapy Resistance Print Wednesday, 27 May 2009 00:00 A research team from the Scripps ...

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  10. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  11. Building up rhetorical structure trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcu, D.

    1996-12-31

    I use the distinction between the nuclei and the satellites that pertain to discourse relations to introduce a compositionality criterion for discourse trees. I provide a first-order formalization of rhetorical structure trees and, on its basis, I derive an algorithm that constructs all the valid rhetorical trees that can be associated with a given discourse.

  12. Hummingbird structure in southeastern Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    Saskatchewan's first Devonian oil pool was discovered September 1966, at Hummingbird, 45 mi (72 km) southwest of Weyburn, Saskatchewan. The Hummingbird structure, located on the northwest flank of the Williston basin, is domal is nature and covers approximately 1 mi/sup 2/ (2.6 km/sup 2/). Oil production is from two zones. The Ratcliffe Member of the Mississippian Charles Formation produces from an algal and bioclastic limestone averaging 49 ft (15 m) thick. The Devonian Birdbear Formation produces from a finely crystalline vuggy dolomite averaging 56 ft (17 m) thick. The Hummingbird structure is a sedimentary structure resulting from multiple-stage salt solution and collapse. Recurring local solution of Middle Devonian Prairie Evaporite during Late Devonian and Early Mississippian time resulted in collapse of overlying strata and deposition of compensating thicknesses of Souris River, Duperow, and Bakken sediments. Between Mississippian and Cretaceous time, solution of Prairie Evaporite in the surrounding area caused collapse of all super-Prairie evaporite beds. The extra Souris River, Duperow, and Bakken strata at Hummingbird created the structure. Vertical migration of formation waters along a high-angle fault is suggested as the cause of the local salt solution at Hummingbird.

  13. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grot, Stephen

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  14. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  15. Method and apparatus for synthesizing filamentary structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Height, Murray J.; Howard, Jack B.; Vandersande, John B.

    2008-02-26

    Method and apparatus for producing filamentary structures. The structures include single-walled nanotubes. The method includes combusting hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen to establish a non-sooting flame and providing an unsupported catalyst to synthesize the filamentary structure in a post-flame region of the flame. Residence time is selected to favor filamentary structure growth.

  16. Investigations of Interfacial Structure in Thermoelectric Tellurides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Discusses examples of work on the investigation of atomic structure of interfaces in thermoelectric tellurides

  17. Embedded high-contrast distributed grating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zubrzycki, Walter J.; Vawter, Gregory A.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of fabrication methods for embedded distributed grating structures is claimed, together with optical devices which include such structures. These new methods are the only known approach to making defect-free high-dielectric contrast grating structures, which are smaller and more efficient than are conventional grating structures.

  18. Process to make structured particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Angela Michelle; Richard, Monique N; Luhrs, Claudia; Blada, Timothy; Phillips, Jonathan

    2014-02-04

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains structured particles. The process includes providing a first precursor in the form of a dry precursor powder, a precursor liquid, a precursor vapor of a liquid and/or a precursor gas. The process also includes providing a plasma that has a high field zone and passing the first precursor through the high field zone of the plasma. As the first precursor passes through the high field zone of the plasma, at least part of the first precursor is decomposed. An aerosol having a second precursor is provided downstream of the high field zone of the plasma and the decomposed first material is allowed to condense onto the second precursor to from structured particles.

  19. Sierra Structural Dynamics Theory Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, Garth M.

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Sierra/SD. For a more detailed description of how to use Sierra/SD , we refer the reader to Sierra/SD, User's Notes . Many of the constructs in Sierra/SD are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Sierra/SD are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature. This page intentionally left blank.

  20. LANL PDMLink Product Structure Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Christopher J.

    2012-08-29

    Over the past 2 and a half years LANL has done both functionality exploration as well as production implementations of PDMLink Product Structure to control the configuration of many of the LANL Design Agency Products. Based on this experience LANL has been recommending for over a year that future product structure implementation in PDMLink do not use the two digit suffix in the number field of enterprise parts (or WTParts). The suffix will be part of one of the attributes for Part Number. Per the TBP's the two digit suffix represents a change in form, fit, or function in a part or a change in the production agency or a number of other conditions. It also denotes backward compatibility with earlier suffixed parts (see TBP 402 section 3.1).

