Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Clean coal technology: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses a project carried out under the US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulphur coal-fired boilers under typical boilers conditions in the United States. The project was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc., who served as a co-funder and as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the flue gas through a catalyst bed where the Nox and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The results of the CCTDP project confirmed the applicability of SCR for US coal-fired power plants. In part as a result of the success of this project, a significant number of commercial SCR units have been installed and are operating successfully in the United States. By 2007, the total installed SCR capacity on US coal-fired units will number about 200, representing about 100,000 MWe of electric generating capacity. This report summarizes the status of SCR technology. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs., 10 photos.

NONE

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) an attractive option for NO{sub x} control in coal-fired power plants?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economics have been estimated for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on power plant boilers burning high sulfur bituminous coals. Costs are based on an SCR unit installed in the hot flue gas on the high-dust side of a 500 MW greenfield plant with a capacity factor of 65%. Uncontrolled NO{sub x} emissions are 1.0 lb/10{sup 6} Btu, with 80% removal of the inlet NO{sub x}. At a space velocity of 2,500/hr and a catalyst price of $370/ft{sup 3}, the total capital requirement is $55/kW. Recent improvements indicate that space velocity can be increased by about 30%, to about 3250/hr. Incorporating this value reduces total capital to about $50/kW. With a 4-year catalyst life, the levelized cost (on a current dollar basis) is 3.4 mills/kWh,m or $870/ton of NO{sub x} removed.

Baldwin, A.L.; Smith, D.N. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Mann, A.N.; McIlvried, H.G.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

HYBRID SELECTIVE NON-CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SNCR)/SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) DEMONSTRATION FOR THE REMOVAL OF NOx FROM BOILER FLUE GASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pennsylvania Electric Energy Research Council, (PEERC), New York State Electric and Gas and GPU Generation, Inc. jointly funded a demonstration to determine the capabilities for Hybrid SNCR/SCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction/Selective Catalytic Reduction) technology. The demonstration site was GPU Generation's Seward Unit No.5 (147MW) located in Seward Pennsylvania. The demonstration began in October of 1997 and ended in December 1998. DOE funding was provided through Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96256 with T. J. Feeley as the Project Manager. EPRI funding was provided through agreements TC4599-001-26999 and TC4599-002-26999 with E. Hughes as the Project Manager. This project demonstrated the operation of the Hybrid SNCR/SCR NO{sub x} control process on a full-scale coal fired utility boiler. The hybrid technology was expected to provide a cost-effective method of reducing NO{sub x} while balancing capital and operation costs. An existing urea based SNCR system was modified with an expanded-duct catalyst to provide increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency from the SNCR while producing increased ammonia slip levels to the catalyst. The catalyst was sized to reduce the ammonia slip to the air heaters to less than 2 ppm while providing equivalent NO{sub x} reductions. The project goals were to demonstrate hybrid technology is capable of achieving at least a 55% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions while maintaining less than 2ppm ammonia slip to the air heaters, maintain flyash marketability, verify the cost benefit and applicability of Hybrid post combustion technology, and reduce forced outages due to ammonium bisulfate (ABS) fouling of the air heaters. Early system limitations, due to gas temperature stratification, restricted the Hybrid NO{sub x} reduction capabilities to 48% with an ammonia slip of 6.1 mg/Nm{sup 3} (8 ppm) at the catalyst inlet. After resolving the stratification problem, the catalyst did not have sufficient activity in order to continue the planned test program. Arsenic poisoning was found to be the cause of premature catalyst deactivation.

Jerry B. Urbas

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based and pillared interlayer clay-based catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated...

Oh, Hyuk Jin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Investigation of the potential synergies of LNT and SCR for treating NOx emissions from a...

8

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Ammonia Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction Ammonia Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August,...

10

SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies for NOx Reduction SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerhesser.pdf More...

11

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Discusses the impact of Na in biodiesel on three emission control devices: the diesel particulate filter, diesel oxidation catalyst, and zeolyte-based SCR catalyst

12

A quantum chemical study of nitric oxide reduction by ammonia (SCR reaction) on V2O5 catalyst surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum chemical study of nitric oxide reduction by ammonia (SCR reaction) on V2O5 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide by ammonia on (0 1 0) V2O5 surface represented by a V2O9/6-31G** level. The computations indicated that SCR reaction consisted of three main parts

Senkan, Selim M.

13

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect...

Gupta, Saurabh

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Deactivation Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Better control for...

17

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems...

25

Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines Stand-alone urea SCR...

26

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from pulverized-coal utility boilers using medium- to high-sulfur US coal. The prototype SCR facility, built in and around the ductwork of Plant Crist Unit 5, consisted of three large SCR reactor units (Reactors A, B, and C), each with a design capacity of 5,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of flue gas, and six smaller reactors (Reactors D through J), each with a design capacity of 400 scfm of flue gas. The three large reactors contained commercially available SCR catalysts as offered by SCR catalyst suppliers. These reactors were coupled with small-scale air preheaters to evaluate (1) the long-term effects of SCR reaction chemistry on air preheater deposit formation and (2) the impact of these deposits on the performance of air preheaters. The small reactors were used to test additional varieties of commercially available catalysts. The demonstration project was organized into three phases: (1) Permitting, Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Preparation, and Preliminary Engineering; (2) Detail Design Engineering and Construction; and (3) Operation, Testing, Disposition, and Final Report Preparation. Section 2 discusses the planned and actual EMP monitoring for gaseous, aqueous, and solid streams over the course of the SCR demonstration project; Section 3 summarizes sampling and analytical methods and discusses exceptions from the methods specified in the EMP; Section 4 presents and discusses the gas stream monitoring results; Section 5 presents and discusses the aqueous stream monitoring results; Section 6 presents and discusses the solid stream monitoring results; Section 7 discusses EMP-related quality assurance/quality control activities performed during the demonstration project; Section 8 summarizes compliance monitoring reporting activities; and Section 9 presents conclusions based on the EMP monitoring results.

NONE

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Results show that a series of dual layer catalysts with a bottom layer of LNT catalyst and a top layer of SCR catalyst can carry out coupled ammonia generation and NOx reduction, achieving high NOx conversion with minimal ammonia slip

29

Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction Focus is the heavy duty, US dynamometer...

30

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using...

31

Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stand-alone urea SCR system was developed for marine diesel engines and showed a 50-percent reduction in NOx.

32

The Effects of Hydrocarbons on NOx Reduction over Fe-based SCR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Study of effects of hydrocarbons on ammonia storage and NOx reduction over a commercial Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst to understand catalyst behaviors at low temperatures and improve NOx reduction performance and reduce system cost

33

SCR body May 16  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 May 2005 3 May 2005 Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers An Update of Topical Report Number 9 TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 23 May 2005 An Update of Topical Report Number 9 Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Photos on pages 1, 3, 9, 11, and 16 courtesy of Riley Power Inc.,

34

Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roles of ceria in LNT SCR: I ncreases NOx storage & NO conversion at low tem perature P rom otes W GS reaction Conditions: Lean: 500 ppm NO, 5% O 2 ; 60s Rich: 2.5% H 2 ; 5s X H2...

35

SCR comes of age  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors take a close look at selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which has become the predominant post-combustion technology for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from utility boilers, both in the United States and worldwide. An added, unanticipated benefit of SCR technology is the enhancement of Hg removal in coal-fired power plants. However, additional work remains to be done in developing low-temperature catlysts, in-situ catalyst regeneration processes, and hybrid SNCR/SCR systems. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 photo.

Alfred Mann; Thomas Sarkus; James Staudt [Parsons Corp. (United States)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Estimating SCR installation costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EUCG surveyed 72 separate US installations of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired units totalling 41 GW of capacity to identify the systems' major cost drivers. The results, summarized in this article, provide excellent first-order estimates and guidance for utilities considering installing the downstream emissions-control technology. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Marano, M.; Sharp, G. [American Electric Power (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

SCR/Urea filter — A new filtration application for diesel vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order that the systems which in future will be necessary for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) in diesel-engined vehicles are protected against wear and ... for all the known SCR systems on the market. Mann+...

Jochen Reyinger; Gunnar-Marcel Klein; Michael Durst

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Closed-loop control of a SCR system using a NOx sensor cross-sensitive to NH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Closed-loop control of a SCR system using a NOx sensor cross-sensitive to NH3 A.Bonfils , Y. Creff for an automotive selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system, for which the feedback is based on a NOx sensor the variety of en- countered technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is one of the most appealing

39

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction...

40

Method to monitor HC-SCR catalyst NOx reduction performance for lean exhaust applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for initiating a regeneration mode in selective catalytic reduction device utilizing hydrocarbons as a reductant includes monitoring a temperature within the aftertreatment system, monitoring a fuel dosing rate to the selective catalytic reduction device, monitoring an initial conversion efficiency, selecting a determined equation to estimate changes in a conversion efficiency of the selective catalytic reduction device based upon the monitored temperature and the monitored fuel dosing rate, estimating changes in the conversion efficiency based upon the determined equation and the initial conversion efficiency, and initiating a regeneration mode for the selective catalytic reduction device based upon the estimated changes in conversion efficiency.

Viola, Michael B. (Macomb Township, MI); Schmieg, Steven J. (Troy, MI); Sloane, Thompson M. (Oxford, MI); Hilden, David L. (Shelby Township, MI); Mulawa, Patricia A. (Clinton Township, MI); Lee, Jong H. (Rochester Hills, MI); Cheng, Shi-Wai S. (Troy, MI)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biodiesel + SCR Retrofit Testing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

+ SCR Retrofit Testing Biodiesel + SCR Retrofit Testing This work retrofitted an in-use engine with urea SCR and measured NOx reductions versus blend levels of ULSD, B20, and B100...

42

Development of an open loop fuzzy logic urea dosage controller for use with an SCR equipped HDD engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) has been shown to be the most promising exhaust aftertreatment system for reducing oxides of nitrogen in near term in-use applications.… (more)

Adams, Theodore R. (Theodore Richard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Surface characterization studies of TiO2 supported manganese oxide catalysts for low temperature SCR of NO with NH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCR of NO with NH3 Padmanabha Reddy Ettireddy a , Neeraja Ettireddy a , Sergey Mamedov b , Punit-impregnation method for the low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ammonia as a reductantO2 supported catalysts for low temperature SCR reaction at catalyst bed temperature 175 8C under

Boolchand, Punit

44

Development of HC-SCR System Using Diesel Fuel as a Reductant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle test Dynamo test In order to remove NOx from diesel vehicle emission, urea- SCR is generally used. In this studies, diesel fuel itself was used as a NO to remove...

45

Selective Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems Optimization A patented EGR-SCR approach was shown to readily meet the 2010 EPA requirments for NOx and PM emisisons...

46

Advanced Metal-Oxide based SCR Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

SCR with ammonia as reductant is an effective strategy being utilized to reduce NOx emissions to meet regulated levels.

47

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCR Catalyst Blinding  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCR Catalyst Blinding SCR Catalyst Blinding University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) is determining the potential of low-rank coal ash to cause blinding or masking of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. A secondary goal will be to determine the degree of elemental mercury conversion across the catalysts. Specific objectives include (1) identify candidate coals and blends for testing under bench-scale conditions, (2) conduct bench-scale testing to screen coals and identify key conditions for full-scale testing, (3) design and construct an SCR slipstream test chamber for sampling at full-scale facilities, (4) conduct testing at full-scale testing, (5) identify SCR blinding mechanisms, rates, and cleaning methods as well as mercury conversion efficiencies, and (6) interpret data, prepare a report, and attend sponsor meetings to present information and recommendations.

48

SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

49

PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION FOR NOx ON MERCURY SPECIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full-scale tests in Europe and bench-scale tests in the United States have indicated that the catalyst, normally vanadium/titanium metal oxide, used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x}, may promote the formation of Hg{sup 2+} and/or particulate-bound mercury (Hg{sub p}). To investigate the impact of SCR on mercury speciation, pilot-scale screening tests were conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The primary research goal was to determine whether the catalyst or the injection of ammonia in a representative SCR system promotes the conversion of Hg{sup 0} to Hg{sup 2+} and/or Hg{sub p} and, if so, which coal types and parameters (e.g., rank and chemical composition) affect the degree of conversion. Four different coals, three eastern bituminous coals and a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, were tested. Three tests were conducted for each coal: (1) baseline, (2) NH{sub 3} injection, and (3) SCR of NO{sub x}. Speciated mercury, ammonia slip, SO{sub 3}, and chloride measurements were made to determine the effect the SCR reactor had on mercury speciation. It appears that the impact of SCR of NO{sub x} on mercury speciation is coal-dependent. Although there were several confounding factors such as temperature and ammonia concentrations in the flue gas, two of the eastern bituminous coals showed substantial increases in Hg{sub p} at the inlet to the ESP after passing through an SCR reactor. The PRB coal showed little if any change due to the presence of the SCR. Apparently, the effects of the SCR reactor are related to the chloride, sulfur and, possibly, the calcium content of the coal. It is clear that additional work needs to be done at the full-scale level.

Dennis L. Laudal; John H. Pavlish; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Gregory F. Weber; Everett Sondreal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Characterization and catalytic performance of vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-PILC catalysts issued from different Ti-precursors in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide by ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-pillared clay catalysts (STi-PILCs) issued from different Ti-precursors were investigated for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 in the presence of O2. The STi-PILC...

J. Arfaoui; L. Khalfallah Boudali; A. Ghorbel; G. Delahay

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Predictable SCR co-benefits for mercury control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test program, performed in cooperation with Dominion Power and the Babcock and Wilcox Co., was executed at Dominion Power's Mount Storm power plant in Grant County, W. Va. The program was focused on both the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst capability to oxide mercury as well as the scrubber's capability to capture and retain the oxidized mercury. This article focuses on the SCR catalyst performance aspects. The Mount Storm site consists of three units totaling approximately 1,660 MW. All units are equipped with SCR systems for NOx control. A full-scale test to evaluate the effect of the SCR was performed on Unit 2, a 550 MWT-fired boiler firing a medium sulfur bituminous coal. This test program demonstrated that the presence of an SCR catalyst can significantly affect the mercury speciation profile. Observation showed that in the absence of an SCR catalyst, the extent of oxidation of element a mercury at the inlet of the flue gas desulfurization system was about 64%. The presence of a Cornertech SCR catalyst improved this oxidation to levels greater than 95% almost all of which was captured by the downstream wet FGD system. Cornertech's proprietary SCR Hg oxidation model was used to accurately predict the field results. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Pritchard, S. [Cormtech Inc. (USA)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Selective catalytic reduction used at Scanraff to reduce NO{sub x}, particulate emissions from FCCU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes various studies conducted to identify how the Scanraff Refinery in Sweden could best comply with environmental legislation for NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. Initial work identified flue gas from the catalyst regenerator of the fluidized catalytic cracking unit as the largest single source of NO{sub x} emissions. A more detailed study identified process modifications to reduce emissions, including the addition of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit and a ceramic hot-gas filter. For the SCR unit, subtopics discussed include design option selection, SCR size and performance, selection of catalyst, catalyst configuration and performance, contamination, and modification of the waste heat boiler. The description of the hot-gas filtration system includes a comparison with electrostatic precipitator systems, the Schumacher filter, filtration medium, design temperature, and handling.

Brook, P.; Hagger, B.; Wood, J. [Foster Wheeler Energy Limited, Reading (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Mercury oxidation over a vanadia-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of the reaction among elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and reactive flue gas components across the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was studied in a laboratory-scale reactor. Prepared vanadia-based SCR catalysts were characterized and analyzed to understand the potential reaction pathways. Mercury oxidation was observed when pro-exposure of the SCR catalyst to HCl, followed by passing through Hg{sup 0}/N{sub 2} in the absence of gas-phase HCl. At testing conditions, Hg{sup 0} was found to desorb from the catalyst surface by adding HCl to the gas stream, which implies that HCl adsorption onto the SCR catalyst is strong relative to the mercury. Surface analysis verified the absorption of HCl onto the SCR catalysts, and the potential reaction pathways were proposed. Indeed, the monomeric vanadyl sites on the catalyst surface were found to be responsible for the adsorption of both Hg{sup 0} and HCl, which means they are active for mercury oxidation. Furthermore, the detailed Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism was proposed to explain the mercury oxidation on the SCR catalyst, where reactive Cl generated from adsorbed HCl reacts with adjacent Hg{sup 0}. 44 refs., 10 figs.

Sheng He; Jinsong Zhou; Yanqun Zhu; Zhongyang Luo; Mingjiang Ni; Kefa Cen [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Local ammonia storage and ammonia inhibition in a monolithic copper-beta zeolite SCR catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3} was studied on a Cu-beta zeolite catalyst, with specific focus on the distributed NH{sub 3} capacity utilization and inhibition. In addition, several other relevant catalyst parameter distributions were quantified including the SCR zone, or catalyst region where SCR occurs, and NO and NH{sub 3} oxidation. We show that the full NH{sub 3} capacity (100% coverage) is used within the SCR zone for a range of temperatures. By corollary, unused NH{sub 3} capacity exists downstream of the SCR zone. Consequently, the unused capacity relative to the total capacity is indicative of the portion of the catalyst unused for SCR. Dynamic NH{sub 3} inhibition distributions, which create local transient conversion inflections, are measured. Dynamic inhibition is observed where the gas phase NH{sub 3} and NO concentrations are high, driving rapid NH{sub 3} coverage buildup and SCR. Accordingly, we observe dynamic inhibition at low temperatures and in hydrothermally aged states, but predict its existence very near the catalyst front in higher conversion conditions where we did not specifically monitor its impact. While this paper addresses some general distributed SCR performance parameters including Oxidation and SCR zone, our major new contributions are associated with the NH{sub 3} capacity saturation within the SCR zone and dynamic inhibition distributions and the associated observations. These new insights are relevant to developing accurate models, designs and control strategies for automotive SCR catalyst applications.

Auvray, Xavier P [Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Yezerets, Alex [Cummins, Inc; Kamasamudram, Krishna [Cummins, Inc; Currier, Neal [Cummins, Inc; Olsson, Louise [Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Generating Optimized Code from SCR Specifications Tom Rothamel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Optimized Code from SCR Specifications Tom Rothamel Yanhong A. Liu Stony Brook for generating efficient code from SCR (Software Cost Reduction) specifications. While the SCR tabular notation now SCR has lacked an automated method for generating optimized code. This paper describes an ef

Liu, Yanhong Annie

58

Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction. 1. Aqueous Solution Ion Exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

selective catalytic reduction; chabazite; SAPO-34; Cu-SAPO-34; diesel engine; emission control; NOx ... NOx storage-reduction (NSR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are leading NOx emission control techniques for such lean-burn diesel engines. ... (8, 47) However, severe intracrystalline mass-transfer limitations for Cu-SSZ-13, due apparently to the small-pore opening structure of Chabazite, complicates such fundamental studies. ...

Feng Gao; Eric D. Walter; Nancy M. Washton; János Szanyi; Charles H. F. Peden

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ethanol/gasoline blends over a silver/alumina catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lean gasoline engines running on ethanol/gasoline blends and equipped with a silver/alumina catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ethanol provide a pathway to reduced petroleum consumption through both increased biofuel utilization and improved engine efficiency relative to the current stoichiometric gasoline engines that dominate the U.S. light duty vehicle fleet. A pre-commercial silver/alumina catalyst demonstrated high NOx conversions over a moderate temperature window with both neat ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol. Selectivity to NH3 increases with HC dosing and ethanol content in gasoline blends, but appears to saturate at around 45%. NO2 and acetaldehyde behave like intermediates in the ethanol SCR of NO. NH3 SCR of NOx does not appear to play a major role in the ethanol SCR reaction mechanism. Ethanol is responsible for the low temperature SCR activity observed with the ethanol/gasoline blends. The gasoline HCs do not deactivate the catalyst ethanol SCR activity, but they also do not appear to be significantly activated by the presence of ethanol.

Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL; Fisher, Galen [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst.

62

Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept Understanding the detailed chemistry of Nox Reduction across the combined LNT+SCR system. deer10crocker.pdf More...

63

Study of mercury oxidation by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst in a pilot-scale slipstream reactor at a utility boiler burning bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the cost-effective mercury control technologies in coal-fired power plants is the enhanced oxidation of elemental mercury in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) followed by the capture of the oxidized mercury in the wet scrubber. This paper is the first in a series of two in which the validation of the SCR slipstream test and Hg speciation variation in runs with or without SCR catalysts inside the SCR slipstream reactor under special gas additions (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 3}) are presented. Tests indicate that the use of a catalyst in a SCR slipstream reactor can achieve greater than 90% NO reduction efficiency with a NH{sub 3}/NO ratio of about 1. There is no evidence to show that the reactor material affects mercury speciation. Both SCR catalysts used in this study exhibited a catalytic effect on the elemental mercury oxidation but had no apparent adsorption effect. SCR catalyst 2 seemed more sensitive to the operational temperature. The spike gas tests indicated that HCl can promote Hg{sup 0} oxidation but not Cl{sub 2}. The effect of Cl{sub 2} on mercury oxidation may be inhibited by higher concentrations of SO{sub 2}, NO, or H{sub 2}O in real flue-gas atmospheres within the typical SCR temperature range (300-350{sup o}C). SO{sub 2} seemed to inhibit mercury oxidation; however, SO{sub 3} may have some effect on the promotion of mercury oxidation in runs with or without SCR catalysts. 25 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bobby Chen; Jiang Wu; Hong Cui; John Smith; Chi-Kuan Chen; Paul Chu; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Combined use of a mass-spectrometer and a UV analyzer in the dynamic study of NH3-SCR for diesel exhaust aftertreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer (MS) and a novel UV analyzer were coupled in the experimental study of the transient Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactivity, aimed at the development of a dynamic numerical model of...

