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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Improving MapReduce energy efficiency for computation intensive workloads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MapReduce is a programming model for data intensive computing on large-scale distributed systems. With its wide acceptance and deployment, improving the energy efficiency of MapReduce will lead to significant energy savings for data centers and computational ... Keywords: intelligent DVFS scheduling, MapReduce energy efficiency, computation intensive workloads, data intensive computing, large-scale distributed systems, data centers, computational grids, energy savings, Hadoop, energy-proportional computing, resource allocation, dynamic voltage and frequency scaling, processor frequency

Thomas Wirtz; Rong Ge

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining ... bearing on the value of mining projects and the image of the mining industry; ...

3

Reducing Cache Access Energy in Array-Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mahmut Kandemir Microsystems Design Lab Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, 16802, USA Ibrahim Kolcu UMIST P.O. Box 88, Sackville Street Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Cache memories are known to consume a large percentage of on-chip energy in current microprocessors. For example, [1] reports that the on-chip cache in DEC Alpha 21264 consumes approximately 25% of the on-chip energy. Both sizes and complexities of state-of-the-art caches play a major role in their energy consumption. Direct-mapped caches are, in general, more energy efficient (from a per access energy consumption viewpoint) as they are simpler as compared to set-associative caches, and require no complex line replacement mechanisms (i.e., there is no decision concerning which line has to be evicted when a new line is to be loaded).

Exte Nd Ed; Mahmut Kandemir; Ibrahim Kolcu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy and reduce carbon emissions across the industrial sector. the portfolio focuses the...

5

OECD energy intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

to examine OECD countries' energy intensity levels (i.e., the ratio of energy ... steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the Organisation of ...

6

Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

John J. Conti

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Energy Intensity Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. We’ll discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools we’re using, what goals have been identified, how we structured the plan to include our team in the process and so on.

Rappolee, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Unlocking energy intensive habits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy intensive habits energy intensive habits Presentation at LBL Oct 10, 2013 by Hal Wilhite Professor and Research Director University of Oslo Centre for Development and the Environment Source: WWF US EIA Outlook 2011 Conventional framing of the energy consumption and savings * Sovereign consumers * Economically rational and persistentely reflexive. * Uninfluenced by social and material conditions of everyday life * Focus on efficiency and not on size and volume which is for the most part treated as an indifferent variable Cognitive reductionism The change of frame * From individual to socio-material * From rational/reflexive experience-based (practical) knowledge * From efficiency to reduction A theory of habit * Acknowledges the role of lived experience (history, both cultural and personal) in forming

9

Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity-Reducing Technologies & Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report looks at the best methods of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity.

10

energy intensity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

intensity intensity Dataset Summary Description Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Energy intensity is defined as: amount of energy used in producing a given level of output or activity; expressed as energy per unit of output. This is the energy intensity of the the electricity sector, which is an energy consuming sector that generates electricity. Data are organized to separate electricity-only generators from combined heat and power (CHP) generators. Data is available for the period 1949 - 2004. Source EERE Date Released May 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Energy Consumption energy intensity fossil fuels renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon electricity_indicators.xls (xls, 2.1 MiB)

11

ESMAP-China Energy Intensity Reduction Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensity Reduction Strategy Intensity Reduction Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name China-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country China Eastern Asia References China Energy Intensity Reduction Strategy[1] Overview "The study involves the development of pragmatic "implementation" focused policy notes to support the Government of China's goal of reducing energy intensity in China focusing on: Reevaluation of renewable energy targets, growth path, and related

12

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

13

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5b

14

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5a

15

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7a

16

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table7c

17

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7b

18

Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Changes in Energy Intensity Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991 Overview Full Report The focus is...

19

Intense low energy positron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the Textile Industry Title Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

22

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-1999 (Million Btu per Worker)

23

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6b . ... Warehouse and Storage 42: 38 45: Other: 3. 154: 170 163: Vacant 28: 21 21: Total ...

24

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

25

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of the assessment recommendations is estimated to be $843,000 with a total implementation cost. Manufacturing at the facility includes both casting and extrusion processes. Process equipment, air compressors productivity. As a result, facility production costs can be reduced and profits can be increased. August 2001

26

Description of Energy Intensity Tables (12)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Description of Energy Intensity Data Tables 3. Description of Energy Intensity Data Tables There are 12 data tables used as references for this report. Specifically, these tables are categorized as tables 1 and 2 present unadjusted energy-intensity ratios for Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy for 1985, 1988, 1991, and 1994; along with the percentage changes between 1985 and the three subsequent years (1988, 1991, and 1994) tables 3 and 4 present 1988, 1991, and 1994 energy-intensity ratios that have been adjusted to the mix of products shipped from manufacturing establishments in 1985 tables 5 and 6 present unadjusted energy-intensity ratios for Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy for 1988, 1991, and 1994; along with the percentage changes between 1988 and the two subsequent

27

Reduces a processor's energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Clearly, this is energy inefficient and wasteful of energy. 2 More precisely, the faster that a processor decide that energy is being wasted and will decrease the frequency/voltage level. Translation: LowerReduces a processor's energy consumption by up to 70% Diminishes greenhouse gas emissions Improves

28

Energy intensity (Table E.1g)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... E.1g World Energy Intensity--Total Primary Energy Consumption per Dollar of Gross Domestic

29

Reducing the Federal Energy Bill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Reducing the Federal Energy Bill Berkeley Lab's Work with the Federal Energy Management Program It costs billions of dollars and uses more energy than any other entity in the United States. What is it? Answer: the Federal government. In fiscal year 1995, the Federal government spent $8 billion on a net energy consumption of 1.15 quadrillion BTUs. While that may be a lot of energy in absolute terms, the numbers have been improving for years. Compared with fiscal year 1985, the 1995 energy-use figure is down by 22.5%, and the costs are down $2.5 billion. The decline is explained in part by the activities of FEMP (the Federal Energy Management Program) and the efforts of energy-efficiency experts at national laboratories, such as those at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy

30

Technical Change, Investment and Energy Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the role of different components of technical change on energy intensity by applying a Translog variable cost function setting to the new EU KLEMS dataset for 3 selected EU countries (Italy, Finland and ...

Kratena, Kurt

31

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas,...

32

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

33

What is energy use intensity (EUI)? | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings Use Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager calculates metrics What is energy use intensity (EUI)? Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio...

34

Changes in energy intensity in the manufacturing sector 1985--1991  

SciTech Connect

In this report, energy intensity is defined as the ratio of energy consumption per unit of output. Output is measured as the constant dollar of value of shipments and receipts, and two measures of energy consumption are presented in British thermal units (Btu): Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy. A decrease in energy intensity from one period to another suggests an increase in energy efficiency, and vice versa. Energy efficiency can be defined and measured in various ways. Certain concepts of energy efficiency, especially those limited to equipment efficiencies, cannot be measured over time using changes in energy-intensity ratios. While improved energy efficiency will tend to reduce energy intensity, it is also true that a change in energy intensity can be due to factors unrelated to energy efficiency. For this report, energy intensity is used as a surrogate measure for energy efficiency, based on industry knowledge and current methodological analyses.

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Title Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication...

36

Purchased Energy, Energy Intensity, and Policy Impacts in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purchased Energy, Energy Intensity, and Policy Impacts in the U.S. Manufacturing Sector: Tentative Findings Speaker(s): Marvin J. Horowitz Date: July 8, 2011 - 12:00pm Location:...

37

China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy...

40

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. What are the key facts? Reducing energy saves money and reduces pollution. When considering a renewable energy system purchase for your home, the first step is to lower your energy use through efficiency measures. Energy audits can help point you to the most effective ways to reduce energy in your home. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. What are the key facts? Reducing energy saves money and reduces pollution. When considering a renewable energy system purchase for your home, the first step is to lower your energy use through efficiency measures. Energy audits can help point you to the most effective ways to reduce energy in your home. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy

42

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

43

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

44

China's energy intensity and its determinants at the provincial level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy intensity is defined as the amount of energy consumed per dollar of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). The People's Republic of China's (China's) energy intensity has been declining significantly since the late 1970s. ...

Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0555(94)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information ...

47

Energy Intensity Indicators in the U.S.: Electricity Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensity Indicators in the U.S.: Electricity Sector (1949 - 2004) Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

48

Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Chlorine Making US energy statistics only report energya weighted-average US energy intensity. The intensity valuesProcess Stage The US Manufacturing Energy Consumption survey

Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian; Einstein, Dan; Martin, Nathan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 6c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using. Weather-Adjusted Site Energy. 1. ... Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category.

50

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economic energy intensity as an indicator for energy savingon industrial energy intensity as an indicator of savingsindustrial energy intensity as an indicator of savings

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Networked Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Networked Devices Speaker(s): Ken Christensen Date: July 19, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 When Personal Computers are networked, energy...

52

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

53

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rotary) Brazil China India Mexico Energy and Carbon Dioxideenergy intensity values for Brazil, China, India, and Mexico,energy intensity values for Brazil, China, India and Mexico,

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Figure 60. Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration Lighting Heating, cooling, and ventilation Other 2040.00 2011.00 ... Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses, 2011 and 2040 ...

55

World Energy Intensity by Region, 1970-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

If energy intensities in the developing world are assumed to increase by 136 percent—the most rapid annual rate of increase observed between 1990 and 1997 ...

56

Figure 59. Commercial delivered energy intensity in four cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 59. Commercial delivered energy intensity in four cases, 2005-2040 (index, 2005 = 1) Reference case 2011 Technology case

57

Figure 55. Residential delivered energy intensity in four ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 55. Residential delivered energy intensity in four cases, 2005-2035 (index, 2005 = 1) Best Available Technology case High Technology case

58

CHANGES IN ENERGY INTENSITY IN THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0552(85-91) Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1991 September 1995 ... All telephone orders should be directed to:

59

Methodology of Energy Intensities - Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary Appendix A Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) designed the 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

60

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reducing the Energy Usage of Office Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate how component-based middleware can reduce the energy usage of closed-source applications. We rst describe how the Puppeteer system exploits well-dened interfaces exported by applications to modify their behavior. We then present a detailed study of the energy usage of Microsoft's PowerPoint application and show that adaptive policies can reduce energy expenditure by 49% in some instances. In addition, we use the results of the study to provide general advice to developers of applications and middleware that will enable them to create more energy-ecient software. 1

Jason Flinn; Eyal De Lara; M. Satyanarayanan; Dan S. Wallach; Willy Zwaenepoel; Willy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Title Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors de la du Can, Stephane Rue, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Jayant A. Sathaye Journal Energy Policy Volume 46 Pagination 234-245 Keywords california, co2 emissions, energy intensity, energy use Abstract In 2008, the gross domestic product (GDP) of California industry was larger than GDP of industry in any other U.S. states. This study analyses the energy use of and output from seventeen industry subsectors in California and performs decomposition analysis to assess the influence of different factors on California industry energy use. The logarithmic mean Divisia index method is used for the decomposition analysis. The decomposition analysis results show that the observed reduction of energy use in California industry since 2000 is the result of two main factors: the intensity effect and the structural effect. The intensity effect has started pushing final energy use downward in 2000 and has since amplified. The second large effect is the structural effect. The significant decrease of the energy-intensive "Oil and Gas Extraction" subsector's share of total industry value added, from 15% in 1997 to 5% in 2008, and the increase of the non-energy intensive "Electric and electronic equipment manufacturing" sector's share of value added, from 7% in 1997 to 30% in 2008, both contributed to a decrease in the energy intensity in the industry sector

63

EIA - AEO2010 - Energy intensity trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

intensity trends in AEO2010 intensity trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Figure 17. Trends in U.S. oil prices, energy consumption, and economic output, 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy intensity—energy consumption per dollar of real GDP—indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

64

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers and stresses the importance of fully researching alternatives before committing to major equipment investments.

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Energy Intensities for the Iron and Steel Industry (1985-1994)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national level data on energy intensity issues on household energy use in the residential sector, energy intensity issues on manufacturing energy use in the ...

66

Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Strategies for the Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New technologies will be a critical component--perhaps the critical component--of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and practices. The Act also requests the Administration to prepare an inventory of climate-friendly technologies suitable for deployment and to identify the barriers and commercial risks facing advanced technologies. Because these issues are related, they are integrated here within a single report that we, representing the Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI), are pleased to provide the President, the Congress, and the public. Over the past eight years, the Administration of President George W. Bush has pursued a series of policies and measures aimed at encouraging the development and deployment of advanced technologies to reduce GHG emissions. This report highlights these policies and measures, discusses the barriers to each, and integrates them within a larger body of other extant policy. Taken together, more than 300 policies and measures described in this document may be viewed in conjunction with the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's (CCTP's) Strategic Plan, published in September 2006, which focuses primarily on the role of advanced technology and associated research and development (R&D) for mitigating GHG emissions. The CCTP, a multi-agency technology planning and coordination program, initiated by President Bush, and subsequently authorized in EPAct2005, is responsible for preparing this report on behalf CCCSTI. This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals. It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application. Importantly, by documenting the hundreds of Federal policies, programs, regulations, incentives, and other activities that are in effect and operating today to address these barriers, it provides a broad context for evaluating the adequacy of current policy and the potential need, if any, for additional measures that might be undertaken by government or industry. Finally, it draws conclusions about the current situation, identifies gaps and opportunities, and suggests analytical principles that should be applied to assess and formulate policies and measures to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of these technologies.

Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

69

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to help reduce the wasted energy. Chapter 3 Occupancyestimate the amount of energy being wasted in each room. Theon reducing the energy being wasted in daily usage. A

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. In a high-intensity discharge lamp, electricity arcs between two electrodes, creating an intensely bright light. Mercury, sodium, or metal halide gas

71

Energy Basics: High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. HID lamps use an electric arc to produce...

72

Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals March 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Energy Information Administration / Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals

73

Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use August 27, 2010 - 1:05pm Addthis DMACC will be installing nearly 1,500 occupancy sensors in the college's classrooms to help conserve energy.| Photo Courtesy of DMACC DMACC will be installing nearly 1,500 occupancy sensors in the college's classrooms to help conserve energy.| Photo Courtesy of DMACC Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Energy retrofit projects estimated to reduce annual energy use by 16 percent Des Moines Area Community College projects annual savings of $280,000 Project funded by nearly $640,000 in Recovery Act funding Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) serves more than 65,000 Iowans on six campuses, making it the largest two-year college in the state of Iowa.

74

Reducing Energy Usage in Extractive Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Butadiene 1:3 is separated from other C4-hydrocarbons by extractive distillation in a sieve plate tower. Prior to the development work to be described, the pressure in the extraction tower was controlled at a fixed value. The tower pressure-boilup control loop did not behave satisfactorily in the presence of non-condensables which entered with the feed. The capacity of the flooded reflux drum condenser for the tower was limiting production during summer months. The tower pressure control loop was put on manual. The pressure was allowed to drop to its lowest attainable value for the existing conditions of boilup and condenser cooling capability. This manner of operation is known as floating pressure control. By taking advantage of the higher relative volatility at the lower tower pressure, energy usage was reduced and there was an increase in production capacity. The tower operation at a lower temperature reduced tower and reboiler fouling. Substantial savings have resulted from these improvements. The annual energy consumption has been reduced by 25% and maximum productive capacity is higher by 15%. The rate of tower and reboiler fouling has not been fully quantified but is greatly reduced. A more stable tower operation has also contributed to higher productivity and reduced energy usage. Venting of non-condensables does not affect tower stability and the operators have adapted well to the new control strategy.

Saxena, A. C.; Bhandari, V. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

Tawfik, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us Speaker(s): Holmes Hummel Date: January 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

77

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity With the two ongoing studies, one for the physics program, 1 and one for the accelerator and facilities 2 on the...

78

Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

REDUCING ENERGY USE IN FLORIDA BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2007 Florida Building Code (ICC, 2008) requires building designers and architects to achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating for commercial buildings located throughout Florida. Although the Florida Building Code is strict in the minimum requirements for new construction, several aspects of building construction can be further improved through careful thought and design. This report outlines several energy saving features that can be used to ensure that new buildings meet a new target goal of 85% energy use compared to the 2007 energy code in order to achieve Governor Crist’s executive order to improve the energy code by 15%. To determine if a target goal of 85% building energy use is attainable, a computer simulation study was performed to determine the energy saving features available which are, in most cases, stricter than the current Florida Building Code. The energy savings features include improvements to building envelop, fenestration, lighting and equipment, and HVAC efficiency. The impacts of reducing outside air requirements and employing solar water heating were also investigated. The purpose of the energy saving features described in this document is intended to provide a simple, prescriptive method for reducing energy consumption using the methodology outlined in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE, 2007). There are two difficulties in trying to achieve savings in non-residential structures. First, there is significant energy use caused by internal loads for people and equipment and it is difficult to use the energy code to achieve savings in this area relative to a baseline. Secondly, the ASHRAE methodology uses some of the same features that are proposed for the new building, so it may be difficult to claim savings for some strategies that will produce savings such as improved ventilation controls, reduced window area, or reduced plug loads simply because the methodology applies those features to the comparison reference building. Several measures to improve the building envelope characteristics were simulated. Simply using the selected envelope measures resulted in savings of less than 10% for all building types. However, if such measures are combined with aggressive lighting reductions and improved efficiency HVAC equipment and controls, a target savings of 15% is easily attainable.

Raustad, R.; Basarkar, M.; Vieira, R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Affordable housing: Reducing the energy cost burden  

SciTech Connect

Residential energy expenditures are a key determinant of housing affordability, particularly for lower Income households. For years, federal, state and local governments and agencies have sought to defray energy expenses and Increase residential energy efficiency for low Income households through legislative and regulatory actions and programs. Nevertheless, household energy costs continue to place a major burden on lower Income families. This issue paper was written to help formulate national energy policy by providing the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) with Information to help define the affordable housing issue; Identify major drivers, key factors, and primary stakeholders shaping the affordable housing issue; and review how responding to this Issue may impact EE`s goals and objectives and Influence the strategic direction of the office. Typically, housing affordability is an Issue associated with lower income households. This issue paper adopts this perspective, but it is important to note that reducing energy utility costs can make {open_quotes}better{close_quote} housing affordable to any household regardless of income. As energy efficiency is improved throughout all sectors of the economy, special consideration must be given to low income households. Of all households, low income households are burdened the most by residential energy costs; their residences often are the least energy-efficient and have the greatest potential for efficiency improvements, but the occupants have the fewest resources to dedicate to conservation measures. This paper begins with a definition of {open_quotes}affordability{close_quotes} as it pertains to total housing costs and summarizes several key statistics related to housing affordability and energy use by lower income households.

Lee, A.D.; Chin, R.I.; Marden, C.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Two Decades of U.S. Household Trends in Energy-Intensity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This paper looks at two decades of energy–intensity trends. Energy intensity measures are often used as a measure of energy efficiency and its change over time.

82

U.S. Residential Housing Weather-Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 6b U.S. Residential Housing Weather-Adjusted Site Energy Intensity

83

Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: intensity considerations  

SciTech Connect

Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity. 13 refs., 7 figs.

Skelton, E.F.; Elam, W.T.; Qadri, S.B.; Webb, A.W.; Schiferl, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations. Revision  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Energy use and intensity in the industrial sector, 1972 - 1991  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in the United States is substantially lower now than it would have been had energy intensities not fallen after the oil price shocks of the 1970s. The United States would have consumed over 30 quadrillion Btu (QBtu) more energy in 1991 if the energy-GDP ratio (energy divided by gross domestic product) had remained at its 1972 value. Much of this improvement has stemmed from developments within the industrial sector. This paper examines industrial energy use from two perspectives. First, the contribution of the industrial sector to the decline in the overall energy-GDP ratio is estimated. Second, the components of change in conservation trends within the industrial sector are examined. This part of the analysis identifies the change in overall industrial intensity (total energy consumption/total industrial output) that is due to improvements in energy intensity at the individual industry level in comparison to various aspects of the composition of industrial output. This paper is based upon recent work conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Alternative Fuels Policy, U.S. Department of Energy. Discussion of other end-use sectors and some additional analysis of industrial sector energy trends is found in Energy Conservation Trends - Understanding the Factors Affecting Conservation Gains and their Implications for Policy Development.