  1. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bezryadin, Alexey (Champaign, IL); Remeika, Mikas (Urbana, IL)

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  2. Collective network for computer structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  3. Multifunctional hyper-structured molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, T.; Zhang, Y.; Aoyama, T.; Kubo, Y.; Sasabe, H.

    1998-07-01

    To fill the gap between molecular design and the architecture of three-dimensional functional structures, the authors propose novel hyper-structured molecules (HSMs) based on well-defined and topologically controlled molecular systems. To this end they have developed carbazole dendrimers, trimers, cyclic oligomers and chromogenic calix[4]arenes as HSMs. Photorefractivity was selected as the primary target function of these HSMs. Oligomers developed in their laboratory exhibit intrinsic photocarrier generation, transport, electro-optic, film-forming and poling properties. These multifunctional properties allow us to demonstrate optical image processing using optical phase conjugation. The topological shapes of indoaniline-derived calix[4]arenes were studied by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. The two indoaniline moieties in calix[4]arene derivatives were pre-aligned so as to enhance the net molecular hyperpolarizability. Besides dendric oligomers, cyclic oligomers can be used as a molecular platform which allows molecular level tuning of shape, size and topology for superior opto-electronic functions.

  4. Sierra Structural Dynamics User's Notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, Garth M.

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Sierra/SD. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

  5. GUI for Structural Mechanics Codes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of GUI for Structural Mechanics Codes The TRACC Cluster gives its users a lot of flexibility when it comes to requesting software version of LS-DYNA and computational resources for submitted jobs. To fully utilize that flexibility, users need to get familiar with on-line documentation of all the installed releases of different software and modules on the cluster. As on other LINUX based HPC systems, the submission and controlling of LS-DYNA is done through text commands. Especially

  6. Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2013-01-08

    A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

  7. Heat pipe wick with structural enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andraka, Charles E.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Moreno, James B.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Showalter, Steven K.; Moss, Timothy A.

    2003-11-18

    Heat pipe wick structure wherein a stout sheet of perforated material overlays a high performance wick material such as stainless steel felt affixed to a substrate. The inventive structure provides a good flow path for working fluid while maintaining durability and structural stability independent of the structure (or lack of structure) associated with the wick material. In one described embodiment, a wick of randomly laid .about.8 micron thickness stainless steel fibers is sintered to a metal substrate and a perforated metal overlay.

  8. Structural rejuvenation in bulk metallic glasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tong, Yang; Iwashita, T.; Dmowski, Wojciech; Bei, Hongbin; Yokoyama, Y.; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-01-05

    Using high-energy X-ray diffraction we study structural changes in bulk metallic glasses after uniaxial compressive homogeneous deformation at temperatures slightly below the glass transition. We observe that deformation results in structural disordering corresponding to an increase in the fictive, or effective, temperature. However, the structural disordering saturates after yielding. Lastly, examination of the experimental structure and molecular dynamics simulation suggests that local changes in the atomic connectivity network are the main driving force of the structural rejuvenation.

  9. Business Structures for Tribal Project Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STRUCTURING TRIBAL BUSINESS ENTERPRISES AND JOINT VENTURES Tribal Energy Program Renaissance Hotel Denver, CO November 19, 2008 Presented by Kathleen M. Nilles, Esq. Holland & Knight LLP 2 OVERVIEW - STRUCTURING TRIBAL BUSINESS* * Key Factors in Choosing a Structure * Available Types of Corporate and Governmental Structures * Pros and Cons of Each Structure * Special Considerations Applicable to Joint Ventures * This PowerPoint Presentation is based on concepts presented and detailed in the

  10. Plated lamination structures for integrated magnetic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Bucknell C.

    2014-06-17

    Semiconductor integrated magnetic devices such as inductors, transformers, etc., having laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are provided, wherein the laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are formed using electroplating techniques. For example, an integrated laminated magnetic device includes a multilayer stack structure having alternating magnetic and insulating layers formed on a substrate, wherein each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by an insulating layer, and a local shorting structure to electrically connect each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to an underlying magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to facilitate electroplating of the magnetic layers using an underlying conductive layer (magnetic or seed layer) in the stack as an electrical cathode/anode for each electroplated magnetic layer in the stack structure.