Cristian Ciardelli; Isabella Nova; Enrico Tronconi…

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub 2} with urea in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub 2} with urea in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was investigated with in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At T=473 K, the reaction rate for urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was significantly greater than that in commercial NaY zeolite with a larger crystal size. In addition, a dramatic decrease in the concentration of undesirable surface species, including biuret and cyanuric acid, was observed in nanocrystalline NaY compared with commercial NaY after urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} at T=473 K. The increased reactivity for urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} was attributed to silanol groups and extra-framework aluminum species located on the external surface of nanocrystalline NaY. Specifically, NOx storage as nitrate and nitrite on the internal zeolite surface was coupled to reactive deNOx sites on the external surface. Isotopic labeling combined with IR analysis suggest that NN bond formation involved both an N-atom originating from NO{sub 2} and an N-atom originating from urea. This is the first clear example demonstrating that the increased external surface area (up to 40% of total surface area) of nanocrystalline zeolites can be used as a reactive surface with unique active sites for catalysis.

Gonghu Li; Conrad A. Jones; Vicki H. Grassian; Sarah C. Larsen [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Department of Chemistry

2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Abductive Approach for Handling Inconsistencies in SCR Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Abductive Approach for Handling Inconsistencies in SCR Specifications Alessandra Russo* Rob in Software Cost Reduction (SCR) specifications. The approach uses an event-based logic, called the Event Calculus, to represent SCR mode transition tables. Building on this formalism, the approach provides

Russo, Alessandra

69

Verifying SCR Requirements Speci cations Using State Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying SCR Requirements Speci cations Using State Exploration In Proc. First ACM SIGPLAN as the SCR Software Cost Reduction method, to specify the requirements of software systems using ta- bles. NRL has developed a formal state machine model de ning the SCR semantics and support tools for anal

70

SCR*: A Toolset for Specifying and Analyzing Software Requirements?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCR*: A Toolset for Specifying and Analyzing Software Requirements? Constance Heitmeyer, James. This paper describes the SCR Software Cost Reduction tools, part of a practical" formal method|a method, knowledge of temporal and higher order logics, or consultation with formal methods experts. The SCR method

71

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past quarter, progress has been made in four tasks as summarized below: Task 1: A delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay was synthesized and carefully characterized. The chemical composition was measured by ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The structural changes in the clay as well as the iron oxide particle sizes were characterized by X-ray diffraction techniques. Task 2: The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR, i.e., NO reduction with NH{sub 3}) activities of the delaminated pillared clay were tested and compared with four other most active SCR catalysts: a commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst, a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay, and two supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts (on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}). The delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay exhibited the highest SCR activities. Catalyst stability test showed that the delaminated sample was also stable. Task 3: To further increase the SCR activity of the delaminated pillared clay, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was doped as a promoter by incipient wetness. Task 4: Deactivation effects of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the SCR activities of the delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay were studied, and compared with other SCR catalysts. The delaminated clay catalyst showed the least deactivation.

Chen, J.P.; Cheng, L.S.; Hausladen, M.C.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and Other Reductants Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and Other Reductants 2004 Diesel Engine...

74

Oxidation of mercury across selective catalytic reduction catalysts in coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kinetic model for predicting the amount of mercury (Hg) oxidation across selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in coal-fired power plants was developed and tested. The model incorporated the effects of diffusion within the porous SCR catalyst and the competition between ammonia and Hg for active sites on the catalyst. Laboratory data on Hg oxidation in simulated flue gas and slipstream data on Hg oxidation in flue gas from power plants were modeled. The model provided good fits to the data for eight different catalysts, both plate and monolith, across a temperature range of 280-420{sup o}C, with space velocities varying from 1900 to 5000 hr{sup -1}. Space velocity, temperature, hydrochloric acid content of the flue gas, ratio of ammonia to nitric oxide, and catalyst design all affected Hg oxidation across the SCR catalyst. The model can be used to predict the impact of coal properties, catalyst design, and operating conditions on Hg oxidation across SCRs. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Constance L. Senior [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Physical and chemical characterisation of potassium deactivation of a SCR catalyst for biomass combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The deactivation of a commercial Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst, of V2O5?WO3/TiO2...type, has been studied through comparisons with results from a full-scale biomass combustion plant to that with la...

Ann-Charlotte Larsson; Jessica Einvall; Arne Andersson; Mehri Sanati

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Optimal SCR Control Using Data-Driven Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an optimal control solution for the urea injection for a heavy-duty diesel (HDD) selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The approach taken here is useful beyond SCR and could be applied to any system where a control strategy is desired and input-output data is available. For example, the strategy could also be used for the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) system. In this paper, we identify and validate a one-step ahead Kalman state-space estimator for downstream NOx using the bench reactor data of an SCR core sample. The test data was acquired using a 2010 Cummins 6.7L ISB production engine with a 2010 Cummins production aftertreatment system. We used a surrogate HDD federal test procedure (FTP), developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU), which simulates the representative transients of the standard FTP cycle, but has less engine speed/load points. The identified state-space model is then used to develop a tunable cost function that simultaneously minimizes NOx emissions and urea usage. The cost function is quadratic and univariate, thus the minimum can be computed analytically. We show the performance of the closed-loop controller in using a reduced-order discrete SCR simulator developed at MTU. Our experiments with the surrogate HDD-FTP data show that the strategy developed in this paper can be used to identify performance bounds for urea dose controllers.

Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Lian, Jianming; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Parker, Gordon

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Onboard Measurements of Nanoparticles from a SCR-Equipped Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Onboard Measurements of Nanoparticles from a SCR-Equipped Marine Diesel Engine ... Measurements were conducted on one of the ship’s four main 12 600 kW medium–speed diesel engines which use low sulfur marine residual fuel and have a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system for NOX abatement. ... A general pattern in the nanoparticles emitted is that there was an initial peak in mass and number concentration at start-up and before reaching the open-sea (Figure 1). ...

Åsa M. Hallquist; Erik Fridell; Jonathan Westerlund; Mattias Hallquist

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

Ammonia Generation over TWC for Passive SCR NOX Control for Lean Gasoline Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) was evaluated for ammonia (NH3) generation on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine as a component in a passive ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The passive NH3 SCR system is a potential low cost approach for controlling nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions from lean burn gasoline engines. In this system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst. NH3 generation was evaluated at different air-fuel equivalence ratios at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Near complete conversion of NOX to NH3 was achieved at =0.96 for nearly all conditions studied. At the =0.96 condition, HC emissions were relatively minimal, but CO emissions were significant. Operation at AFRs richer than =0.96 did not provide more NH3 yield and led to higher HC and CO emissions. Results of the reductant conversion and consumption processes were used to calculate a representative fuel consumption of the engine operating with an ideal passive SCR system. The results show a 1-7% fuel economy benefit at various steady-state engine speed and load points relative to a stoichiometric engine operation.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for CIDI Engines Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for CIDI Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that these data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the ninth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on Unit 1 at Plant 7, a 566 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 3.6% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Four sampling tests were performed in August 2004 during ozone season with the SCR operating; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, SCR outlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Three sampling tests were also performed in November 2004 during non-ozone season with the SCR bypassed; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet). Process samples for material balances were collected during the flue gas measurements. The results show that, at the point where the flue gas enters the FGD, a greater percentage of the mercury was in the oxidized form when the SCR was operating compared to when the SCR was bypassed (97% vs 91%). This higher level of oxidation resulted in higher mercury removals in the FGD because the FGD removed 90-94% of the oxidized mercury in both cases. Total coal-to-stack mercury removal was 86% with the SCR operating, and 73% with the SCR bypassed. The average mercury mass balance closure was 81% during the ozone season tests and 87% during the non-ozone season tests.

J. A. Withum; S. C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Modeling of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using four modern catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ammonia and Oxygen Exponents for V Catalyst........................ 36 Table 6.20 Experimental Data at 150 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28].................................. 40 Table 6.21 Experimental Data at 200 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst... [28].................................. 40 Table 6.22 Experimental Data at 250 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28].................................. 40 Table 6.23 Experimental Data at 300 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28...

Sharma, Giriraj

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past quarter, progress was made in three tasks. The poisoning effects of alkali metals (as Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}0 and Cs{sub 2}O) on iron oxide pillared clay (Fe-Bentonite) catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3} were investigated. The effects of sulfur dioxide and water vapor on the performance of the high activity catalyst, that is, Ce-doped Fe-Bentonite pillared clay (Ce-Fe-Bentonite) were examined. In addition, an iron ion-exchanged titania pillared clay (Ti-PILC) was prepared and its catalytic activity for the SCR of NO with NH{sub 3} was studied, which showed a high activity and a high S0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}0 resistance at high temperatures (i.e., above 400{degree}C).

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics over Cu-SSZ-13 from motion of the Cu ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios, at 6, 12 and 35, are synthesized with solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions. By varying Si/Al ratios and Cu loadings, it is possible to synthesize catalysts with one dominant type of isolated Cu2+ ion species. Prior to full dehydration of the zeolite catalyst, hydrated Cu2+ ions are found to be very mobile as judged from EPR. NO oxidation is catalyzed by O-bridged Cu-dimer species that form at relatively high Cu loadings and in the presence of O2. For NH3 oxidation and standard SCR reactions, transient Cu-dimers even form at much lower Cu loadings; and these are proposed to be the active sites for reaction temperatures ? 350 °C. These dimer species can be viewed as in equilibrium with monomeric Cu ion complexes. Between ~250 and 350 °C, these moieties become less stable causing SCR reaction rates to decrease. At temperatures above 350 °C and at low Cu loadings, Cu-dimers completely dissociate to regenerate isolated Cu2+ monomers that then locate at ion-exchange sites of the zeolite lattice. At low Cu loadings, these Cu species are the high-temperature active SCR catalytic centers. At high Cu loadings, on the other hand, both Cu-dimers and monomers are highly active in the high temperature kinetic regime, yet Cu-dimers are less selective in SCR. Brönsted acidity is also very important for SCR reactivity in the high-temperature regime. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Kollar, Marton; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures. Copper oxide in excess of monolayer coverage reduces at temperatures close to the reduction temperature of the unsupported copper oxide. Increased dispersion increases the support effect. Low activity of ceria in NO reduction may be due to its resistance to reduction at low temperatures.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Applying the SCR Requirements Method to the Light Control Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying the SCR Requirements Method to the Light Control Case Study Journal of Universal Computer@itd.nrl.navy.mil Abstract: To date, the SCR Software Cost Reduction requirements method has been used in industrial plants and avion- ics systems. This paper describes the use of the SCR method to specify the requirements

88

A LogicModel Semantics for SCR Software Requirements Joanne M. Atlee \\Lambda Michael A. Buckley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Logic­Model Semantics for SCR Software Requirements Joanne M. Atlee \\Lambda Michael A. Buckley a simple logic­model semantics for Software Cost Reduction (SCR) soft­ ware requirements. Such a semantics enables model­ checking of native SCR requirements and obviates the need to transform the requirements

Atlee, Joanne M.

89

Using the BToolkit to Ensure Safety in SCR Specifications Indrakshi Ray \\Lambda Paul Ammann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the B­Toolkit to Ensure Safety in SCR Specifications Indrakshi Ray \\Lambda Paul Ammann: findrakshi, pammanng@gmu.edu Abstract SCR (Software Cost Reduction) specifications are useful for specifying event­driven systems. To use SCR effectively for critical applications, automated verification of safety

Ray, Indrakshi

90

JV 58-Effects of Biomass Combustion on SCR Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portable slipstream selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactor was installed at a biomass cofired utility boiler to examine the rates and mechanisms of catalyst deactivation when exposed to biomass combustion products. The catalyst was found to deactivate at a much faster rate than typically found in a coal-fired boiler, although this may have been the result of high ash loading rather than a general property of biomass combustion. Deactivation was mainly the result of alkali and alkaline-earth sulfate formation and growth in catalyst pores, apparently caused by alkaline-earth ash deposition on or near the pore sites. The high proportion of biomass in the fuel contributed to elevated levels of alkali and alkaline-earth material in the ash when compared to coal ash, and these higher levels provided more opportunity for sulfate formation. Based on laboratory tests, neither catalyst material nor ammonia contributed measurably to ash mass gains via sulfation. A model constructed using both field and laboratory data was able to predict catalyst deactivation of catalysts under subbituminous coal firing but performed poorly at predicting catalyst deactivation under cofiring conditions. Because of the typically higher-than coal levels of alkali and alkaline-earth elements present in biomass fuels that are available for sulfation at typical SCR temperatures, the use of SCR technology and biomass cofiring needs to be carefully evaluated prior to implementation.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Joshua R. Strege; Donald P. McCollor; Jason D. Laumb; Lingbu Kong

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the tenth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on two 468 MW units burning bituminous coal containing 1.3-1.7% sulfur. Unit 2 is equipped with an SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Unit 1 is similar to Unit 2, except that Unit 1 has no SCR for NOx control. Four sampling tests were performed on both units in January 2005; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the economizer outlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process samples for material balances were collected with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the SCR increased the oxidation of the mercury at the air heater outlet. At the exit of the air heater, a greater percentage of the mercury was in the oxidized and particulate forms on the unit equipped with an SCR compared to the unit without an SCR (97.4% vs 91%). This higher level of oxidation resulted in higher mercury removals in the scrubber. Total mercury removal averaged 97% on the unit with the SCR, and 87% on the unit without the SCR. The average mercury mass balance closure was 84% on Unit 1 and 103% on Unit 2.

J. A. Withum; J. E. Locke

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Validated SCR Concept Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Validated SCR Concept Development 2007 DEER Conference, Detroit, MI Dr. Michael Traver, IAV Inc James Ireton, IAV Inc Dr. Lutz Krmer, IAV GmbH Jrgen Manns, IAV GmbH Poster...

93

Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE...

94

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last Quarterly Technical Progress Report the authors reported the synthesis and (partial characterization) and SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO) activity for a delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PILC). The SCR activity for this PILC was substantially higher than that of the commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst. During the past quarter, the authors first completed the characterization of the delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PILC catalyst. Both physical characterization (micropore probing by adsorption and Moessbauer spectroscopy) and chemical characterization (by IR spectroscopy) were performed. Since the synthesis of this PILC sample was undertaken under a specific set of conditions and it is known that the PILC properties depend strongly on the synthesis conditions, they then proceeded to examine in a systematic manner the dependence of the catalytic properties of the PILC on its synthesis conditions. Four parameters in the synthesis were studied: Fe precursors, pH of the pillaring solution, concentration of the pillaring solution, and the starting clay. Finally, the effect of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoter on the SCR activity of the pillar clay was studied. Results are reported.

Chen, J.P.; Li, W.B.; Hausladen, M.C.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

XAFS Study of Active Tungsten Species on WO3/TiO2 as a Catalyst for Photo-SCR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity of the photo-assisted selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 (photo-SCR) was enhanced by the addition of WO3 to TiO2. From the result of XAFS analysis, the W species on TiO2 had a WO4 tetrahedral structure and agglutination took place as the addition of WO3 was increased. We conclude that the isolated W species enhances the surface acidity and photo-SCR activity whereas the agglutinated W species is an inactive species.

Yamazoe, Seiji; Masutani, Yasuyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Tsunehiro [Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Final technical report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most advanced and proven technology for NO{sub x} control for stationary sources is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). In SCR, NO{sub x} is reduced by NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The commercial catalysts are based on V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2}, and the vanadium-based catalysts are patented by the Japanese (Mitsubishi). However, there are three main advantages for the vanadium-based SCR catalyst: (a) a tendency to be poisoned in the flue gas; (b) oxidation of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, this is a particularly severe problem due to the higher sulfur content of American coals compared with coals used in Japan (from Australia) and in Europe; (c) environmental problems involved in the disposal of the spent catalyst (due to the toxicity of vanadium). In order to overcome these problems, in addition to the undesirable dominance by the Japanese patent position, the authors have studied in this project a new type of catalyst for the SCR reaction; namely, pillared clays, which have adjustable, unique structures and acidity. Three types of catalysts were developed and tested for this reaction, i.e. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clays, delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clays, and ion-exchanged pillared clays. The project was divided into sixteen tasks, and will be reported as such.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Chen, J.P.; Hausladen, M.C.; Cheng, L.S.; Kikkinides, E.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

SCR SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS: PROGRESS TOWARDS MEETING EURO 4 EMISSION STANDARDS IN 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions of diesel engines contain some components, which support the generation of smog and which are classified hazardous. Exhaust gas aftertreatment is a powerful tool to reduce the NOx and Particulate emissions. The NOx-emission can be reduced by the SCR technology. SCR stands for Selective Catalytic Reduction. A reduction agent has to be injected into the exhaust upstream of a catalyst. On the catalyst the NOx is reduced to N2 (Nitrogen) and H2O (Water). This catalytic process was developed in Japan about 30 years ago to reduce the NOx emission of coal-fired power plants. The first reduction agent used was anhydrous ammonia (NH3). SCR technology was used with diesel engines starting mid of the 80s. First applications were stationary operating generator-sets. In 1991 a joint development between DaimlerChrysler, MAN, IVECO and Siemens was started to use SCR technology for the reduction of heavy duty trucks. Several fleet tests demonstrated the durability of the systems. To day, SCR technology is the most promising technology to fulfill the new European Regulations EURO 4 and EURO 5 being effective Oct. 2005 and Oct. 2008. The efficient NOx reduction of the catalyst allows an engine calibration for low fuel consumption. DaimlerChrysler decided to use the SCR technology on every heavy duty truck and bus in Europe and many other truck manufacturers will introduce SCR technology to fulfill the 2005 emission regulation. The truck manufacturers in Europe agreed to use aqueous solution of Urea as reducing agent. The product is called AdBlue. AdBlue is a non toxic, non smelling liquid. The consumption is about 5% of the diesel fuel consumption to reduce the NOx emissions. A small AdBlue tank has to be installed to the vehicle. With an electronically controlled dosing system the AdBlue is injected into the exhaust. The dosing system is simple and durable. It has proven its durability during winter and summer testing as well as in fleet tests. The infrastructure for AdBlue is under evaluation in Europe by Urea Producers and Mineral Oil companies to be readily available in time. Urea is one of the most common chemical products in the world and the production and the distribution very much experienced. However, a pure grade is needed for automotive application and requires special attention.

Frank, W; Huethwohl, G; Maurer, B

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ion-exchanged pillared clays: A new class of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons and by ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} is presently performed with vanadia-based catalysts for flue gas applications. Hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). SCR of NO by hydrocarbons can also find important applications for lean-burn (i.e., O{sub 2}-rich) gasoline and diesel engines where the noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective in the presence of excess oxygen. Pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) have been studied extensively for a number of catalyzed reactions. We have found high activities of PILCs for SCR of NO by NH{sub 3} (26.28). Pillared clays have considerable Bronsted acidity (27, 28), and the protons can be exchanged with metal cations. The Bronsted acidity of TiO{sub 2}-PILC, in particular, remains high after heat treatment at temperatures as high as 400{degrees}C (27-29). In this note, we report first results on the activities of cation-exchanged pillared clays for SCR of NO by both hydrocarbon and NH{sub 3}. 37 refs., 3 figs.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single-cylinder diesel engine with an emissions control system - diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), Fe-zeolite selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF) - was used to perform accelerated thermal aging of the SCR catalyst. Cyclic aging is performed at SCR inlet temperatures of 650, 750 and 850 degrees C for up to 50 aging cycles. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated thermal aging protocol, a field-aged SCR catalyst of similar formulation was also evaluated. The monoliths were cut into sections and evaluated for NO{sub x} performance in a bench-flow reactor. While the rear section of both the field-aged and the accelerated engine-aged SCR catalysts maintained high NO{sub x}conversion, 75-80% at 400 degrees C, the front section exhibited a drastic decrease to only 20-35% at 400 degrees C. This two-tiered deactivation was also observed for field-aged samples that were analyzed in this study. To understand the observed performance changes, thorough materials characterization was performed which revealed two primary degradation mechanisms. The first mechanism is a general Fe-zeolite deterioration which led to surface area losses, dealumination of the zeolite, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal growth. This degradation accelerated above 750 degrees C, and the effects were generally more severe in the front of the catalyst. The second deactivation mechanism is linked to trace levels of Pt that are suspected to be volatizing from the DOC and depositing on the front section of the SCR catalyst. Chemical evidence of this can be seen in the high levels of NH{sub 3} oxidation (80% conversion at 400 degrees C), which coincides with the decrease in performance.

Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Nguyen, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Foster, Adam [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W [ORNL; Jiao, Jian [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), evaluated the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)-wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber-fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL determined mercury speciation and removal at 10 bituminous coal-fired facilities; at four of these facilities, additional tests were performed on units without SCR, or with the existing SCR bypassed. This project final report summarizes the results and discusses the findings of the body of work as a whole. Eleven Topical Reports were issued (prior to this report) that describe in great detail the sampling results at each of the ten power plants individually. The results showed that the SCR-FGD combination removed a substantial fraction of mercury from flue gas. The coal-to-stack mercury removals ranged from 65% to 97% for the units with SCR and from 53% to 87% for the units without SCR. There was no indication that any type of FGD system was more effective at mercury removal than others. The coal-to-stack mercury removal and the removal in the wet scrubber were both negatively correlated with the elemental mercury content of the flue gas and positively correlated with the scrubber liquid chloride concentration. The coal chlorine content was not a statistically significant factor in either case. Mercury removal in the ESP was positively correlated with the fly ash carbon content and negatively correlated with the flue gas temperature. At most of the units, a substantial fraction (>35%) of the flue gas mercury was in the elemental form at the boiler economizer outlet. After passing through the SCR-air heater combination very little of the total mercury (<10%) remained in the elemental form in the flue gas; this was true for all SCR catalyst types and sources. Although chlorine has been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas, coal chlorine was not a statistically significant factor affecting mercury speciation at the economizer exit or at the air heater exit. The only statistically significant factors were the coal ash CaO content and the fly ash carbon content; the fraction of mercury in the elemental form at the economizer exit was positively correlated with both factors. In a direct comparison at four SCR-equipped units vs. similar units at the same sites without SCR (or with the SCR bypassed), the elemental mercury fractions (measured at the ESP outlet) were lower, and the coal-to-stack mercury removals were higher, when the SCR was present and operating. The average coal-to-stack mercury removal at the four units without an operating SCR was 72%, whereas the average removal at the same sites with operating SCRs was 88%. The unit mercury mass balance (a gauge of the overall quality of the tests) at all of the units ranged from 81% to 113%, which were within our QA/QC criterion of 80-120%.

J.A. Withum

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mitigation of the Impact of Pt Contamination on Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Investigates operating conditions under which PGM elements get volatilized and transferred onto the downstream SCR catalyst, resulting in loss of NOx reduction performance

102

Multi-Pulse SCR Rectifiers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents the introduction, analysis and experimental verification of the six-pulse SCR rectifier and multi-pulse SCR rectifiers. As a fundamental three-phase controllable ac-dc converter,… (more)

Li, Mei

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Using SCR Requirements Marsha Chechik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using SCR Requirements Marsha Chechik University of Toronto Department of Computer Science October of this project came from development and analysis of specifications. The SCR community was able to develop the following developments in this area: ffl informal description and formal semantics of SCR; ffl techniques

Chechik, Marsha

104

SCR*: A Toolset for Specifying and Analyzing Requirements Constance Heitmeyer, Alan Bull, Carolyn Gasarch, and Bruce Labaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCR*: A Toolset for Specifying and Analyzing Requirements Constance Heitmeyer, Alan Bull, Carolyn expressed in the SCR Software Cost Reduction tabular notation. The tools include an editor for building that the speci cations satisfy se- lected application properties. As background, the SCR method for specifying

105

Software Cost Reduction Constance L. Heitmeyer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software Cost Reduction Constance L. Heitmeyer Introduction Software Cost Reduction SCR is a set Research Laboratory NRL beginning in the late 1970s. A major goal of the original SCR research team Variable Model 37 and the SCR requirements model 15 , and a set of software tools for analyzing SCR

106

DRIFT study of manganese/titania-based catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese oxides and iron-manganese oxides supported on TiO{sub 2} were prepared by the sol-gel method and used for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3}. Based on the previous study, Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} and Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} were then selected to carry out the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) investigation for revealing the reaction mechanism. The DRIFT spectroscopy for the adsorption of NH{sub 3} indicated the presence of coordinated NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} on both of the two catalysts. When NO was introduced, the coordinated NH{sub 3} on the catalyst surface was consumed rapidly, indicating these species could react with NO effectively. When NH{sub 3} was introduced into the sample preadsorbed with NO + O{sub 2}, SCR reaction would not proceed on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2}. However, for Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} the bands due to coordinated NH{sub 3} on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were formed. Simultaneously, the bidentate nitrates were transformed to monodentate nitrates and NH{sub 4}{sup +} was detected. NO{sub 2} from the oxidation of NO on catalyst could react with NH{sub 4}{sup +} leading to the reduction of NO. Therefore, it was suggested that the SCR reaction on Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} could also take place in a different way from the reactions on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} proposed by other researchers. Furthermore, the SCR reaction steps for these two kinds of catalysts were proposed. 29 refs., 9 figs.

Zhongbiao Wu; Boqiong Jiang; Yue Liu; Haiqiang Wang; Ruiben Jin [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Selective Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems Optimization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A patented EGR-SCR approach was shown to readily meet the 2010 EPA requirments for NOx and PM emisisons through independent testing programs.

108

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. This document, the second in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 330 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 1.0% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR system for NOx control and a spray dryer absorber for SO{sub 2} control followed by a baghouse unit for particulate emissions control. Four sampling tests were performed in March 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. Due to mechanical problems with the boiler feed water pumps, the actual gross output was between 195 and 221 MW during the tests. The results showed that the SCR/air heater combination oxidized nearly 95% of the elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal-to-stack basis, was 87%. The mercury material balance closures for the four tests conducted at the plant ranged from 89% to 114%, with an average of 100%. These results appear to show that the SCR had a positive effect on mercury removal. In earlier programs, CONSOL sampled mercury at six plants with wet FGDs for SO{sub 2} control without SCR catalysts. At those plants, an average of 61 {+-} 15% of the mercury was in the oxidized form at the air heater outlet. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential Hg removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NOx, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of Hg chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize Hg removal.

J. A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nonroad SCR-Urea Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonroad SCR-Urea Study Raymond Schubert sponsored by Senior Technologist- Case Manager Engine Manufacturers Association schubert.raymond@tiaxllc.com TIAX, LLC 1601 S. De Anza Blvd,...

110

Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation,...

111

Effect of Unburned Methyl Esters on the NOx Conversion of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engine and flow reactor experiments were conducted to determine the impact of biodiesel relative to ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on inhibition of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction over an Fe-zeolite catalyst. Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts have the ability to adsorb and store unburned hydrocarbons (HC) at temperatures below 300 C. These stored HCs inhibit or block NO{sub x}-ammonia reaction sites at low temperatures. Although biodiesel is not a hydrocarbon, similar effects are anticipated for unburned biodiesel and its organic combustion products. Flow reactor experiments indicate that in the absence of exposure to HC or B100, NO{sub x} conversion begins at between 100 and 200 C. When exposure to unburned fuel occurs at higher temperatures (250-400 C), the catalyst is able to adsorb a greater mass of biodiesel than of ULSD. Experiments show that when the catalyst is masked with ULSD, NO{sub x} conversion is inhibited until it is heated to 400 C. However, when masked with biodiesel, NO{sub x} conversion is observed to begin at temperatures as low as 200 C. Engine test results also show low-temperature recovery from HC storage. Engine tests indicate that, overall, the SCR system has a faster recovery from HC masking with biodiesel. This is at least partially due to a reduction in exhaust HCs, and thus total HC exposure with biodiesel.

Williams, A.; Ratcliff, M.; Pedersen, D.; McCormick, R.; Cavataio, G.; Ura, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Annual technical report, September 30, 1993--September 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay catalyst was prepared for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} at above 300{degrees}C. The delaminated pillard clay was characterized by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy) chemical analysis, XRD (X-ray diffraction) structure and line broadening analyses, micropore size probing, and Moessbauer analysis. These analyses showed that the catalyst contained fragmented Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay forming {open_quotes}house-of-cards{close_quotes} structure with dispersed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles approximately 170 {angstrom} in size. The SCR activity of the delaminated pillard clay was higher than the commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst, and also higher than the undelaminated pillard clay and supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, under conditions with SO{sub 2}. Infrared measurements of adsorbed NH{sub 3} showed strong Bronsted acidity which was caused possibly by interactions between Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and clay.

Chen, J.P.; Hausladen, M.C.; Yang, R.T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fast SCR Thyratron Driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an improvement project on the linear accelerator at SLAC, it was necessary to replace the original thyratron trigger generator, which consisted of two chassis, two vacuum tubes, and a small thyratron. All solid-state, fast rise, and high voltage thyratron drivers, therefore, have been developed and built for the 244 klystron modulators. The rack mounted, single chassis driver employs a unique way to control and generate pulses through the use of an asymmetric SCR, a PFN, a fast pulse transformer, and a saturable reactor. The resulting output pulse is 2 kV peak into 50 {Omega} load with pulse duration of 1.5 {mu}s FWHM at 180 Hz. The pulse risetime is less than 40 ns with less than 1 ns jitter. Various techniques are used to protect the SCR from being damaged by high voltage and current transients due to thyratron breakdowns. The end-of-line clipper (EOLC) detection circuit is also integrated into this chassis to interrupt the modulator triggering in the event a high percentage of line reflections occurred.

Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

engineering controls Metal oxides in lean adsorption rich reduction cycles NO x Sorption (NO x Traps) Disadvantages Typical Usage Method Pioneering Science and Technology...

115

Detailed modeling of the evaporation and thermal decomposition of urea-water-solution in SCR systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed modeling of the evaporation and thermal decomposition of urea-water-solution in SCRE Journal. Keywords: Multi-component, , evaporation, UWS, Adbue, urea decomposition, thermolysis SCR Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems. In the multi-component evaporation model, the influence of urea

Boyer, Edmond

116

Marathon selects Shaw for benzene reduction work  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Shaw Group Inc's Energy & Chemicals Group is to provide project management, engineering and procurement services for the feasibility and definition phases of benzene reduction projects at Marathon Oil Corp's refineries in Robinson, Illinois; Garyville, Louisiana; and Catlettsburg, Kentucky.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Solid SCR Demonstration Truck Application | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SCR Demonstration Truck Application Solid SCR Demonstration Truck Application Demonstrate the feasibility and performance of the FEV Solid SCR (Ammonium Carbamate) Technology...

118

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dryer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the seventh in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 1,300 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing three percent sulfur. The unit was equipped with an ESP and a limestone-based wet FGD to control particulate and SO2 emissions, respectively. At the time of sampling an SCR was not installed on this unit. Four sampling tests were performed in September 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the FGD inlet flue gas oxidized:elemental mercury ratio was roughly 2:1, with 66% oxidized mercury and 34% elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal-to-stack basis, was 53%. The average Hg concentration in the stack flue gas was 4.09 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The average stack mercury emission was 3.47 Ib/TBtu. The mercury material balance closures ranged from 87% to 108%, with an average of 97%. A sampling program similar to this one was performed on a similar unit (at the same plant) that was equipped with an SCR for NOx control. Comparison of the results from the two units show that the SCR increases the percentage of mercury that is in the oxidized form, which, in turn, lends to more of the total mercury being removed in the wet scrubber. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NOx, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal.

J.A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J.E. Locke

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Iron oxide and chromia supported on titania-pillared clay for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TiO{sub 2}-pillard clay (PILC) with high surface area, large pore volume, and large interlayer spacing was used as the support for mixed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3}. The Fe/Cr ratio was varied at a fixed total amount of oxide dopant of 10% (wt). The Fe-Cr/TiO{sub 2}-PILC with Fe/Cr=3 showed the highest activity. Compared with commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts, the activity (on a per gram basis) of the doped pillared clay was approximately twice as high under H{sub 2}O- and SO{sub 2}-free conditions and was approximately 40% higher under conditions with H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In addition, its activity for SO{sub 2} oxidation was only 20%-25% of that of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts. TPD of NH{sub 3} on the Fe-Cr/TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst showed that both M=O and M-OH (M=Fe or Cr) were necessary for the SCR reaction. In situ IR spectra of NH{sub 3} showed that there was a higher Bronsted acidity than the Lewis acidity on the surface under reaction conditions and that there existed a direct correlation between the SCR activity and the Bronsted acidity among pillared clays with different Fe/Cr ratios. These results, along with the transient response to O{sub 2}, indicated that a similar mechanism to that on the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst was operative. The TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay used as the support also contributed to the high activity of the Fe-Cr catalyst. The TiO{sub 2} pillars combined with the tetrahedral SiO{sub 2} surfaces of the clay apparently gave rise to a high dispersion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 52 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Cheng, L.S.; Yang, R.T. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Ning Chen [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO with methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a stabilization effect on the structure and activity of Ag/Al2O3 for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with CH4 imparted by the presence of SO2 in the exhaust gasmixture. The reaction is carried out at temperature above 600 8C to keep the surface partially free of sulfates. In SO2-free gases, catalyst deactivation is fast and measurable at these temperatures. Time-resolved TEM analyses of used samples have determined that deactivation is due to sintering of silver from well-dispersed clusters to nanoparticles to micrometer-size particles with time-on-stream at 625 8C. However, sintering of silver was dramatically suppressed by the presence of SO2 in the reaction gas mixture. The structural stabilization by SO2 was accompanied by stable catalyst activity for the NO reduction to N2. The direct oxidation of methane was suppressed, thus the methane selectivity was improved in SO2-laden gas mixtures. In tests with high-content silver alumina with some of the silver present in metallic form, an increase in the SCR activity was found in SO2-containing gas mixtures. This is attributed to redispersion of the silver particles by SO2, an unexpected finding. The catalyst performance was reversible over many cycles of operation at 625 8C with the SO2 switched on and off in the gas mixture.

She, Xiaoyan; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Wang, Chong M.; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging The impact of improved urea...

122

SELECTION AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE REDUCTANTS FOR SRAT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Defense Waste Processing Facility - Engineering (DWPF-E) has requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform scoping evaluations of alternative flowsheets with the primary focus on alternatives to formic acid during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The reductants shown below were selected for testing during the evaluation of alternative reductants for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing. The reductants fall into two general categories: reducing acids and non-acidic reducing agents. Reducing acids were selected as direct replacements for formic acid to reduce mercury in the SRAT, to acidify the sludge, and to balance the melter REDuction/OXidation potential (REDOX). Non-acidic reductants were selected as melter reductants and would not be able to reduce mercury in the SRAT. Sugar was not tested during this scoping evaluation as previous work has already been conducted on the use of sugar with DWPF feeds. Based on the testing performed, the only viable short-term path to mitigating hydrogen generation in the CPC is replacement of formic acid with a mixture of glycolic and formic acids. An experiment using glycolic acid blended with formic on an 80:20 molar basis was able to reduce mercury, while also targeting a predicted REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) of 0.2 expressed as Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe. Based on this result, SRNL recommends performing a complete CPC demonstration of the glycolic/formic acid flowsheet followed by a design basis development and documentation. Of the options tested recently and in the past, nitric/glycolic/formic blended acids has the potential for near term implementation in the existing CPC equipment providing rapid throughput improvement. Use of a non-acidic reductant is recommended only if the processing constraints to remove mercury and acidify the sludge acidification are eliminated. The non-acidic reductants (e.g. sugar) will not reduce mercury during CPC processing and sludge acidification would require large amounts of nitric acid (and subsequently larger reductant additions) unless a reducing acid is also used.

Stone, M.; Pickenheim, B.; Peeler, D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

SCR-DPF Integrations for Diesel ExhaustPerformance and Perspectives for High SCR Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents laboratory and engine bench test results from integrating the SCR catalyst into the diesel filter as one multifunctional unit.

124

On the selection of dimension reduction techniques for scientific applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many dimension reduction methods have been proposed to discover the intrinsic, lower dimensional structure of a high-dimensional dataset. However, determining critical features in datasets that consist of a large number of features is still a challenge. In this paper, through a series of carefully designed experiments on real-world datasets, we investigate the performance of different dimension reduction techniques, ranging from feature subset selection to methods that transform the features into a lower dimensional space. We also discuss methods that calculate the intrinsic dimensionality of a dataset in order to understand the reduced dimension. Using several evaluation strategies, we show how these different methods can provide useful insights into the data. These comparisons enable us to provide guidance to a user on the selection of a technique for their dataset.

Fan, Y J; Kamath, C

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Work focused on optimizing SCR washcoat within the DPF substrate, and maximizing the capacity for passive soot oxidation exhibited in the system

126

Sinia Renovables SCR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: Sinia Renovables SCR Place: Spain Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Investment arm of Banco Sabadell, involved in the financing of renewable energy projects....

127

Appendix SCR: Feature, Event, and Process Screening for PA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary of New Information SCR-4.1.3.1.1.3 Screening Argument SCR-4.1.3.2 Fracture Development SCR-4.1.3.2.1 FEP Number: N8 FEP Title: Formation of Fractures...

128

Fuel-Borne Reductants for NOx Aftertreatment: Preliminary EtOH...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reductants for NOx Aftertreatment: Preliminary EtOH SCR Study Fuel-Borne Reductants for NOx Aftertreatment: Preliminary EtOH SCR Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge...

129

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

LNT + SCR Aftertreatment for Medium-Heavy Duty Applications:...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

+ SCR Aftertreatment for Medium-Heavy Duty Applications: A Systems Approach LNT + SCR Aftertreatment for Medium-Heavy Duty Applications: A Systems Approach Poster presentation at...

131

Improvement of Urea SCR Performance Using Wiremesh Thermolysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Improvement of Urea SCR Performance Using Wiremesh Thermolysis Mixer Improvement of Urea SCR Performance Using Wiremesh Thermolysis Mixer Wiremesh mixer development should bring...

132

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Aftertreatment Technologies Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Work is undertaken to examine the feasibility of integrating SCR and DPF technologies...

133

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

134

Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel Retrofit Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel...

135

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ace025rappe2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment...

136

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ace025rappe2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment...

137

Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of...

138

Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements...

139

Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion...

140

Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System Through the Use of CFD Analysis UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development of SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy Duty Applications Development of SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy Duty Applications Evaluation of a system...

142

SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in 2005 SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards...

143

Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application To understand...

144

Thermolysis Characterization of Urea-SCR | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermolysis Characterization of Urea-SCR Thermolysis Characterization of Urea-SCR 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins Inc. 2002deerfang.pdf More Documents & Publications...

145

Eliminating air heater plugging and corrosion caused by SCR/SNCR systems for NOx control on coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a typical coal-fired power plant the rotary regenerative air heater is responsible for 5-10% of the boiler's total efficiency. The three biggest threats to air heater performance deterioration are corrosion of the heat exchange surfaces, plugging, and air heater leakage through the seals. The article concentrates on the vastly increased level of corrosion and plugging issues associated with installing selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) systems for controlling nitrogen oxide emissions. Some injected ammonia in the SCR process reacts with SO{sub 2} to form ammonium sulphate and bisulphate (ABS) which is deposited on the air heater element surfaces. This can be overcome by applying coatings, using corrosion-resistant steels, reconfiguring the air heaters to a two layer design, improving air heater blowers, improving technologies for removing ammonia 'slip' before it enters the air heater, and using new catalysts that reduce the oxidation of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. 4 figs.

Guffre, J. [Paragon Airheater Technologies (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

DEVELOPMENT OF UREA-SCR FOR HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS DEMONSTRATION UPDATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study included engine cell and vehicle tests. The engine cell tests are aimed at determining NOX reduction using the US transient and OICA emissions test cycles. These cycles will be included in future US HD emissions standards. The vehicle tests will show urea-SCR system performance during real-world operation. These tests will prove that the technology can be successfully implemented and demonstrated over-the-road. The program objectives are to: (a) apply urea-SCR to a US HD diesel engine; (b) determine engine cell emissions reduction during US-transient and OICA cycles; (c) apply urea-SCR to a US HD diesel truck; and (d) determine NOX reduction and urea consumption during over-the-road operation.

Miller, William

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

FTIR and kinetic studies of the mechanism of Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of FTIR spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide by ammonia were conducted on Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay (Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC) catalyst. It was found that No molecules were absorbed on the fresh Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst and then oxidized by O{sub 2} to adsorbed NO{sub 2} and nitrate species. These NO{sub x} adspecies could be reduced by NH{sub 3} at high temperatures. NH{sub 3} molecules could also be adsorbed on the Broensted acid and Lewis acid sites on the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalyst to generate, respectively, NH{sup +}{sub 4} ions and coordinated NH{sub 3} species. These NH{sub 3} adspecies were active in reacting with NO, NO + O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, but the reaction rates of NH{sub 3} + NO + O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} were much higher than that of NNO + NH{sub 3}. However, under reaction conditions, the surface of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC was mainly covered by NH{sup +}{sub 4} ions and coordinated NH{sub 3}, and no NO{sub x} adspecies were detected. This is in agreement with the zero-order for the SCR reaction with respect to NH{sub 3}. A possible reaction scheme for the SCR reaction on Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC was proposed. NO reduction initially involved the reaction between NO{sub 2} and pairs of NH{sub 3} adspecies to form an active intermediate, which finally reacted with gaseous or weakly adsorbed NO to produce N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O.

Long, R.Q.; Yang, R.T.