Belzer, D.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy Intensity Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Intensity Figure 7. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Energy intensity, measured as energy use (in thousand Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2000 dollars), is projected to decline at an average annual rate of 1.6 percent from 2006 to 2030 in the AEO2008 reference case (Figure 7). Although energy use generally increases as the economy grows, continuing improvement in the energy efficiency of the U.S. economy and a shift to less energy-intensive activities are projected to keep the rate of energy consumption growth lower than the rate of GDP growth. Since 1992, the energy intensity of the U.S. economy has declined on

91

Definition: Reduced Sustained Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Sustained Outages A sustained outage is one lasting >5 minutes, excluding major outages and wide-scale outages. The monetary benefit of reducing sustained outages is based on the value of service (VOS) of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, administrative costs, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can reduce the likelihood that there will be an outage, allow the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage

92

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween October 30, 2013 - 9:57am Addthis This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department Paul Grabowski Demonstration and Deployment, Bioenergy Technologies Office This Halloween, think of turning seasonal municipal solid waste (MSW) to energy as a very important "trick" that can have a positive environmental impact. Usually, these seasonal items including hay, pumpkins, candy, and leaves, are thrown away and sent to landfills. From there, the MSW decomposes and eventually turns into methane-a harmful

93

Using QECBs for Public Building Upgrades: Reducing Energy Bills...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Building Upgrades: Reducing Energy Bills in the City of Philadelphia Title Using QECBs for Public Building Upgrades: Reducing Energy Bills in the City of Philadelphia...

94

Effect of light intensity on photosynthesis by thermal algae adapted to natural and reduced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal algae in alkaline hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) grow as compact mats in which self-shading is extensive, as shown by measurement by autoradiog-raphy of photosynthetic activity of cells at different levels in the mat. The effect of light intensity on photosynthesis of the algal mats was studied using neutral density filters during incubation with l”CO Despite the intense sunlight at the altitude of Yellowstone, light inhibition by full sur$ght was observed only occasionally; the rate of photosynthesis fell progressively with decreasing light, although the most efficient use was at 7-14s of full sunlight. Later, the light intensity over portions of the algal mats was reduced to 18 % of full sunlight by installing neutral density glass plates, and changes of chlorophyll content, cell number, and response of photosynthesis to light intensity were determined over the next year. Although the chlorophyll content of the algae at the surface of the mat rose quickly, the chlorophyll content of the mat as a whole rose slowly or not at all; the photosynthetic response of the algal mats to full and reduced sunlight also changed slowly or not at all. Although individual algal cells can adapt rapidly to changes in light, the entire population, because of its existence in compact mats, adapts slowly. At the latitude of Yellowstone there is sufficient light throughout the year to enable algal growth to occur even at temperatures near the upper limit at which blue-green algae can grow; in Iceland, hot spring algae cannot grow during several winter months. Natural ultraviolet radiation neither inhibited nor stimulated photosynthesis.

Thomas D. Brock; M. Louise Brock

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Reducing Regulatory Burden  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Billing Code 6450 01-P Billing Code 6450 01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Reducing Regulatory Burden AGENCY: Office of the General Counsel, Department of Energy. ACTION: Request for information. SUMMARY: As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, "Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review," issued by the President on January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking comments and information from interested parties to assist DOE in reviewing its existing regulations to determine whether any such regulations should be modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed. The purpose of DOE's review is to make the agency's regulatory program more effective and less burdensome in achieving its regulatory objectives. DATES: Written comments and information are requested on or before 45 days after

96

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

97

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

98

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past June 7, 2012 - 2:48pm Addthis Franklin County Courthouse (Before) 1 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (Before) A court employee and news photographer survey the bomb damage in the Franklin County Courthouse's main courtroom in November 1969. Image: Courtesy of the Washington Missourian. Franklin County Courthouse (After) 2 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (After) The fully restored main courtroom includes the original 1930s paint colors and reproduction lighting. Image: Sallie Glaize Franklin County, MO Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy People across the country are looking for ways to make homes and buildings

100

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past June 7, 2012 - 2:48pm Addthis Franklin County Courthouse (Before) 1 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (Before) A court employee and news photographer survey the bomb damage in the Franklin County Courthouse's main courtroom in November 1969. Image: Courtesy of the Washington Missourian. Franklin County Courthouse (After) 2 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (After) The fully restored main courtroom includes the original 1930s paint colors and reproduction lighting. Image: Sallie Glaize Franklin County, MO Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy People across the country are looking for ways to make homes and buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China Title National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5253E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zhou, Nan, Lynn K. Price, Nina Zheng, Jing Ke, and Ali Hasanbeigi Date Published 10/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkerley National Laboratory ISBN Number LBNL-5253E Keywords china, china energy, co-control, energy intensity, industrial energy efficiency, iron and steel industry, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies, sulfur dioxide Abstract Since 2006, China has set goals of reducing energy intensity, emissions, and pollutants in multiple guidelines and in the Five Year Plans. Various strategies and measures have then been taken to improve the energy efficiency in all sectors and to reduce pollutants. Since controlling energy, CO2 emissions, and pollutants falls under the jurisdiction of different government agencies in China, many strategies are being implemented to fulfill only one of these objectives.Co-controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG)emissions and criteria air pollutant emissions. The targets could be met in a more cost effective manner if the integrated measures can be identified and prioritized. This report provides analysis and insights regarding how these targets could be met via co-control measures focusing on both CO2 and SO2 emissions in the cement, iron & steel, and power sectors to 2030 in China. An integrated national energy and emission model was developed in order to establish a baseline scenario that was used to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and expected actions. In addition, CO2 mitigation scenarios and SO2 control scenarios were also established to evaluate the impact of each of the measures and the combined effects.

102

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity With the two ongoing studies, one for the physics program, [1] and one for the accelerator and facilities [2] on the "Neutrino Factory Based on a Muon Storage Ring", a number of interesting suggestions and ideas came up. Almost immediately the question of scaling cost with the storage ring energy and with intensity came up. Nevertheless, it was impossible to explore all those questions in great detail, either in the report or in the preliminary cost estimate that is presented in Appendix A. During the study it became more and more clear, that one of the unique features of a neutrino source, namely the possibility to balance the cost of the accelerator with the cost of the detector, would urge the accelerator people to find an answer to this

103

Definition: Reduced Major Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Major Outages A major outage is defined using the beta method, per IEEE Std 1366-2003 (IEEE Power Engineering Society 2004). The monetary benefit of reducing major outages is based on the VOS of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can mitigate major outages by allowing the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage through islanding or alternative power supply.[1]

104

Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

105

Energy spectrum, dissipation, and spatial structures in reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the effect of the Hall term in the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence under a strong externally supported magnetic field, seeing how this changes the energy cascade, the characteristic scales of the flow, and the dynamics of global magnitudes, with particular interest in the dissipation. Numerical simulations of freely evolving three-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics are performed, for different values of the Hall parameter (the ratio of the ion skin depth to the macroscopic scale of the turbulence) controlling the impact of the Hall term. The Hall effect modifies the transfer of energy across scales, slowing down the transfer of energy from the large scales up to the Hall scale (ion skin depth) and carrying faster the energy from the Hall scale to smaller scales. The final outcome is an effective shift of the dissipation scale to larger scales but also a development of smaller scales. Current sheets (fundamental structures for energy dissipation) are affected in two ways by increasing the Hall effect, with a widening but at the same time generating an internal structure within them. In the case where the Hall term is sufficiently intense, the current sheet is fully delocalized. The effect appears to reduce impulsive effects in the flow, making it less intermittent.

Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gomez, D. O. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Reuschl, R. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Partner Resources You are here Home Buildings & Plants Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact...

108

Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometric study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., physical energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product ...

Shi, Xiaoyu, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometrics study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has ...

Shi, Xiaoyu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S. Title A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hasanbeigi, Ali, Lynn K. Price, Nathaniel T. Aden, Zhang Chunxia, Li Xiuping, and Shangguan Fangqin Date Published June/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Iron & Steel Research Institute, Iron and Steel Industry Keywords energy intensity, energy use, Low Emission & Efficient Industry Abstract Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steelproduced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order industry energy use to develop a common framework for comparing steel intensity energy use.

111

Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs May 3, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. Tracey A. LeBeau Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs What are the key facts? It's not uncommon for families in Alaska Native communities to spend nearly half of their monthly income on energy costs. To help these communities make smart energy choices, the Energy

112

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting January 16, 2012 - 9:29am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "Hey, don't throw that away!" This a phrase I heard quite often when I visited my parents over the holidays. What were they referring to? All the banana and carrot peelings I would discard, nonchalantly into the garbage bin. My father, an avid gardener for as long as I can remember, has taken-up composting again, this time with renewed fervor and an ever watchful eye. The result of my compost-conscious parent's hard work? A humungous nutrient-rich compost pile, perfect for all their summer outdoor gardening projects.In addition to the usual suspects of compost (coffee grinds, apple

113

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicators of steel sector energy efficiency and intensity.Energy intensity in the iron and steel industry: a comparison of physical and economic indicators,”

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings June 15, 2012 - 5:51pm Addthis Low-flow fixtures and showerheads can achieve water savings of 25%–60%. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/DaveBolton. Low-flow fixtures and showerheads can achieve water savings of 25%-60%. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/DaveBolton. What does this mean for me? Fix leaks, install low-flow fixtures, and purchase an energy-efficient dishwasher and clothes washer to use less hot water and save money. You can lower your water heating costs by using and wasting less hot water in your home. To conserve hot water, you can fix leaks, install low-flow fixtures, and purchase an energy-efficient dishwasher and clothes washer. Fix Leaks You can significantly reduce hot water use by simply repairing leaks in

115

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

116

Detecting leaks to reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how analyzing boilerhouse data in its manufacturing plants and applying algorithmic techniques is helping an automobile manufacturer run its utility operations more efficiently. Ford Motor Co., based in Dearborn, Michigan, is realizing significant energy savings, reducing capital expenditures, and minimizing wastewater disposal costs by diagnosing and quantifying leaks in its compressed air, steam/condensate, and process water systems by applying algorithms developed by Cleveland-based CEC Consultants Inc. These algorithms make use of readily available--and often already installed--instruments, such as vortex shedding meters, chart recorders, and data loggers, to compare how much utility use is needed for assembly and manufacturing equipment with how much is being generated.

Valenti, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather-Adjusted Site Energy by Census Region and Principal Building Activity.

118

Reducing energy use comes at a costReducing energy use comes at a cost ----the EU casethe EU case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YOUR LOGO HERECGES Reducing energy use comes at a costReducing energy use comes at a costDeputy Director and Chief Economist Centre for Global Energy StudiesCentre for Global Energy Studies AthensAthens ---- 88thth May 2008May 2008 Nuclear Energy WorkshopNuclear Energy Workshop ---- National Research Centre

119

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Table 5c. Residential Energy Intensity Using Site Energy by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

51. 52. 58. 42 . 37: ... Except for 1997, estimates include all the floor area of the housing unit that was enclosed from the weather. Sources: Energy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce Steel Production Costs ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor Energy Recovery & Reuse 504 Boiler constructed and installed with...

122

Table 6. Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010)" Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010)" "thousand Btu per dollar of GDP" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",18.27258197,17.12573602,17.40982338,17.21199023,16.87274619,16.36600572,16.26201029,16.16667416,15.88996309,15.31511861,15.97051076,-0.1259849985,-2.302071213 "Alaska",21.74118991,20.61708506,19.78031734,20.18143227,20.28953911,21.09573287,18.72961653,17.79373817,15.85124571,14.13669694,14.24461661,-0.3448097058,-7.496573297 "Arizona",8.723022426,8.474435286,8.399371812,7.993493579,8.274516227,7.602521438,7.232690272,7.328159916,7.62679414,7.507000095,7.628169778,-0.1255129924,-1.094852647

123

EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities, 1978-2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Sector Energy Intensities Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of residential sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1978 -1984, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 based on the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. excel table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b excel table 1b Total Primary Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1c) html Table 1c excel table 1c excel table 1c Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1d)

124

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use August 9, 2011 - 11:09am Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel...

125

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use electricity. Electric water heating -- Purchase an energy-efficient electric water heater and operate it efficiently. Or select an energy-efficient water heater that...

126

On reducing energy management delays in disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise computing systems consume a large amount of energy, the cost of which contributes significantly to the operating budget. Consequently, dynamic energy management techniques are prevalent. Unfortunately, dynamic energy management for disks impose ... Keywords: Disk energy management, Peer memory sharing, Spin-up delay reduction

Krish K.R., Guanying Wang, Puranjoy Bhattacharjee, Ali R. Butt, Chris Gniady

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Definition: Reduced Electricity Theft | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Theft Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Theft Smart meters can typically detect tampering. Moreover, a meter data management system can analyze...

129

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

130

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

131

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfaces to Reduce PC Energy Usage. In Proceedings of46.2% of this primary energy usage[9]. Since buildings havecontributors to the total energy usage. Then, we can study

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Compiler Support for Reducing Leakage Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy. Our strategy is built upon a data-flow analysis that ...

W. Zhang; M. Kandemir; N. Vijaykrishnan; M. J. Irwin; V. De

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Definition: Reduced Electricity Losses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Losses Losses Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Losses Functions that provide this benefit could help manage peak feeder loads, reduced electricity throughput, locate electricity production closer to the load and ensure that voltages remain within service tolerances, while minimizing the amount of reactive power provided. These actions can reduce electricity losses by making the system more efficient for a given load served or by actually reducing the overall load on the system.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, reactive power, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Electricity_Losses&oldid=502644

134

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs July 23, 2010 - 3:24pm Addthis Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? 70 street lights and 25 traffic signals to be replaced via Recovery Act. Town expects 10 percent reduction in energy costs. Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

135

Walking in simulated reduced gravity: mechanical energy fluctuations and exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Walking in simulated reduced gravity: mechanical energy fluctuations and exchange TIMOTHY M reduced gravity: mechanical energy fluctuations and exchange. J. Appl. Physiol. 86(1): 383­390, 1999.--Walking humans conserve mechanical and, presum- ably, metabolic energy with an inverted pendulum-like ex

Kram, Rodger

136

Definition: Reduced Momentary Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Momentary Outages Momentary Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Momentary Outages By locating faults more accurately or adding electricity storage, momentary outages could be reduced or eliminated. Moreover, fewer customers on the same or adjacent distribution feeders would experience the momentary interruptions associated with reclosing. Momentary outages last <5 min in duration. The benefit to consumers is based on the value of service.[1] Related Terms electricity storage technologies, electricity generation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Momentary_Outages&oldid=493094

137

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY INTENSITY INDICATORS AND THEIR ROLE AS POLICY -MAKING TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY INTENSITY INDICATORS AND THEIR ROLE AS POLICY - MAKING TOOLS by Mallika as a basis for policy-making has been on the rise. The idea that trends in both energy intensity policy criteria. Estimates of economic energy intensity from decomposition analyses are found to be data

138

Energy-Efficient and Reduced-Effluent Process for Ultraclean ...  

Energy-Efficient and Reduced-Effluent Process for Ultraclean Surface Drying ... Scientific papers have been published on this topic: Michael C. Rushford, ...

139

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger. Author(s), Anders Kenneth Sorhuus, Geir Wedde, Ketil A.

140

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China Title Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell ...  

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs. August 1, 2013. In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to develop ...

142

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs July 23, 2010 - 3:24pm Addthis Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? 70 street lights and 25 traffic signals to be replaced via Recovery Act. Town expects 10 percent reduction in energy costs. Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

143

Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or less to consumers. Such a vehicle would reduce the United States' reliance on foreign oil and lower energy costs for the average American, so one of the Department of Energy's...

144

Strategies for reducing energy demand in the materials sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research answers a key question - can the materials sector reduce its energy demand by 50% by 2050? Five primary materials of steel, cement, aluminum, paper, and plastic, contribute to 50% or more of the final energy ...

Sahni, Sahil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 - 2010)" "kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2010"...

146

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil ... Energy use in homes, ... the role of energy-intensive industries in the United States declined with continuing structural changes ...

147

Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11% of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20% of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks.The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical compound, used as basis for almost all products. Fuel use is estimated at 268 PJ (excluding feedstocks) while 368 PJ natural gas is used as feedstock. Electricity consumption is estimated at 14 PJ. We estimate the energy intensity of ammonia manufacture at 39.3 GJ/tonne (including feedstocks, HHV) and 140 kWh/tonne, resulting in a specific primary energy consumption of 40.9 GJ/tonne (HHV), equivalent to 37.1 GJ/tonne (LHV). Excluding natural gas use for feedstocks the primary energy consumption is estimated at 16.7 GJ/tonne (LHV). The third most important product from an energy perspective is the production of chlorine and caustic soda. Chlorine is produced through electrolysis of a salt-solution. Chlorine production is the main electricity consuming process in the chemical industry, next to oxygen and nitrogen production. We estimate final electricity use at 173 PJ (48 TWh) and fuel use of 38 PJ. Total primary energy consumption is estimated at 526 PJ (including credits for hydrogen export). The energy intensity is estimated at an electricity consumption of 4380 kWh/tonne chlorine and fuel consumption of 3.45 GJ/tonne chlorine, where all energy use is allocated to chlorine production. Assuming an average power generation efficiency of 33% the primary energy consumption is estimated at 47.8 GJ/tonne chlorine (allocating all energy use to chlorine).

Worrell, E.; Phylipsen, D.; Einstein, D.; Martin, N.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

EIA Energy Efficiency-Iron and Steel Energy Intensity, 1998-2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy Intensities, 1998, 2002, and 2006 Below are data for iron and steel industry from the 1998, 2002, and 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The tables provide estimates for energy consumed for all purposes, end uses of fuel consumption, offsite-produced fuel consumption, expenditures for purchased energy, as well as energy intensities per value of production and per ton of steel. Energy Consumption 1998, 2002, and 2006 Table 1. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) html Table 1 excel table 1. pdf table 1. Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption html table 2. excel table 2. pdf table 2. Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption html table 3. excel table 3. pdf table 3. Table 4. Expenditures for Purchased Energy

149

Save Energy Now Reveals New Opportunities for Steel Manufacturers to Reduce Costs and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study describes how the Industrial Technologies Program helps steel companies find ways to improve the efficiency of energy-intensive process heating and steam systems by performing Save Energy Now energy assessments.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a review of the multifunctional platform project in Mali Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a review of the multifunctional platform project in Mali Agency/Company /Organization: Abeeku Brew-Hammond & Anna Crole-Rees Partner: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.beta.undp.org/undp/en/home/librarypage/environment-energy/sustaina

152

REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant investigated for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development and the development of the electric launch system design.

Mark Machina

2002-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.An ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Short, Robert W. (Rochester, NY); Craxton, Stephen (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs August 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to develop clean, domestic energy sources, the Energy Department today announced a $4.5 million investment in two projects-led by Minnesota-based 3M and the Colorado School of Mines-to lower the cost, improve the durability, and increase the efficiency of next-generation fuel cell systems. This investment is a part of the Energy Department's commitment to maintain American leadership in innovative clean energy technologies, give American businesses more options to cut energy costs, and reduce our reliance on imported oil. "Fuel cell technologies have an important role to play in diversifying

156

Carbon Intensity, - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Intensity using Market Exchange Rates (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Thousand Year 2005 U.S. Dollars) Loading...