  11. Explosive scabbling of structural materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

  12. Convectively cooled electrical grid structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.W.

    1980-11-10

    Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor. The conductors are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages in the flexible support elements. The grid may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

  13. Quantum superpositions of crystalline structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrusch, Jens D.; Morigi, Giovanna [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Grup d'Optica, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Cormick, Cecilia [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); De Chiara, Gabriele [Grup d'Optica, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Calarco, Tommaso [Institut fuer Quanteninformationsverarbeitung, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A procedure is discussed for creating coherent superpositions of motional states of ion strings. The motional states are across the structural transition linear-zigzag, and their coherent superposition is achieved by means of spin-dependent forces, such that a coherent superposition of the electronic states of one ion evolves into an entangled state between the chain's internal and external degrees of freedom. It is shown that the creation of such an entangled state can be revealed by performing Ramsey interferometry with one ion of the chain.

  14. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  15. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today?s nuclear science is the ?journey to the limits? of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  16. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  17. Structural assessment of accident loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-28

    Structural assessments were made for specific accident loads for specific catch, receiver, and storage tanks. The evaluation herein represents level-of-effort order-of-magnitude estimates of limiting loads that would lead to collapse or rupture of the tank and unmitigated loss of confinement for the waste. Structural capacities were established using failure criteria. Compliance with codes such as ACI, ASCE, ASME, RCRA, UBC, WAC, and DOE Orders was `NOT` maintained. Normal code practice is to prevent failure with margins consistent with expected variations in loads and strengths and confidence in analysis techniques. The evaluation herein represent estimates of code limits without code load factors or code strength reduction factors, and loading beyond such a limit is considered as an onset of some failure mode. The exact nature of the failure mode and its relation to a safe condition is a judgment of the analyst. Consequently, these `RESULTS SHALL NOT BE USED TO ESTABLISH OPERATING OR SAFETY LOAD LIMITS FOR THESE TANKS`.

  18. The Structure of the Proton

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  19. Battery structures, self-organizing structures, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Moorehead, William Douglas

    2013-11-19

    An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode comprising a second material, at least a portion of the first and second materials forming an interpenetrating network when dispersed in an electrolyte, the electrolyte, the first material and the second material are selected so that the first and second materials exert a repelling forve on each other when combined. An electrochemical device, includes a first electrode in electrical communication with a first current collector; a second electrode in electrical communication with a second current collector; and an ionicaily conductive medium in ionic contact with said first and second electrodes, wherein at least a portion of the first and second electrodes form an interpenetrating network and wherein at least one of the first and second electrodes comprises an electrode structure providing two or more pathways to its current collector.

  20. Battery Structures, self-organizing structures, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Moorehead, William Douglas

    2013-11-12

    An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode comprising a second material, at least a portion of the first and second materials forming an interpenetrating network when dispersed in an electrolyte, the electrolyte, the first material and the second material are selected so that the first and second materials exert a repelling force on each other when combined. An electrochemical device, includes a first electrode in electrical communication with a first current collector; a second electrode in electrical communication with a second current collector; and an ionically conductive medium in ionic contact with said first and second electrodes, wherein at least a portion of the first and second electrodes form an interpenetrating network and wherein at least one of the first and second electrodes comprises an electrode structure providing two or more pathways to its current collector.

  1. Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Yet Ming; Moorehead, William Douglas; Gozdz, Antoni S.; Holman, Richard K.; Loxley, Andrew; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Viola, Michael S.

    2009-08-25

    An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode comprising a second material, at least a portion of the first and second materials forming an interpenetrating network when dispersed in an electrolyte, the electrolyte, the first material and the second material are selected so that the first and second materials exert a repelling force on each other when combined. An electrochemical device, includes a first electrode in electrical communication with a first current collector; a second electrode in electrical communication with a second current collector; and an ionically conductive medium in ionic contact with said first and second electrodes, wherein at least a portion of the first and second electrodes form an interpenetrating network and wherein at least one of the first and second electrodes comprises an electrode structure providing two or more pathways to its current collector.