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction over Ag/Al2O3 Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DRIFT spectroscopy used together with flow reactor experiments to investigate the role of H2 for SCR over Ag/Al2O3

149

SCR Tech LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SCR Tech LLC SCR Tech LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name SCR-Tech LLC Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28214 Sector Services Product US-based provider of catalyst regeneration technologies and management services for SCR systems. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Poisoning and Sulfation on Vanadia SCR Catalyst.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Deactivation of titania-supported vanadia commercial SCR catalysts exposed to flue gases from both coal and coal-biomass co-firing boilers were investigated. BET surface area and average… (more)

Guo, Xiaoyu 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Poisoning and Sulfation on Vanadia SCR Catalyst.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Deactivation of titania-supported vanadia commercial SCR catalysts exposed to flue gases from both coal and coal-biomass co-firing boilers were investigated. BET surface area and… (more)

Guo, Xiaoyu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Two in One: SCR on Filter  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 BASF Corporation; 25 MiddlesexEssex Turnpike; Iselin, NJ 08830 USA 2 BASF Catalysts Germany GmbH; Freundallee 23, 30173 Hannover Two in One: SCR on Filter DEER 2010 2 Potential...

153

SCR-DPF Integrations for Diesel ExhaustPerformance and Perspectives...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SCR-DPF Integrations for Diesel ExhaustPerformance and Perspectives for High SCR Loadings SCR-DPF Integrations for Diesel ExhaustPerformance and Perspectives for High SCR Loadings...

154

3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

SCR system provides direct ammonia gas dosing for optimal SCR performance with simplified and flexible exhaust layout.

155

Efficient feature size reduction via predictive forward selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the widely used pattern classification algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVM), are sensitive to the presence of irrelevant or redundant features in the training data. Automatic feature selection algorithms aim at selecting a subset ... Keywords: Classification, Feature selection, Forward selection, Meta-learning, SVM

Matthias Reif; Faisal Shafait

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

http://psych.pomona.edu/scr 2002, October No. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://psych.pomona.edu/scr 2002, October No. 1 Integration in the brain - The Subconscious Alteration of Visual Perception by Cross-Modal Integration By Ladan Shams http://psych.pomona.edu/scr

Shams, Ladan B.

157

Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions TiO2-supported...

158

European Experience and Case study of SCR Passenger Car Integration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Experience and Case study of SCR Passenger Car Integration European Experience and Case study of SCR Passenger Car Integration Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006,...

159

Nonroad SCR-Urea Study | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonroad SCR-Urea Study Nonroad SCR-Urea Study Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit,...

160

A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data Presents experimental study of a Cu-zeolite SCR in both reactor and engine test cell,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Long term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts Long term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts Test bench results and on-road experiences of more than 1 million km offer comparisons of...

162

Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NH 3 stored on Cu-SCR as expected 14 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Standard SCR Reaction Impacted More by Fouling * Measured steady state NOx...

163

Department of Bioengineering Spring 2012 MR Compatible SCR Device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Bioengineering Spring 2012 MR Compatible SCR Device Overview This project constructed a Skin Conductance Response (SCR) measurement device that was compatible with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements with the SCR recordings by using MATLab. All challenges were overcome

Demirel, Melik C.

164

http://psych.pomona.edu/scr Editorial Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 http://psych.pomona.edu/scr Editorial Review A computer-based model of Crick and Koch's Framework for Consciousness By Stan Franklin [SCR, 2003 March, No. 1] The Framework Recently Crick and Koch offered a "Framework for Consciousness" (2003). Pradeep Mutalik's review of that article in SCR (Mutalik 2003) asserts

Memphis, University of

165

Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

Gruber, M.; Hermann, K. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)] [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Feature Selection with Fuzzy Decision Reducts Chris Cornelis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the context of fuzzy rough set theory, we generalize the classical rough set framework for data confirms the potential of the approach. Keywords: fuzzy sets, rough sets, decision reducts, classification 1 Introduction Rough set theory [5] is well-suited to semantics-preserving data dimensionality

Gent, Universiteit

167

Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Study by in situ FTIR of the SCR of NO by propene on Cu2+ ion-exchanged Ti-PILC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption on Cu ion-exchanged titanium pillared clay (Cu-Ti-PILC) was investigated by in situ infrared spectroscopy to provide insight into the reaction intermediates present in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by propene in the presence of oxygen. The NO/O2 adsorption produced different nitrate species due to the presence of terminal and bridged Cu2+–OH groups. These nitrates evolved into N2 and N2O in small amounts once the NO catalytic cycle was finished. It can be concluded that the Cu2+–OH groups reacted with the nitro group, thus forming nitrates. C3H6 adsorption was higher and stronger than NO adsorption on the active sites of the catalyst. C3H6 reacted in the active site producing hydrocarbon intermediates (an organic nitro compound and acetate), which were responsible for the NO reduction.

J.L. Valverde; A. de Lucas; F. Dorado; A. Romero; P.B. García

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A r - - - NH 3 adsorption and desorption * All SCR models developed in MatlabSimulink using a variable step solver (ode23tb) * First order Euler integration in...

170

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

control systems Probe interaction of DPF-SCR couples to better understand the optimization of the coupled units Determine system limitations, define basic requirements for...

171

Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model, Control System, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ace028johnson2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model,...

172

Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model, Control System, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace028johnson2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model,...

173

Passive Ammonia SCR for Lean Burn SIDI Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Passive NH3 SCR has been demonstrated as a high efficiency and low cost alternative lean NOx aftertreatment technology for stratified gasoline engines.

174

Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel Retrofit Ray Conway, Senior Applications Engineer Sougato Chatterjee, Jon Caserta, Ajay Joshi Location: P23 SCRT System NOx...

175

Urea-SCR System Demonstration and Evaluation for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spcctficauon,or regulauon. Urea-SCR System Demonstration andCahforma Berkeley of at Urea-SCR System Demonstration andtreatment technology The urea-SCR System mjects aqueous urea

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing SCR system provides direct...

177

A SCR SWITCHED CAPACITOR VOLTAGE REGULATOR FOR 150 kV NEUTRAL BEAM POWER SUPPLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 ;;o c: REGULATOR BANK SCR TRIGGER CHASSIS BLOCK DIAGRAMLBL-8156 UC-20 A SCR SWITCHED CAPACITOR VOLTAGE REGULATORwill discharge through the SCR and the diodes. All of the

Milnes, K.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with various Cu loadings were prepared via solution ion exchange. The hydrated samples were studied with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Cu2+ ion coordination numbers were obtained by analyzing the hyperfine structures while Cu-Cu distances were estimated from line broadening of the EPR features. By coupling EPR and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results, two Cu2+ ion locations were suggested. Standard and fast NH3-SCR, as well as non-selective NH3 oxidation reactions were carried out over these catalysts at high space velocities. For the SCR reaction, intra-particle diffusion limitation was found throughout the reaction temperatures investigated. Although clear structure-activity relationships cannot be derived, the reaction results allow for reactant diffusivities and Cu2+ ion locations to be estimated. The slower NH3 oxidation reaction, on the other hand, is kinetically limited at low temperatures, and, therefore, allows for a correlation between Cu2+ ion location and reaction kinetics to be made. Furthermore, the dynamic Cu2+ ion motion as a function of temperature could also be derived from the NH3 oxidation kinetics.

Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Karp, Eric M.; Luo, Jin-Yong; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NMR Studies of Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cuzeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea. NMR Studies of Cuzeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea. Abstract: The effects of hydrothermal aging of Cu...

180

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes recent progress on a collaborative project between scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at PNNL and at Ford Motor Company, involving investigations of laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We are investigating SCR catalysts with reduced ammonia slip, increased low temperature activity, and increased product selectivity to N2. More recent recognition that high temperature performance, under regimes that sometimes cause deactivation, also needs to be improved is driving current work focused on catalyst materials modifications needed to achieve this enhanced performance. We are also studying materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we examine the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measure the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Kim, Do Heui; Li, Xiaohong S.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia over Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay (PILC) catalysts were prepared and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by ammonia. They were also characterized for surface area, pore size distribution, and by XRD, H{sub 2}-TPR, and FT-IR methods. The Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts showed high activities in the reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen. SO{sub 2} further increased the catalytic activities at above 350 C, whereas H{sub 2}O decreased the activity slightly. The catalysts were about twice as active as commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Moreover, compared to the commercial catalyst, the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts had higher N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O product selectivities (e.g., 0--1% vs 9% N{sub 2}O at 400 C) and substantially lower activities (by 74--88%) for SO{sub 2} oxidation to SO{sub 3} under the same reaction conditions. The activity was further increased to over three times that of the vanadia-based catalyst when Ce was added. The high activity and low N{sub 2}O selectivity for the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts were attributed to their low activity in the oxidation of ammonia, as compared with vanadia catalysts. XRD patterns of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC were similar to those of TiO{sub 2}-PILC, showing no peaks due to iron oxide, even when the iron content reached 20.1%. The TPR results indicated that iron in the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts with lower iron contents existed in the form of isolated Fe{sup 3+} ions. The activities of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts were consistent with their surface acidities, which were identified by FT-IR of the NH{sub 3}-adsorbed samples. The enhancement of activities by H{sub 2}O + SO{sub 2} was attributed to the increase of surface acidity resulting from the formation of surface sulfate species of iron.

Long, R.Q.; Yang, R.T. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Poisoning of A Urea SCR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Understanding what reactions and which catalytic functions are affected by hydrocarbons can lead to improved tolerances for selective catalytic reduction performance

183

Attribute selection with fuzzy decision reducts Chris Cornelis a,*, Richard Jensen b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

xxxx Keywords: Rough sets Fuzzy sets Attribute selection Data analysis Decision reducts a b s t r a c t Rough set theory provides a methodology for data analysis based on the approximation of concepts rough set theory, we present a generalization of the classical rough set framework for data

Gent, Universiteit

184

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts continued towards the synthesis of new pillared clay catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia. The possibility of utilizing hydrocarbons was also investigated.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Showcases new content added to the AFDC including: Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies, and an upcoming Deisel Exhaust Fluid Locator.

186

TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power controller device is disclosed which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the ``reset`` input of a R-S flip flop, while an ``0`` crossing detector controls the ``set`` input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the ``reset`` and ``set`` inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations. 9 figs.

Hughes, W.J.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power controller device which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the "reset" input of a R-S flip flop, while an "0" crossing detector controls the "set" input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the "reset" and "set" inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations.

Hughes, Wallace J. (Boston Lake, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms potential for formulation of Euro 6 SCR catalysts

189

Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

P-20 UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System Through the Use of CFD Analysis Gi-Heon Kim, Matthew Thornton National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

190

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Work is undertaken to examine the feasibility of integrating SCR and DPF technologies for the next generation of emission control systems for on-road heavy-truck application

191

SCR Performance Optimization Through Advancements in Aftertreatment Packaging  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The impact of improved urea mixing designs on urea vaporization and ammonia distribution is presented, along with a comparison of single and dual walled packaging for SCR systems. Urea doser integration is also investigated.

192

Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model, Control System, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace028johnson2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model,...

193

NO removal by reducing agents and additives in the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of the additives on the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) reaction has been determined in a three-stage laboratory scale reactor. The optimum reaction temperature is lowered and the reaction temperature window is widened with increasing concentrations of the gas additives (CO, CH4). The optimum reaction temperature is lowered and the maximum NO removal efficiency decreases with increasing the concentration of alcohol additives (CH3OH, C2H5OH). The addition of phenol lowers the optimum reaction temperature about 100–150 °C similar to that of the toluene addition. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs: C6H5OH, C7H8) can be utilized in the SNCR process to enhance NO reduction and removed at the same time. A previously proposed simple kinetic model can successfully apply the NO reduction by NH3 and the present additives.

Sang Wook Bae; Seon Ah Roh; Sang Done Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chapter 22 - Heterogeneous Catalytic Reduction for Water Purification: Nanoscale Effects on Catalytic Activity, Selectivity, and Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reductive catalysis is a promising water treatment technology that employs heterogeneous metal catalysts (e.g., Pd nanoparticles on a support) to convert dihydrogen to adsorbed atomic hydrogen in order to promote reactions with functional groups in various contaminants. Reductive catalysis has several potential advantages, including high selectivity for a given target, fast rates under mild conditions, and low production of harmful by-products. The technology has been applied mostly for remediation of groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbons and for treatment of nitrate, but recent studies have expanded the range of target contaminants to include perchlorate and N-nitrosamines. Palladium-based catalysts hold tremendous promise for their ability to selectively destroy several drinking water contaminants, and some compounds that exhibit slow reaction kinetics with Pd alone are rapidly degraded when a second, promoter metal is added to the catalyst. However, there is a lack of information about the long-term sustainability of these catalytic treatment processes, which is a major consideration in their possible adoption for remediation applications. Recent research has focused on the nanoscale characterization of these heterogeneous catalysts in order to develop an improved understanding of their mechanisms of deactivation and the pathways for regeneration. Two examples of studies from the authors’ laboratories, involving (i) hydrodehalogenation of iodinated X-ray contrast media with Ni or Pd catalysts and (ii) selective reduction of nitrate with a regenerable Pd-In/alumina catalyst, are discussed in this chapter.

Timothy J. Strathmann; Charles J. Werth; John R. Shapley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Selective reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over vanadia on pillared titanium phosphate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the catalyst. Shikada et al. (1981) compared AlzOz, SiOz, and SiO, ? TiOz (equimolar) supports for VzOs using a simulated flue gas containing 100 ppni SOz. The silica- titanium dioxide supported catalyst showed the highest NO conversions followed by those...SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE YVITH AMMONIA OVER VANADIA ON PILLARED TITANIUM PHOSPHATE A Thesis LAWRENCE JOSEPH CZARNECKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Czarnecki, Lawrence Joseph

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A technique for accelerated aging of SCR system (DOC -> SCR-> DPF) reveals two deactivation mechanisms and replicates field-aged effects

197

Economic Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles in the U.S. Market Economic Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles in the U.S. Market...

198

LNT or Urea SCR Technology: Which is the right technology for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or Urea SCR Technology: Which is the right technology for TIER 2 BIN 5 passenger vehicles? LNT or Urea SCR Technology: Which is the right technology for TIER 2 BIN 5 passenger...

199

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts. The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts. Abstract: The different impacts of SO2 and SO3...

200

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan....

202

Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

203

ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines Presentation given at...

204

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Lean-burn SIDI...

205

Safe and compact ammonia storage/delivery systems for SCR-DeNOX...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Safe and compact ammonia storagedelivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in automotive units Safe and compact ammonia storagedelivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in automotive units Presentation...

206

Low Emisssions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulations...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emisssions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulations - A Progress Report Low Emisssions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulations - A Progress Report...

207

Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ford Motor Company 2004deerhammerle.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF...

208

Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report 2003...

209

Initial Results of the DeNOx SCR System by Urea Injection in...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initial Results of the DeNOx SCR System by Urea Injection in the Euro 5 Bus Initial Results of the DeNOx SCR System by Urea Injection in the Euro 5 Bus 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

210

Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach This...

211

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation The feasibility of on-board ammonia generation was...

212

TECHNICAL REPORT SCR-01-TR-703 c Siemens Corporate Research 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL REPORT SCR-01-TR-703 c Siemens Corporate Research 2001 A Spectral Power Factorization Radu Balan and Justinian Rosca radu.balan,justinian.rosca@scr.siemens.com Siemens Corporate Research

Maryland at College Park, University of

213

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies. Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by...

214

Designing of SCR systems for reducing nitrogen oxide in diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SCR technology is the main strategy being pursued in order to comply with future NOx limits on the European, US and Japanese passenger car markets. Apart from a sound base of experience, the optimum design of SCR...

Rolf Kaiser; Klaus Rusch

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based...

216

A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents experimental study of a Cu-zeolite SCR in both reactor and engine test cell, and comparison of the model parameters between the SCR reactor and engine model

217

Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. scr1845 c ESO 2010 February 19, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. scr1845 c ESO 2010 February 19, 2010 Quiescent and flaring X-ray emission from the nearby M/T dwarf binary SCR 1845-6357 J. Robrade, K. Poppenhaeger, and J and have an effectively neutral photosphere. Methods. We investigate an XMM-Newton observation of SCR 1845

Robrade, Jan

218

SCR as an IV&V Tool Steve Easterbrook and John Callahan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCR as an IV&V Tool Steve Easterbrook and John Callahan fsteve,callahang@cerc.wvu.edu NASA West of SCR-style speci cation as a tool for Independent Veri cation and Validation IV&V. Our intention processes. However, there are a number of problems that need to be solved before SCR-style methods can

Easterbrook, Steve

219

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has investigated new metal oxide catalysts for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as CO. Significant progress in catalyst development has been made during the course of the project. We have found that fluorite oxides, CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, and rare earth zirconates such as Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} are active and stable catalysts for reduction Of SO{sub 2} by CO. More than 95% sulfur yield was achieved at reaction temperatures about 450{degrees}C or higher with the feed gas of stoichiometric composition. Reaction of SO{sub 2} and CO over these catalysts demonstrated a strong correlation of catalytic activity with the catalyst oxygen mobility. Furthermore, the catalytic activity and resistance to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} poisoning of these catalysts were significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of transition metals, such as Co, Ni, Co, etc. The resulting transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalyst has superior activity and stability, and shows promise in long use for the development of a greatly simplified single-step sulfur recovery process to treat variable and dilute SO{sub 2} concentration gas streams. Among various active composite catalyst systems the Cu-CeO{sub 2} system has been extensively studied. XRD, XPS, and STEM analyses of the used Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst found that the fluorite crystal structure of ceria was stable at the present reaction conditions, small amounts of copper was dispersed and stabilized on the ceria matrix, and excess copper oxide particles formed copper sulfide crystals of little contribution to catalytic activity. A working catalyst consisted of partially sulfated cerium oxide surface and partially sulfided copper clusters. The overall reaction kinetics were approximately represented by a first order equation.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Applying the SCR Requirements Method to a Simple Autopilot In Proc. Fourth NASA Langley Formal Methods Workshop, Sep 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying the SCR Requirements Method to a Simple Autopilot In Proc. Fourth NASA Langley Formal. One exception is a formal method called SCR for specifying computer system requirements which, due. To demonstrate and evaluate the SCR method and tools, we recently used SCR to specify the re- quirements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides; Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work was done in three tasks during the first quarter. In Task 1, a new SCR reactor system has been built, complete with on-line GC and MS analyses. The GC is used to monitor the N{sub 2} product so the NO{sub x} > N{sub 2} conversion can be calculated. The MS is used to analyze the N{sub 2}0 concentration. In addition, a wet analytical technique has been established for SO{sub 3} analysis. The new SCR system and the SO{sub 3} analytical technique have been subjected to shakedown tests with success. Along with the existing SCR reactor system, there are now two systems that are being run independently. In Task 2, a procedure for the synthesis of stable Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} Pillared clay has been established. Inductive coupled plasma spectrometric analysis (ICP) has been used to analyze the chemical composition of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} Pillared clay. Preliminary results for the SCR activities of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay are obtained in Task 3. The results show that the activities are near that of the commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. However, the SO{sub 2}-to-SO{sub 3} conversion is substantially lower with the pillared clay catalyst, which could be an important advantage.

Chen, J.P.; Cheng, L.S.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

A weighted bee colony optimisation hybrid with rough set reduct algorithm for feature selection in the medical domain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feature selection refers to the problem of selecting the set of most relevant features which produces the most predictive outcome. Rough set theory has been one of the most successful methods used for feature selection. However, this method is still not able to find the optimal subsets. This paper proposes a new feature selection method based on rough set theory hybrid with a weighted bee colony optimisation (WBCO) in an attempt to combat this. This proposed work is applied in the medical domain to find the minimal reducts and experimentally compared with the existing rough set methods, rough set methods with computational intelligence and non-rough set methods. The performance is analysed with a novel genetic algorithm-based k-nearest neighbour (GkNN) classifier. The experiments and results show that our proposed method could find optimum reducts than the other algorithms.

N. Suguna; K. Thanushkodi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the washability and comprehensive characterization of 975 raw coal channel samples collected from the Eastern, Central, and Western Regions (including Alaska) of the United States. All of this information is sorted in the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Technology Data Base. Individual reports for each region were completed previously as Volumes 1, 2, and 3 and included the detailed data for each of the 975 samples. This report is a summation of the results of those three reports on a state- and region-wide basis only, and does not include the data for individual samples, but only includes the composite data for each state and region. Graphical summations are presented by state, section or rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions and showing the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. The statistical evaluations in the Appendices present the composited washability data of 1.30, 1.40, and 1.60 specific gravities of separation, the selected chemical and physical properties, and the composited washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. 13 refs., 93 figs., 9 tabs.

Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA)); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Impact of Biodiesel Impurities on the Performance and Durability of DOC, DPF and SCR Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is estimated that operating continuously on a B20 fuel containing the current allowable ASTM specification limits for metal impurities in biodiesel could result in a doubling of ash exposure relative to lube-oil derived ash. The purpose of this study was to determine if a fuel containing metals at the ASTM limits could cause adverse impacts on the performance and durability of diesel emission control systems. An accelerated durability test method was developed to determine the potential impact of these biodiesel impurities. The test program included engine testing with multiple DPF substrate types as well as DOC and SCR catalysts. The results showed no significant degradation in the thermo-mechanical properties of cordierite, aluminum titanate, or silicon carbide DPFs after exposure to 150,000 mile equivalent biodiesel ash and thermal aging. However, exposure of a cordierite DPF to 435,000 mile equivalent aging resulted in a 69% decrease in the thermal shock resistance parameter. It is estimated that the additional ash from 150,000 miles of biodiesel use would also result in a moderate increases in exhaust backpressure for a DPF. A decrease in DOC activity was seen after exposure to 150,000 mile equivalent aging, resulting in higher HC slip and a reduction in NO{sub 2} formation. The metal-zeolite SCR catalyst experienced a slight loss in activity after exposure to 435,000 mile equivalent aging. This catalyst, placed downstream of the DPF, showed a 5% reduction in overall NOx conversion activity over the HDDT test cycle.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R.; Luecke, J.; Brezny, R.; Geisselmann, A.; Voss, K.; Hallstrom, K.; Leustek, M.; Parsons, J.; Abi-Akar, H.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this quarter, progress was made on the following tasks: TPD techniques were employed to study the reaction mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia over iron oxide pillared clay catalyst; and a sulfur dioxide resistant iron oxide/titanium oxide catalyst was developed.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2003deerhammerle.pdf More Documents &...