157

High pressure study of changes in energy and intensity of excitations in crystalline metal glyoximes  

SciTech Connect

The effect of high pressure has been measured on the energy and integrated intensity of electronic excitations of several layered crystals of glyoximes containing Ni, Pd, or Pt. Large changes in both energy and intensity were observed, both of which were completely reversible. The shifts in energy with pressure, are explained in terms of the relative spatial extent of the outer d and p orbitals of Ni, Pd, and Pt. The effects of back donation from the ligands and intensity borrowing from the higher energy charge transfer excitations are considered as possible causes of the observed intensity changes. It was concluded that intensity borrowing was the major cause of the observed changes.

Tkacz, M.; Drickamer, H.G.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 2.1.3 Direct Reduced Iron – Electric ArcThin Slab Casting Direct Reduced Iron – Electric ArcThin Slab Casting Direct Reduced Iron – Electric Arc

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

160

Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries September 9, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov Electricvehicles8331019248.jpg Electric vehicles lined up in Cascade Locks. Credit: Oregon Department of Transportation A better battery-one that is cheap and safe, but packs a lot of power-could lead to an electric vehicle that performs better than today's gasoline-powered cars, and costs about the same or less to consumers. Such a vehicle would reduce the United States' reliance on foreign oil and lower energy costs for the average American, so one of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) goals is to fund research that will revolutionize the performance of next-generation batteries. In honor of DOE's supercomputing month, we are highlighting some of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Determinants of energy intensity in industrialized countries : a comparison of China and India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of final energy per unit of economic output (usually in terms of gross domestic product, or GDP), known as energy intensity, is often used to measure the effectiveness of energy use and the consumption patterns ...

Huang, Feiya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting iron ore to metallic iron nodules. Various types of coals including a bio-coal produced though torrefaction can result in production of NRI at reduced GHG levels. The process results coupled with earlier already reported developments indicate that this process technique should be evaluated at the next level in order to develop parameter information for full scale process design. Implementation of the process to full commercialization will require a full cost production analysis and comparison to other reduction technologies and iron production alternatives. The technical results verify that high quality NRI can be produced under various operating conditions at the pilot level.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Chargers Energy Department Awards Nearly 7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers December 21, 2011 - 12:49pm Addthis As part of the...

164

ORNL continues to reduce its energy footprint | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

continues to reduce its energy footprint ORNL has 15 buildings that are LEED certified and 23 that are High Performance Sustainable Buildings. ORNL has 15 buildings that are LEED...

165

The Challenge of Reducing Energy Consumption in China's Industrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Challenge of Reducing Energy Consumption in China's Industrial Sector Speaker(s): Lynn Price Date: September 16, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

166

Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

announced up to 7 million to reduce the non-hardware costs of residential and commercial solar energy installations. Made available through the SunShot Incubator Program, this...

167

Reducing 3G energy consumption on mobile devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 3G wireless interface is a significant contributor to battery drain on mobile devices. This paper describes the design, implementation, and experimental evaluation of methods to reduce the energy consumption of the 3G ...

Deng, Shuo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985 - 1994 Full Report Introduction Summary of Data Data Tables Data Summaries All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone (32) Metals (33) Fab. Metals (34) Machinery (35) El. Equip.(36) Instruments (38) Misc. (39) Appendices Survey Design Quality of Data Sector Description Nonobservation Errors Glossary Intensity Sites Commercial Residential Transportation International Manufacturing Energy Intensity Changes in Energy Intensity Click for Full Graph Manufacturing Energy Consumption Consumption of Energy Click for Full Graph Manufacturing Shipments History of Shipments Click for Full Graph The focus of this data report is on intensity of energy use, measured by energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report explicitly relates changes in two energy measures of energy intensity to efficiency, while being cognizant that there are structural and behavioral effects enmeshed in those measures of energy efficiency. Reporting EI serves to continue the Intensity Change report series.

169

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cracking and alternative processes,” Energy 31 (2006), pp.cracking and alternative processes,” Energy 31 (2006), pp.cracking and alternative processes,” Energy 31 (2006), pp.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Part 1: Housing Unit Characteristics and Energy Usage Indicators Energy Consumption 2 Energy Expenditures 2 Total U.S. (quadrillion Btu) Per Household (Dollars) Per

171

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the United States, energy intensity has been declining steadily since the early 1970s and continues to decline in EIA's long-term projection.

172

Glass manufacturing is an energy-intensive industry mainly ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... There is substantial potential for energy efficiency improvements in glass manufacturing. Estimates range from ...

173

Lower residential energy use reduces home energy expenditures as ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Aggregate home energy expenditures by U.S. households fell $12 billion in 2012 ... households spent $1,945 on heating, cooling, appliances, electronics, and lighting ...

174

Implementing Energy Efficiency in Wastewater to Reduce Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the industrial world creating a quality product at minimum cost is the goal. In this environment all expenses are scrutinized, when they are part of the manufacturing process. However, even at the most conscientious facility the wastewater system is often overlooked, just plain accepted as is. At many locations facility personnel are completely unaware of utility costs but more importantly they are not aware of their energy consumption. The Wisconsin Focus on Energy Industrial Program has surveyed and assessed many municipal and industrial wastewater systems across the state, identified opportunities to save energy and assisted in implementing energy efficiency modifications without adversely impacting the quality of the treatment system or the manufacturing process. In many instances not only did the energy efficiency modification result in reduced energy consumption and costs, it also reduced maintenance and down time while improving effluent quality. Most of the opportunities that were implemented were installed while the manufacturing operations remained in operation.

Cantwell, J. C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Estimating material and energy intensities of urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to develop methods to estimate, analyze and visualize the resource intensity of urban areas. Understanding the resource consumption of the built environment is particularly relevant in cities ...

Quinn, David James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation October 3, 2008 - 11:09am Addthis John Lippert If you pay your own energy bills, you don't need to be reminded that energy prices are escalating. Energy price projections for this coming winter are not encouraging. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential natural gas prices during the upcoming heating season (October though March) are projected to average $14.93 per Mcf, an increase of about 17% compared to last year's heating season. Residential heating oil prices are projected to average $4.13 per gallon this winter, an increase of about 25%. What if you live in an all-electric house? Many utilities are continuing to pursue retail electricity rate increases in response to power generation

177

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation October 3, 2008 - 11:09am Addthis John Lippert If you pay your own energy bills, you don't need to be reminded that energy prices are escalating. Energy price projections for this coming winter are not encouraging. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential natural gas prices during the upcoming heating season (October though March) are projected to average $14.93 per Mcf, an increase of about 17% compared to last year's heating season. Residential heating oil prices are projected to average $4.13 per gallon this winter, an increase of about 25%. What if you live in an all-electric house? Many utilities are continuing to pursue retail electricity rate increases in response to power generation

178

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Naoya Motegi Information Technology that is featured by standard communication protocol like Lon Works, BACnet is very useful for managing building systems. Now we can collect much data quickly and easily and to analyze them in detail with this technology. Under the circumstances in that saving energy and reducing CO2 are required strongly, important thing is finding the effective information for building operation and control from collected data and the analysis of them. In our project, the floor integration controller that integrates the each building systems was proposed. It

179

10 Strategic Steps to Reducing Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your company is looking at energy management as part of its overall strategy to reduce costs and improve profits, it is not alone. While energy prices have increased at a shocking rate, so has interest in environmental responsibility. Progressive organizations are exploring ways to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse gases. Some are even creating new positions for these issues, placing someone in charge of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The CSR's job is to help a company be more socially responsible and reduce harmful emissions. Energy management can accomplish both conservation and emission goals- plus, it lowers utility costs and strengthens your bottom line! In the past, reasonably priced energy made it difficult to justify new conservation projects. It was hard to meet the standard criteria of 2-3 years payback. However, natural gas prices have tripled in the last five years from $2 to over $6 per Dekatherm (Dth). Electric prices also have increased dramatically-by more than 100% in some parts of the country. These increased energy costs have made conservation projects more desirable. A natural gas improvement project that had a six-year payback five years ago may have less than a two-year payback today. New technologies also have helped drive down the payback of projects and opened up new areas for potential savings. The following paper looks at how the new market offers opportunities to reduce overall energy costs.

Swanson, G. A.; Haley, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy Efficiency CO2 Intensity Calculator (EE-CO2 Intensity Calculator) Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This spreadsheet calculator will allow members to quantify the impact of their energy efficiency savings and fuel displacement on carbon-dioxide emissions, specific to their region and the end-uses ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ISC-Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ISC-Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management ISC-Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: ISC-Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iscvt.org/resources/documents/san_francisco_sfpark.pdf Locality: San Francisco, California Cost: Free Language: English ISC-Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management Screenshot References: Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management[1] "The transit study concluded that congestion is a primary factor reducing the reliability and speed of onroad transit, which in turn is exacerbated

182

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Use in the Steel Industry. Brussels: IISI. Worrell,1998. Energy Use in the Steel Industry. Brussels: IISI. 2.2.1998. Energy Use in the Steel Industry. Brussels: IISI. Best

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Glass manufacturing is an energy-intensive industry mainly fueled ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

184

The cement industry is the most energy intensive of all ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

185

Psychological strategies to reduce energy consumption: first annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary program composed of a mix of physical and social scientists is studying the behavior of occupants as well as the engineering aspects of household energy consumption. A study of the Twin Rivers, New Jersey area examined and tested psychological strategies for helping people achieve significant reductions in their residential energy consumption. The results show that homeowners are motivated by cost and other pressures provided by daily feedback on their actual energy consumption. Four feedback experiments suggest that feedback helps homeowners to reduce their energy consumption, but the optimal nature of the feedback system has yet to be identified. The project also included research on thermostat control and on attitudes.

Seligman, C.; Darley, J.M.; Becker, L.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon dioxide. PPPL reduced leaks of SF6 by 65 percent over three years - reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions by 48 percent between 2008 and 2011. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon

187

Reduce Overhead, Implement Energy Efficiency in Water/Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the Focus on Energy program in the State of Wisconsin we have been able to identify savings for industries in their water/wastewater treatment or distribution systems. Modifications required to realize savings resulted in reduced energy consumption and reduced cost to industry. Reduced cost is a pleasant benefit when the cost of utility bills comes off the bottom line and if the industry is working on a 5 percent margin the actual value of the savings could be considered to be 20 times its actual savings. Modifications can be made in wastewater treatment applications by adjusting dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in treatment process, modifying aeration system blowers, changing diffusers, and considering a DO automatic control system. In water systems, changes in pump operations by not throttling valves for control, adding variable speed drives to constant speed operations, and reducing pressure on systems where it will not adversely impact the process.

Cantwell, J. C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PPPL Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has received a federal Sustainability Award for reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions 48 percent since 2008 - far exceeding the U.S. government's goal of a 28 percent reduction. Members of the PPPL staff were among the 20 recipients of the Sustainability Awards in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept.

189

Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions in Indonesia Emissions in Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search Name Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia Agency/Company /Organization Center for International Forestry Research Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://prod-http-80-800498448. Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Reducing Forestry Emissions in Indonesia[1] Overview "In this paper, we look critically at the trade-offs between development pathways based on land-intensive enterprises and climate change mitigation. Without a coordinated approach to multiple objectives, efforts in one area could undermine efforts in the other. For example, potential major

190

Energy intensities in OECD countries, 1970--1989: A sectoral analysis  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the evolution of energy intensities in key sectors or subsectors between the early 1970s and the late 1980s in nine OECD countries. The sectors covered are manufacturing, automobile and air travel, freight trucking, residential space heating, and the service sector. Intensity changes varied among the sectors and countries, but common trends are visible in many cases. In most cases, the intensity decline slowed or ceased in the mid-1980s. We discuss the causes for the changes observed in each area, showing how energy-price changes were but one of many factors that played a role. Weighting the changes in intensities by 1973 energy use patterns, we find that the aggregate energy intensity index fell by 14--19% between 1973 and 1988 in the US, Japan, and West Germany.

Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.; Howarth, R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

DRAFT DO NOT QUOTE Energy Prices and Energy Intensity in China: A Structural Decomposition Analysis and Econometrics Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has declined dramatically, by about 70%, in spite of increases in energy consumption. Is this just a coincidence? Or does a systematic relationship exist between energy prices and energy intensity? In this study, we examine whether and how China’s energy price changes affect its energy intensity trend during 1980-2002 at a macro level. We conduct the research by using two complementary economic models: the input-output-based structural decomposition analysis (SDA) and econometric regression models and by using a decomposition method of own-price elasticity of energy intensity. Findings include a negative own-price elasticity of energy intensity, a price-inducement effect on energyefficiency improvement, and a greater sensitivity (in terms of the reaction of energy intensity towards changes in energy prices) of the industry sector, compared to the overall economy. Analysts can use these results as a starting point for China's energy and carbon

Xiaoyu Shi; Karen R. Polenske; Xiaoyu Shi; Karen R. Polenske

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions March 15, 2010 - 11:14am Addthis Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo Joshua DeLung The 10 federal land organizations - including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges - in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyoming's borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear. Thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program, the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee will

193

Boise, Idaho: Saving Money and Reducing Waste | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boise, Idaho: Saving Money and Reducing Waste Boise, Idaho: Saving Money and Reducing Waste Boise, Idaho: Saving Money and Reducing Waste April 8, 2011 - 2:17pm Addthis Boise Mayor David Bieter talks about the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Thanks to a $1.2 million grant from the Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program, the city of Boise, Idaho, will replace and install 1,450 LED streetlights by the end of this month. The project is projected to save $1.2 million over the next 15 years. Boise Mayor David Bieter says that the EECBG Program is the best federal program he's worked with in the time he's been in office. "We've just been overjoyed with the effect of this project," he said.

194

GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for Reducing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for Reducing Energy Use GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for Reducing Energy Use September 13, 2011 - 11:08am Addthis Timothy Unruh, Program Manager for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Image: Energy Department Image | Photo By Mark Bealer (Contractor) Timothy Unruh, Program Manager for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Image: Energy Department Image | Photo By Mark Bealer (Contractor) Timothy Unruh FEMP Program Manager How can I participate? The 2012 event will be held August 19-22 at the America's Center Convention Complex in St. Louis, Missouri. As President Obama has said, we here in the Federal Government are the largest energy consumer in the United States, and as such, we have "a

195

GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for Reducing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for Reducing Energy Use GovEnergy 2011 Offers Federal Energy Professionals Strategies for Reducing Energy Use September 13, 2011 - 11:08am Addthis Timothy Unruh, Program Manager for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Image: Energy Department Image | Photo By Mark Bealer (Contractor) Timothy Unruh, Program Manager for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Image: Energy Department Image | Photo By Mark Bealer (Contractor) Timothy Unruh FEMP Program Manager How can I participate? The 2012 event will be held August 19-22 at the America's Center Convention Complex in St. Louis, Missouri. As President Obama has said, we here in the Federal Government are the largest energy consumer in the United States, and as such, we have "a

196

Rapid Metal Heating: Reducing Energy Consumption and Increasing Productivity in the Thermal Processing of Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy intensive manufacturing operations, such as iron and steel production, forging, and heat treating, are attempting to increase productivity while decreasing energy consumption.

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate whether intensity-modulated proton therapy with a reduced spot size (rsIMPT) could further reduce the parotid and submandibular gland dose compared with previously calculated IMPT plans with a larger spot size. In addition, it was investigated whether the obtained dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Methods: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal cancer were included in a comparative treatment planning study. Both IMPT plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal PTV. IMPT and rsIMPT used identical three-field beam arrangements. In the IMPT plans, the parotid and submandibular salivary glands were spared as much as possible. rsIMPT plans used identical dose-volume objectives for the parotid glands as those used by the IMPT plans, whereas the objectives for the submandibular glands were tightened further. NTCPs were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Target coverage was similar for both IMPT techniques, whereas rsIMPT clearly improved target conformity. The mean doses in the parotid glands and submandibular glands were significantly lower for three-field rsIMPT (14.7 Gy and 46.9 Gy, respectively) than for three-field IMPT (16.8 Gy and 54.6 Gy, respectively). Hence, rsIMPT significantly reduced the NTCP of patient-rated xerostomia and parotid and contralateral submandibular salivary flow dysfunction (27%, 17%, and 43% respectively) compared with IMPT (39%, 20%, and 79%, respectively). In addition, mean dose values in the sublingual glands, the soft palate and oral cavity were also decreased. Obtained dose and NTCP reductions varied per patient. Conclusions: rsIMPT improved sparing of the salivary glands and reduced NTCP for xerostomia and parotid and submandibular salivary dysfunction, while maintaining similar target coverage results. It is expected that rsIMPT improves quality of life during and after radiotherapy treatment.

Water, Tara A. van de, E-mail: t.a.van.de.water@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lomax, Antony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hug, Eugen B. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The cement industry is the most energy intensive of all ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy July 1, 2013.. ... tags: consumption industrial manufacturing. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

199

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Figure on Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings (1989 data) (file size .89 MB) pages: 140

200

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors  

SciTech Connect

"World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S Title A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2011 Authors Price, Lynn K., Ali Hasanbeigi, Nathaniel T. Aden, Zhang Chunxia, Li Xiuping, and Shangguan Fangqin Conference Name ACEEE Industrial Summer Study Date Published 07/2011 Publisher American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location New York Keywords china, energy intensity, iron and steel, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, united states Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity of steel production in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and industry structure. In addition to the base case analysis, six scenarios were developed to assess the effect of different factors such as the share of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel production, conversion factors for the embodied energy of imported and exported intermediary and auxiliary products, and the differences in net calorific values of the fuels. The results of the analysis show that for the whole iron and steel production process, the final energy intensity in 2006 was equal to 14.90 GJ/tonne crude steel in the U.S. and 23.11 GJ/tonne crude steel in China in the base scenario. In another scenario that assumed the Chinese share of electric arc furnace production in 2006 (i.e. 10.5%) in the U.S., the energy intensity of steel production in the U.S. increased by 54% to 22.96GJ/tonne crude steel. Thus, when comparing the energy intensity of the U.S and Chinese steel industry,the structure of the industry should be taken into account.

202

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1995 End-Use Data 1995 End-Use Data Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating, cooling, lighting, etc.)...

203

EPRI Energy Efficiency CO2 Intensity Calculator, 2013 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This spreadsheet calculator will allow members to quantify the impact of their energy efficiency savings and fuel displacement on carbon-dioxide emissions, specific to their region and the end-uses ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

EPRI Energy Efficiency CO2 Intensity Calculator, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This spreadsheet calculator will allow members to quantify the impact of their energy efficiency savings on carbon-dioxide emissions, specific to their region and the end-uses for which the savings emanate. This user-friendly COintensity calculator is a Microsoft Excel application to help utility staff calculate the impact of their actual or planned energy efficiency programs on emissions of CO8322. The calculator will access a database of load dispatch simulation runs of the EPRI National Electric Syste...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy  

SciTech Connect

Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mt, net imported Direct-Reduced Iron (DRI) in 2006 was 2.61in Figure 3) pig iron, direct-reduced iron (DRI), pellets,of net imported direct reduced iron Energy used for the

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A New System of Energy Intensity Indicators for the U.S. Economy Focus on Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. commitment to energy efficiency and conservation policy was emphasized in the National Energy Policy (NEP) made public in May 2001. Recommendation 14 in Chapter 4 of the NEP - "Making Energy Efficiency a National Priority" -recommended that "...the President direct the Secretary of Energy to establish a national priority for improving energy efficiency. The priority would be to improve the energy intensity of the U.S. economy, as measured by the amount of energy required for each dollar of economic productivity. This increased efficiency should be pursued through the combined efforts of industry, consumers, and federal, state, and local governments." As part of the effort to make energy efficiency a national priority, the Department of Energy has developed improved national indicators of energy intensity.

Roop, J. M.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy sourceÂ’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

209

Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton the rovibra- tional energy distributions of fragmentsl formed in the infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD energies of the frag- ment can be well characterized in terms of a Boltzmann distribution with a single

Zare, Richard N.

210

Why did China's Energy Intensity Increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal-dependent consumption structure (Fig. 4) and low per capita energy endowments. China's coal use takes up about 70 percent of the total energy consumption. Per capita oil, natural gas and coal deposits). Moreover, industrial consumption increased more rapidly due to expansion in energy-intensive industries

Edwards, Paul N.