  2. Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Moorehead, William D.; Gozdz, Antoni S.; Holman, Richard K.; Loxley, Andrew L.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Viola, Michael S.

    2012-06-26

    An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode comprising a second material, at least a portion of the first and second materials forming an interpenetrating network when dispersed in an electrolyte, the electrolyte, the first material and the second material are selected so that the first and second materials exert a repelling force on each other when combined. An electrochemical device, includes a first electrode in electrical communication with a first current collector; a second electrode in electrical communication with a second current collector; and an ionically conductive medium in ionic contact with said first and second electrodes, wherein at least a portion of the first and second electrodes form an interpenetrating network and wherein at least one of the first and second electrodes comprises an electrode structure providing two or more pathways to its current collector.

  3. Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Moorehead, William D.; Gozdz, Antoni S.; Holman, Richard K.; Loxley, Andrew L.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Viola, Michael S.

    2012-05-01

    An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode comprising a second material, at least a portion of the first and second materials forming an interpenetrating network when dispersed in an electrolyte, the electrolyte, the first material and the second material are selected so that the first and second materials exert a repelling force on each other when combined. An electrochemical device, includes a first electrode in electrical communication with a first current collector; a second electrode in electrical communication with a second current collector; and an ionically conductive medium in ionic contact with said first and second electrodes, wherein at least a portion of the first and second electrodes form an interpenetrating network and wherein at least one of the first and second electrodes comprises an electrode structure providing two or more pathways to its current collector.

  4. Battery structures, self-organizing structures and related methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Moorehead, William D.; Gozdz, Antoni S.; Holman, Richard K.; Loxley, Andrew L.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Viola, Michael S.

    2011-08-02

    An energy storage device includes a first electrode comprising a first material and a second electrode comprising a second material, at least a portion of the first and second materials forming an interpenetrating network when dispersed in an electrolyte, the electrolyte, the first material and the second material are selected so that the first and second materials exert a repelling force on each other when combined. An electrochemical device, includes a first electrode in electrical communication with a first current collector; a second electrode in electrical communication with a second current collector; and an ionically conductive medium in ionic contact with said first and second electrodes, wherein at least a portion of the first and second electrodes form an interpenetrating network and wherein at least one of the first and second electrodes comprises an electrode structure providing two or more pathways to its current collector.

  5. Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

    2014-08-19

    A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

  6. Tag: Employees & Retirees | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: Employees & Retirees CNS employees blaze through certification exam Seventeen CNS employees earned certified fire protection specialist credentials this year. More... ...

  7. Electron-deuteron DIS with spectator tagging at EIC: Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Such experiments offer full control of the nuclear configuration during ... Conf.; Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 06; Conference: 6th International Conference on Physics ...

  8. Tag: Global Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Security Global Security Analysis and Training Program Sr. Manager Toby Williams describes the GSAT program and its important role to combat radiological terrorism....

  9. Tag: nuclear deterrence | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quality. More... Category: Employees & Retirees Passing the baton On Feb. 1, Dave Richardson assumed the role as president and general manager of B&W Y-12. More... Category:...

  10. Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

  11. Tag: nuclear nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displaying 1 - 1 of 1... Category: News Jamaican Connection Y-12 joins Jamaica and Canada in helping a research reactor on the Caribbean island switch fuels. More......

  12. Fluorescence dye tagging scheme for mercury quantification and speciation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiao, Hong; Catterall, Hannah

    2015-09-22

    A fluorescent dye or fluorophore capable of forming complexes with mercury comprises 6,8-difluoro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylate amide, wherein the amide is formed by reacting the succinimidyl ester (Pacific Blue.TM.) with an amino acid containing a thiol group, such as cysteine or glutathione. Mercury complexes of the fluorophore fluoresce when excited by a UV or violet laser diode, and the detected intensity can be calibrated to quantify the concentration of mercury in a sample reacted with the fluorophore.