228

Application of SCR and PM-METALIT for Non-Road Applications: SCRi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Advantages of this new application of SCR and PM-METALIT for non-road applications include compact design, robustness, low backpressure, and cost

229

ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines Richard Carlson Extengine Transport Systems, LLC Fullerton, California 2006 DEER Conference Poster...

230

Impact of Honeycomb Ceramics Geometrical Cell Design on Urea SCR System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Honeycomb ceramic substrates with 3 cell geometries were performance tested for Nox conversion. Results provide suggestions for the best cell structure for SCR systems.

231

Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Study demonstrates high NOx conversion with SCR coated on DPF. Optimization of catalyst washcoat and coating process minimizes back-pressure while maintaining good performance.

232

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400--650{degree}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2} formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650{degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams, The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Williams, R.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Physica Scripta Phys. Scr. T160 (2014) 014026 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2014/T160/014026  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Physica Scripta Phys. Scr. T160 (2014) 014026 (6pp) doi:10 Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr.

Olivares, Stefano

236

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 73 (2006) 16 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/73/2/000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 73 (2006) 1­6 doi:10 Published xx February 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/73/1 Abstract We describe here an ORNL Physics

237

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 75 (2007) 363373 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/75/3/023  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 75 (2007) 363­373 doi:10 for publication 12 December 2006 Published 8 February 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/75/363 Abstract

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

238

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 76 (2007) 577592 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/76/5/028  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 76 (2007) 577­592 doi:10 2007 Published 16 October 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/76/577 Abstract The spontaneous

Rehse, Steven J.

239

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 79 (2009) 035401 (11pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/79/03/035401  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 79 (2009) 035401 (11pp) doi:10.uni-stuttgart.de Received 24 July 2008 Accepted for publication 19 November 2008 Published 3 March 2009 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Nahar, Sultana Nurun

240

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 87 (2013) 055003 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/87/05/055003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 87 (2013) 055003 (8pp) doi:10@cas.usf.edu Received 15 August 2012 Accepted for publication 13 March 2013 Published 3 April 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Ma, Wen-Xiu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel LNT (Generates Ammonia) Exhaust Selective Catalytic DPF Valve Reduction Catalyst (SCR) 2 DEER 2007 Bypass V2 LNT V1 Reformer SCR Bypass V2 LNT V1 SCR Reformer * NOx storage...

242

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ammonia) DPF Reformate Fuel Air Exhaust Valve Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst (SCR) DEER 24AU06 MDH 4 Bypass V2 LNT V1 Reformer SCR Bypass V2 LNT V1 SCR Reformer NOx...

243

Cu, Co, Ag-Containing Pillared Clays as Catalysts for the Selective Reduction of NOx by Hydrocarbons in an Excess of Oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermally stable Al- and Zr-PILC loaded with copper and cobalt cations and...2 loaded with the same active components. Specificity of the catalytic properties of nanocomposites in SCR of NO x ...

G.A. Konin; A.N. Il'ichev; V.A. Matyshak; T.I. Khomenko…

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Digital SCR Control Box for Educational Laboratory Zakdy Sorchini,Jonathan W. Kimball and Philip T. Krein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital SCR Control Box for Educational Laboratory Zakdy Sorchini,Jonathan W. Kimball and Philip T designed to introduce the silicone controlled rectifier (SCR) to power electronicsstudents. SCRs are useful, I. INTRODUCTION The silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) is an important device in the context

Kimball, Jonathan W.

245

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 87 (2013) 058504 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/87/05/058504  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 87 (2013) 058504 (6pp) doi:10 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/87/058504 Abstract The simulation of biomolecular structural-8949/13/058504+06$33.00 Printed in the UK & the USA 1 © 2013 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences #12;Phys. Scr. 87 (2013) 058504

Bachmann, Michael

246

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 80 (2009) 048102 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/80/04/048102  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 80 (2009) 048102 (7pp) doi:10 July 2009 Published 1 October 2009 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/80/048102 Abstract We have examined. Scr. 80 (2009) 048102 R M Young et al Figure 1. (a) Photoelectron spectra of Hg- n measured with 7.9 e

Neumark, Daniel M.

247

Automated Addition of Fault-Tolerance to SCR Toolset: A case study1 Fuad Abu-Jarad Sandeep S. Kulkarni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/10 Automated Addition of Fault-Tolerance to SCR Toolset: A case study1 Fuad Abu-Jarad Sandeep S-tolerance to the SCR tools. We illustrate our approach using two case studies: an altitude switch controller and an automobile cruise controller. Keywords: SCR tools, Automated addition of fault-tolerance, Event

Kulkarni, Sandeep

248

Annex to the agreement on CLUSTER Dual Masters between IST and KTH Master Program on Systems, Control and Robotics (SCR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Control and Robotics (SCR) B-1/4 Appendix B: Dual Degree Agreement between Instituto Superior Técnico (IST on Systems, Control and Robotics (SCR) B-2/4 This page is intentionally left blank #12;Annex to the agreement on CLUSTER Dual Masters between IST and KTH Master Program on Systems, Control and Robotics (SCR) B-3/4 FIRST

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

249

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 79 (2009) 055301 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/79/05/055301  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 79 (2009) 055301 (12pp) doi:10 at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/79/055301 Abstract The unified method for total electron­ion recombination Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. 79 (2009) 055301 S N Nahar et al AI rates for the (e + ion) system

Nahar, Sultana Nurun

250

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 80 (2009) 048107 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/80/04/048107  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 80 (2009) 048107 (6pp) doi:10 2009 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/80/048107 Abstract The paper reviews recent advantages Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. 80 (2009) 048107 V V Kuznetsov et al diss is much shorter than

251

mis of most land plants is uniseriate (compris-ing one layer), and if SHR and SCR orthologs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

378 mis of most land plants is uniseriate (compris- ing one layer), and if SHR and SCR orthologs- mis in some organs (8). These horsetails have apparently tinkered with their SCR and SHR genes to allow SHR to escape the clutches of SCR in the first endodermal layer, thus extend- ing the endodermis

252

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 78 (2008) 015303 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/78/01/015303  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 78 (2008) 015303 (6pp) doi:10 for publication 19 May 2008 Published 2 July 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/78/015303 Abstract High-8949/08/015303+06$30.00 1 © 2008 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. 78 (2008) 015303

Bayram, S. Burçin

253

SCR++: A Language Design for Real-Time Multi-Agent Vijay Narayana Halaharvi and Gopal Gupta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCR++: A Language Design for Real-Time Multi-Agent Systems Vijay Narayana Halaharvi and Gopal Gupta on developing a language framework called SCR++ which is based on the four variable model of the software cost. Figure: Four Variable Model SCR++ is inherited from the Four Variable Model and has extensions

Gupta, Gopal

254

Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400-650 {degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought {open_quotes}Claus-alternative{close_quotes} for coal-fired power plant applications.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The very nearby M/T dwarf binary SCR 1845-6357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recently discovered star SCR 1845-6357 is the first late M/T dwarf binary discovered. SCR 1845 is a particular object due to its tight orbit (currently around 4 AU) and its proximity to the Sun (3.85 pc). We present spatially resolved VLT/NACO images and low resolution spectra of SCR 1845 in the J, H and K near-infrared bands. Since the T dwarf companion, SCR 1845B, is so close to the primary SCR 1845A, orbital motion is evident even within a year. Following the orbital motion, the binary's mass can be measured accurately within a decade, making SCR 1845B a key T-dwarf mass-luminosity calibrator. The NIR spectra allow for accurate determination of spectral type and also for rough estimates of the object's physical parameters. The spectral type of SCR 1845B is determined by direct comparison of the flux calibrated JHK spectra with T dwarf standard template spectra and also by NIR spectral indices obtained from synthetic photometry. Constrained values for surface gravity, effective temperature and metallicity are derived by comparison with model spectra. Our data prove that SCR 1845B is a brown dwarf of spectral type T6 that is co-moving with and therefore gravitationally bound to the M8.5 primary. Fitting the NIR spectrum of SCR 1845B to model spectra yields an effective temperature of about 950K and a surface gravity log(g)=5.1 (cgs) assuming solar metallicity. Mass and age of SCR 1845B are in the range 40 to 50 Jupiter masses and 1.8 to 3.1 Gyr.

Markus Kasper; Beth A. Biller; Adam Burrows; Wolfgang Brandner; Jano Budaj; Laird M. Close

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state was found to be Au11L52+ at lower coverage and Au11L5+ at higher coverage, respectively. A coverage-dependent electron tunneling mechanism is proposed to account for the observed reduction of charge of mass-selected multiply charged gold clusters soft landed on SAMs. The results demonstrate that one of the critical parameters that influence the chemical and physical properties of supported metal clusters, ionic charge state, may be controlled by selecting the coverage of charged species soft landed onto surfaces.

Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

PILC-based monolithic catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by methane in oxygen excess  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work was the study and development of aluminum-pillared clay (Al-PILC)-based monolithic Pd catalysts for reducing \\{NOx\\} emissions from natural gas-fired power plants using methane as a selective reductant. During preparation of the support, the same raw material used to synthesize the pillared clays was used as a permanent inorganic binder. This confers high surface area and acidity to the extrudates, in addition to high hydrothermal resistance and mechanical strength. The influence of the method used for active phase incorporation on the physico-chemical properties and DeNOx activity and selectivity was studied. Conclusions were drawn from the use of different solution pH values and precursors in relation to the isoelectric point of the solid. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, and NH3 and CO chemisorption.

F. Mohino; P. Avila; P. Salerno; A. Bahamonde; S. Mendioroz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A "loop entropy reduction" phage-display selection for folded amino acid sequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is that insertion of a long disordered sequence into a loop of a host protein will substantially destabilize; ACCEPTED October 27, 2000) Abstract As a step toward selecting folded proteins from libraries of randomized the host because of the entropic cost of closing a loop in a disordered chain. If the inserted sequence

Baker, David

259

Selective hydrocracking of heavy straight run naphtha bottoms for T90 reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refiners are being presented with a major challenge to meet proposed stringent specifications for reformulated gasoline to lower auto exhaustive emissions. Among the specifications proposed to be regulated by EPA, the T90 boiling point of gasoline is found to have a great influence on hydrocarbon emissions. T90 reduction of naphtha streams by hydrocracking has been identified as a processing scheme to upgrade the heavy naphtha fraction before blending with other refining streams. In this paper, a commercially available catalyst was evaluated for the T90 reduction of the heavy fraction of heavy straight run naphtha with an ASTM D-86 boiling range of 275-386F (HSRN). The catalyst was found to be effective in lowering the T90 of HSRN from 344F to 300F under reaction conditions of 2 LHSV/1000 psig/650 F or 4 LHSV/1000 psig/695 F. The product yield shift by hydrocracking was from C9-C11 hydrocarbons to C4-C6 components, particularly C4 and C5 isoparaffins. Both RON and MON of the liquid products were increased significantly from 36 and 42 up to 78 and 74, respectively. The increase of octane numbers is a function of hydrocracking severity. The liquid product yield was about 75 vol% with a T90 of 300F. The liquid product sulfur and nitrogen contents were less than 30 and 0.15 wppm, respectively.

Hsing, L.H.; Nelson, R.G. [Texaco Research and Development, Port Arthur, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Selective Reduction of Active Metal Chlorides from Molten LiCl-KCl using Lithium Drawdown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of optimizing electrorefining technology for treating spent nuclear fuel, lithium drawdown has been investigated for separating actinides from molten salt electrolyte. Drawdown reaction selectivity is a major issue that needs to be investigated, since the goal is to remove actinides while leaving the fission products in the salt. A series of lithium drawdown tests with surrogate fission product chlorides was run to obtain selectivity data with non-radioactive salts, develop a predictive model, and draw conclusions about the viability of using this process with actinide-loadd salt. Results of tests with CsCl, LaCl3, CeCl3, and NdCl3 are reported here. An equilibrium model has been formulated and fit to the experimental data. Excellent fits to the data were achieved. Based on analysis and results obtained to date, it is concluded that clean separation between minor actinides and lanthanides will be difficult to achieve using lithium drawdown.

Michael F. Simpson; Daniel LaBrier; Michael Lineberry; Tae-Sic Yoo

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rapid Automated Treatment Planning Process to Select Breast Cancer Patients for Active Breathing Control to Achieve Cardiac Dose Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate a rapid automated treatment planning process for the selection of patients with left-sided breast cancer for a moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique using active breathing control (ABC); and to determine the dose reduction to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the heart using mDIBH. Method and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using an automated method for patients undergoing left-sided breast radiotherapy (n = 53) with two-field tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy. All patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, defined as having >10 cm{sup 3} of the heart receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 50}) on the free-breathing automated treatment plan, underwent repeat scanning on a protocol using a mDIBH technique and ABC. The doses to the LAD and heart were compared between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans. Results: The automated planning process required approximately 9 min to generate a breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan. Using the dose-volume criteria, 20 of the 53 patients were selected for ABC. Significant differences were found between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans for the heart V{sub 50} (29.9 vs. 3.7 cm{sup 3}), mean heart dose (317 vs. 132 cGy), mean LAD dose (2,047 vs. 594 cGy), and maximal dose to 0.2 cm{sup 3} of the LAD (4,155 vs. 1,507 cGy, all p <.001). Of the 17 patients who had a breath-hold threshold of {>=}0.8 L, 14 achieved a {>=}90% reduction in the heart V{sub 50} using the mDIBH technique. The 3 patients who had had a breath-hold threshold <0.8 L achieved a lower, but still significant, reduction in the heart V{sub 50}. Conclusions: A rapid automated treatment planning process can be used to select patients who will benefit most from mDIBH. For selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, the mDIBH technique using ABC can significantly reduce the dose to the LAD and heart, potentially reducing the cardiac risks.

Wang Wei; Purdie, Thomas G. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rahman, Mohammad; Marshall, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Liu Feifei [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fyles, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.fyles@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Analyzed the effects of higher hydrocarbon emissions from PCCI combustion on SCR catalysts in operating a light-duty 1.9-liter GM diesel engine in both PCCI and conventional combustion modes

265

Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the...

266

Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for Hybrid Vehicles using PSAT System Simulations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Results of simulations of LDD hybrid vehicle under hybrid drive cycle conditions in PSAT show the potential impact of urea-SCR NOx controls on HEVs and PHEVs powered by lean-burn engines.

267

Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-based Systems Approach Poster P Poster P - - 2 2, Wednesday Bruce Bunting and Todd Toops Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

268

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Chang H. Kim, Kevin Perry, Wei Li, Kushal Narayanaswamy, and Michael Viola Global Research &...

269

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC Adam Foster and Ke Nguyen University of Tennessee - Knoxville Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops Oak...

270

Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2003 Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program...

271

Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford...

272

Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor...

273

Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- August 25, 2002 1 Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development...

274

Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Calcul du SCR Planchet -Guibert -Juillard -1 -UN CADRE DE REFERENCE POUR UN MODELE INTERNE PARTIEL EN ASSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcul du SCR Planchet - Guibert - Juillard - 1 - UN CADRE DE REFERENCE POUR UN MODELE INTERNE référence (best estimate, marge pour risque et SCR) dans le cadre d'une approche mêlant calculs analytiques auteur, publié dans "Bulletin Français d'Actuariat 10, 20 (2010) pp. 5-34" #12;Calcul du SCR Planchet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Comment on the numerical solutions of a new coupled MKdV system (2008 Phys. Scr. 78 045008)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this comment we point out some wrong statements in the paper by Inc and Cavlak, Phys. Scr. 78 (2008) 045008

Francisco M. Fernández

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

those for selective catalytic reduction (SCR)), scrubbing liquors, flue gas or coal additives, combustion modifications, barrier discharges, and ultraviolet radiation....

278

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) Gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) Pulverized coal (PC) boilers LNG production

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Stripping ethanol from ethanol-blended fuels for use in NO.sub.x SCR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to use diesel fuel alchohol micro emulsions (E-diesel) to provide a source of reductant to lower NO.sub.x emissions using selective catalytic reduction. Ethanol is stripped from the micro emulsion and entered into the exhaust gasses upstream of the reducing catalyst. The method allows diesel (and other lean-burn) engines to meet new, lower emission standards without having to carry separate fuel and reductant tanks.

Kass, Michael Delos (Oak Ridge, TN); Graves, Ronald Lee (Knoxville, TN); Storey, John Morse Elliot (Oak Ridge, TN); Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur (Andersonville, TN); Sluder, Charles Scott (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, John Foster (Powell, TN)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

Constance Senior

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, together with a reversible inhibition due to competitive adsorption of SO{sub 2} with NO on the catalyst. In an effort to minimize the deactivating effect of SO{sub 2} on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, two synthetic approaches were briefly examined. These consisted of (1) the incorporation of highly dispersed Co(II) ions in silica, as a non-sulfating matrix, via the sol-gel preparation of CoO-SiO{sub 2}; and (2) the sol-gel preparation of a mixed metal oxide, CoO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}, with the aim of exploiting the acidity of the niobium oxide to minimize SO2 adsorption. While both catalysts showed almost no activity for NO oxidation in the absence of SO{sub 2}, when SO{sub 2} was present low activity was observed, indicating that SO{sub 2} acts as a promoter for NO oxidation over these materials. The kinetics of NO oxidation over Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} were also examined. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was found to exhibit a higher apparent activation energy for NO oxidation than the Pt catalysts, while the combined reaction order in NO and O{sub 2} for the three catalysts was very close to one. CO{sub 2} was found to have no effect on the kinetics of NO oxidation over these catalysts. The presence of H{sub 2}O caused a decrease in NO conversion for both Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, while no effect was observed for Pt/SiO{sub 2}. The inhibiting effect of water was reversible and is attributed to competitive adsorption with the reactants. In sum, this study has shown that a variety of base metal catalysts are very active for NO oxidation. However, all of the catalysts studied are strongly deactivated in the presence of 2800 ppm SO{sub 2} at typical flue gas temperatures; consequently improving catalyst resistance to SO{sub x} will be a pre-requisite if the fast SCR concept is to be applied to coal-fired flue gas conditions.

Mark Crocker

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T130 (2008) 014016 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T130/014016  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T130 (2008) 014016 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T130 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T130/014016 Abstract Aspects of turbulence in protostellar accretion

Brandenburg, Axel

283

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T122 (2006) 810 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2006/T122/003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T122 (2006) 8­10 doi:10 Published 25 January 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T122/8 Abstract Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF

Egedal, Jan

284

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014007 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140/014007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014007 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140 2010 Accepted for publication 16 June 2010 Published 30 September 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Olivares, Stefano

285

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T125 (2006) 2125 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2006/T125/005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T125 (2006) 21­25 doi:10 June 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T125/21 Abstract The Strutinsky shell correction method

Pomorski, Krzysztof

286

Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 247 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Western Region of the United States. Although the Western Region includes Alaska, coal data from this state will often be cited apart from the Western Region data from the lower United States. This is the third of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Western Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA). Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Evaluation of SCR and DOC/CPF Tech in Diesel Exhaust Emission Control to Meet U.S. Tier 2 Bin 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The continuous regeneration trap may cause irreversibly negative effects on the NOx removal efficiency of the SCR system.

290

Characteristics of vanadia on the surface of V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst for the reduction of \\{NOx\\} by NH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of vanadia catalysts impregnated on titania pillared interlayered clays (Ti-PILCs) were prepared to identify the characteristics of vanadia on the surface of Ti-PILC for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3. V2O5/Ti-PILC exhibited superior performance as a novel SCR catalyst compared to conventional catalysts including V2O5/TiO2 and V2O5/Al2O3. NO removal activity over the supported vanadia catalyst is strongly influenced by the structure of vanadia species on the catalyst surface. The structure of vanadia species on various supports including TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 along with Ti-PILC has been examined by XRD, NMR and Raman analyses for the comparative study. Increasing the content of vanadia up to the monolayer coverage of the surface of Ti-PILC catalyst enhanced the ratio of the polymerized surface vanadia species to the isolated ones. These results are well correlated with TOF of vanadia on the catalyst surface for the reduction of NO by NH3.

Ho Jeong Chae; In-Sik Nam; Sung-Won Ham; Suk Bong Hong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 74 (2006) 6270 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/74/1/009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 74 (2006) 62­70 doi:10@nephy.chalmers.se Received 18 November 2005 Accepted for publication 30 March 2006 Published 16 June 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Pázsit, Imre

292

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 74 (2006) 614617 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/74/6/003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 74 (2006) 614­617 doi:10.fisher@weizmann.ac.il Received 14 June 2006 Accepted for publication 15 August 2006 Published 31 October 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

293

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 78 (2008) 058124 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/78/05/058124  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 78 (2008) 058124 (7pp) doi:10.Simons@chem.ox.ac.uk Received 14 July 2008 Accepted for publication 16 July 2008 Published 5 November 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Davis, Ben G.