211

Definition: Reduced Ancillary Service Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary Service Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary services are necessary to ensure the reliable and efficient operation of the grid. The level of ancillary services required at any point in time is determined by the grid operator and/or energy market rules. Ancillary services, including spinning reserve and frequency regulation, could be reduced if generators could more closely follow load; peak load on the system was reduced; power factor, voltage, and VAR control were improved; or information available to grid operators were improved.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms ancillary service, frequency regulation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in

212

Definition: Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usage (Not Monetized) Usage (Not Monetized) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) The functions that provide this benefit eliminate the need to send a line worker or crew to the switch or capacitor locations to operate them eliminate the need for truck rolls to perform diagnosis of equipment condition, and reduce truck rolls for meter reading and measurement purposes. This reduces the fuel consumed by a service vehicle or line truck. The use of plug-in electric vehicles can also lead to this benefit since the electrical energy used by plug-in electric vehicles displaces the equivalent amount of oil.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition

213

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reducing Air-Conditioning System Energy Using a PMV Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The control system of central air-conditioning, based on PMV, not only improves thermal comfort but also reduces system energy consumption. A new thermal comfort degree softsensor model is built via use of the CMAC neural network nonlinear calibration function. It can realize on-line detection of thermal comfort. At the same time it can also realize real-time control of central air-conditioning system based on PMV. Simulation results demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of the presented method.

Li, H.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Budgets of Divergent and Rotational Kinetic Energy during Two Periods of Intense Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Budgets of divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy (KD and KR) are investigated for two periods of intense convection. Derivations of the budget equations are presented for limited volumes in terms of VD and VR. The two periods ...

Dennis E. Buechler; Henry E. Fuelberg

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Roles of Divergent and Rotational Winds in the Kinetic Energy Balance Intense Convective Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contibutions of divergent and rotational wind components to the synoptic-scale kinetic energy balance are described using rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals from NASA’s fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 4). Two intense ...

Henry E. Fuelberg; Peter A. Browning

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Comparison of the Evolution of Energy Intensity in Spain and in the EU15. Why is Spain Different?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy intensity in Spain has increased since 1990, while the opposite has happened in the EU15. Decomposition analysis of primary energy intensity ratios has been used to identify which are the key sectors driving the ...

Ocaña, Carlos

218

A Novel Dose Constraint to Reduce Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the predictors of incidence and duration of xerostomia (XT) based on parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SMG), and both glands taken as a whole organ (TG) in head-and-neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was initiated in May 2003. Sixty-three head-and-neck patients (44 with nasopharynx cancer) were included in the analysis. Using the dose-volume histogram the PG, SMG, and TG mean doses were calculated. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow were measured and XT-related questionnaires were compiled before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after radiotherapy. Salivary gland toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and Grade >=3 toxicity was used as the endpoint. The XT incidence was investigated according to descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analysis. The Bonferroni method was used for multiple comparison adjustment. Results: After a reduced flow at 3 months after radiotherapy, recovery of salivary flow was observed over time. Primary site and salivary gland mean doses and volumes were identified in univariate analysis as prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TG mean dose (p = 0.00066) and pretreatment stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.00420) are independent factors for predicting XT. Conclusion: The TG mean dose correlates with XT as assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, salivary output, and XT-related questionnaires. Our results suggest that TG mean dose is a candidate dose constraint for reducing XT, requiring considerably more validation in non-nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.i [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Bruzzaniti, Vicente [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Giovinazzo, Giuseppe; Marucci, Laura [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A comparison of energy intensity in the United States and Japan  

SciTech Connect

This report compares energy intensity in the US and Japan in 1985. Energy intensity is examined for each of the following end-use energy consuming sectors: residential and commercial, transportation, and industrial (manufacturing). In each sector, comparative measures of the relative energy intensity are developed. The comparison indicates that when adjustments are made for certain differences between the two countries, energy intensity in the US compares more favorably with Japan than when just the aggregate energy-to-gross-domestic-product ratio is used. For instance, climate and residential floor space explain a good portion of the difference between residential energy consumption in the US and Japan. Likewise, although the US requires about twice as much energy for passenger travel, it requires about half the energy for freight movement (when normalized for distance and vehicle capacity) compared with Japan. Finally, the US manufacturing sector, as a whole, is about equal to Japan in terms of the amount of energy consumed in producing a dollar's worth of goods, in current dollars and using 1985 exchange rates. 53 refs.

McDonald, S.C.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Reducing fuel usage through applications of conservation and solar energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal technology, coupled with aggressive conservation measures, offers the prospect of greatly reducing the dependence of industry on oil and natural gas. The near-term market for solar technology is largely in industrial processes operating at temperatures below 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F). Such process heat can be supplied by the relatively unsophisticated solar equipment available today. The number and diversity of industrial plants using process heat at this temperature allows favorable matches between solar technologies and industrial processes. The problems involved with the installation and maintenance of conservation and solar equipment are similar. Both compete for scarce investment capital, and each complicates industrial operations and increases maintenance requirements. Technological innovations requiring new types of equipment and reducing the temperature requirements of industrial processes favor the introduction of solar hardware. The industrial case studies program at the Solar Energy Research Institute has examined technical, economic, and other problems facing the near-term application of solar thermal technology to provide industrial process heat. The plant engineer is in the front line of any measure to reduce energy consumption or to supplement existing fuel supplies. The conditions most favorable to the integration of solar technology are presented and illustrated with examples from actual industrial plants.

May, E. K.; Hooker, D. W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

SciTech Connect

Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

DE-AC03-76SF00098. Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11 % of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20 % of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks. The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical

Ernst Worrell; Dian Phylipsen; Dan Einstein; Nathan Martin; Ernst Worrell; Dian Phylipsen; Dan Einstein; Nathan Martin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

224

Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have revived interest in explaining the long-run changes in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy. We use a KLEM dataset for 35 industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ...

Sue Wing, Ian.

225

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Introduction Rankeda EI Numbers of Total Inputs of Energy SIC Codeb Intensity for 1985c Intensity for 1994c 29 18.11 25.85 26 17.82 17.71 33 19.57 16.27 32 14.75 14.69 28 11.09 12.14 All 5.34 5.77 24 5.24 5.05 22 4.07 3.82 20 2.41 2.72 30 2.81 2.22 34 1.91 1.98 25 1.37 1.16 39 1.14 1.16 38 0.92 1.10 36 1.11 0.90 35 1.14 0.86 27 0.62 0.74 23 0.47 0.38 c For this report, all energy-intensity ratios are presented in units of thousands of Btu per 1992 constant dollars. Source: Table 12 of this report. The focus of this data report is on energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report presents two measures of energy consumption, Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy,

226

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Introduction Rankeda EI Numbers of Total Inputs of Energy SIC Codeb Intensity for 1985c Intensity for 1994c 29 18.11 25.85 26 17.82 17.71 33 19.57 16.27 32 14.75 14.69 28 11.09 12.14 All 5.34 5.77 24 5.24 5.05 22 4.07 3.82 20 2.41 2.72 30 2.81 2.22 34 1.91 1.98 25 1.37 1.16 39 1.14 1.16 38 0.92 1.10 36 1.11 0.90 35 1.14 0.86 27 0.62 0.74 23 0.47 0.38 c For this report, all energy-intensity ratios are presented in units of thousands of Btu per 1992 constant dollars. Source: Table 12 of this report. The focus of this data report is on energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report presents two measures of energy consumption, Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy,

227

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us Speaker(s): Holmes Hummel Date: January 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Diamond Driving the U.S. energy system toward climate stabilization requires integration of multiple policy instruments in a staged series of legislative and regulatory policy vehicles. Qualifying the limitations of a cap-and-trade approach, Dr. Hummel will present a framework for orienting and organizing a multi-faceted policy development process. After surveying key design recommendations for specific sectors, the presentation will drill deeper into the specific challenge of engaging energy-intensive industries subject to global competition. After briefly discussing some of

228

Department of Energy Support of Energy Intensive Manufacturing Related to Refractory Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) richly supported refractory related research to enable greater energy efficiency processes in energy intensive manufacturing industries such as iron and steel, glass, aluminum and other non-ferrous metal production, petrochemical, and pulp and paper. Much of this support came through research projects funded by the former DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) under programs such as Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM), Industrial Materials of the Future (IMF), and the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). Under such initiatives, work was funded at government national laboratories such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at universities such as West Virginia University (WVU) and the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T) which was formerly the University of Missouri Rolla, and at private companies engaged in these manufacturing areas once labeled industries of the future by DOE due to their strategic and economic importance to American industry. Examples of such projects are summarized below with information on the scope, funding level, duration, and impact. This is only a sampling of representative efforts funded by the DOE in which ORNL was involved over the period extending from 1996 to 2011. Other efforts were also funded during this time at various other national laboratories, universities and private companies under the various programs mentioned above. Discussion of the projects below was chosen because I was an active participant in them and it is meant to give a sampling of the magnitude and scope of investments made by DOE in refractory related research over this time period.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer  

SciTech Connect

Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Markland, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental data of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Vulcan petawatt laser. These measurements were made using a CCD-based magnetic spectrometer. We present details on the distinct effective temperatures that were obtained for a wide variety of targets as a function of laser intensity. It is found that as the intensity increases from 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, a 0.4 dependence on the laser intensity is found. Between 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} and 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, a gradual rolling off of temperature with intensity is observed.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W L; Moon, S; Patel, N; Patel, P K; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: U.S. National Energy Use Intensity |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. National Energy Use U.S. National Energy Use Intensity Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

232

Scaling to Ultra-High Intensities by High-Energy Petawatt Beam Combining  

SciTech Connect

The output pulse energy from a single-aperture high-energy laser amplifier (e.g. fusion lasers such as NIF and LMJ) are critically limited by a number of factors including optical damage, which places an upper bound on the operating fluence; parasitic gain, which limits together with manufacturing costs the maximum aperture size to {approx} 40-cm; and non-linear phase effects which limits the peak intensity. For 20-ns narrow band pulses down to transform-limited sub-picosecond pulses, these limiters combine to yield 10-kJ to 1-kJ maximum pulse energies with up to petawatt peak power. For example, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at NIF is designed to provide kilo-Joule pulses from 0.75-ps to 50-ps, with peak focused intensity above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Using such a high-energy petawatt (HEPW) beamline as a modular unit, they discuss large-scale architectures for coherently combining multiple HEPW pulses from independent apertures, called CAPE (Coherent Addition of Pulses for Energy), to significantly increase the peak achievable focused intensity. Importantly, the maximum intensity achievable with CAPE increases non-linearly. Clearly, the total integrated energy grows linearly with the number of apertures N used. However, as CAPE combines beams in the focal plane by increasing the angular convergence to focus (i.e. the f-number decreases), the foal spot diameter scales inversely with N. Hence the peak intensity scales as N{sup 2}. Using design estimates for the focal spot size and output pulse energy (limited by damage fluence on the final compressor gratings) versus compressed pulse duration in the ARC system, Figure 2 shows the scaled focal spot intensity and total energy for various CAPE configurations from 1,2,4, ..., up to 192 total beams. They see from the fixture that the peak intensity for event modest 8 to 16 beam combinations reaches the 10{sup 21} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} regime. With greater number of apertures, or with improvements to the focusability of the individual beams, the maximum peak intensity can be increased further to {approx} 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. Lastly, an important feature of the CAPE architecture is the ability to coherently combine beams to produce complex spatio-temporal intensity distributions for laser-based accelerators (e.g. all-optical electron injection and acceleration) and high energy density science applications such as fast ignition.

Siders, C W; Jovanovic, I; Crane, J; Rushford, M; Lucianetti, A; Barty, C J

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring of Direct Energy Consumption in Long-Term2007. “Constraining Energy Consumption of China’s LargestProgram: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steel produced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order to develop a common framework for comparing steel industry energy use. This study uses a bottom-up, physical-based method to compare the energy intensity of China and U.S. crude steel production in 2006. This year was chosen in order to maximize the availability of comparable steel-sector data. However, data published in China and the U.S. are not always consistent in terms of analytical scope, conversion factors, and information on adoption of energy-saving technologies. This study is primarily based on published annual data from the China Iron & Steel Association and National Bureau of Statistics in China and the Energy Information Agency in the U.S. This report found that the energy intensity of steel production is lower in the United States than China primarily due to structural differences in the steel industry in these two countries. In order to understand the differences in energy intensity of steel production in both countries, this report identified key determinants of sector energy use in both countries. Five determinants analyzed in this report include: share of electric arc furnaces in total steel production, sector penetration of energy-efficiency technologies, scale of production equipment, fuel shares in the iron and steel industry, and final steel product mix in both countries. The share of lower energy intensity electric arc furnace production in each country was a key determinant of total steel sector energy efficiency. Overall steel sector structure, in terms of average plant vintage and production capacity, is also an important variable though data were not available to quantify this in a scenario. The methodology developed in this report, along with the accompanying quantitative and qualitative analyses, provides a foundation for comparative international assessment of steel sector energy intensity.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Aden, Nathaniel; Chunxia, Zhang; Xiuping, Li; Fangqin, Shangguan

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Reducing Energy Consumption on Process Ovens & Oxidation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the uncertain cost of energy, optimizing the use of air in process dryers, ovens and air pollution control systems is critical to your bottom line. The revived emphasis on air management through the entire process, from plant make-up air heating systems to pollution control system exhaust, provides many opportunities to save energy and cut operating costs. This presentation includes an overview of good air management practices used to optimize energy use in your process and plant. One of the most important benefits of the more stringent air pollution control regulations throughout the world is the focus on better use and conservation of our natural resources. Through the efforts of many of the world's finest engineers and scientists the world is now realizing the benefits of an environmentally friendly approach to manufacturing. These benefits, which include more efficient process operation, less waste generation and reduced emissions, have produced the unforeseen benefit of reduced production costs and higher quality products. Process dryers and ovens are used in the manufacture of a wide variety of products produced by the companies represented at the Industrial Energy Technology Conference. This equipment is installed and operating in facilities that produce printed materials, packaging materials, adhesive tapes, pharmaceutical diagnostic materials, coated papers & films, foil laminations, electronic media, and photographic & x-ray films. They are also used extensively in the food industry. The products manufactured include baked goods, cereals, pet food, tobacco, and many other products. Ovens are used to bake and cure surface coated materials. Such as building siding, window frames, window blinds, automotive parts, wood products, and miscellaneous metal parts. More stringent environmental regulations are also impacting the design and operation of coating and food processes. Today air pollution control devices are used on many of the above applications to control the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and odors. As emission limits have decreased, the use of permanent total enclosures PTE's are becoming a standard part of the process line design. These enclosures are used to obtain 100% capture of the solvents used in the process. In addition, concerns over solvent concentrations in ovens along with concerns over exposure limits to employees have combined to drive process exhaust flows ever higher. Increasing process exhaust flows has been the common approach to addressing process and environmental issues. This increase in exhaust flows has resulted in significant increases in energy use and operating costs.

Worachek, C.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Enforcing elemental mass and energy balances for reduced order models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of economically feasible gasification and carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies requires a variety of software tools to optimize the designs of not only the key devices involved (e., g., gasifier, CO{sub 2} adsorber) but also the entire power generation system. High-fidelity models such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are capable of accurately simulating the detailed flow dynamics, heat transfer, and chemistry inside the key devices. However, the integration of CFD models within steady-state process simulators, and subsequent optimization of the integrated system, still presents significant challenges due to the scale differences in both time and length, as well the high computational cost. A reduced order model (ROM) generated from a high-fidelity model can serve as a bridge between the models of different scales. While high-fidelity models are built upon the principles of mass, momentum, and energy conservations, ROMs are usually developed based on regression-type equations and hence their predictions may violate the mass and energy conservation laws. A high-fidelity model may also have the mass and energy balance problem if it is not tightly converged. Conservations of mass and energy are important when a ROM is integrated to a flowsheet for the process simulation of the entire chemical or power generation system, especially when recycle streams are connected to the modeled device. As a part of the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed a software framework for generating ROMs from CFD simulations and integrating them with Process Modeling Environments (PMEs) for system-wide optimization. This paper presents a method to correct the results of a high-fidelity model or a ROM such that the elemental mass and energy are conserved perfectly. Correction factors for the flow rates of individual species in the product streams are solved using a minimization algorithm based on Lagrangian multiplier method. Enthalpies of product streams are also modified to enforce the energy balance. The approach is illustrated for two ROMs, one based on a CFD model of an entrained-flow gasifier and the other based on the CFD model of a multiphase CO{sub 2} adsorber.

Ma, J.; Agarwal, K.; Sharma, P.; Lang, Y.; Zitney, S.; Gorton, I.; Agawal, D.; Miller, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications  

SciTech Connect

The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

Mikhail A. Dorf, Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev and Ronald C. Davidson

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inaccuracies. However, we do waste energy when a vacant roombuildings, thus indicating energy waste. In order to makein each room. The energy waste information gives feedback to

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The centralized Energy Management Systems(EMS), by Johnsonby a central Energy Management System(EMS) and are operateda centralized Energy Management System(EMS). The Computer

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Department of Energy Commercial Building Benchmarks (New Construction): Energy Use Intensities, May 5, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarks Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68 Secondary School 69 74 74 73 50 68 67 87 72 72 99 81 117 101 128 181 80 Supermarket 161 171 161 175 155 162 171 191 174 186 206 188 224 209 240

242

Measuring the efficacy of an energy and environmental awareness campaign to effectively reduce water consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased energy costs and a move toward environmental stewardship are driving many organizations, including universities, to engage in awareness efforts to reduce both energy consumption… (more)

Miller, Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Study Title Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Study Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-6104E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ganti, Venkata, and Girish Ghatikar Conference Name Grid-Interop 2012 Date Published 12/2012 Conference Location Irving, TX Keywords data centers, market sectors, technologies Abstract The Smart Grid facilitates integration of supply- and demand-side services, allowing the end-use loads to be dynamic and respond to changes in electricity generation or meet localized grid needs. Expanding from previous work, this paper summarizes the results from field tests conducted to identify demand response opportunities in energy-intensive industrial facilities such as data centers. There is a significant opportunity for energy and peak-demand reduction in data centers as hardware and software technologies, sensing, and control methods can be closely integrated with the electric grid by means of demand response. The paper provides field test results by examining distributed and networked data center characteristics, end-use loads and control systems, and recommends opportunities and challenges for grid integration. The focus is on distributed data centers and how loads can be "migrated" geographically in response to changing grid supply (increase/decrease). In addition, it examines the enabling technologies and demand-response strategies of high performance computing data centers. The findings showed that the studied data centers provided average load shed of up to 10% with short response times and no operational impact. For commercial program participation, the load-shed strategies must be tightly integrated with data center automation tools to make them less resource-intensive.

244

CCLEP Reduces Energy Consumption by More than 50% for a Luxury...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCLEP Reduces Energy Consumption by More than 50% for a Luxury Shopping Mall Title CCLEP Reduces Energy Consumption by More than 50% for a Luxury Shopping Mall Publication Type...

245

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics? March 5, 2009 -...

246

Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large cooling systems typically represent substantial capital investments and incur high operating energy costs. Cooling loads tend to peak during times of year and times of day when high ambient temperatures create a maximum demand for power, and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand is reduced, time-of day energy costs can be minimized, and real-time variations in power value can be used to the advantage of the energy consumer.

Andrepont, J. S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A New Energy-Efficient Home in the D.C. Community Solar Decathlon at Home in the D.C. Community Record-Breaking Solar Game-Changing Advancements in Solar Energy Energy Pumpkin...

248

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- useFigure 3.7: The energy consumption of HVAC during ourSpring 2011 tests - Energy consumption for electricity and

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Phoenix 2 Launch Event The Max Tech and Beyond Competition Estes Park Middle School America's Home Energy Education Challenge Poster Contest Clean Energy Ministerial 2012 in...