  13. Tag: global security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: News Sizing up nuclear fuel The IAEA relies on Y-12 expertise to analyze the powder and pellets that fuel nuclear reactors. More... Category: About Broader National ...

  14. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  15. Tag: fire protection | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    participate in the CNSUniversity of Tennessee's Fire Protection Engineering program burn class. More... Category: Partnerships CNS, University of Tennessee partner on new fire...

  16. Electron-deuteron DIS with spectator tagging at EIC: Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: EPJ Web Conf.; Journal Volume: ... Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote ...

  17. Tag: ES&H | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More... Category: About NNSA announces 2014 sustainability awards NNSA has awarded six 2014 Sustainability Awards for innovation and excellence to the Pantex Plant and the Y-12 ...

  18. Passive hybrid sensing tag with flexible substrate saw device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skinner, Jack L.; Chu, Eric Y.; Ho, Harvey

    2012-12-25

    The integration of surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, microfabricated transmission lines, and sensors onto polymer substrates in order to enable a passive wireless sensor platform is described herein. Incident microwave pulses on an integrated antenna are converted to an acoustic wave via a SAW filter and transmitted to an impedance based sensor, which for this work is a photodiode. Changes in the sensor state induce a corresponding change in the impedance of the sensor resulting in a reflectance profile. Data collected at a calibrated receiver is used to infer the state of the sensor. Based on this principal, light levels were passively and wirelessly demonstrated to be sensed at distances of up to about 12 feet.

  19. Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Paulus, Michael J.; Gleason, Shaun S.

    2007-04-24

    A novel functional imaging system for use in the imaging of unrestrained and non-anesthetized small animals or other subjects and a method for acquiring such images and further registering them with anatomical X-ray images previously or subsequently acquired. The apparatus comprises a combination of an IR laser profilometry system and gamma, PET and/or SPECT, imaging system, all mounted on a rotating gantry, that permits simultaneous acquisition of positional and orientational information and functional images of an unrestrained subject that are registered, i.e. integrated, using image processing software to produce a functional image of the subject without the use of restraints or anesthesia. The functional image thus obtained can be registered with a previously or subsequently obtained X-ray CT image of the subject. The use of the system described herein permits functional imaging of a subject in an unrestrained/non-anesthetized condition thereby reducing the stress on the subject and eliminating any potential interference with the functional testing that such stress might induce.

  20. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  1. Cationic phospholipids: structure transfection activity relationships...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lipids, they form stable complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. ... MIXTURES; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; NUCLEIC ACIDS; PHOSPHATES; PHOSPHOLIPIDS Word ...

  2. Electronic structural and electrochemical properties of lithium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Electronic structural and electrochemical properties of lithium zirconates and ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of the Electrochemical Society; ...

  3. Cationic phospholipids: structure transfection activity relationships...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: ENGLISH Subject: 59 ... LIPIDS; MEMBRANES; MIXTURES; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; NUCLEIC ACIDS; PHOSPHATES; ...

  4. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Perspectives Nonlinear optical approaches for elucidating interfacial fluid and sorbed species structures and dynamics pdf Structural and Dynamic Properties of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Confined within Hierarchical Porous Materials pdf Structure and Dynamics of Electrical Double Layer Using Integrated Scanning Probe Microscopy and Molecular Simulations pdf Effects of Nano-Confinement on the Fluid Interfacial Structure, Dynamics and Thermodynamic behavior pdf Molecular Insights into

  5. Structurally efficient inflatable protective device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelsen, J.M.; Whinery, L.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; McBride, D.D.; Luna, D.A.; Holder, J.P.; Bliton, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for making a low cost, self-venting, inflatable protective cushion of simple and structurally efficient design with a shape and construction that optimizes the cushion`s ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed which includes a sheet defined by at least one fold line and a plurality of flap portions, each flap portion having a base edge corresponding to a fold line and at least two side edges each extending outwardly from a base edge and ultimately converging to meet each other, the flap portions being folded at the fold line(s) and being joined at corresponding side edges to define an inflatable chamber. The inflatable protective cushion and method for making same may further include a lightweight, low permeability, fabric that optimizes the cushion`s ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed and minimizes the packed volume of the cushion when stored. 22 figs.