294

Kinetics of the Selective Reduction of NO with CH4 Over an In-Fe2O3/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A kinetic model presented for the selective reduction of NO with CH4 over an In-Fe2O3/HZSM-5 catalyst by considering the process as a combination...2+CH4 (reaction 1) and O2+CH4 (reaction 2). Linear regression ca...

Xiaodong Wang; Weicheng Liu; Tao Zhang…

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T153 (2013) 014006 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2013/T153/014006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T153 (2013) 014006 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2013/T153 at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T153/014006 Abstract We suggest and demonstrate a new protocol based on correlated Swedish Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T153 (2013) 014006 G Brida et al Figure 1

Paris, Matteo G. A.

296

To appear in Proceedings, International Symposium on Requirements Engineering, York, England, March 26-27, 1995 1 Consistency Checking of SCR-Style Requirements Speci cations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

26-27, 1995 1 Consistency Checking of SCR-Style Requirements Speci cations Constance Heitmeyer checking that mechanically checks requirements speci cations, expressed in the SCR tab- ular notation. As background, the SCR notation for specifying requirements is reviewed. A formal re- quirements model

297

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T147 (2012) 014003 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2012/T147/014003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T147 (2012) 014003 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2012/T147 for publication 2 December 2011 Published 17 February 2012 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T147/014003 Abstract;Phys. Scr. T147 (2012) 014003 K Bartkiewicz and A Miranowicz quantum cloning with prior partial

Miranowicz, Adam

298

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T142 (2010) 014032 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T142/014032  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T142 (2010) 014032 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T142 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T142/014032 Abstract Magnetic field line reconnection is still in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T142 (2010) 014032 W Gekelman et al Figure 1. The LAPD device. The plasma column

California at Los Angles, University of

299

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T151 (2012) 014035 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2012/T151/014035  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T151 (2012) 014035 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2012/T151@bgu.ac.il Received 18 April 2012 Accepted for publication 27 June 2012 Published 30 November 2012 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T151 (2012) 014035 D Cohen Figur

Cohen, Doron

300

How to Fake a Rational Design Process using the SCR Method In Proc. Software Engineering for High Assurance Systems (SEHAS 2003),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to Fake a Rational Design Process using the SCR Method In Proc. Software Engineering for High Parnas and Clements [7], by the application of the ex- tended SCR Method of Heitmeyer and Bharadwaj. We of tools in the SCR Toolset. Fur- ther, since the products associated with each step have a consistent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of HC-SCR System Using Diesel Fuel as a Reductant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-19lee.pdf More Documents & Publications Engine and Reactor...

302

Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better control for preventing catalyst deactivation resulted from study of and proposed mechanism for deactivation of Cu/zeolite under rich conditions.

303

Combined Catalyzed Soot Filter and SCR Catalyst System for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantially reduces particulate emission for diesel vehicles Up to 90% effective against carbonaceous particulate matter Significantly reduces CO and HC Filter regenerates at normal diesel operation temperatures Removable design for easy cleaning and maintenance.

Kakwani, R.M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maronde (DOE) This publication was prepared with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Award No. DE-FC26- 02NT41218. However, any opinions, findings, conclusions,...

305

NMR Studies of Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hydrothermal aging of Cu/zeolite urea-SCR catalysts on their reactivity and material properties was assessed by performance tests and multiple characterization techniques that included 27Al NMR and XRD. Three aging protocols were used that consisted of varying temperature during hydrothermal aging with or without exposure to aqueous urea solution. Differences in behavior were even found for samples hydrothermally aged immediately following exposure to the urea solution or if the sample was dried overnight before hydrothermal aging. The combination of urea and high temperature exposure increased the deactivation of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts beyond that observed by hydrothermal aging alone, with an immediate high temperature exposure following wetting of the catalyst core with aqueous urea causing the most significant deterioration in performance. The impact of urea on SCR catalyst durability was also found to increase with the aging temperature. NMR analysis suggested that aging with urea resulted in relatively more dealumination of the zeolite for the SCR catalysts in this study.

Cheng, Yisun; Hoard, John; Lambert, Christine; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} on Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts were investigated by SCR performance tests and multiple characterization techniques including temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results indicate that a larger amount of highly dispersed CuSO{sub 4} formed in the zeolite catalysts (Z-CuSO{sub 4}) upon SO{sub 3} poisoning, explaining the much more significant deactivation of the Cu/zeolite catalysts that were exposed to SO{sub 3} compared to poisoning by SO{sub 2}. This paper provides the first demonstration that active sites of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts involved in the storage and removal of sulfur can react with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} in very different ways. In particular, the significant differences in the extent of sulfur uptake account for the considerably different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} poisoning on the performance of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts.

Cheng, Y.; Lambert, C; Kim, D; Kwak, J; Cho, S; Peden, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Le financement des entreprises par les socits de capital de risque (SCR) est essentiel au dveloppement de l'conomie. Ce financement s'adresse tous les types d'entreprises et ce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Le financement des entreprises par les sociétés de capital de risque (SCR) est essentiel au leurs impacts sur les entreprises, et d'outiller les gestionnaires des SCR pour le choix de leurs d'investissement des SCR de la sélection des projets jusqu'au retrait. Lorsqu'une SCR décide d

Spino, Claude

308

Ambient Temperature Hydrocarbon Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx Using Atmospheric Pressure Nonthermal Plasma Activation of a Ag/Al2O3 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient Temperature Hydrocarbon Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx Using Atmospheric Pressure Nonthermal Plasma Activation of a Ag/Al2O3 Catalyst ... This low temperature activity provides the basis for applying nonthermal plasmas to activate emission control catalysts during cold start conditions, which remains an important issue for mobile and stationary applications. ... (14, 15) Therefore, the combination of heterogeneous catalysis with plasmas has attracted interest due to the combined possible advantages of having a fast and low-temperature reaction from atmospheric nonthermal plasma and high product selectivity from heterogeneous catalysis. ...

Cristina E. Stere; Wameedh Adress; Robbie Burch; Sarayute Chansai; Alexandre Goguet; William G. Graham; Fabio De Rosa; Vincenzo Palma; Christopher Hardacre

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Power corrections in the decay rate and distributions in B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}} in the standard model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the leading power corrections to the decay rates and distributions in the decay B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}} in the standard model (SM) using heavy quark expansion (HQE) in (1/m{sub b}) and a phenomenological model implementing the Fermi motion effects of the b quark bound in the B hadron. In the HQE method, we find that including the leading power corrections the decay width {Gamma}(B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}}) decreases by about 4{percent} and the branching ratio B(B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}}) by about 1.5{percent} from their (respective) parton model values. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is found to be stable against power corrections over a good part of this spectrum. However, near the high-mass end point this distribution becomes negative with the current value of the nonperturbative parameter {lambda}{sub 2} (the {lambda}{sub 1}-dependent corrections are found to be innocuous), implying the breakdown of the HQE method in this region. Our results are at variance with the existing ones in the literature in both the decay rate and the invariant dilepton mass distribution calculated in the HQE approach. As an alternative, we implement the nonperturbative effects in the decay B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}} using a phenomenologically motivated Gaussian Fermi motion model. We find small corrections to the branching ratio, but the nonperturbative effects are perceptible in both the dilepton mass distribution and the forward-backward asymmetry in the high dilepton mass region. (Abstract Truncated)

Ali, A.; Hiller, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Handoko, L.T.; Morozumi, T. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi Hiroshima - 739 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi Hiroshima - 739 (Japan)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Selective catalytic reduction studies with ammonia/NO model gas mixtures were used to screen mixed FeVO4/titania powders for activity in both fresh and aged conditions; reaction of ammonia in the absence of NO was also used as measure of ammonia oxidation tendency at elevated reaction temperatures

312

Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A modified Spaci-IR technique can measure transient NH3 and NOx concentrations; data have been used to calibrate and validate an SCR model, with good agreement between experiments and simulations.

313

The Solar Neighbourhood XI: The trigonometric parallax of SCR 1845--6357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a trigonometric parallax for the nearby star SCR1845--6357, an extremely red high proper motion object discovered by Hambly et al. (2004) and identified via accurate photoelectric photometry and spectroscopy to be an M8.5 dwarf with a photometric parallax of $4.6\\pm0.8$ pc by Henry et al. (2004). Using methods similar to those described in Deacon & Hambly (2001) we have derived a full astrometric solution from SuperCOSMOS scans of eight survey and non--survey Schmidt photographs held in the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope Unit plate library. We calculate the trigonometric parallax to be $\\pi=282\\pm23$ mas yielding a distance of $3.5\\pm0.3$ pc which implies an absolute K$_{s}$ magnitude of 10.79. This distance calculation places SCR1845--6357 as the 16th closest stellar system to the Sun.

Niall R. Deacon; Nigel C. Hambly; Todd J. Henry; John P. Subasavage; Misty A. Brown; Wei-Chun Jao

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this collaborative program, scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Ford Motor Company have investigated laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We have also studied materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we have examined the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measured the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model. Since this CRADA has now been completed, in this annual report we will provide very brief summaries of most of the work carried out on this CRADA over the last several years.

Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Cheng, Yisun; Lupescu, Jason; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Lambert, Christine; McCabe, Robert W.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T137 (2009) 014013 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2009/T137/014013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T137 (2009) 014013 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2009/T137 October 2009 Accepted for publication 23 October 2009 Published 14 December 2009 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T137 (2009) 014013 J M Fink et al 1 , 2 Cg Cin Cout Resonator 20 mK Qubit I

Wallraff, Andreas

316

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014015 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140/014015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014015 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140 for publication 4 June 2010 Published 30 September 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T140/014015 Abstract We Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014015 M Bina et al 0 2 4 6 8 0 0.5 1 a

Paris, Matteo G. A.

317

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014018 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140/014018  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014018 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140 2010 Published 30 September 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T140/014018 Abstract In a recent The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014018 V D'Auria et al

Paris, Matteo G. A.

318

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T130 (2008) 014001 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T130/014001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T130 (2008) 014001 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T130@berkeley.edu Received 11 March 2008 Accepted for publication 14 March 2008 Published 16 July 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr Swedish Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T130 (2008) 014001 G W Marcy et al HD 9407 (G

Metchev, Stanimir

319

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T137 (2009) 014005 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2009/T137/014005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T137 (2009) 014005 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2009/T137 16 October 2009 Accepted for publication 23 October 2009 Published 14 December 2009 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr Swedish Academy of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T137 (2009) 014005 S Ashhab et al L R L R L R

Nori, Franco

320

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014037 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140/014037  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014037 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140 for publication 8 April 2010 Published 30 September 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T140/014037 Abstract We of Sciences Printed in the UK #12;Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014037 R Tana´s and Z Ficek also been shown [19, 20

Tanas, Ryszard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Selective CO{sub 2} reduction conjugated with H{sub 2}O oxidation utilizing semiconductor/metal-complex hybrid photocatalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a new hybrid photocatalyst for CO{sub 2} reduction, which is composed of a semiconductor and a metal complex. In the hybrid photocatalyst, ?G between the position of conduction band minimum (E{sub CBM}) of the semiconductor and the CO{sub 2} reduction potential of the complex is an essential factor for realizing fast electron transfer from the conduction band of semiconductor to metal complex leading to high photocatalytic activity. On the basis of this concept, the hybrid photocatalyst InP/Ru-complex, which functions in aqueous media, was developed. The photoreduction of CO{sub 2} to formate using water as an electron donor and a proton source was successfully achieved as a Z-scheme system by functionally conjugating the InP/Ru-complex photocatalyst for CO{sub 2} reduction with a TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst for water oxidation. The conversion efficiency from solar energy to chemical energy was ca. 0.04%, which approaches that for photosynthesis in a plant. Because this system can be applied to many other inorganic semiconductors and metal-complex catalysts, the efficiency and reaction selectivity can be enhanced by optimization of the electron transfer process including the energy-band configurations, conjugation conformations, and catalyst structures. This electrical-bias-free reaction is a huge leap forward for future practical applications of artificial photosynthesis under solar irradiation to produce organic species.

Morikawa, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Sato, S., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Arai, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Uemura, K., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Yamanaka, K. I., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Suzuki, T. M., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Kajino, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Motohiro, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Microclimate effects of fuels-reduction and group-selection silviculture: Implications for fire behavior in Sierran mixed-conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fire suppression and other past management practices in the western USA have led to dense conifer forests with high canopy cover and thick layers of surface fuels, changes likely to alter understory microclimate relative to historical conditions. Silvicultural treatments are used to restore forest resilience, but little is known about their microclimate-mediated effects on fire behavior. We measured fire-related microclimate variables for two years before and after experimental, operational-scale application of fuels-reduction thinning and group selection treatments in a Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest. Measurements included air speed, temperature, and relative humidity; soil temperature and moisture; and dead fuel moisture. Wind gust speed increased moderately (average 0.7 m s?1 or 31% increase) in thinned forest and sharply (average 2.5 m s?1 or 128% increase) in group-selection openings. Surprisingly, treatments did not affect air temperature or humidity. Soil temperatures increased by a mean of 4 °C in group openings but did not increase in thinned stands. Duff moisture in group selection openings was 72% of that in the control stands, but there were no effects on moisture in other fuel particle size classes, or in thinned stands. Soil moisture increased in group-selection openings at depths down to 0.7 m but did not change in thinned stands. Fire spread simulation modeling with \\{FMAPlus\\} indicated that elevated wind speeds could increase the fire rate of spread, but that increases are moderate and largely linear rather than exponential across the observed range of wind gust speeds. In general our results suggest that group selection openings placed in high canopy cover, Sierran mixed-conifer forests are distinct microclimatic environments that will have slightly different fire behavior than the surrounding matrix due to higher surface temperatures and faster wind speeds. Current fuels-reduction thinning practices in dry western forests, however, will have minimal microclimatic-mediated influence on wildfire behavior, and there is little cause for concern about a faster rate of fire spread or drier fuels in such stands.

Seth W. Bigelow; Malcolm P. North

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Automatic resource specification generation for resource selection in large-scale distributed environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Varying SCR.. 117of predicted RC size change due to varying SCR for smallRC size change due to varying SCR and parallelism for larger

Huang, Richard Yu-Hua

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

On the origin of the selectivity of oxygen reduction of ruthenium-containing electrocatalysts in methanol-containing electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactivity with water and methanol of oxygen-reducing (Ru{sub 1{minus}x}Mo{sub x}SeO{sub z}) and oxygen (from water)-evolving electrocatalysts (RuS{sub 2}, RuO{sub 2}), which permit electron transfer via ruthenium d-states, was studied using electrochemical techniques and differential electrochemical mass spectroscopy (DEMS). In contrast to platinum, which is depolarized by methanol, ruthenium compounds show a high reactivity with water species and an extremely low reactivity with methanol. The authors conclude that the ruthenium-centered coordination chemical reactivity with water channels electrochemical currents, thus producing kinetic selectivity. The reason for the higher reactivity with water of Ru d-states as compared to platinum is seen in the higher density of d-states near the Fermi level as shown by this comparative study.

Alonso-Vante, N.; Bogdanoff, P.; Tributsch, H.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

sourcefile: msefk10_scr.doc;5 page 1 Druckversion 2010-04-07 14:39 Technische Universitt Dresden apl. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Kreher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sourcefile: msefk10_scr.doc;5 page 1 Druckversion 2010-04-07 14:39 Technische Universität Dresden Kreher sourcefile: msefk10_scr.doc;5 page 2 Druckversion 2010-04-07 14:39 www.nano.tu-dresden.de Inhalt

Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

326

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T125 (2006) 188189 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2006/T125/044  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T125 (2006) 188­189 doi:10@kft.umcs.lublin.pl Received 8 July 2005 Accepted for publication 1 September 2005 Published 28 June 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Pomorski, Krzysztof

327

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T136 (2009) 014007 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2009/T136/014007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T136 (2009) 014007 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2009/T136 for publication 28 January 2009 Published 12 October 2009 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T136/014007 Abstract We

328

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T129 (2007) 2226 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2007/T129/005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T129 (2007) 22­26 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2007/T129 Accepted for publication 5 July 2007 Published 22 November 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T129

Boo, Jin-Hyo

329

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014062 (3pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140/014062  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T140 (2010) 014062 (3pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T140.olivares@mi.infn.it Received 29 March 2010 Accepted for publication 16 April 2010 Published 30 September 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Paris, Matteo G. A.

330

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T153 (2013) 014059 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2013/T153/014059  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T153 (2013) 014059 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2013/T153@kielich.amu.edu.pl Received 21 August 2012 Accepted for publication 21 October 2012 Published 28 March 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Tanas, Ryszard

331

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T129 (2007) 227230 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2007/T129/051  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T129 (2007) 227­230 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2007/T129 Published 28 November 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T129/227 Abstract. In the present paper, ball

Zheng, Yufeng

332

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T142 (2010) 014064 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T142/014064  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T142 (2010) 014064 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2010/T142 for publication 2 June 2010 Published 31 December 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/T142/014064 Abstract

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

333

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 76 (2007) C48C55 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/76/3/N07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 76 (2007) C48­C55 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/76/3/N07 Low Accepted for publication 20 June 2007 Published 3 August 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr/76/C48

Farrar, James M.

334

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T133 (2008) 014009 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T133/014009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. T133 (2008) 014009 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T133 September 2008 Accepted for publication 19 September 2008 Published 19 December 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/PhysScr

Korn, Andreas

335

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxice Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2000/1111 2000/1111 Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal- Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment August 1998 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center Morgantown, WV/Pittsburgh, PA 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respon- sibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

336

Refeeding after acute food restriction: Differential reduction in preference for ethanol and ethanol-paired flavors in selectively bred rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rats' voluntary ethanol intake varies with dispositional factors and energy status. The joint influences of these were of interest here. We previously reported that rats selectively bred for high voluntary saccharin intake (HiS) consume more ethanol and express more robust conditioning of preference for flavors paired with voluntarily consumed ethanol than do low-saccharin consuming counterparts (LoS). Three new experiments examined the effect of refeeding after an episode of food restriction on ethanol intake and on preference for ethanol-paired flavors in HiS and LoS rats. A 48-h episode of food restriction with wheel running reduced intake of and preference for 4% ethanol (Exp. 1a) and preference for an ethanol-paired flavor (Exp. 1b) during refeeding. Food restriction alone was sufficient to reduce the flavor preference (Exp. 2). Adding fat to the refeeding diet or extending the food restriction period exacerbated the effect (Exp. 3), yielding a frank aversion to ethanol-paired flavors in LoS rats. These studies indicate that rebound from negative energy balance shifts responses to ethanol-associated cues from preference toward aversion. Analyses of bodyweight changes and caloric intake during refeeding support this conclusion and further suggest that lower metabolic efficiency may be a marker for enhanced preference mutability.

Nancy K. Dess; Clinton D. Chapman; Laura A. Cousins; Derek C. Monroe; Phuong Nguyen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Current Biology 19, 20372042, December 15, 2009 2009 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2009.10.028 Visualization of Individual Scr mRNAs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1016/j.cub.2009.10.028 Report Visualization of Individual Scr mRNAs during Drosophila Embryogenesis this method to charac- terize transcription at the endogenous locus of the Hox gene Sex combs reduced (Scr'' and ``maintenance'' phases of gene activity at the Scr locus. Results and Discussion In early Drosophila embryos

McGinnis, William

338

Effects of Hydrothermal Aging on NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hydrothermal treatment on model Cu/zeolite catalysts were investigated to better understand the nature of Cu species for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3}. After hydrothermal aging at 800 C for 16 h, the NO{sub x} reduction performance of Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta were significantly reduced at low temperatures, while that of Cu-SSZ-13 was not affected. When the zeolite framework aluminum species were probed using solid state {sup 27}Al-NMR, significant reduction in the intensities of the tetrahedral aluminum peak was observed for Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, although no increase in the intensities of the octahedral aluminum peak was observed. When the redox behavior of Cu species was examined using H{sub 2}-TPR, it was found that Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} and to Cu{sup 0} fir Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta catalysts, while Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} only for Cu-SSZ-13. After hydrothermal aging, CuO and Cu-aluminate species were found to form in Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, while little changes were observed for Cu-SSZ-13.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Tran, Diana N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Szanyi, Janos; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Five NOx-Control Projects to Combat Acid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 5, 2004 November 5, 2004 DOE Selects Five NOx-Control Projects to Combat Acid Rain and Smog Industry Partners to Focus on Reducing Emissions While Cutting Energy Costs PITTSBURGH, PA - Continuing efforts to cut acid rain and smog-producing nitrogen oxides (NOx) have prompted the U.S. Department of Energy to partner with industry experts to develop advanced NOx-control technologies. With the selection of five new NOx-control projects, the Energy Department continues as a leader in developing advanced technologies to achieve environmental compliance for the nation's fleet of coal-fired power plants. Although today's NOx-control workhorses, such as low-NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction (SCR), have been successfully deployed to address existing regulations, proposed regulations will require deeper cuts in NOx emissions, at a greater number of generating facilities. Many of the smaller affected plants will not be able to cost-effectively use today's technologies; these are the focus of the advanced technologies selected in this announcement.