250

Method for Reducing Background Clutter in a Camera Image - Energy ...  

Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; ... and any other scenario which requires accurate 3D mapping. ...

251

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America National Wind Technology Center - Colorado America's Wind Testing Facilities Beyond Solyndra: How the Energy Department's Loans are Accelerating...

252

Potential for reducing paper mill energy use and carbon dioxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Li Journal Applied Energy Volume 102 Date Published 022013 Keywords co2 emissions, energy audit, paper mill Abstract The pulp and paper industry is one of the most...

253

How Do You Reduce Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Do You Reduce Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? How Do You Reduce Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? How Do You Reduce Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? December 16, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis On Monday, John discussed some ways to reduce the energy used by computers and electronics. Some tips include ensuring your computer is configured for optimal energy savings, turning off devices that aren't in use, and using "smart" power strips. How do you reduce energy use from computers and electronics? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and

254

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon DioxideStructural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Sustainable Communities Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Best Practices Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.iscvt.org/resources/documents/san_francisco_sfpark.pdf SFpark is a new project being implemented with federal Urban Partnership Program funds. It combines innovative technologies and strategies to redistribute the demand for parking in real-time. Goals include making parking easier, reducing congestion (by reducing circling and double parking), improving bus speed and reliability, and transferring lessons learned to other cities.

256

NREL's Renewable Energy Development Expertise Reduces Project Risks (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) success story fact sheet highlights a June 2012 solar power purchase agreement between the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority and three corporations. The fact sheet describes how technical assistance from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory enabled the U.S. Virgin Islands to realistically assess its clean energy resources and identify the most viable and cost-effective solutions to its energy challenges--resulting in a $65 million investment in solar energy in the territory.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

'Top 25' City Aims to Reduce Energy Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Top 25' City Aims to Reduce Energy Use 'Top 25' City Aims to Reduce Energy Use 'Top 25' City Aims to Reduce Energy Use August 16, 2010 - 11:00am Addthis Wind turbines like this will grace Gabe Nesbitt Community Park in McKinney, Texas, thanks to an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant | Photo courtesy of McKinney, Texas Wind turbines like this will grace Gabe Nesbitt Community Park in McKinney, Texas, thanks to an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant | Photo courtesy of McKinney, Texas Kevin Craft What are the key facts? McKinney, Texas, is one of Forbes 25 best places to move. They using a Recovery Act grant to fund energy efficiency projects and create savings. They're installing 97 LED light bulbs in street lights to save an estimated 3.1 million kWh. Thirty miles to the north of Dallas, Texas, the city of McKinney is one of

258

Partially Reduced Feedstocks and Blast Furnace Ironmaking ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Partially Reduced Feedstocks and Blast Furnace Ironmaking Carbon Intensity ... simple Rist-style blast furnace mass and energy balance, assuming furnace ...

259

ENERGY STAR Using On-site Renewable Energy as the Next Step to Improving Energy Performance and Reducing Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP TO IMPROVING ENERGY PERFORMANCE AND REDUCING EMISSIONS jcpenney has a corporate energy management strategy that includes using energy efficient technologies in its stores and encouraging energy conservation. As part of this strategy, the company also investigated generating electricity through on-site renewable energy. jcpenney is a partner in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings Program, and has been tracking building energy use since 2006 using EPA's free benchmarking tool, Portfolio Manager. Portfolio Manager provides a 1-100 energy performance score similar to a "miles-per-gallon" metric for vehicle fuel efficiency. Those buildings that achieve an ENERGY STAR score

260

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Agency/Company /Organization: PEW Center Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.pewclimate.org/DDCF-Briefs/Transportation Cost: Free References: Policies To Reduce Emissions From The Transportation Sector[1] Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Overview Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Outputs include: General Information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Definition: Reduced Co2 Emissions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Co2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Co2 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in CO2 emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Co2_Emissions&oldid=502618

262

Definition: Reduced Meter Reading Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meter Reading Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Meter Reading Cost Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) equipment eliminates the need to send someone to...

263

Proxying: Reducing PC Energy Use With Network Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vendors, component manufacturers, and PC companies. Proxying applies directly to other devices and will be an important strategy to reduce electricity consumption in the...

264

Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost - Energy Innovation ...  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a method that reduces the expense of capturing carbon dioxide generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. This technology ...

265

Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use Intensity and its Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building Preprint Rob Guglielmetti, Jennifer Scheib, Shanti D. Pless, and Paul Torcellini National Renewable Energy Laboratory Rachel Petro RNL Design Presented at the ASHRAE Winter Conference Las Vegas, Nevada January 29 - February 2, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-49103 March 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

266

Large hospitals tend to be energy-intensive - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... natural gas was the most common main space heating fuel, ...

267

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics? March 5, 2009 - 10:08am Addthis This week, John told us about purchasing an energy-efficient computer. Buying an efficient computer is a great start to reducing the energy used by your office equipment, but computers aren't they only office electronics that use energy. Between monitors, printers, scanners, routers, external hard drives, speakers, and the many other products you can purchase to support your computing, the energy used by these products can really add up. How do you reduce the energy used by your computers and office electronics? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

268

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics? March 5, 2009 - 10:08am Addthis This week, John told us about purchasing an energy-efficient computer. Buying an efficient computer is a great start to reducing the energy used by your office equipment, but computers aren't they only office electronics that use energy. Between monitors, printers, scanners, routers, external hard drives, speakers, and the many other products you can purchase to support your computing, the energy used by these products can really add up. How do you reduce the energy used by your computers and office electronics? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

269

ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-ELECTRON IONIZATION OF HELIUM IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that a neutral atom interacting with a strong laser field will ionize at sufficiently high intensity even for photon energies well below the ionization threshold. When the required number of photons becomes very large, this process is best described by the suppression of the Coulomb barrier by the laser's oscillating electric field, allowing the electron to tunnel into the continuum. As the laser intensity is increased, more tightly bound electrons may be successively liberated by this mechanism. Such a sequential multiple ionization, long accepted as a reasonable approach to the formidable problem of a multielectron atom interacting nonperturbatively with an intense electromagnetic field, provides fair estimates of the various charge state appearance intensities while the tunneling rates are in excellent agreement with single ionization yields. However, more accurate measurements revealed systematic and very large deviations from the tunneling rates: near appearance intensity under standard experimental conditions, the observed double ion yield is several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the sequential rate. It soon became clear that electrons could not be considered as independent and that electron-electron correlation had to be taken into account. Dynamic correlations have been considered in several theories. First qualitatively in the shakeoff model; then empirically through the e-2e cross-section in the quantum/classical three-step model (tunnel ionization, acceleration by the oscillating electric field and e-2e recollision with the ion); recently through the so-called intense field many-body-S-matrix theory and a purely empirical model of collective tunnel ionization. The validity of these ideas has been examined using numerical models. The measurement of total ion yields over a dynamic range exceeding ten orders of magnitude, a major breakthrough made possible by the availability of high-repetition rate lasers at the beginning of the 90's, was for a long time the only quantitative data to confront theory.

LAFON,R.; CHALOUPKA,J.L.; SHEEHY,B.; DIMAURO,L.F.; PAUL,P.M.; AGOSTINI,P.; KULANDER,K.C.

2000-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Costs with an Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School ener- gy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002-and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and 2006. Improving a school's energy efficiency doesn't have to cost millions. In fact, schools can cut their energy expenses by 5 to 20 percent simply by efficiently managing and operating physical plants. This holds true regardless of the age of a school building. A smart O&M program can improve an existing school's energy performance An O&M program can be a simple initiative or a

271

Definition: Reduced T&D Operations Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced T&D Operations Cost Automated or remote controlled operation of capacitor banks and feeder and line switches eliminates the...

272

Reducing 'Search Cost' and Risk in Energy-efficiency Investments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This paper asserts that these programs have been successful because they reduce the two market barriers of high "search cost" and high perceived risks. Attachment Size PDF 770.7...

273

Definition: Reduced Wide-Scale Blackouts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

will reduce the probability of wide-scale regional blackouts.1 Related Terms bes emergency, smart grid References SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An i LikeLike...

274

Sparkling Diamonds – Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under construction. The focus on a construction site tends to be on keeping the project on schedule, and not on energy matters although the two can, and need to, complement each other. There were two motivating factors in completing an energy review during the construction phase: cost and environmental responsibilities. De Beers Canada is working to identify a long term strategy to manage their business in a sustainable manner while mitigating the energy costs of their on-site power usage. The paper will highlight the: • Approach De Beers took; • Challenges of conducting an energy assessment at a construction site; • Energy issues exposed by a sub-arctic climate • Results achieved; • Next steps to achieve a sustainable energy management program. The paper will also discuss how De Beers Canada is incorporating the learning and the systems development benefits from the energy review. The organization is building these aspects into their overall Carbon Emissions and Energy Management System that will be implemented at their three new sites across Canada.

Feldman, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Science Bowl 2013 National Science Bowl 2013 President Obama Visits the Energy Department Four Years of Leadership with Secretary Chu The Technology Showcase: AC Kinetics...

276

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Fleets Announcement 1 of 14 Clean Fleets Announcement Untitled Secretary Chu Visits Dublin, Ireland 110410-110510 Keep Your Home Office Efficient with ENERGY STAR. Home...

277

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

process work? Similar to composting, one method of converting waste to energy is called anaerobic digestion. This is a natural process where microorganisms are used to break down...

278

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10 19%. With the assumption of an annual increase...

279

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within… (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Clean Energy Standard could reduce power sector carbon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... but is removed from the sales baseline when calculating a utility's required clean energy share. Small utilities are exempt from the CES requirement. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A wlan scheduling algorithm to reduce the energy consumption of a distributed speech recognition system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In distributed speech recognition, speech features are computed on a mobile device, compressed, and sent to a server that performs the computationally intensive search for the most likely word sequence. Much of the current research in distributed speech recognition has been in the area of feature compression and communication robustness over wireless links, including error correction and concealment techniques. However, another challenge in designing a distributed speech recognition system is minimizing the energy consumption on the mobile device. We consider quality-of-service tradeoffs including compression ratio and overall system latency. Our measurements verify that for high speed wireless interfaces such as 802.11b, small changes in compression rates have little effect on system level energy consumption. However, for wireless networks with lower power/bit-rate ratios such as Bluetooth, the choice of bit-rate and compression ratio becomes more important. We present a wireless LAN scheduling algorithm to minimize the energy consumption of a distributed speech recognition front-end on a mobile device. By powering down the 802.11b interface when not in use, we are able to reduce the energy consumption by up to a factor of 5 in heavy traffic conditions. Increasing the total amount of time spent in the off state to almost one second will allow the system to save power regardless of traffic conditions. We compare the results of this power saving algorithm to the low-power mechanisms of Bluetooth. The lower overhead of Bluetooth allows for greater energy savings with a much lower delay of approximately 300ms. 1.

Brian Delaney; Nikil Jayant

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies & Practices This report examines strategies of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity. CDStratCompleteReport116092.pd...

283

Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

examines strategies of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity. CDStratCompleteReport116092.pdf More Documents & Publications...

284

How Do You Reduce Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? How Do You Reduce Energy Use from Computers and Electronics? December 16, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis On Monday, John discussed some ways to reduce the energy used by computers and electronics. Some tips include ensuring your computer is configured for optimal energy savings, turning off devices that aren't in use, and using "smart" power strips. How do you reduce energy use from computers and electronics? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce the Energy Used by Computers and Office Electronics?

285

The potential for reducing energy utilization in the refining industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper first discusses energy use in petroleum refineries and CO{sub 2} emissions because of the fuels used. Then the paper looks at near-, mid-, and long-term opportunities for energy reduction. Some of the options are catalysts, cooling water recycling, steam system efficiency, and the use of coke and petroleum residues.

Petrick, M.; Pellegrino, J.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

Torvanger, A. (Senter for Anvendt Forskning, Oslo (Norway) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Reduces Time Spent With Acute Dermatitis for Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 to 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n = 405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n = 399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results: The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, Grade 0; 34%, Grade 1; 61%, Grade 2; and 2%, Grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, Grade 0/1, and 52%, Grade 2/3, for IMRT; and 25%, Grade 0/1, and 75%, Grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p < 0.0001). The IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with Grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with Grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the time spent with Grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p = 0.0015), medium (p < 0.0001), and large (p < 0.0001) breasts. Conclusions: Breast IMRT is associated with a significant decrease both in the time spent during treatment with Grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with that associated with conventional radiation, regardless of breast size.

Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: Gary.Freedman@FCCC.edu; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nicolaou, Nicos; Chen Yan; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Using On-Chip Configurable Logic to Reduce Embedded System Software Energy Greg Stitt1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using On-Chip Configurable Logic to Reduce Embedded System Software Energy Greg Stitt1 , Brian We examine the energy savings possible by re-mapping critical software loops from a microprocessor that reduced software energy is an additional benefit, making such chips even more useful. We find critical

Vahid, Frank

289

Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle July 30, 2010 - 10:59am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Three years ago at Sacred Heart grade school in Norfolk, Neb., efforts to recycle were grim. "When I got here, we had no paper recycling program," says Troy Berryman, who is entering his sixth year as principal at Sacred Heart. "A couple years prior, we had a guy park a semi-truck in the parking lot for people to recycle paper." But Berryman says this system did not work out well, as the truck was often locked and papers would be left to blow around in the wind or get wet with rain. Knowing that something must be done, he began to look into the local

290

Definition: Reduced Sags And Swells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sags And Swells Sags And Swells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Sags And Swells Locating high impedance faults more quickly and precisely and adding electricity storage will reduce the frequency and severity of the voltage fluctuations that they can cause. Installing advanced reclosers that only allow a limited amount of current to flow through them upon reclosing can also reduce voltage fluctuations. Moreover, fewer customers on the same or adjacent distribution feeders would experience the voltage fluctuation caused by the fault. The benefit to consumers is based on the value of service.[1] Related Terms electricity storage technologies, electricity generation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

291

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation November 19, 2013 - 3:49pm Addthis A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine cuts a thin steel plate that will be formed into lighting fixture housing. Wisconsin-based Eaton Corporation is developing a new manufacturing process that streamlines LED fixture designs. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine cuts a thin steel plate that will be formed into lighting fixture housing. Wisconsin-based Eaton Corporation is developing a new manufacturing process that streamlines LED fixture designs. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation A goniometer measures the photometric output distribution of an outdoor LED street light fixture. Researchers at Eaton are developing a new manufacturing process will enable LED chips to sit directly on heat sinks, improving heat transfer. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation

292

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions November 15, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration. An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration.

293

Energy conservation: The main factor for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect

The energy intensity of the former Soviet Union is more than twice that of other market economics in similar stages of economic development. Low energy efficiency in the Soviet Union has contributed significantly to global carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions. The technological potential for energy conservation in the former Soviet Union is the largest in the world. The inefficiencies of the previously command-system economy, however, have provided little incentive for conserving energy. The present transition to a market-based economy should encourage the incorporation of energy-efficiency improvements in order for the former Soviet Union to successfully lower its energy intensity. There are several obstacles that limit implementing energy conservation: for example, energy prices and discount rates influence the volume of investment in energy efficiency. Nevertheless, cost-effective measures for energy conservative do exist even in the most energy-intensive sectors of the Soviet economy and should form the core of any energy conservation program. The overall cost-effective potential for carbon savings in the former Soviet Union is estimated to be 280 to 367 million tons of carbon per year by the year 2005, or 23 to 29 percent of 1988 energy-related emissions.

Bashmakov, I.A.; Chupyatov, V.P.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Management Trade Show Supercomputers' Pictorial Superpowers EcoCAR Challenge Finish Line Event 1 of 8 Students Earn Street Cred With the EcoCAR Challenge Florida...

295

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 4.4: Power consumption of a desktop PC + 3 LCDChapter 2 Trends in Building Consumption 2.1 UCSD as abreakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- use

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

WIND ENERGY POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM REDUCING GEARBOX STRESS ...  

A wind energy power conversion system includes a gearbox, a generator, an AC to DC power converter, a DC link, and a DC to AC power converter, and at least one ...

297

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) filters 5 1.1VOC holding capacity of ACF . 14 1.3.2 Evaluation of VOC28 1.3.5 Energy consumption costs for using ACF filter bed

Sidheswaran, Meera

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

Reducing Network Energy Consumption via Sleeping and Rate-Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to save power when routers are idle. The performance states we assume dynamically change the rate of links where ps states reduce power consumption by lowering the rate at which work consumption. We also assume a penalty for transitioning between power states. For simplicity, we measure

Ratnasamy, Sylvia

300

Energy loss estimates at several beam intensities in the Fermilab Booster  

SciTech Connect

The difference between the effective rf voltage and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field can be used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Although the effective rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured and used to calculate the accelerating voltage, the calibration of the signals during the fast change of the Booster rf frequency is difficult and appears to introduce some offset to the beam energy loss estimation. An observed linear relationship between energy loss and beam intensity is used to evaluate the offset, which is then applied to the experimental data. This approach, rather than recalibrating the signals, is simple and suitable for minimizing the error in the data.

Xi Yang and James MacLachlan

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Large hospitals tend to be energy-intensive - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... used energy for generating electricity, primarily for emergency back-up generation. Fuel oil was by far the most common fuel used for this ...

302

Best Practices: Energy Savings Efficient energy use reduces Colorado State's total energy demand, decreases harmful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

square foot on campus has flattened out. Students making a difference In 2004, Colorado State became one, decreases harmful emissions, and minimizes the cost of providing energy to the campus. As a result of energy conservation initiatives that have been implemented over the past 20 years, growth in the average demand per

303

FEMP Energy Savings Expert Teams (ESET) to Help Federal Facilities Immediately Reduce Demand and Consumption  

SciTech Connect

FEMP offers energy savings expert teams (ESET) assessments for federal facilities as part of a broad strategy to reduce natural gas consumption.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

further recover or reduce wasted energy. Exhaust air (gases)Energy use for the system can be reduced by analyzing how much heat is wasted

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NREL: Buildings Research - U.S. Coast Guard Sees Reduced Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Coast Guard Sees Reduced Energy Costs and Usage After NREL's Energy Assessment Training A man with a notebook references the machinery and equipment he is standing next to...

306

NREL: Technology Deployment - U.S. Coast Guard Sees Reduced Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Coast Guard Sees Reduced Energy Costs and Usage After NREL's Energy Assessment Training A man with a notebook references the machinery and equipment he is standing next to...

307

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

School Project Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project EnergySmart Schools fact sheet on how school operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel can play a...

308

Strategic Industrial Energy Efficiency: Reduce Expenses, Build Revenues, and Control Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some manufacturing companies successfully boost their financial performance through optimized energy use. This leads not only to reduced energy consumption and associated environmental benefits, but also to capacity improvements that generate additional

Russell, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Plant View On Reducing Steam Trap Energy Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy will continue to be an ever increasingly important factor in the cost of doing business in the decade of the 80' s. In many petrochemical industries, energy is the second most costly item in producing a product. About 36% of our nation's total energy consumption is used by industry in producing the goods which are consumed around the world. Steam is the most commonly used energy source for the petrochemical industry. Most of this steam is used for heating and evaporating the many petrochemical liquids. This steam is then condensed and is removed from the system at the same rate as it is being formed or the loss of heat transfer will result. From a cost standpoint only condensate should be allowed through the trap. But at many plants half of the steam traps are passing excess steam. This is caused by neglect of aged steam traps which have worn out and misapplication of steam traps by oversizing or using the 'wrong' type trap. Elimination of steam wastes by an effective well engineered steam trap program is what is covered by this article.