  6. Structurally efficient inflatable protective device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelsen, James M.; Whinery, Larry D.; Gwinn, Kenneth W.; McBride, Donald D.; Luna, Daniel A.; Holder, Joseph P.; Bliton, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making a low cost, self-venting, inflatable protective cushion of simple and structurally efficient design with a shape and construction that optimizes the cushion's ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed which includes a sheet defined by at least one fold line and a plurality of flap portions, each flap portion having a base edge corresponding to a fold line and at least two side edges each extending outwardly from a base edge and ultimately converging to meet each other, the flap portions being folded at the fold line(s) and being joined at corresponding side edges to define an inflatable chamber. The inflatable protective cushion and method for making same may further include a lightweight, low permeability, fabric that optimizes the cushion's ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed and minimizes the packed volume of the cushion when stored.

  7. Structurally efficient inflatable protective device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelsen, J.M.; Whinery, L.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; McBride, D.D.; Luna, D.A.; Holder, J.P.; Bliton, R.J.

    1997-03-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for making a low cost, self-venting, inflatable protective cushion of simple and structurally efficient design with a shape and construction that optimizes the cushion`s ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed which includes a sheet defined by at least one fold line and a plurality of flap portions, each flap portion having a base edge corresponding to a fold line and at least two side edges each extending outwardly from a base edge and ultimately converging to meet each other, the flap portions being folded at the fold line(s) and being joined at corresponding side edges to define an inflatable chamber. The inflatable protective cushion and method for making same may further include a lightweight, low permeability, fabric that optimizes the cushion`s ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed and minimizes the packed volume of the cushion when stored. 22 figs.

  8. Structurally efficient inflatable protective device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelsen, James M.; Whinery, Larry D.; Gwinn, Kenneth W.; McBride, Donald D.; Luna, Daniel A.; Holder, Joseph P.; Bliton, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making a low cost, self-venting, inflatable protective cushion of simple and structurally efficient design with a shape and construction that optimizes the cushion's ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed which includes a sheet defined by at least one fold line and a plurality of flap portions, each flap portion having a base edge corresponding to a fold line and at least two side edges each extending outwardly from a base edge and ultimately converging to meet each other, the flap portions being folded at the fold line(s) and being joined at corresponding side edges to define an inflatable chamber. The inflatable protective cushion and method for making same may further include a lightweight, low permeability, fabric that optimizes the cushion's ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed and minimizes the packed volume of the cushion when stored.

  9. Structurally efficient inflatable protective device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelsen, James M.; Whinery, Larry D.; Gwinn, Kenneth W.; McBride, Donald D.; Luna, Daniel A.; Holder, Joseph P.; Bliton, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making a low cost, self-venting, inflatable protective cushion of simple and structurally efficient design with a shape and construction that optimizes the cushion's ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed which includes a sheet defined by at least one fold line and a plurality of flap portions, each flap portion having a base edge corresponding to a fold line and at least two side edges each extending outwardly from a base edge and ultimately converging to meet each other, the flap portions being folded at the fold line(s) and being Joined at corresponding side edges to define an inflatable chamber. The inflatable protective cushion and method for making same may further include a lightweight, low permeability, fabric that optimizes the cushion's ability to withstand inflation pressures and impact when deployed and minimizes the packed volume of the cushion when stored.

  10. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  11. Structures and Functions of Oligosaccharins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albersheim, Peter

    1995-12-01

    We have made considerable progress during the 2.5 year funding period just ending in our studies of the structures and functions of oligosaccharide signal molecules (oligosaccharins). We have emphasized studies of the enzymes that solubilize, process, and degrade oligosaccharins and of the proteins that inhibit those enzymes. We have been especially interested in elucidating how oligosaccharins and their processing enzymes participate in determining the outcome of challenges to plants by pathogenic microbes. We have studied, to a lesser extent, the roles of oligosaccharins in plant growth and development. Abstracts of papers describing results acquired with support from this grant that have been published, submitted, or in preparation are presented to summarize the progress made during the last two and one half years. The report highlights the most important contributions made in our oiigosaccharin research during this time period, and the corresponding abstract is referenced. Results of work in progress are described primarily in conjunction with our application for continued support.