340

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with today's regulatory requirements. Low-NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology have enabled hundreds of power plants to reach mandated emission levels....

342

Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of NO by Hydrocarbons Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis...

343

Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. During solution ion exchange, different SAPO-34...

344

Mercury oxidation over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(WO{sub 3})/TiO{sub 2} commercial SCR catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury oxidation by hydrochloric acid over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(WO{sub 3})/TiO{sub 2} commercial SCR catalyst was investigated. Both fresh and aged catalysts with honeycomb structure, which were exposed to a coal combustion flue gas in a coal-fired boiler for over 71 000 h. were examined. The aged catalysts were characterized by X-ray and SEM-EDX analysis to examine the presence of ash deposition on the surface. The mercury oxidation rate was enhanced by increasing HCl concentrations and inhibited strongly by the presence of NH{sub 3}. This behavior could be explained by a kinetic model assuming that HCl competes for the catalyst active sites against NH{sub 3}. As the catalyst operation time increased, the mercury oxidation rate was observed to decrease considerably in the presence of NH{sub 3} while NO reduction rate was apparently nearly unchanged. By examining aged catalysts, deposits stemming from fly ash and SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} were observed to accumulate continuously on the catalyst surface. The ash deposited on the surface may partially block the active catalyst sites and decrease their number. The decrease of the number of active sites on the catalyst surface caused NH{sub 3} to remain unreacted in the honeycomb catalyst. The decrease of the Hg{sup 0} oxidation rate was caused by the inhibition effect of NH{sub 3} remaining in the catalyst.

Kamata, H.; Ueno, S.; Naito, T.; Yukimura, A [IHI Corp, Kanagawa (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

346

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

347

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

348

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

349

Government control or low carbon lifestyle? – Analysis and application of a novel selective-constrained energy-saving and emission-reduction dynamic evolution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores a novel selective-constrained energy-saving and emission-reduction (ESER) dynamic evolution system, analyzing the impact of cost of conserved energy (CCE), government control, low carbon lifestyle and investment in new technology of ESER on energy intensity and economic growth. Based on artificial neural network, the quantitative coefficients of the actual system are identified. Taking the real situation in China for instance, an empirical study is undertaken by adjusting the parameters of the actual system. The dynamic evolution behavior of energy intensity and economic growth in reality are observed, with the results in perfect agreement with actual situation. The research shows that the introduction of CCE into ESER system will have certain restrictive effect on energy intensity in the earlier period. However, with the further development of the actual system, carbon emissions could be better controlled and energy intensity would decline. In the long run, the impacts of CCE on economic growth are positive. Government control and low carbon lifestyle play a decisive role in controlling ESER system and declining energy intensity. But the influence of government control on economic growth should be considered at the same time and the controlling effect of low carbon lifestyle on energy intensity should be strengthened gradually, while the investment in new technology of ESER can be neglected. Two different cases of ESER are proposed after a comprehensive analysis. The relations between variables and constraint conditions in the ESER system are harmonized remarkably. A better solution to carry out ESER is put forward at last, with numerical simulations being carried out to demonstrate the results.

Guochang Fang; Lixin Tian; Min Fu; Mei Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SCR Potential and Issues for Heavy-Duty Applications in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Daimler Chrysler Detroit Diesel Corporation

351

High-contrast spectroscopy of SCR J1845-6357 B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral characterization of sub-stellar companions is essential to understand their composition and formation processes. However, the large contrast ratio of the brightness of each object to that of its parent star limits our ability to extract a clean spectrum, free from any significant contribution from the star. During the development of the long slit spectroscopy (LSS) mode of IRDIS, the dual-band imager and spectrograph of SPHERE, we proposed a data analysis method to estimate and remove the contributions of the stellar spectrum. This method has never been tested on real data because of the lack of instrumentation capable of combining adaptive optics (AO), coronagraphy, and LSS. Nonetheless, a similar attenuation of the star can be obtained using a particular observing configuration. Test data were acquired using the AO-assisted spectrograph VLT/NACO. We obtained new J- and H-band spectra of SCR J1845-6357 B, a T6 companion to a nearby (3.85\\pm0.02 pc) M8 star. This system is a well-suited benchmark as ...

Vigan, Arthur; Chauvin, Gaël; Moutou, Claire; Montagnier, Guillaume

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Discovery of a Very Nearby Brown Dwarf to the Sun: A Methane Rich Brown Dwarf Companion to the Low Mass Star SCR 1845-6357  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present VLT/NACO SDI images of the very nearby star SCR 1845-6357 (hereafter SCR 1845). SCR 1845 is a recently discovered (Hambly et al. 2004) M8.5 star just 3.85 pc from the sun (Henry et al. 2006). Using the capabilities of the unique SDI device, we discovered a substellar companion to SCR 1845 at a separation of 4.5 AU (1.170''+-0.003'' on the sky) and fainter by 3.57+-0.057 mag in the 1.575 um SDI filter. This substellar companion has an H magnitude of 13.16+0.31-0.26 (absolute H magnitude of 15.30+0.31-0.26), making it likely the brightest mid-T dwarf known. The unique Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI) consists of 3 narrowband filters placed around the 1.6 um methane absorption feature characteristic of T-dwarfs (Teff SCR 1845-6357B. For an age range of 100 Myr - 10 Gyr and spectral type range of T4.5-T6.5, we find a mass range of 9 - 65 MJup for SCR 1845B from the Baraffe et al. 2003 COND models. SCR 1845AB is the 24th closest stellar system to the Sun (at 3.85 pc); the only brown dwarf system closer to the Sun is Eps Indi Ba-Bb (at 3.626 pc). In addition, this is the first T-dwarf companion discovered around a low mass star.

B. A. Biller; M. Kasper; L. M. Close; W. Brandner; S. Kellner

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Mechanistic Investigation of Ethanol SCR of NOx over Ag/Al2O3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2 wt.% Ag/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied for the ethanol selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} from 200 to 550 C and space velocities between 30,000 h{sup -1} and 140,000 h{sup -1}. Peak NO{sub x} conversions reached 85% at 400 C, and an activation energy was determined to be 57 kJ/mol with a feed of ethanol to NO{sub x} or HC{sub 1}/NO{sub x} = 3. Up to 80% of the NO is oxidized to NO{sub 2} at 250 C, but overall NO{sub x} conversion is only 15%. Interestingly, ethanol oxidation occurs at much lower temperatures than NO{sub x} reduction; at 250 C, ethanol oxidation is 80% when flowing ethanol + NO + O{sub 2}. This increased reactivity, compared to only 15% when flowing only ethanol + O{sub 2}, combined with the observation that NO is not oxidized to NO{sub 2} in the absence of ethanol illustrates a synergistic relationship between the reactants. To further investigate this chemistry, a series of DRIFTS experiments were performed. To form nitrates/nitrites on the catalysts it was necessary to include ethanol in the feed with NO. These nitrates/nitrites were readily formed when flowing NO{sub 2} over the catalyst. It is proposed that ethanol adsorbs through an ethoxy-intermediate that results in atomic hydrogen on the surface. This hydrogen aids the release of NO{sub 2} from Ag to the gas-phase which, can be subsequently adsorbed at {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sites away from Ag. The disappearance of these nitrates/nitrites at higher temperatures proceeds in parallel with the increase in NO{sub x} reduction reactivity between 300 and 350 C observed in the kinetic study. It is therefore proposed that the consumption of nitrates is involved in the rate determining step for this reaction.

Johnson, William L [ORNL; Fisher, Galen [University of Michigan; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pillared smectite modified with carbon and manganese as catalyst for SCR of NOx with NH3. Part I. General characterization and catalyst screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon- and manganese-modified zirconia-pillared smectites were prepared, characterized (XRD, BET and pore analysis, XPS) and tested in selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3. Both untreated and acidic pre...

Lucjan Chmielarz; Roman Dziembaj; Teresa Grzybek; Jerzy Klinik…

355

Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Experimental Study of PM Emission Characteristics of Commercial Diesel Engine with Urea-SCR System Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset...

356

Simultaneous Removal of NOx and Mercury in Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a 18-month investigation to advance the development of a novel Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR), for the simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and mercury (elemental and oxidized) from flue gases in a single unit operation located downstream of the particulate collectors, are reported. In the proposed LTSCAR, NO{sub x} removal is in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The concomitant capture of mercury in the unit is achieved through the incorporation of a novel chelating adsorbent. As conceptualized, the LTSCAR will be located downstream of the particulate collectors (flue gas temperature 140-160 C) and will be similar in structure to a conventional SCR. That is, it will have 3-4 beds that are loaded with catalyst and adsorbent allowing staged replacement of catalyst and adsorbent as required. Various Mn/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to reduce NO at low temperature using CO as the reductant. It has been shown that with a suitably tailored catalyst more than 65% NO conversion with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity can be achieved, even at a high space velocity (SV) of 50,000 h-1 and in the presence of 2 v% H{sub 2}O. Three adsorbents for oxidized mercury were developed in this project with thermal stability in the required range. Based on detailed evaluations of their characteristics, the mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) adsorbent was found to be most promising for the capture of oxidized mercury. This adsorbent has been shown to be thermally stable to 200 C. Fixed-bed evaluations in the targeted temperature range demonstrated effective removal of oxidized mercury from simulated flue gas at very high capacity ({approx}>58 mg Hg/g adsorbent). Extension of the capability of the adsorbent to elemental mercury capture was pursued with two independent approaches: incorporation of a novel nano-layer on the surface of the chelating mercury adsorbent to achieve in situ oxidation on the adsorbent, and the use of a separate titania-supported manganese oxide catalyst upstream of the oxidized mercury adsorbent. Both approaches met with some success. It was demonstrated that the concept of in situ oxidation on the adsorbent is viable, but the future challenge is to raise the operating capacity beyond the achieved limit of 2.7 mg Hg/g adsorbent. With regard to the manganese dioxide catalyst, elemental mercury was very efficiently oxidized in the absence of sulfur dioxide. Adequate resistance to sulfur dioxide must be incorporated for the approach to be feasible in flue gas. A preliminary benefits analysis of the technology suggests significant potential economic and environmental advantages.

Neville G. Pinto; Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigation of HDDE exhaust flow mixing devices to enhance SCR performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The 2010 regulations implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require significant reduction in Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM). These regulations… (more)

Sathi, Venkata Reddy.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Coupled LNT/SCR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

We introduce a new bench-scale engine generator testing system for different diesel fuels, fuel blends, fuel additives, and evaluate their efficiency in Nox reduction.

359

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

360

A Pollen Coat Protein, SP11/SCR, Determines the Pollen S-Specificity in the Self-Incompatibility of Brassica Species1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Pollen Coat Protein, SP11/SCR, Determines the Pollen S- Specificity in the Self-Incompatibility Institute of Seed Production Company, Sendai 989­3204, Japan (K.H.) Many flowering plants have evolved self-incompatibility in the pollen coat, a finding consistent with its expected biological role. Self-incompatibility (SI) prevents

Bhattacharyya, Madan Kumar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Final Update on APBF-DEC EGR/DPF/SCR Demonstration Project at...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Update on APBF-DEC EGRDPFSCR Demonstration Project at SwRI Final Update on APBF-DEC EGRDPFSCR Demonstration Project at SwRI 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

362

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project Objectives The 1996 and 1997 Iowa General Assembly-share basis to livestock producers and operators selected to carry out various demonstration projects. Organization The Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project was administered by ISU Extension. Stewart

Lin, Zhiqun

363

THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXIII. CCD PHOTOMETRIC DISTANCE ESTIMATES OF SCR TARGETS-77 M DWARF SYSTEMS WITHIN 25 pc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present CCD photometric distance estimates of 100 SCR (SuperCOSMOS RECONS) systems with {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1}, 29 of which are new discoveries previously unpublished in this series of papers. These distances are estimated using a combination of new VRI photometry acquired at CTIO and JHK magnitudes extracted from 2MASS. The estimates are improvements over those determined using photographic plate BRI magnitudes from SuperCOSMOS plus JHK, as presented in the original discovery papers. In total, 77 of the 100 systems investigated are predicted to be within 25 pc. If all 77 systems are confirmed to have {pi}{sub trig} {>=} 40 mas, this sample would represent a 23% increase in M dwarf systems nearer than 25 pc in the southern sky.

Winters, Jennifer G.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Subasavage, John P. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Finch, Charlie T. [United States Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Hambly, Nigel C., E-mail: winters@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: thenry@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: finch@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: nch@roe.ac.uk [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute of Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Attribute Selection Methods in Rough Set Theory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Attribute selection for rough sets is an NP-hard problem, in which fast heuristic algorithms are needed to find reducts. In this project, two reduct… (more)

Li, Xiaohan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Data Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data reduction has two meanings. Firstly, in analysis, it is the process of reducing large masses of data to produce a few summary statistics. This process involves grouping data into tables, visualizing the...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Influence of Real-World Engine Load Conditions on Nanoparticle Emissions from a DPF and SCR Equipped Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Influence of Real-World Engine Load Conditions on Nanoparticle Emissions from a DPF and SCR Equipped Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine ... United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) emission standards for heavy-duty diesel engines have gradually evolved toward stringent emissions control policy. ... All diesel engines manufactured to be used in the US are subject to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), which mandates exercising the engine over the FTP engine dynamometer cycle. ...

Arvind Thiruvengadam; Marc C. Besch; Daniel K Carder; Adewale Oshinuga; Mridul Gautam

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Comparative analyses for selected clean coal technologies in the international marketplace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean coal technologies (CCTs) are being demonstrated in research and development programs under public and private sponsorship. Many of these technologies could be marketed internationally. To explore the scope of these international opportunities and to match particular technologies with markets appearing to have high potential, a study was undertaken that focused on seven representative countries: Italy, Japan, Morocco, Turkey, Pakistan, the Peoples' Republic of China, and Poland. The results suggest that there are international markets for CCTs and that these technologies can be cost competitive with more conventional alternatives. The identified markets include construction of new plants and refurbishment of existing ones, especially when decision makers want to decrease dependence on imported oil. This report describes potential international market niches for U.S. CCTs and discusses the status and implications of ongoing CCT demonstration activities. Twelve technologies were selected as representative of technologies under development for use in new or refurbished industrial or electric utility applications. Included are the following: Two generic precombustion technologies: two-stage froth-flotation coal beneficiation and coal-water mixtures (CWMs); Four combustion technologies: slagging combustors, integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors (AFBCs), and pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBCs); and Six postcombustion technologies: limestone-injection multistage burner (LIMB) systems, gas-reburning sorbent-injection (GRSI) systems, dual-alkali flue-gas desulfurization (FGD), spray-dryer FGD, the NOXSO process, and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. Major chapters of this report have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Allocation Reductions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Allocation Allocation Reductions Quarterly Allocation Reductions MPP (or computational) repositories that haven't used significant amounts of time are adjusted at certain times by transferring a part of the unused balance to the corresponding DOE Office reserve. The following schedule will be used for allocation year 2014 (which runs 14 January 2014 through 132January 2015). On April 9: if usage is less than 10% remove 25% of the unused balance On July 9: if usage is less than 25% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 50% of the unused balance On October 8: if usage is less than 50% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 25% remove 75% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 90% of the unused balance On November 5:

369

Nitrate reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air preheater interactions). SCR pro- cess improvements that1987; CS-5361s. 13. 13. SCR Projects Bid and Award Tracking;Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Control of NO x Emissions; SCR

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Dynamic duo captures mercury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is strong evidence that the combination of wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) scrubbers and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can prove a viable and formidable combination for knocking out mercury. This article analyzes the capabilities and limitations of the SCR-FGD combination for mercury compliance, including applicability to different types of coal and issues with scrubber by-products. 3 figs.

Senior, C.; Adams, B. [Reaction Engineering International (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Long-term catalyst health care  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Now that many US selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems are in their fifth or sixth year of operation, a number of utilities are shifting their attention from implementing the technology to operating and maintaining it. Catalyst management and performance are key to the successful operation of any SCR system. The article looks at the various stages of successful catalyst management. 7 figs.

Scot Pritchard [Cormetech Inc. (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Prerequisites: Engine Systems, Dynamic Programming and Optimal Control, MATLAB/Simulink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Nonroad Diesel Engines with SCR Systems Description: To fulfill the emission legislation, modern nonroad Diesel engines are equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. These systems reduce NOx" in order to achieve minimal urea and fuel consumptions. The optimization problem needs to be solved

Lygeros, John

374

Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70-90% Mercury Reduction on an Eastern Bituminous Coal Cyclone Boiler with SCR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final site report for testing conducted at Public Service of New Hampshire's (PSNH) Merrimack Unit 2 (MK2). This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase III project with the goal to develop mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. While results from testing at Merrimack indicate that the DOE goal was partially achieved, further improvements in the process are recommended. Merrimack burned a test blend of eastern bituminous and Venezuelan coals, for a target coal sulfur content of 1.2%, in its 335-MW Unit 2. The blend ratio is approximately a 50/50 split between the two coals. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on the flue gas stream either in front of the air preheater (APH) or in between the two in-series ESPs. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that, without SO3 control, the sorbent concentration required to achieve 50% control would not be feasible, either economically or within constraints specific to the maximum reasonable particle loading to the ESP. Subsequently, with SO{sub 3} control via trona injection upstream of the APH, economically feasible mercury removal rates could be achieved with PAC injection, excepting balance-of-plant concerns. The results are summarized along with the impacts of the dual injection process on the air heater, ESP operation, and particulate emissions.

Tom Campbell

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Validated SCR Concept Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

377

body  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 JULY 1997 Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 9 A report on a project conducted jointly under a cooperative agreement between: The U.S. Department of Energy and Southern Company Services, Inc. JULY 1997 Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Cover image: Photo of SCR Project at Plant Crist. Preparation and printing of this document conforms to the general funding provisions of a cooperative agreement between Southern Company Services and the U.S. Department of Energy. The funding contribution of the industrial participant permitted inclusion of multicolored artwork and photographs at no additional expense to the U.S. Government. Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)

378

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea...

379

Wiremesh Substrates for Enhanced Particulate Oxidation and Efficient...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wiremesh Substrates for Enhanced Particulate Oxidation and Efficient Urea SCR NOx Reduction Wiremesh Substrates for Enhanced Particulate Oxidation and Efficient Urea SCR NOx...

380

TAME: A PVS Interface to Simplify Proofs for Automata Models Presented at UITP 98, Eindhoven, Netherlands, July 13-15, 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to provide theorem proving support for the SCR Software Cost Reduction requirements method, a method the SCR toolset 9, 6, 7 . The SCR tools are designed to support editing and performing various kinds into the SCR toolset, the user who wishes to apply TAME to an SCR speci cation will have rst-level interface

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ferry Alice Austen Vessel SCR Demonstration Project FinalScarnegie, B. , PM Reduction by SCR Catalyst. Society ofDiesel Trucks Using SINOx Urea SCR Technology - Long-Term

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

2006 environmental controls conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two topics covered at the conference were: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selection non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) for NOx control, and techniques for managing sulfur trioxide. A total of 45 presentations are summarized on the NETL website of which 22 are available in full. These include keynote addresses for each of the two major topics. In addition four poster papers are listed. The papers are arranged in sections headed: regulatory considerations; overview of SCR/SNCR; managing SCR catalysts; gas monitoring and analysis; predictive performance tools; non-coal applications; layered SCR; flow distribution and modeling; hybrid systems; innovative applications; SO{sub 2} conversion to SO{sub 3}; SO{sub 3} overview; acid gas control issues; sorbent injection for acid gas migration; and effects of SO{sub 3} on mercury control.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An improved attribute reduction scheme with covering based rough sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Attribute reduction is viewed as an important preprocessing step for pattern recognition and data mining. Most of researches are focused on attribute reduction by using rough sets. Recently, Tsang et al. discussed attribute reduction with covering rough sets in the paper (Tsang et al., 2008), where an approach based on discernibility matrix was presented to compute all attribute reducts. In this paper, we provide a new method for constructing simpler discernibility matrix with covering based rough sets, and improve some characterizations of attribute reduction provided by Tsang et al. It is proved that the improved discernibility matrix is equivalent to the old one, but the computational complexity of discernibility matrix is relatively reduced. Then we further study attribute reduction in decision tables based on a different strategy of identifying objects. Finally, the proposed reduction method is compared with some existing feature selection methods by numerical experiments and the experimental results show that the proposed reduction method is efficient and effective.

Changzhong Wang; Mingwen Shao; Baiqing Sun; Qinghua Hu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CO2 Reduction on Supported Ru/Al2O3 Catalysts: Cluster Size Dependence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Reduction on Supported RuAl2O3 Catalysts: Cluster Size Dependence of Product Selectivity. CO2 Reduction on Supported RuAl2O3 Catalysts: Cluster Size Dependence of Product...

385

Reduction of fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Replacing standard oil pumps with bypass control by regulated oil pumps with variable oil pressure which adapt their variable oil pumping quantity to the engine oil pressure requirements promises reductions in fuel

Dieter Voigt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selectedworld-best-practice-energy-intensity-values-selected-One main reason for the energy intensity reduction in recent

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

comprehensive comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and  The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other acts of terrorism Protect high priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage These efforts result in threat reduction by improving security on the bomb material remaining at civilian sites - each vulnerable building that is protected reduces the risk until a permanent threat reduction solution can be implemented.