Vallery, S. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial cooling remains one of the largest potential areas for electrical energy savings in industrial plants today. This is in spite of a relatively small amount of attention paid to it by energy auditors and rebate program designers. US DOE tool suites, for example, have long focused on combustion related systems and motor systems with a focus on pumps and compressors. A chilled water tool designed by UMass was available for some time but is no longer being supported by its designers or included in the government tool website. Even with the focus on motor systems, auditing programs like the DOE's Industrial Assessment Center program show dramatically less energy savings for electrical based systems than fossil fueled ones. This paper demonstrates the large amount of increased saving from a critical review of plant chilled water systems with both hardware and operational improvements. After showing several reasons why cooling systems are often ignored during plant energy surveys (their complexity, lack of data on operations etc.), three specific upgrades are considered which have become more reliable and cost effective in the recent past. These include chiller changeouts, right sizing of systems with load matching, and floating head pressures as a retrofit. Considerations of free cooling and improved cooling tower operations are shown as additional "big hitters”. It is made clear that with appropriate measurements and an understanding of the cooling system, significant savings can be obtained with reasonable paybacks and low risk.

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Enhancing the energy of terahertz radiation from plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz (THz) radiation from atomic clusters illuminated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is investigated. By studying the angular distribution, polarization properties and energy dependence of THz waves, we aim to obtain a proper understanding of the mechanism of THz generation. The properties of THz waves measured in this study differ from those predicted by previously proposed mechanisms. To interpret these properties qualitatively, we propose that the radiation is generated by time-varying quadrupoles, which are produced by the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse.

Jahangiri, Fazel [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashida, Masaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

DOE Announces Contracts to Achieve $140 Million in Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

strategy to reduce energy waste and greenhouse gases, the TEAM initiative seeks to reduce energy intensity across DOE's nationwide complex by at least 30 percent and to reduce...

313

Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs 7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems November 15, 2011 - 4:52pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative, Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $7 million to reduce the non-hardware costs of residential and commercial solar energy installations. Made available through the SunShot Incubator Program, this funding will support the development of tools and approaches that reduce non-hardware, or "soft" costs, such as installation, permitting, interconnection, and inspection. These expenses can amount to up to half of the cost of residential systems. The Incubator will make the process of

314

Distributional implications of reducing interstate energy price differences  

SciTech Connect

A model of state residential energy consumption for electricity, natural gas, and petroleum examines scenarios which reflect the response to a reduction in regional price differences attributable to deregulation. The results indicate that natural gas deregulation will benefit eastern and northwestern consumers at the expense of middle and western consumers. The deregulation of bulk electric power also benefits the east coast, but rising electricity prices would outweigh any benefits for the northwest. In contrast, electricity producers in the west have the most to gain from deregulation of bulk power transmissions because of the opportunities of a national market. A deregulated environment will likely have less dramatic distributional consequences from future energy price shocks, while increased fuel competition will probably limit price movements in any one fuel. 3 figures, 5 tables.

Schmidt, R.H.; Gunther, J.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Laying the Foundation for a More Energy Efficient Future: Reducing Climate Change through Green Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Residential electricity use per capita has been increasing since the 1980's, and US energy consumption of energy required by the world's population by increasing efficiency and reducing energy demand (Tester et al, 2005). Figure 1 Sector Share of Total Energy Consumption, 2004 Residential 21% Commercial

Mauzerall, Denise

316

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA’s Teaming Up to Save Energy (U.S. EPA, 2005), which isStates Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Energy Efficiencyinstalled: $25,000 US Reduced energy use by 10%, equal to

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Proposed Design for a Coupled Ground-Source Heat Pump/Energy Recovery Ventilator System to Reduce Building Energy Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis focuses on reducing the energy demand of a residential building by using a coupled ground-source heat pump/energy recovery ventilation… (more)

McDaniel, Matthew Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use Addthis 1 of 7 Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman explores the new home energy monitor at the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies (CCET) Discovery Center's Model Home. He is joined by Kenny Mercado, CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric's Division Senior Vice President, Regulated Operations Technology; Dr. Milton Holloway, President of CCET; and Craig Lobel, the founder and president of EcoEdge Consulting. Image: Department of Energy Image | Photo by Jen Stutsman 2 of 7 Home energy monitors help families identify where they are using the most energy at any one time whether it's from running the dishwasher in the kitchen, keeping the lights on in the family room, or running the washer

319

Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

Parkin, Don M. (Los Alamos, NM); Dudey, Norman D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations June 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the availability of more than $27 million in new funding that will reduce the non-hardware costs of solar energy projects, a critical element in bringing down the overall costs of installed solar energy systems. The funding will support a $12.5 million challenge to encourage cities and counties to compete to streamline and digitize permitting processes, as

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321

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, 27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations June 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the availability of more than $27 million in new funding that will reduce the non-hardware costs of solar energy projects, a critical element in bringing down the overall costs of installed solar energy systems. The funding will support a $12.5 million challenge to encourage cities and counties to compete to streamline and digitize permitting processes, as

322

Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

323

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Comparison Study of Energy Intensity in the Textile Industry: A Case Study in Five Textile Sub-sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contributes to the understanding of energy use in the textile industry by comparing the energy intensity of textile plants in five major sub-sectors, i.e. spinning, weaving, wet-processing, worsted fabric manufacturing, and carpet manufacturing in Iran. Results of the study showed that spinning plant electricity intensity varies between 3.6 MWh/tonne yarn and 6.6 MWh/tonne yarn, while fuel intensity ranges between 6.7 MBtu/tonne yarn and 11.7 MBtu/tonne yarn. In weaving plants, electricity intensity ranges from 1.2 MWh/tonne fabric to 2.2 MWh/tonne fabric, while fuel intensity was 10.1 MBtu/tonne fabric and 16.4 MBtu/tonne fabric for the two plants studied. In three wet-processing plants, the electricity intensity was found to be between 1.5 MWh/tonne finished fabric and 2.5 MWh/tonne finished fabric, while the fuel intensity was between 38.2 MBtu/tonne finished fabric and 106.3 MBtu/tonne finished fabric. In addition, some methodological issues to improve such energy intensity comparison analysis and benchmarking in the textile industry is discussed.

Hasanbeigi, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers December 21, 2011 - 12:49pm Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to reduce America's dependence on oil through advanced vehicle technologies, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced awards totaling nearly $7 million in research and development funding that will help to reduce the current costs of electric vehicle chargers by 50 percent over the next three years. With support from the Energy Department, manufacturers in California, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania will work to improve the development and design of charging equipment. This research will promote "smart"

327

Industrial Application of High Combustion Intensity Systems and Energy Conservation Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade industrial combustion technology has been advanced through adaptations of the equipment operating with dramatically reduced excess air requirements and use of air preheat techniques. The importance of operating industrial combustion equipment at stoichiometric conditions is emphasized. The calculated fuel savings resulting from elimination of excess air and use of heat recovery air preheat are reviewed. Design parameters for the aerodynamic design and control of the combustion process are quantified for vortex stabilized systems. Design analyses of the fuel injectors used with gaseous, liquid and pulverized coal fuels are also presented. The resulting high intensity combustion systems evolved are illustrated with photographs of flames in actual installations and during equipment development testing. Attention to detail in equipment manufacture and proper field adjustment of combustion equipment is essential in achieving the dramatic fuel savings that are possible.

Williams, F. D. M.; Anderson, L. E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation’s finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation’s balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2006, China has set goals of reducing energy intensity, emissions, and pollutants in multiple guidelines and in the Five Year Plans. Various strategies and measures have then been taken to improve the energy efficiency in all sectors and to reduce pollutants. Since controlling energy, CO{sub 2} emissions, and pollutants falls under the jurisdiction of different government agencies in China, many strategies are being implemented to fulfill only one of these objectives. Co-controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutant emissions. The targets could be met in a more cost effective manner if the integrated measures can be identified and prioritized. This report provides analysis and insights regarding how these targets could be met via co-control measures focusing on both CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emissions in the cement, iron &steel, and power sectors to 2030 in China. An integrated national energy and emission model was developed in order to establish a baseline scenario that was used to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and expected actions. In addition, CO{sub 2} mitigation scenarios and SO{sub 2} control scenarios were also established to evaluate the impact of each of the measures and the combined effects. In the power sector, although the end of pipe SO{sub 2} control technology such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has the largest reduction potential for SO{sub 2} emissions, other CO{sub 2} control options have important co-benefits in reducing SO{sub 2} emissions of 52.6 Mt of SO{sub 2} accumulatively. Coal efficiency improvements along with hydropower, renewable and nuclear capacity expansion will result in more than half of the SO{sub 2} emission reductions as the SO{sub 2} control technology through 2016. In comparison, the reduction from carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is much less and has negative SO{sub 2} reductions potential. The expanded biomass generation scenario does not have significant potential for reducing SO{sub 2} emissions, because of its limited availability. For the cement sector, the optimal co-control strategy includes accelerated adoption of energy efficiency measures, decreased use of clinker in cement production, increased use of alternative fuels, and fuel-switching to biomass. If desired, additional SO{sub 2} mitigation could be realized by more fully adopting SO{sub 2} abatement mitigation technology measures. The optimal co-control scenario results in annual SO{sub 2} emissions reductions in 2030 of 0.16 Mt SO{sub 2} and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reductions of 76 Mt CO{sub 2}. For the iron and steel sector, the optimal co-control strategy includes accelerated adoption of energy efficiency measures, increased share of electric arc furnace steel production, and reduced use of coal and increased use of natural gas in steel production. The strategy also assumes full implementation of sinter waste gas recycling and wet desulfurization. This strategy results in annual SO{sub 2} emissions reductions in 2030 of 1.3 Mt SO{sub 2} and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reductions of 173 Mt CO{sub 2}.

Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Department of Energy's Request for Information on Reducing Regulatory Burden  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy's Department of Energy's Request for Information on Reducing Regulatory Burden Submitted on June 18, 2012 On behalf of the Natural Resources Defense Council and our more than 1.3 million members and online activists, we submit the following comments in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Reducing Regulatory Burden. (77 Federal Register 28518, May 15, 2012) NRDC has spent decades working to build and improve the Department of Energy's ("DOE") federal appliance standards programs because of the important energy, environmental, and consumer benefits of appliance

331

CRIMM Energy-saving Magnetic Separation Equipment and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Water and Energy in Mineral Processing. Presentation ... Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining Operations · Processing of ...

332

How Do You Reduce the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? How Do You Reduce the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? December 30, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis On Monday, John told you about some changes to television labeling that will help you compare the energy use of different models when you're shopping. Many households have more than one television, and many of those televisions are always on! Unless you're paying attention, that could add up to a lot of energy use-and a higher electricity bill. How do you reduce the amount of energy used by your televisions? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

333

How Do You Reduce the Time You Spend Idling? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce the Time You Spend Idling? Reduce the Time You Spend Idling? How Do You Reduce the Time You Spend Idling? November 4, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Tuesday, Shannon discussed some efforts by Clean Cities, parents, and students to reduce the time that parents spend idling in school parking lots. Some schools have even become idle-free zones. The Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center offers a few tips for reducing idling, including turning off your engine if you are parked for more than a minute, switching to a hybrid electric vehicle, and avoiding drive-thrus and walking inside instead. How do you reduce the time you spend idling? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

334

Attaining and using extremely high intensities of solar energy with non-imaging concentrators  

SciTech Connect

Using the principles and techniques of non-imaging optics, solar concentrations that approach the theoretical maximum can be achieved. In this paper, the authors review recent progress in attaining, measuring, and using such ultrahigh solar fluxes. In particular, they review the design principles for optimized two-stage concentrators and solar furnaces and discuss the characteristics and properties of a variety of non-imaging secondaries which have been employed. These include Compound Parabolic Concentrators (CPC) type secondaries, Dielectric Totally Internally Reflecting Concentrators (DTIRC), and flow-line or {open_quotes}trumpet{close_quotes} concentrators. The usual design is a configuration where {phi}, the rim angle of the primary, is small, that is, corresponding to a system with a relatively large focal length to diameter (F/D) ratio. All three types of secondary are characterized by a design acceptance angle {phi}{sub a} which must be greater than or equal to {phi}. The design parameters and trade-offs for each of these systems including strategies for choice of particular secondary and degree of truncation, are presented. The authors review the calorimetric techniques used to measure these high intensities and describe a newly developed technique for {open_quotes}extracting{close_quotes} light from inside a high index medium. Finally they review a number of potential applications for highly concentrated solar energy and the current status of the associated technology. By making possible new and unique applications for intense solar flux, these techniques have opened a whole new frontier for research and development of potential economic uses of solar energy. 63 refs., 34 figs., 3 tabs.

Jenkins, D.; O`Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Prospects to Reduce the Use of Energy by 50% in Existing Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive feasibility study indicates that it is possible to reduce the energy used in Swedish office buildings by 50% within an acceptable economic framework. A recent project managed by an advisory group to The Swedish Energy Agency comprises comprehensive audits, calculations and implementation with the focus to reduce the use of energy in five different office buildings. The average annual use of energy (heat + electricity) before measures is of the order of 200 kWh/m2 and the expected resulting use of energy after measures is on average of the order of 100 kWh/m2 total building area. The required investments to reduce the use of energy by 50% is estimated to be of the order of 100 €/m2 total building area. The paper presents a description of the overall project approach, the studied buildings and the most typical measures, associated investment costs and internal rate of return on the investments.

Dalenback, J.; Abel, E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Action Management, or TEAM Initiative. In addition to reducing our energy intensity across all DOE sites by 30%, through our TEAM Initiative we intend to have all...

337

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP™) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver, Colorado. The refrigeration unit is designed to provide refrigeration for two process units at the refinery while utilizing waste heat as the energy source. The added refrigeration capacity benefits the refinery by recovering salable products, debottlenecking process units, avoiding additional electrical demand, and reducing the refinery Energy Intensity Index. In addition, the WHAARP unit lowers air pollutant emissions by reducing excess fuel gas that is combusted in the refinery flare. A comprehensive utility and process efficiency Master Plan developed for the Denver refinery by Planetec provided the necessary platform for implementing this distinctive project. The $2.3 million WHAARP system was paid for in part by a $760,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of their "Industry of the Future Program". Total combined benefits are projected to be approximately $1 million/year with a 1.6 year simple payback including the grant funding.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the US pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect

The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the US (US EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the US This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the U.S. (U.S. EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the U.S. This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, George M. (Merrick, NY); Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ)

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile for high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

Chao, Bei Tse (Urbana, IL); Rabl, Ari (Downers Grove, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers December 21, 2011 - 12:49pm Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to reduce America's dependence on oil through advanced vehicle technologies, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced awards totaling nearly $7 million in research and development funding that will help to reduce the current costs of electric vehicle chargers by 50 percent over the next three years. With support from the Energy Department, manufacturers in California, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania will work to improve the development and design of charging equipment. This research will promote "smart"

344

Fossil Energy RD&D: Reducing the Cost of CCUS for Coal Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy RD&D: Reducing the Cost of CCUS for Coal Power Plants Revision 1, January 31, 2012 DOENETL-20121550 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

345

A knee brace design to reduce the energy consumption of walking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent research into the mechanics of walking indicates that a quasi passive wearable device could be created which dramatically reduces the metabolic energy used in walking especially when the wearer is carrying additional ...

Carvey, Matthew R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Reducing energy usage in a manufacturing facility through a behavior change based approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many companies have developed energy reduction programs for their manufacturing facilities to reduce their operational costs while also decreasing their greenhouse gas emissions. The majority of these manufacturing facilities ...

Norelli, Michael A., IV (Michael Anthony)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use August 9, 2011 - 11:09am Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman sees firsthand how new in-home monitors help consumers save money. Click here to see more photos and learn how new smart grid technology can help you save. | Energy Department Image | Photo by Jen Stutsman Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman sees firsthand how new in-home monitors help consumers save money. Click here to see more photos and learn how new smart grid technology can help you save. | Energy Department Image | Photo by Jen Stutsman Jen Stutsman

349

Michigan Company Eaton Awarded $2 Million by Energy Department to Reduce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Company Eaton Awarded $2 Million by Energy Department to Michigan Company Eaton Awarded $2 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost of Advanced Fuel Cells Michigan Company Eaton Awarded $2 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost of Advanced Fuel Cells March 29, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above approach to American energy, the Energy Department today announced the investment of $2 million to Eaton Corporation in Southfield, Michigan, to lower the cost of advanced fuel cell systems by developing cost-effective, durable, and highly efficient fuel cell components. The 3-year project will focus on boosting the performance of fuel cell systems for vehicles and stationary applications while reducing costs. These investments are a part of the Department's commitment to U.S. leadership in innovative fuel cell

350

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Sky-maps of the sidereal anisotropy of galactic cosmic ray intensity and its energy dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the sidereal daily variations observed between 1985 and 2006 at Matsushiro, Japan (MAT) and between 1993 and 2005 at Liapootah, Tasmania (LPT). These stations comprise the two hemisphere network (THN) of underground muon detectors in Japan and Australia. Yearly mean harmonic vectors at MAT and LPT are more or less stable without any significant change in phase and amplitude in correlation with either the solar activity- or magnetic-cycles. In this paper, therefore, we analyze the average anisotropy over the entire observation periods, i.e. 1985-2006 for MAT and 1993-2005 for LPT. We apply to the THN data a best-fitting analysis based on a model anisotropy in space identical to that adopted by Amenomori et al. (2007) for Tibet III data. The median energies of primary cosmic rays recorded are ~0.5 TeV for THN and ~5 TeV for the Tibet III experiment. It is shown that the intensity distribution of the best-fit anisotropy is quite similar to that derived from Tibet III data, regardless of the order of magnitude difference in energies of primary particles. This, together with the THN observations, confirms that the analysis by Amenomori et al. (2007) based on the Tibet III experiment in the northern hemisphere is not seriously biased. The best-fit amplitudes of the anisotropy, on the other hand, are only one third or less of those reported by the Tibet III experiment, indicating attenuation due to solar modulation. The rigidity dependence of the anisotropy amplitude in the sub-TeV region is consistent with the spectrum reported by Hall et al. (1999), smoothly extending to the Tibet III result in the multi-TeV region. The amplitude at higher energies appears almost constant or gradually decreasing with increasing rigidity.

K. Munakata; N. Matsumoto; S. Yasue; C. Kato; S. Mori; M. Takita; M. L. Duldig; J. E. Humble; J. Kota

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energy - environmental methods to reduce CO2emissions in Romanian iron and steel industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some energy-environmental methods for reducing the CO2 emissions in Romanian iron and steel processes, both technological, as well as combustion processes, in case of integrated, technological and energetic approach, using ... Keywords: CO2 emissions, emissions reduction, energy-environmental methods, integrated system, mathematical model

Ion Melinte; Mihaela Balanescu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/21/2011 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is essential for achieving a sustainable clean energy future and will be an enormous challenge. Buildings account for 40% of the nation's carbon emissions and the consumption of 40% of our

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

354

Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger

D. Magnetto; G. Vidiella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Enables Energy Efficiency Strategies, Ongoing Commissioning and Improved Operational Control Harry Sim CEO Cypress Envirosystems harry.sim@cypressenvirosystems.com www.cypressenvirosystems.com NASA Ames Reduced Project Cost by Over 80% with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies * Legacy Pneumatic Thermostats  Waste energy  High maintenance costs  Uncomfortable occupants  No visibility * Project Scope  14 buildings  1,370 pneumatic thermostats  Integration with campus BAS  Diagnostics for ongoing commissioning * Traditional DDC Retrofit  Cost over $4.1 million  Asbestos exposure/abatement  Occupants significantly disrupted

356

Extending current energy policies would reduce U.S. energy use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Extended Policies case, released today as part of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), shows that extending certain federal energy ...