  12. Method of forming structural heliostat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Alfred J.

    1984-06-26

    In forming a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement characterized by a method of forming the mirror module in which the mirror is laid upon a solid rigid supporting bed in one or more sections, with or without focusing; a mirror backing sheet is applied by first applying respective thin layers of silicone grease and, thereafter, progressively rolling application to eliminate air bubbles; followed by affixing of a substrate assembly to the mirror backing sheet to form a mirror module that does not curve because of thermally induced stresses and differential thermal expansion or contraction effects. The silicone grease also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and protect the mirror backside against adverse effects of the weather. Also disclosed are specific details of preferred embodiments.

  13. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  14. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems | Department of Energy Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy,

  15. Energy efficient building structure and panel therefor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Th.J.; Paisley, J.K.

    1984-08-28

    A building structure is constructed from a plurality of sheathed, foam cored structural panels which are adapted to receive solar energy conversion or heat storage devices and are adapted to be connected in an air flow loop to provide integral heating and/or cooling systems for the building structure.

  16. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  17. Evolution on folding landscapes in combinatorial structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of molecular structures by random point mutations. They will consider two types of molecular structures: (a) (RNA) secondary structures, and (b) random structures. In both cases structure consists of: (1) a contact graph, and (2) a family of relations imposed on its adjacent vertices. The vertex set of the contact graph is simply the set of all indices of a sequence, and its edges are the bonds. The corresponding relations associated with the edges are viewed as secondary base pairing rules and tertiary interaction rules respectively. Mapping of sequences into secondary and random structures are modeled and analyzed. Here, the set of all sequences that map into a particular structure is modeled as a random graph in the sequence space, the so called neutral network and they study how neutral networks are embedded in sequence space. A basic replication of deletion experiment reveals how effective secondary and random structures can be searched by random point mutations and to what extent the structure effects the dynamics of this optimization process. In particular the authors can report a nonlinear relation between the fraction of tertiary interactions in random structures, and the times taken for a population of sequences to find a high fitness target random structure.

  18. Structural health monitoring of wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmermacher, T.; James, G.H. III.; Hurtado, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    To properly determine what is needed in a structural health monitoring system, actual operational structures need to be studied. We have found that to effectively monitor the structural condition of an operational structure four areas must be addressed: determination of damage-sensitive parameters, test planning, information condensation, and damage identification techniques. In this work, each of the four areas has been exercised on an operational structure. The structures studied were all be wind turbines of various designs. The experiments are described and lessons learned will be presented. The results of these studies include a broadening of experience in the problems of monitoring actual structures as well as developing a process for implementing such monitoring systems.

  19. Structural Code Considerations for Solar Rooftop Installations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Sanchez, Alfred

    2014-12-01

    Residential rooftop solar panel installations are limited in part by the high cost of structural related code requirements for field installation. Permitting solar installations is difficult because there is a belief among residential permitting authorities that typical residential rooftops may be structurally inadequate to support the additional load associated with a photovoltaic (PV) solar installation. Typical engineering methods utilized to calculate stresses on a roof structure involve simplifying assumptions that render a complex non-linear structure to a basic determinate beam. This method of analysis neglects the composite action of the entire roof structure, yielding a conservative analysis based on a rafter or top chord of a truss. Consequently, the analysis can result in an overly conservative structural analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the conservative nature of the regulations and codes governing residential construction and the associated structural system calculations.

  20. Combining Multiple Pairwise Structure-based Alignments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-11-12

    CombAlign is a new Python code that generates a gapped, one-to-many, multiple structure-based sequence alignment(MSSA) given a set of pairwise structure-based alignments. In order to better define regions of similarity among related protein structures, it is useful to detect the residue-residue correspondences among a set of pairwise structure alignments. Few codes exist for constructing a one-to-many, multiple sequence alignment derived from a set of structure alignments, and we perceived a need for creating a newmore » tool for combing pairwise structure alignments that would allow for insertion of gaps in the reference structure.« less