388

FEATURE SELECTION/WEIGHTING AND DIMENSIONALITY REDUCTION IN GENOMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 U.S.A. 2Intelligent Systems Program University of Pittsburgh their effects on an MS cancer proteomic data set. The closing discussion provides assistance in performing networks collect traffic or weather infor- mation in real­time, documents and news articles are distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

390

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

391

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

392

Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

393

Components for Optimized SCR Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

394

Investigation of the Effects of Biodiesel-based Na on Emissions Control Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single-cylinder diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of biodiesel-based Na on emissions control components using specially blended 20% biodiesel fuel (B20). The emissions control components investigated were a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a Cu-zeolite-based NH{sub 3}-SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst, and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both light-duty vehicle, DOC-SCR-DPF, and heavy-duty vehicle, DOC-DPF-SCR, emissions control configurations were employed. The accelerated Na aging is achieved by introducing elevated Na levels in the fuel, to represent full useful life exposure, and periodically increasing the exhaust temperature to replicate DPF regeneration. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated Na aging protocol, engine-aged lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs), DOCs and DPFs are also evaluated. To fully characterize the impact on the catalytic activity the LNT, DOC and SCR catalysts were evaluated using a bench flow reactor. The evaluation of the aged DOC samples and LNT show little to no deactivation as a result of Na contamination. However, the SCR in the light-duty configuration (DOC-SCR-DPF) was severely affected by Na contamination, especially when NO was the only fed NO{sub x} source. In the heavy-duty configuration (DOC-DPF-SCR), no impact is observed in the SCR NO{sub x} reduction activity. Electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) reveals that Na contamination on the LNT, DOC, and SCR samples is present throughout the length of the catalysts with a higher concentration on the washcoat surface. In both the long-term engine-aged DPF and the accelerated Na-aged DPFs, there is significant Na ash present in the upstream channels; however, in the engine-aged sample lube oil-based ash is the predominant constituent.

Brookshear, D. William [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nguyen, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Howe, Janet E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Select Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dosanjh » Select Dosanjh » Select Publications Select Publications Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2013 Richard A. Barrett, Shekhar Borkar, Sudip S. Dosanjh, Simon D. Hammond, Michael A. Heroux, X. Sharon Hu, Justin Luitjens, Steven G. Parker, John Shalf, Li Tang, "On the Role of Co-design in High Performance Computing", Transition of HPC Towards Exascale Computing, E.H. D'Hollander et. al (Eds.), IOS Press, 2013, ( November 1, 2013) Download File: Codesign-Paper.pdf (pdf: 867 KB) Rolf Riesen, Sudip Dosanjh, Larry Kaplan, "The ExaChallenge Symposium", IBM Research Paper, August 26, 2013, Download File: ExaChallenge2012.pdf (pdf: 1.4 MB) S. Dosanjh, R. Barrett, D. Doerfler, S. Hammond, K. Hemmert, M. Heroux, P. Lin, K. Pedretti, A. Rodrigues, T. Trucano, J.Juitjens, "Exascale Design

396

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

397

Economics of Grade Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the following abbreviations are used:* C25 diameter in inches of high pressure cylinder. c= diameter in inches of low pressure cylinder. P= boiler pressure. R}= ratio of mean effective pressure to boiler pressure in low pressure cylinder, taken from Pig. E.... But the only error of moment in such case will be in the es- timated saving in train mileage, for the same degree of efficiency or inefficiency is to be expected after the reduction of grade as before. As the estimated saving per train mile as given...

Neff, Paul J.

1914-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reduction relations for monoid semirings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we study rewriting techniques for monoid semirings. Based on disjoint and non-disjoint representations of the elements of monoid semirings we define two different reduction relations. We prove that in both cases the reduction relation describes ... Keywords: Confluence, Congruence, Critical pair, Reduction relation, Rewriting system, Semiring, Termination

Friedrich Otto; Olga Sokratova

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Greenidge multi-pollutant project achieves emissions reduction goals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance testing at the Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Project has met or exceeded project goals, indicating that deep emission reduciton sin small, difficult-to-retrofit power plants can be achieved. The technology fitted at the 107 MWe AES Greenridge Unit 4 includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction/selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control (NOxOUT CASCADE) and a Turbosorp circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system for SO{sub 2}, mercury, SO{sub 3} HC and Hf control. 2 figs.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dose Reduction Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

WAGGONER, L.O.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

National Idling Reduction Network News- December 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

403

National Idling Reduction Network News- December 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

404

National Idling Reduction Network News- January 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

405

National Idling Reduction Network News- October 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

406

National Idling Reduction Network News- December 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

407

National Idling Reduction Network News- October 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

408

National Idling Reduction Network News- May 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

409

National Idling Reduction Network News- October 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

410

National Idling Reduction Network News- January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

411

National Idling Reduction Network News- August 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

412

National Idling Reduction Network News- April 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

413

National Idling Reduction Network News- November 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

414

National Idling Reduction Network News- February 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

415

National Idling Reduction Network News- July 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

416

National Idling Reduction Network News- March 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

417

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Reduction Initiative An overview of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals. Global Threat Reduction Initiative More Documents &...

418

National Idling Reduction Network News- May 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

419

National Idling Reduction Network News- August 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

420

National Idling Reduction Network News- February 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

National Idling Reduction Network News- April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

422

Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies: Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction system...

423

National Idling Reduction Network News- June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

424

National Idling Reduction Network News- April 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

425

National Idling Reduction Network News- March 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

426

National Idling Reduction Network News- May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

427

National Idling Reduction Network News- November 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

428

Water Use Reduction | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reduction Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides agencies with guidance and direction on how to reduce water use and increase...

429

National Idling Reduction Network News- February 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

430

National Idling Reduction Network News- April 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

431

National Idling Reduction Network News- March 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

432

National Idling Reduction Network News- September 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

433

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling The Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was...

434

On the Promoting Effect of Water during NOx Removal over Single-Site Copper in Hydrophobic Silica APD-Aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reversibility of the Cu2+/Cu+ redox pair was confirmed in the Cu-aerogel during and after wet redox cycling. ... (1) Popular solutions to selective catalytic reduction of NOx include the use of exhaust hydrocarbon residuals (SCR-HC-deNOx) or ammonia added to the exhaust (SCR-NH3-deNOx) as the reductant; the former technology being suitable for light duty passenger vehicles, whereas the latter is applied to medium or heavy duty vehicles. ... During vehicle use, the converter is exposed to heat, which causes the metal particles to agglomerate and grow, and their overall surface area to decrease. ...

Tina Kristiansen; Karina Mathisen

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Risk Evaluation and Reduction | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coordination Office Risk Evaluation and Reduction Risk Evaluation and Reduction The Project Management Coordination Office (PMCO) coordinates risk management activities...

436

Model-Constrained Optimization Methods for Reduction of Parameterized Large-Scale Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most model reduction techniques employ a projection framework that utilizes a reduced-space basis. The basis is usually formed as the span of a set of solutions of the large-scale system, which are computed for selected ...

Tan, Bui-Thanh

437

Model-constrained optimization methods for reduction of parameterized large-scale systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most model reduction techniques employ a projection framework that utilizes a reduced-space basis. The basis is usually formed as the span of a set of solutions of the large-scale system, which are computed for selected ...

Bui-Thanh, Tan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY INFORMATION COLLECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Chris Rouleau, PRA Officer Records Management Division Office of the Associate Chief Information Officer for IT Planning, Architecture and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer Office of the Chief Information Officer 2/16/2010 2 TOPICS  Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 - Law  Paperwork Reduction Act - Overview  Information Collection Requests (ICRs)  Information Collection Request Associated with A Notice of Proposed Rule Making  Program Points of Contacts  Information Collection Clearance Managers  Information Collection Requests Checklist  Drivers  Annual Information Collection Budget  Summary of What To Do  Summary of What NOT

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Requirements The Wisconsin Department of Administration's fleet management policy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a compedium of the National Idling Reduction Network News from July 2004 to April 2014. The National Idling Reduction Network News provides information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

442

High reduction transaxle for electric vehicle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A drivetrain (12) includes a transaxle assembly (16) for driving ground engaging wheels of a land vehicle powered by an AC motor. The transaxle includes a ratio change section having planetary gear sets (24, 26) and brake assemblies (28, 30). Sun gears (60, 62) of the gear sets are directly and continuously connected to an input drive shaft (38) driven by the motor. A first drive (78a) directly and continuously connects a planetary gear carrier (78) of gear sets (24) with a ring gear (68) of gear set (26). A second drive (80a) directly and continuously connects a planetary gear carrier (80) of gear set (26) with a sun gear (64) of a final speed reduction gear set (34) having a planetary gear carrier directly and continuously connected to a differential (22). Brakes (28, 30) are selectively engageable to respectively ground a ring gear 66 of gear set 24 and ring gear 68 of gear set 26.

Kalns, Ilmars (Plymouth, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE FY 2011 Advanced Combustion Technologies Annual Report. CLEERS is a research and development focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at PNNL through CLEERS: DPF, SCR, and LNT. Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. In FY 2011, more emphasis was placed on the SCR and LNT activities because of urgent application issues associated with these technologies. Objectives of this project are to lead and contribute to the Cross-Cut Lean Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulations (CLEERS) activities - (a) Provide project updates to the industry sub-team, solicit feedback, and adjust work scope accordingly; and (b) Lead technical discussions, invite distinguished speakers, and maintain an open dialogue on selective catalytic reduction (SCR), lean-NOx trap (LNT), and diesel particulate filter (DPF) modeling issues. Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Objectives are to: (1) Develop improved modeling capabilities for SCR and DPFs through fundamental experiments; and (2) Develop a fundamental understanding of SCR and LNT catalysts with primary focus on reaction mechanisms and material characterization. Some accomplishments are: (1) Participated in monthly CLEERS teleconferences and coordinated the calls focused on SCR, LNT and DPF technologies; (2) Updated PNNL's SCR model for the state-of-the-art commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst to extract kinetic parameters and to quantitatively describe the effects of hydrothermal aging; (3) Examined the effects of hydrothermal aging on the physicochemical properties and SCR reactions using the commercial Cu catalyst in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (4) Investigated the nature of Cu species and obtained kinetic parameters for small-pore zeolite-based Cu SCR catalyst. (5) Examined the effects of support materials for Ba-based LNT catalysts, and found magnesium aluminate may improve the oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) reduction performance at high temperatures; (6) Investigated soot oxidation mechanisms for relevant oxidants (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}) through reactor experiments and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) analysis; (7) Seven publications and 21 public presentations (eight invited) during the past FY; and (8) Co-organized sessions on emission control and modeling for the SAE World Congress and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Internal Combustion Engine Conference.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Stewart, Mark L.; Strzelec, Andrea; Szanyi, Janos; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

444

Multi-Site Energy Reduction Through Teamwork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Flare switched to stand-by 6. Acid water specification 7. Nitrogen consumption reduction 8. Compressed air optimization 9. Boiler minimum fire set-point reduction 10. Leak reduction...

Theising, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A GP-Based Hyper-Heuristic Framework for Evolving 3-SAT Heuristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.502 - - 0.560 start FLIP v v RANDOM l | IFV pro, v, v MAX SCR l [, op] | MIN SCR l [, op] MAX AGE l [, op] l ALL | IFL pro, l, l ALL USC | RAND USC | SCR Z l [, op] op TIE RAND | TIE AGE | TIE SCR pro 0 for SAT using GP-HH. MAC SCR l selects a variable from list l that by flipping will maximize the number

Fernandez, Thomas

446

Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation Meeting arravt041tibaird2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project Vehicle...

447

Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Peer Evaluation arravt041esbaird2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project North...

448

Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

-- Washington D.C. tiarravt041baird2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project Utah Clean...

449

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

450

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

451

Facile and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and its applications. Facile and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and its applications....

452

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011. Global Threat Reduction Initiative More Documents &...

453

Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Experiment Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the...

454

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Greenhouse Gas Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Reduction A leader in federal greenhouse gas (GHG) management, NREL has conducted GHG inventories, developed reduction goals, and reported emissions since 2000. NREL...

455

Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

456

Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Presentation slides from the June 19, 2012, Fuel...

457

Stoichiometric CO reduction by supported metal carbonyls. Annual report Dec 82-Jan 83  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project objective is to study stoichiometric reactions on supported organometallic complexes with emphasis on the reduction of carbon monoxide. Previous work in their laboratory has shown that the homogeneous proton-induced reduction of CO to CH4 in metal carbonyls in neat super acid is greatly dependent on the metal cluster nuclearity. A study of the effect of metal nuclearity on the heterogeneous reduction of CO should provide insight on the physical requirements for CO reduction. Ways to improve product selectivity in this complex reaction may also result from such a study.

Shriver, D.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Computer simulation as a NOx reduction design tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nalco Mobotec engineers were charged with reducing emissions on a utility boiler converted from burning oil to eastern bituminous coal using the company's Rotamix selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) system which injects urea into the furnace. A CFD simulation of the existing boiler was first conducted and then the furnace was simulated with the SNCR system added and the design was optimised. Operating and capital costs were minimised by optimal placement of 50 injector ports. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Liu, G.; Higgins, B.S. [Nalco Mobotec (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

463

Big Bend sees big environmental push  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1800 MW Big Bend Power Station is a coal-fired facility in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA owned by Tampa Electric. It has four pulverized coal- fired steam units equipped with FGD scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. Currently the addition of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems is under consideration. The Unit 4 SCR retrofit was completed in June 2007; the remaining three systems are scheduled for completion by 2010. Boiler draft systems will be modified to a balance draft design to accommodate the increased pressure drop of the new systems. 3-D computer models were developed to determine constructability due to the tight clearance at the site. 1 photo.

Blankinship, S.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Glow Discharge Enhanced Chemical Reaction: Application in Ammonia Synthesis and Hydrocarbon Gas Cleanup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, such as the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) methods have been studied for the cleaning of diesel engine exhaust. The SCR system, in which ammonia is used as a reducing agent, is thought to be one of the most promising methods for emissions... of methane, it can also include ethane, propane, butane and pentane. The composition of natural gas can vary widely, but Table 1 below outlines the typical makeup of natural gas before it is refined. 3 Table 1. Typical composition of natural gas...

Ming, Pingjia

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

465

Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complimentary copy. Redistribution subject to AIP license or copyright, see http:php.aip.orgphpcopyright.jsp rate and frequency spectra in both the unstable and damped-...

466

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

467

NOx Reduction from Biodiesel Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NOx Reduction from Biodiesel Fuels ... NOx emissions appear to be different for biodiesels from different feedstocks. ... For the suite of biodiesels prepared from nearly pure fatty acids, all biodiesel fuels produced higher NOx than certification diesel with the following exceptions:? methyl palmitate, methyl laurate, ethyl stearate, and the ethyl ester of hydrogenated soybean oil. ...

Sandun Fernando; Chris Hall; Saroj Jha

2005-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

468

Applying Practical Formal Methods to the Speci cation and Analysis of Security Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: chacs.nrl.navy.mil SCR Abstract. The SCR Software Cost Reduction toolset contains tools for specifying tabular notation for writing speci cations. Part of the SCR Software Cost Reduction requirements method system 7 , the shutdown system for the Darlington nuclear power plant 21 , and the ight program

469

Candidate Selection Instrument  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The candidate selection instrument is designed to take the guesswork out of selecting candidates for the various career development programs of interest. The instrument is straightforward and...

470

Adaptive Port Reduction in Static Condensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Port Reduction in Static Condensation JL Eftang DBP Huynh DJ Knezevic EM Rønquist a framework for adaptive reduction of the degrees of freedom associated with ports in static condensation (SC reduction for the interior of a component with model order reduction on the ports in order to rapidly

Rønquist, Einar M.

471

Energy Reduction Techniques for Caches and Multiprocessors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Reduction Techniques for Caches and Multiprocessors #12;#12;Energy Reduction Techniques-90-72298-03-4 Keywords: Energy reduction, Caches, Multi processor scheduling Cover design: Floris de Langen Copyright c the years. #12;#12;Energy Reduction Techniques for Caches and Multiprocessors Pepijn de Langen Abstract E

Kuzmanov, Georgi

472

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction to Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development Related Links Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Idle Reduction Photo of fleet trucks

473

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Incentives Cascade Sierra Solutions (CSS) provides comprehensive idle reduction solutions for commercial trucks and trailers. Financing, loans, and grant

474

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioner Reduction Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditioner Reduction Project to Reduce Vehicle Fuel Use by 30% Conditioner Reduction Project to Reduce Vehicle Fuel Use by 30% United States map depicting number of millions of gallons of cooling and dehumidification by state: Alabama 167, Alaska 1, Arizona 43, Arkansas 86, California 730, Colorado 76, Connecticut 61, Delaware 19, Florida 753, Georgia 251, Hawaii 68, Idaho 26, Illinois 242, Indiana 142, Iowa 68, Kansas 75, Kentucky 95, Louisiana 176, Maine 21, Maryland 118, Massachusetts 86, Michigan 186, Minnesota 86, Mississippi 85, Missouri 144, Montana 12, Nebraska 40, Nevada 61, New Hampshire 90, New Jersey 167, New Mexico 52, New York 273, North Carolina 187, North Dakota 12, Ohio 229, Oklahoma 109, Oregon 66, Pennsylvania 238, Rhode Island 15, South Carolina 127, South Dakota 17, Tennessee 179, Texas 735, Utah 43, Vermont 9, Virginia 187, Washington 64, West Virginia 37, Wisconsin 167, and Wyoming 7

475

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

476

Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

p. 1 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 EMISSIONS REDUCTION IMPACT OF RENEWABLES October 2012 Jeff Haberl, Bahman Yazdani, Charles Culp Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University p. 2 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012... Do TCEQ: Vince Meiller, Bob Gifford ERCOT: Warren Lasher USEPA: Art Diem, Julie Rosenberg ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS p. 3 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 RENEWABLES Solar PV Solar Thermal Hydro Biomass Landfill Gas Geothermal p. 4...

Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The reduction of packaging waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one-third of the waste disposed in sanitary landfills. the US Department of Energy (DOE) generated close to 90,000 metric tons of sanitary waste. With roughly one-third of that being packaging waste, approximately 30,000 metric tons are generated per year. The purpose of the Reduction of Packaging Waste project was to investigate opportunities to reduce this packaging waste through source reduction and recycling. The project was divided into three areas: procurement, onsite packaging and distribution, and recycling. Waste minimization opportunities were identified and investigated within each area, several of which were chosen for further study and small-scale testing at the Hanford Site. Test results, were compiled into five ``how-to`` recipes for implementation at other sites. The subject of the recipes are as follows: (1) Vendor Participation Program; (2) Reusable Containers System; (3) Shrink-wrap System -- Plastic and Corrugated Cardboard Waste Reduction; (4) Cardboard Recycling ; and (5) Wood Recycling.

Raney, E.A.; Hogan, J.J.; McCollom, M.L.; Meyer, R.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle at a loading zone, parking or service area, route terminal, or other off-street areas, except for the following situations:

479

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle engine may not operate for more than five consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the following exceptions:

480

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirements Effective May 1, 2014, a driver may not idle his or her motor vehicle for more than five minutes in a 60-minute period. This limit does not apply if

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduction scr selective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 pounds may not idle for more than five minutes in any continuous 60 minute period.

482

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement The owner or operator of a diesel powered vehicle must limit the length of time their vehicle remains idle. The limit is based on the outside

483

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles may not idle unnecessarily for longer than five consecutive minutes during any 60-minute period. This includes heavy-duty diesel

484

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel truck or bus engines may not idle for more than 15 consecutive minutes. Exemptions apply to diesel trucks or buses for which the Nevada

485

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A person that operates a diesel powered motor vehicle in certain counties and townships may not cause or allow the motor vehicle, when it is not in

486

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial vehicle or gasoline powered vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes during any 60-minute period. Exemptions are allowed for the

487

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

488

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A gasoline-fueled motor vehicle is not allowed to operate for more than three consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the

489

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A diesel- or gasoline-powered motor vehicle may not idle for more than three consecutive minutes, except under the following conditions: 1) to

490

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles licensed for commercial or public service may not idle for more than three minutes in commercial or residential urban areas, unless

491

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Idling of any unattended vehicle is prohibited in Utah. Violators are subject to a penalty of up to $750 and/or up to 90 days imprisonment.

492

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement On-road heavy-duty motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater may not idle for more than three consecutive

493

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Loans Idle Reduction Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Loans The Small Business Pollution Prevention Assistance Account Loan Program provides low interest rate loans to small businesses undertaking projects in Pennsylvania that reduce waste, pollution, or energy use, including the

494

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Initiative The Petroleum Savings and Independence Advisory Commission (Commission) was established to provide recommendations and monitor programs designed to

495

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle may not idle for more than five consecutive minutes. This regulation does not apply to: 1) vehicles being serviced, provided that

496

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Vehicle operators may not idle any commercial diesel vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds for more than 10 minutes

497

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement School bus operators may not idle a school bus engine for more than three consecutive minutes except under the following conditions: uncontrollable

498

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or more may not idle for more than 15 minutes in any 60-minute

499

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes from April through October in cities and counties where the local government has signed a

500

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A driver may not idle a vehicle on a roadway outside a business or residential district when it is practical to stop and park the vehicle. A