357

Narrow Energy Spread Protons and Ions from High-Intensity, High-Contrast Laser Solid Target Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent simulations show that an idealized, high intensity, short pulse laser can generate quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies over 100 MeV in an interaction with a thin film. However, most short pulse laser facilities with sufficient intensity have difficulty controlling the nanosecond and picosecond contrast necessary to realize such a regime. Experiments were performed to investigate proton and ion acceleration from a high contrast, short pulse laser by employing dual plasma mirrors along with a deformable mirror at the HERCULES laser facility at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Sciences, University of Michigan. Plasma mirrors were characterized, allowing a 50% throughput with an intensity contrast increase of 105. The focal spot quality was also exceptional, showing a 1.1 micron full width at half maximum (FWHM) focal diameter. Experiments were done using temporally cleaned 30 TW, 32 fs pulses to achieve an intensity of up to 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2} on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mylar targets with thicknesses ranging 50 nm to 13 microns. Proton beams with energy spreads below 2 MeV were observed from all thicknesses, peaking with energies up to 10.3 MeV and an energy spread of 0.8 MeV. Similar narrow energy spreads were observed for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at the silicon nitride thickness of 50 nm with energies up to 24 MeV with an energy spread of 3 MeV, whereas the energy spread is greatly increased at a larger thickness. Maximum energies were confirmed with CR39 track detectors, while a Thomson ion spectrometer was used to gauge the monoenergetic nature of the beam.

Dollar, Franklin; Matsuoka, Takeshi; McGuffey, Christopher; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Thomas, Alec G. R.; Willingale, Louise; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, Univ. Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Davis, Jack; Petrov, George [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Beyond Energy Savings: Case Studies on Enhancing Productivity and Reducing Costs Through Energy Efficiency Investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Promoting energy efficiency to corporate CEOs and CFOs based on energy savings alone has had limited success. Experience shows that energy efficiency projects' non-energy benefits often exceed the value of energy savings, so energy savings should be viewed more correctly as part of the total benefits, rather than the focus of the results. Quantifying the total benefits of energy efficiency projects helps companies understand the financial opportunities of investments in energy efficiency. Quantifying total benefits also helps get financing for energy efficiency investments because it lessens the risk to lending institutions. This paper discusses recent case studies of projects and companies that support the hypothesis that total benefits from energy efficiency and pollution prevention enhance shareholder value. As corporate CEOs and CFOs see total benefits rise, they should recognize the parallel between environmental and financial performance.

Pye, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost of Advanced Fuel Cells Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost of Advanced Fuel Cells March 29, 2012 - 4:20pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above approach to American energy, the Energy Department today announced the investment of $3 million to 3M Company in St. Paul, Minnesota, to lower the cost of advanced fuel cell systems by developing cost-effective, durable, and highly efficient fuel cell components. The 3-year project will focus on boosting the performance of fuel cell systems for vehicles and stationary applications while driving down costs. These investments are a part of the Department's commitment to U.S. leadership in innovative fuel cell

360

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2015. 23 In 2005, national energy consumption structure wasof: (a) national average annual energy consumption growthnational average) rate of change in energy consumption.

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of China’ s Energy-Saving and Emission Reductionrates: provincial trends Energy saving goals: equal ratesrates: provincial trends Energy saving goals: provincial

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Resources Institute (WRI). 2009. Energy Consumption:Residential energy consumption per capita. WRI EarthTrendstargets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads 3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads 3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads November 1, 2012 - 3:35pm Addthis Using a power strip to turn off electronics and appliances when they aren't in use ensures that they are truly off and not using extra electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DonNichols. Using a power strip to turn off electronics and appliances when they aren't in use ensures that they are truly off and not using extra electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DonNichols. John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Standby power costs the average U.S. household $100 per year. You can reduce your use of standby power by using power strips,

364

3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads 3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads 3 Easy Tips to Reduce Your Standby Power Loads November 1, 2012 - 3:35pm Addthis Using a power strip to turn off electronics and appliances when they aren't in use ensures that they are truly off and not using extra electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DonNichols. Using a power strip to turn off electronics and appliances when they aren't in use ensures that they are truly off and not using extra electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/DonNichols. John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Standby power costs the average U.S. household $100 per year. You can reduce your use of standby power by using power strips,

365

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

366

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

367

How America can look within to achieve energy security and reduce global warming.  

SciTech Connect

Making major gains in energy efficiency is one of the most economical and effective ways our nation can wean itself off its dependence on foreign oil and reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases. Transportation and buildings, which account for two thirds of American energy usage, consume far more than they need to, but even though there are many affordable energy efficient technologies that can save consumers money, market imperfections inhibit their adoption. To overcome the barriers, the federal government must adopt policies that will transform the investments into economic and societal benefit. And the federal government must invest in research and development programs that target energy efficiency. Energy efficiency is one of America's great hidden energy reserves. We should begin tapping it now. Whether you want the United States to achieve greater energy security by weaning itself off foreign oil, sustain strong economic growth in the face of worldwide competition or reduce global warming by decreasing carbon emissions, energy efficiency is where you need to start. Thirty-five years ago the U.S. adopted national strategies, implemented policies and developed technologies that significantly improved energy efficiency. More than three decades have passed since then, and science and technology have progressed considerably, but U.S. energy policy has not. It is time to revisit the issue. In this report we examine the scientific and technological opportunities and policy actions that can make the United States more energy efficient, increase its security and reduce its impact on global warming. We believe the findings and recommendations will help Congress and the next administration to realize these goals. Our focus is on the transportation and buildings sectors of the economy. The opportunities are huge and the costs are small.

Richter, B.; Goldston, D.; Crabtree, G.; Glicksman, L.; Goldstein, D.; Greene, D.; Kammen, D.; Levin, M.; Lubell, M.; Savitz, M.; Sperling, D.; Schlachter, F.; Scofield, J.; Dawson, J. (Materials Science Division); (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.); (National Resources Defense Council); (Harvard Univ.); (ORNL); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (LBNL); (American Physical Society); (City Coll. of CUNY); (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center); (Stanford Univ.); (The Advisory Group); (Univ. of California at Davis)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Extending current energy policies would reduce U.S. energy use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... technologies exemplify the policy extensions ... the effects of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 passed by ...

370

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates in

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

372

Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully overcame them. The IT settings and strategies outlined in this document have been used to significantly reduce data center energy requirements in the RSF; however, these can also be used in existing buildings and retrofits.

Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Pulp and Paper Industry,” Energy Policy 25 (7-9):on reducing energy use” Pulp and Paper Magazine. Milleron the US pulp and paper industry,” Energy Policy, Volume

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow models for the US steel industry,” Energy 26, no. 2 (of Energy, Energy Information Administration (U.S. DOE/EIA).of Energy, Energy Information Administration (U.S. DOE/EIA).

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy Conservation Fund: Helping Corporations Develop Energy Conservation Strategies and Reduce Utility Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation projects can save companies significant money over time and often pay for themselves very quickly. This is especially true with the dramatic increase in energy costs over the past few years. Yet convincing corporate decision makers of their value is challenging, since most plants with limited capital tend to direct resources toward projects that increase production rather than toward those that save energy. The irony is that production projects may not realize savings if markets change, while conservation improvements usually change a plant's infrastructure in ways that ensure continued savings. Establishing a business unit or department focused on energy cost reduction and investing its profits in an Energy Conservation Fund (ECF) is part of a total energy approach that helps corporations identify projects, dedicate funds and implement changes. It makes conservation improvement projects more attractive on the front end, so companies can enjoy the long-term benefits.

Swanson, G. A.; Houston, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

'Top 25' City Aims to Reduce Energy Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Addthis Wind turbines like this will grace Gabe Nesbitt Community Park in McKinney, Texas, thanks to an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant | Photo courtesy of...

377

Barriers to reducing energy demand in existing building stock -a perspective based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barriers to reducing energy demand in existing building stock - a perspective based on observation incentives for replacing the worst boilers, installing insulation funding for businesses and charities to push incentives, offer advice, develop new interventions building regs that apply to new boilers

Carletta, Jean

378

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

379

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

380

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and toward a low-energy service sector. In line with theseand toward a low-energy service sector. In line with theseand toward a low- energy service sector. In line with these

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Industrial Insulation: An Energy Efficient Technology That Saves Money and Reduces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing energy efficiency in U.S. industrial facilities is an important part of the U.S. energy policy for attaining goals such as reduced greenhouse gas emissions, a stronger economy, and greater national security. One of the quickest ways to improve energy efficiency in the manufacturing sector is to install, upgrade, and repair insulation on process piping systems and equipment. Insulation has always been a ""good thing to do"". Everyone knows it save energy by preventing heat loss-but no one knew exactly just how much. Everyone understands that insulation protects people from hot surfaces and that it prevents condensation. Until recently, however no one could quantify the emissions saved for the insulation investment incurred. In fact, quantifying the benefits of insulation in terms of energy saved versus overall cost has always been a difficult task. The chemical plant example presented had an insulation appraisal conducted and was able to quantify the possible reductions of specific greenhouse gases and demonstrate to management that installing insulation could result in major reductions in the facilities operating costs. The insulation appraisal used the new Windows® version of 3E Plus®, a computer software program that can now calculate how much insulation is necessary to reduce NOx, CO2, and Carbon Equivalent (CE) emissions, exactly how much energy is saved throughout applying a range of insulation thicknesses and the dollar cost savings realized through preventing energy waste.

Brayman, B.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only provide national energy consumption data up to 2003.and data on national energy consumption are provided bymetals Total energy consumption: national steel industry

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

GAO-05-897 Department of Energy: Additional Opportunities Exist for Reducing Laboratory Contractors' Support Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Energy Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives September 2005 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Additional Opportunities Exist for Reducing Laboratory Contractors' Support Costs GAO-05-897 What GAO Found United States Government Accountability Office Why GAO Did This Study Highlights Accountability Integrity Reliability www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-897. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Jim Wells at (202) 512-3841 or wellsj@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-05-897, a report to the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives September 2005 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Additional Opportunities Exist for

384

Changes in energy markets reduce regional effects of energy price movements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in energy prices are having more equal effects on the residents of different regions than previously as consumption patterns adjust to natural gas deregulation and higher energy costs. Regions with a higher proportion of energy use, such as New England, have dropped their per capita consumption rates and have changed their mix of fuels. The extent of fuel switching becomes more apparent if electricity consumption is apportioned to the fuel used to generate power. Comparisons between the New England, East North Central, and West North Central regions show a decline in oil consumption for each and an increase in electricity use. 2 figures.

Schmidt, R.H.; Dunstan, R.H.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comparison of operational energy intensities and consumption of pipelines versus coastal tankers: US Gulf coast to northeast coast routes  

SciTech Connect

This report is a comparative analysis of operational energy intensities and consumption for pipeline shipments versus coastal tanker and tanker-barge movements of light petroleum products from the US Gulf Coast to US East Coast Mid-Atlantic states. It has been prepared for the Office of Transportation Programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a project designed to develop energy conservation strategies in the areas of modal shifts and energy materials transport. It also answers an expressed interest of DOE's Office of Competition as to whether energy penalties are being paid in this region by the shipment of this oil by tanker rather than pipeline. Detailed estimates are made of the 1977 energy intensities (EIs) for tankers and the two major pipelines serving these routes; these are the Colonial pipeline (from Houston) and the Plantation pipeline (from Baton Rouge). Estimates of potential operational energy savings gained from diverting these shipments from tankers to pipelines are figured from these EIs plus 1977 tanker short-ton volumes for these products. Also estimated for these diversions are additional savings of petroleum available through shifts from the fuel oil used to power tankers, to the other energy sources used by pipelines (e.g., coal, which is burned by the utilities serving them). Table 1 indicates that these tanker volumes have been large and steady as a whole; however, individual origin ports have had substantial variations since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Indirect energy requirements of the two modes are not included in this analysis because the methodology for calculating them is still an unresolved research area (e.g., diagreements exist as to how much supporting-infrastructure energy usage should be included for a mode).

Hooker, J.; Rose, A.B.; Bertram, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Resource Intensive Traffic-Aware Scheme for Cluster-based Energy Conservation in Wireless Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless traffic that is destined for a certain device in a network, can be exploited in order to minimize the availability and delay trade-offs, and mitigate the Energy consumption. The Energy Conservation (EC) mechanism can be node-centric by considering ... Keywords: Energy Conservation, Traffic-aware scheme, End-to-end communication, Capacity consideraiton for Energy Harvesting

Marios C. Charalambous; Constandinos X. Mavromoustakis; Muneer Bani Yassein

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Design features of high-intensity medium-energy superconducting heavy-ion Linac.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires the construction of a cw 1.4 GV superconducting (SC) linac that is capable of producing 400 kW beams of all ions from protons at 900 MeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u. The design of such a linac was outlined at the previous Linac conference. This linac will accelerate multiple-charge-states (multi-q) of the heaviest ion beams, for which the beam current is limited by ion-source performance. The linac consists of two different types of accelerating and focusing lattice: for uranium below {approx}85 MeV/u the focusing is provided by SC solenoids installed in cryostats with the SC resonators while in the high-beta section the focusing elements are located outside of the cryostats. A detailed design has been developed for the focusing-accelerating lattice of the linac. Beam dynamics studies have been performed with the goal of optimization of the linac structure in order to reduce a possible effective emittance growth of the multi-q uranium beam. A wide tuning range of the accelerating and focusing fields is required for acceleration of the variety of ions with different charge-to-mass ratios to the highest possible energy in single charge state mode. The focusing must be retuned for different ion masses to avoid resonance coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions. Any visible impact of this coupling on the formation of beam halo must be avoided due to the high beam power.

Ostroumov, P. N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Measures to reduce industrial consumption of petroleum under a short-term energy emergency  

SciTech Connect

Significant opportunities for petroleum conservation in the industrial sector in the event of an energy emergency are discussed. The most feasible government options identified are presented. These and the probable savings are: removing institutional barriers to fuel switching in industrial boilers and burners (384 to 407 Mbbl/day); rescinding certain air pollution regulations (19 to 100 Mbbl/day); restricting export of energy-intensive goods (20 to 60 Mbbl/day); rescinding thermal pollution regulations for power plants (16 to 27 Mbbl/day); removing trade barriers on certain imports; restricting electricity production by industry; and restricting export of recyclable materials. The bases for many of the recommended options are presented. Specifically, characteristics of industrial petroleum consumption for the chemical, steel, cement, and paper industries are presented.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr; D' Acierno, J.; Pilati, D.A.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evidence from Two Large Field Experiments that Peer Comparison Feedback Can Reduce Residential Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: By providing feedback to customers on home electricity and natural gas usage with a focus on peer comparisons, utilities can reduce energy consumption at a low cost. We analyze data from two large-scale, random-assignment field experiments conducted by utility companies providing electricity (the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)) and electricity and natural gas (Puget Sound Energy (PSE)), in partnership with a private company, Positive Energy/oPower, which provides monthly or quarterly mailed peer feedback reports to customers. We find reductions in energy consumption of 1.2 % (PSE) to 2.1% percent (SMUD), with the decrease sustained over time (seven months (PSE) and twelve months (SMUD)).

Ian Ayres Yale; Sophie Raseman Yale; Alice Shih Yale; Ian Ayres; Sophie Raseman; Alice Shih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tropical cyclone (TC) viewed as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean into the kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while ...

Yuqing Wang; Jing Xu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use August 17, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Standby power, vampire power, phantom loads, leaking electricity... Whatever you want to call it, standby power is the power consumed by a product when in the lowest power consuming mode-typically when the product is switched off or not performing its primary purpose. Alan Meier and colleagues at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) noted that many household appliances are never fully switched off, but spend most of the time in a standby mode, consuming electricity to power such features as clocks and remote control operation. They estimated that standby power accounts for 5%-10% of

392

Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use Please Stand By: Reduce Your Standby Power Use August 17, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Standby power, vampire power, phantom loads, leaking electricity... Whatever you want to call it, standby power is the power consumed by a product when in the lowest power consuming mode-typically when the product is switched off or not performing its primary purpose. Alan Meier and colleagues at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) noted that many household appliances are never fully switched off, but spend most of the time in a standby mode, consuming electricity to power such features as clocks and remote control operation. They estimated that standby power accounts for 5%-10% of

393

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Steam Pressure-Reducing Station Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project  

SciTech Connect

The Facilities and Operations (F&O) Directorate is sponsoring a continuous process improvement (CPI) program. Its purpose is to stimulate, promote, and sustain a culture of improvement throughout all levels of the organization. The CPI program ensures that a scientific and repeatable process exists for improving the delivery of F&O products and services in support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Management Systems. Strategic objectives of the CPI program include achieving excellence in laboratory operations in the areas of safety, health, and the environment. Identifying and promoting opportunities for achieving the following critical outcomes are important business goals of the CPI program: improved safety performance; process focused on consumer needs; modern and secure campus; flexibility to respond to changing laboratory needs; bench strength for the future; and elimination of legacy issues. The Steam Pressure-Reducing Station (SPRS) Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project, which is under the CPI program, focuses on maintaining and upgrading SPRSs that are part of the ORNL steam distribution network. This steam pipe network transports steam produced at the ORNL steam plant to many buildings in the main campus site. The SPRS Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project promotes excellence in laboratory operations by (1) improving personnel safety, (2) decreasing fuel consumption through improved steam system energy efficiency, and (3) achieving compliance with applicable worker health and safety requirements. The SPRS Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project being performed by F&O is helping ORNL improve both energy efficiency and worker safety by modifying, maintaining, and repairing SPRSs. Since work began in 2006, numerous energy-wasting steam leaks have been eliminated, heat losses from uninsulated steam pipe surfaces have been reduced, and deficient pressure retaining components have been replaced. These improvements helped ORNL reduce its overall utility costs by decreasing the amount of fuel used to generate steam. Reduced fuel consumption also decreased air emissions. These improvements also helped lower the risk of burn injuries to workers and helped prevent shrapnel injuries resulting from missiles produced by pressurized component failures. In most cases, the economic benefit and cost effectiveness of the SPRS Safety and Energy Efficiency Improvement Project is reflected in payback periods of 1 year or less.

Lower, Mark D [ORNL; Christopher, Timothy W [ORNL; Oland, C Barry [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S.energy and carbon intensity  

SciTech Connect

A recent (1996-2000) acceleration of declines in energy andcarbon intensity in the U.S. remains largely unexplained. This study usesDivisia decomposition and regression to test two candidate explanations -fuel mix and weather. The Divisia method demonstrates that fuel mix doesnot explain the declines in carbon intensity. The fuel mix, both overalland for electricity generation, became slightly more carbon intensiveover the study period (though the slight trend reversed before the end ofthe period). A regression-based correction to the Divisia indices,accounting for variation in heating- and cooling-degree-days, indicatesthat warmer weather accounts for about 30 percent ofthe total declines.This leaves declines of more than 2 percent per year (and an accelerationof more than 1 percent over previous decade) remaining to beexplained.

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Table 6c. U.S. Residential Energy Intensity Using Weather ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

51. 61. 46 . 42 . Single-Family ... Except for 1997, estimates include all the floor area of the housing unit that was enclosed from the weather. Sources: Energy ...

398

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, ... The events surrounding the Arab oil embargo in 1973 were associated with a dramatic rise in energy prices.

399

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Light-duty vehicles are by far the largest energy consuming part of ...

400

Sensitivity to Dark Energy candidates by searching for four-wave mixing of high-intensity lasers in the vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical challenges to understand Dark Matter and Dark Energy suggest the existence of low-mass and weakly coupling fields in the universe. The quasi-parallel photon-photon collision system (QPS) can provide chances to probe the resonant production of these light dark fields and the induced decay by the coherent nature of laser fields simultaneously. By focusing high-intensity lasers with different colors in the vacuum, new colors emerge as the signature of the interaction. Because four photons in the initial and final states interplay via the dark field exchange, this process is analogous to four-wave mixing in quantum optics, where the frequency sum and difference among the incident three waves generate the fourth wave with a new frequency via the nonlinear property of crystals. The interaction rate of the four-wave mixing process has the cubic dependence on the intensity of each wave. Therefore, if high-intensity laser fields are given, the sensitivity to the weakly coupling of dark fields to photons rapidly increases over the wide mass range below sub-eV. Based on the experimentally measurable photon energies and the linear polarization states, we formulate the relation between the accessible mass-coupling domains and the high-intensity laser parameters, where the effects of the finite spectrum width of pulse lasers are taken into account. The expected sensitivity suggests that we have a potential to explore interactions at the Super-Planckian coupling strength in the sub-eV mass range, if the cutting-edge laser technologies are properly combined.

Kensuke Homma

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program:Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005, the Chinese government announced an ambitious goal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% between 2005 and 2010. One of the key initiatives for realizing this goal is the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises program. The energy consumption of these 1000 enterprises accounted for 33% of national and 47% of industrial energy usage in 2004. Under the Top-1000 program, 2010 energy consumption targets were determined for each enterprise. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the program design and initial results, given limited information and data, in order to understand the possible implications of its success in terms of energy and carbon dioxide emissions reductions and to recommend future program modifications based on international experience with similar target-setting agreement programs. Even though the Top-1000 Program was designed and implemented rapidly, it appears that--depending upon the GDP growth rate--it could contribute to somewhere between approximately 10% and 25% of the savings required to support China's efforts to meet a 20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010.

Price, Lynn; Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun; Yun, Jiang

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

SR/OIAF/2006-01 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Preface and Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. EIA provides timely, high-quality energy information and prepares objective, transparent analyses for use of Congress, the Administration and the public. EIA does not, however, take positions on policy issues. Because of EIA?s statutory independence with respect to the content of its energy information program, the analysis presented herein is strictly its own and should not be construed as representing the views of the U.S. Department of Energy or the Administration. The model projections in this report are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The reference case projections are businessas-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral starting point that can be used to

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Optimizing conversion efficiency and reducing ion energy in a laser-produced Gd plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have demonstrated an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source at 6.7 nm by irradiating Gd targets with 0.8 and 1.06 {mu}m laser pulses of 140 fs to 10 ns duration. Maximum conversion efficiency of 0.4% was observed within a 0.6% bandwidth. A Faraday cup observed ion yield and time of flight signals for ions from plasmas generated by each laser. Ion kinetic energy was lower for shorter pulse durations, which yielded higher electron temperatures required for efficient EUV emission, due to higher laser intensity. Picosecond laser pulses were found to be the best suited to 6.7 nm EUV source generation.

Cummins, Thomas; Li Bowen; O'Gorman, Colm; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Otsuka, Takamitsu [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Jiang Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

High-Intensity and High-Density Charge-Exchange Injection Studies into the CERN PS Booster at Intermediate Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the high brilliance LHC ultimate beam and the high intensity CNGS beam, single batch injections into the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) will be used to increase the overall machine intensity compared with the present double batch injections. Charge-exchange injection into the PS Booster with a new linac at intermediate energies is thus examined. A key parameter to consider is the energy dependence of beam incoherent tune shifts at injection. Increasing the linac energy from the present 50 MeV to 160 MeV should yield a safer tune shift. For each PS Booster ring, a charge-exchange injection scheme is envisaged inside a proper straight section, redesigned with new bends to make a local bump and using the existing fast bump magnets for horizontal phase-space painting. ACCSIM simulations for charge-exchange injection at 160 MeV have been investigated for both LHC and CNGS beams. After optimizing the parameters that are used for the space charge tracking routines, the results of the simulations agree well with ex...

Martini, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

MRMAC: medium reservation MAC protocol for reducing end-to-end delay and energy consumption in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter proposes a novel medium reservation MAC protocol that reduces both end-to-end delay and energy consumption for wireless sensor networks. MRMAC reduces endto-end delay by informing the intended receiver of NPAT (next packet arrival time) and ... Keywords: asynchronous, end-to-end delay, energy consumption, medium access control, wireless sensor networks

Jaeyoung Hong; Ingook Jang; Hanjin Lee; Suho Yang; Hyunsoo Yoon

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric restructuring, currently proposed in California and being reviewed elsewhere, can produce many opportunities for large companies to reduce their electricity costs. As the electricity market changes, electric utilities and other potential suppliers are likely to develop a portfolio of options and creative pricing to attract customers in a competitive market. In attempting to be "energy neutral," i.e., to be indifferent to energy costs in one state or utility service area versus another, many companies are looking at a corporate approach to energy procurement, similar to the procurement of other products. Industrial customers may be looking for regional or even national energy suppliers for their facilities. Electric utilities, in an attempt to be competitive and retain customers, will likely work to be this regional or national energy supplier. The expectation will be that these suppliers can offer competitive pricing and a portfolio of options from which to choose. These options may resemble those that have developed in the natural gas market as a result of restructuring in the fuels industry.

Lowe, E. T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Styrofoam cups are one of many Styrofoam cups are one of many products made from styrene monomer. Exelus Inc. (Livingston, NJ), established in 2000, develops and licenses "Cleaner-by- Design" chemical technologies to produce a vast array of products and materials used in consumer goods, transportation, and food processing. Currently, the company's principal process technologies are: ExSact - a refining technology that overcomes the environmental concerns, safety hazards and rising costs associated with conventional liquid acid technologies ExSyM - energy efficient, low cost SM production technology BTG - efficient, cost-effective conversion of biomass to clean, high-octane, gasoline-compatible fuel http://www.exelusinc.com/ New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces

410

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, Jon B. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well.

Smith, A.C. Jr.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

1986-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

GRPANL: a program for fitting complex peak groupings for gamma and x-ray energies and intensities  

SciTech Connect

GRPANL is a general-purpose peak-fitting program that calculates gamma-ray and x-ray energies and intensities from a given spectral region. The program requires that the user supply input information such as the first and last channels of the region, the channels to be used as pre- and post-region background, the system gain and zero-intercept, and a list of approximate energy values at which peaks occur in the region. Because the peak position and peak-shape parameters enter nonlinearly into the peak-fitting algorithm, an iterative least-square procedure is used in the fitting process. The program iterates until either all convergence criteria are met or ten iterations have elapsed. The code described here allows for twenty free parameters and a region as large as 240 data channels. This code runs on an LSI-11 computer with 32K memory and disk-storage capability.

Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure on Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility, featuring the Vehicle Modification Facility, Vehicle Test Pad and ReCharge Integrated Demonstration System. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year - not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air conditioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three installations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are developing strategies to address two separate but equally crucial areas of research: meeting the demands of electric vehicle-grid integration and minimizing fuel consumption related to vehicle climate control. Part of NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems (CTTS), the VTIF is dedicated to renewable and energy efficient solutions. This facility showcases technology and systems designed to increase the viability of sustainably powered vehicles. NREL researchers instrument every class of on-road vehicle, conduct hardware and software validation for electric vehicle (EV) components and accessories, and develop analysis tools and technology for the Department of Energy, other government agencies and industry partners. Research conducted at the VTIF examines the interaction of building energy systems, utility grids, renewable energy sources and PEVs, integrating energy management solutions, and maximizing potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, while smoothing the transition and reducing costs for EV owners. NREL's collaboration with automakers, charging station manufacturers, utilities and fleet operators to assess technologies using VTIF resources is designed to enable PEV communication with the smart grid and create opportunities for vehicles to play an active role in building and grid management. Ultimately, this creates value for the vehicle owner and will help renewables be deployed faster and more economically, making the U.S. transportation sector more flexible and sustainable.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will be concentrated in two areas: (1) HCEI Working Groups will be formed and made up of private, state, and U.S. government experts in the areas of Transportation and Fuels, Electricity Generation, Energy Delivery and Transmission, and End-Use Efficiency; and (2) Partnership Projects will be undertaken with local and mainland partners that demonstrate and commercialize new technologies and relieve technical barriers.

Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Phase-Shifted Full Bridge DC-DC Converter with Energy Recovery Clamp and Reduced Circulating Current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase-Shifted Full Bridge DC-DC Converter with Energy Recovery Clamp and Reduced Circulating an improved PSFB DC-DC converter using only a modified energy recovery clamp circuit attached at the secondary and/or output voltage changes. Section II describes the PSFB DC-DC circuit with the proposed energy

417

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy/carbon footprint of the nation's buildings is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-20-09 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy/carbon footprint some renewable energy technologies are most economical when using buildings as their deployment. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC), in the Energy and Transportation Science

418

Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

D. Kuridze; T. V. Zaqarashvili

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths  

SciTech Connect

A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume and are significant in the sustainable future of building design and construction. The role of daylighting (and its simulation) in the design process becomes critical. In this paper we present the process the National Renewable Energy Laboratory embarked on in the procurement, design, and construction of its newest building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) - particularly the roles of daylighting, electric lighting, and simulation. With a rapid construction schedule, the procurement, design, and construction had to be tightly integrated; with low energy use. We outline the process and measures required to manage a building design that could expect to operate at an efficiency previously unheard of for a building of this type, size, and density. Rigorous simulation of the daylighting and the electric lighting control response was a given, but the oft-ignored disconnect between lighting simulation and whole-building energy use simulation had to be addressed. The RSF project will be thoroughly evaluated for its performance for one year; preliminary data from the postoccupancy monitoring efforts will also be presented with an eye toward the current efficacy of building energy and lighting simulation.

Guglielmetti , R.; Scheib, J.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini , P.; Petro, R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

High intensity discharge lamp self-adjusting ballast system sensitive to the radiant energy or heat of the lamp  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a self-adjusting ballast system for mercury vapor, high intensity discharge lamps having outputs of 100 watts or greater, comprising: a direct current source; a lamp circuit containing a high intensity discharge lamp; sensing means for sensing the radiant energy output of the lamp; a pulse width modulator which, in response to the output of the sensing means, varies the width of the pulses that power the lamp during warm-up of the lamp; a high frequency oscillator; a DC to AC converter that converts current from the direct source to pulses of alternating current for powering the lamp, the converter comprising: at least one switch for gating current to the lamp; a switch control means, responsive to the high frequency oscillator, for controlling the switch and controlling the frequency of the alternating current pulses that power the lamp; current sensing means for sensing the current being supplied to the lamp; and current control means for limiting the current through the lamp to a predetermined safe level when the current sensed by the current sensing means exceeds a reference value.

Kuhnel, D.S.; Ottenstein, S.A.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retail electricity rates and will also reduce residential,retail electricity rates but will also reduce residential,

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Agency – World Bank Energy Efficiency Indicatorsfacility to the Bank of Beijing for energy efficiencyBank of Beijing obtains 130 mln yuan IFC facility for energy

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR for Industry Energy Guides include both process-s sector-wide energy efficiency guides provide informationto develop energy efficiency guides, which are being

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy) (2006). “Fossil energy. ” http://fossil.energy.gov/.through reduction of fossil fuel energy consumption, andWith 85% of U.S. energy supplied by fossil fuels (US DOE

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nissan and Centro partner to reduce energy cost 20% through improved metering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centro Inc. Nissan Centro Inc. Nissan 321 Hill Avenue 983 Nissan Drive Nashville, TN 37210 Smyrna, TN 37167 Business: Flow Control Distributor & Representative Business: Automobile Manufacturing Brad Davis Chris Goddard Territory Manager Environmental Engineer Phone: 615-255-2220 Phone: 615-459-1633 Email: bdavis@centromemphis.com Email: chris.goddard@nissan-usa.com Nissan and Centro partner to reduce energy cost 20% through improved metering Project Scope Nissan wanted to precisely measure consumption by department in their Smyrna facility. For low pressure natural gas applications, Nissan sought a simple, reliable metering device with no moving parts. Centro determined that the Aaliant Target Flow meter and the Fox Thermal Mass Flow meter would meet

428

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Probing TeV Left-Right Seesaw at Energy and Intensity Frontiers: a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss ways to probe the origin of neutrino masses at the Energy and Intensity frontiers, in TeV-scale left-right seesaw models where small neutrino masses arise via type-I seesaw mechanism. We consider generic ('vanilla') version of such models as well as a version which leads to 'large' light-heavy neutrino mixing while keeping the neutrino masses small in a natural manner. We point out specific observable implications of these classes of models at the LHC as well as in searches for lepton flavor violating processes such as $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$ and $\\mu\\to 3e$, and also in searches for lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay.

P. S. Bhupal Dev; R. N. Mohapatra

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

430

Using measured equipment load profiles to "right-size" HVAC systems and reduce energy use in laboratory buildings (Pt. 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load profiles to “right-size” HVAC systems and reduce energyGeorgia. ASHRAE [1999]. HVAC Applications Handbook 1999.Inefficiency of a Common Lab HVAC System,” presented at the

Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Frenze, David; Morehead, Michael; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne?s research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas emissions was also a major reason. The transportation sector alone consumes about 13 million barrels of crude oil per day (nearly 60% of which is imported) and is responsible for about 30% of the CO{sub 2} emission. When we consider manufacturing and other energy-intensive industrial processes, the amount of petroleum being consumed due to friction and wear reaches more than 20 million barrels per day (from official energy statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration). Frequent remanufacturing and/or replacement of worn parts due to friction-, wear-, and scuffing-related degradations also consume significant amounts of energy and give rise to additional CO{sub 2} emission. Overall, the total annual cost of friction- and wear-related energy and material losses is estimated to be rather significant (i.e., as much as 5% of the gross national products of highly industrialized nations). It is projected that more than half of the total friction- and wear-related energy losses can be recovered by developing and implementing advanced friction and wear control technologies. In transportation vehicles alone, 10% to 15% of the fuel energy is spent to overcome friction. If we can cut down the friction- and wear-related energy losses by half, then we can potentially save up to 1.5 million barrels of petroleum per day. Also, less friction and wear would mean less energy consumption as well as less carbon emissions and hazardous byproducts being generated and released to the environment. New and more robust anti-friction and -wear control technologies may thus have a significant positive impact on improving the efficiency and environmental cleanliness of the current legacy fleet and future transportation systems. Effective control of friction in other industrial sectors such as manufacturing, power generation, mining and oil exploration, and agricultural and earthmoving machinery may bring more energy savings. Therefore, this project was timely and responsive to the energy and environmental objectives of DOE and our nation. In this project, most of the boron-based mater

Erdemir, Ali [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Center Loads for a Large- Data Center Loads for a Large- scale, Low-energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility The NREL Approach * December 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 2 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility Michael Sheppy, Chad Lobato, Otto Van Geet, Shanti Pless, Kevin Donovan, Chuck Powers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado December 2011

433

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steel Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantAn ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MWh of incremental renewable energy production provides, onincremental renewable energy production exceeds 10 billion

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative energies: solar photovoltaic, wind and fuelof solar photovoltaic devices is the energy conversiongenerated electric energy by the photovoltaic devices. The

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Aggregate energy usage statistics are insu?cientmonitoring of individual energy usages in real-time. . . . .Aggregated energy usage by appliance type normalized by

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new metric for energy technology. ” Proc. of 15ththree alternative energy technologies, including solarselect the alternative energy technologies mainly based on

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANUFACTURING THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SUPPLY Chris Y.Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partially

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES AWEA (American Wind Energy Association) (2006). “Wind energy projects throughout the United States ofWhile solar and wind energy are site-specific, fuel cells

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Virginia Manufacturer Keeps Jobs Local By Embracing Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Now LEADER initiative, which calls on manufacturers to reduce their facilities' energy intensity by 25% over a 10-year timeframe. Since becoming a LEADER Company, Volvo's...

442

Department of Energy Finalizes Regulations to Increase Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order (EO 13423), announced earlier this year, which directed federal agencies to reduce energy intensity and greenhouse gas emissions; substantially increase use and efficiency...

443

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Jeannette. 2004. “Xcel Energy’s RecommissioningLong and Crowe 2008a). Xcel Energy had a similar target inFor example, the 2003 Xcel Energy program excluded buildings

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fall in between. The clean energy incentives provided by theafter incentives, is the most economical clean energy source

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Trade Commission, Energy Saving Office of ShandongImplementation of Energy-Saving Agreements in Shandongthe Thousand Enterprise Energy Saving Action Implementation

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy Practices and Policies.than Previously Believed. ” Renewable Energy World, 6 (2).to Switch America to Renewable Energy. Cambridge, Mass. :

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the policies and energy management systems implemented inmanagement include s an energy purchase management system,energy use management system, an assessment of each

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reporting system, conduct energy audits, conduct training,auditing, an example of energy audits in a power plant, theenterprises regarding energy audits for the Top-1000 program

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Save Energy Now Reveals New Opportunities for Steel Manufacturers to Reduce Costs and Energy Use (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This case study summarizes savings numbers and top energy-saving recommendations identified during Save Energy Now energy assessments of U.S. steel companies.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Practices andDetermining the Real Cost: Why Renewable Power is More Cost-than Previously Believed. ” Renewable Energy World, 6 (2).

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy Conservation in the United States: Understanding its Role in Climate Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efforts to reduce carbon emissions significantly will require considerable improvements in energy intensity, the ratio of energy consumption to economic activity. Improvements in energy intensity over the past thirty years ...

Metcalf, Gilbert E.

452

The relationship between policy choice and the size of the policy region: Why small jurisdictions may prefer renewable energy policies to reduce CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 2012. C. Fischer. Renewable portfolio standards: WhenCBO. The Effects of Renewable and Clean Energy Standards.jurisdictions may prefer renewable energy policies to reduce

Accordino, Megan H.; Rajagopal, Deepak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas and other non-renewable-energy commodities (ignoring thefor other non-renewable, non-energy commodities. Although we

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

On the Effectiveness of Movement Prediction To Reduce Energy Consumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

120 Percentageenergysaving(%) History length Random waypoint Model Fig. 2. Percentage energy saving in more energy saving. Figure 2 shows how energy saving increases with the increase of the history length decrease in #12;9 History Length Percentage decrease in Percentage energy Absolute energy average

Lui, John C.S.

455

Measuring and Reducing Energy Consumption of Network Interfaces in Hand-Held Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next generation hand-held devices must provide seamless connectivity while obeying stringent power and size constrains. In this paper we examine this issue from the point of view of the Network Interface (NI). We measure the power usage of two PDAs, the Apple Newton Messagepad and Sony Magic Link, and four NIs, the Metricom Ricochet Wireless Modem, the AT&T Wavelan operating at 915 MHz and 2.4 GHz, and the IBM Infrared Wireless LAN Adapter. These measurements clearly indicate that the power drained by the network interface constitutes a large fraction of the total power used by the PDA. We then examine two classes of optimizations that can be used to reduce network interface energy consumption on these devices: transport-level strategies and application-level strategies. Simulation experiments of transportlevel strategies show that the dominant cost comes not from the number of packets sent or received by a particular transport protocol but the amount of time that the NI is in an activ...

Mark Stemm; Randy H. Katz; Y H. Katz

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

end-use model of China’s energy economy for 2020. Assessedto meet its goal of reducing energy intensity by 20% in fiveCommission (BDRC) Beijing Energy Efficiency Center (BECon)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distinguish useful and wasted energy. For example, if a userasleep might be called wasted energy. Currently, we do notwhere energy is consumed and wasted, and is a necessary step

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preferences, energy and technology costs, settlement andof Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).and MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement Industrial

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Efficient Reduced Complexity Multi-Service, Multi-Channel Scheduling Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The need for energy efficient communications is essential in current and next-generation wireless communications systems. A large component of energy expenditure in mobile devices is… (more)

Dechene, Dan J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for local energy generation, distribution, and sharing. IEEElocal energy generation, distribution, and sharing. In IEEEto-Grid Generation Transmission Distribution Load / DG

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reducing energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

High-Tech Garage Showcases Strategies for Reducing Energy (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The parking garage fact sheet highlights the many features of NREL's garage, including energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, building materials, and waste minimization.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Reduce NOx and Improve Energy Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program NOx and Energy Assessment Tool (NxEAT) can help petroleum refining and chemical plants improve energy efficiency.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z