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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

2

The Costs of Reducing Electricity Sector CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a high-level analysis of some of the critical challenges associated with cutting United States electricity-sector CO2 emissions and an order of magnitude feeling for what it will cost to meet emission-reduction targets now under consideration. Three basic strategies to limit emissions are illustrated to give readers a basic understanding of the tradeoff between CO2 reductions and additional cost inherent in several generation choices. Regional power market system simulations are then...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

4

Diagnostics-while drilling: Reducing the cost of geothermal-produced electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to estimate the potential impact of proposed new Diagnostics-While-Drilling technology on the cost of electricity (COE) produced with geothermal energy. A cost model that predicts the COE was developed and exercised over the range of conditions found for geothermal plants in flashed-steam, binary, and enhanced-reservoir (e.g., Hot Dry Rock) applications. The calculations were repeated assuming that DWD technology is available to reduce well costs and improve well productivity. The results indicate that DWD technology would reduce the geothermal COE by 2--31%, depending on well depth, well productivity, and the type of geothermal reservoir. For instance, for a typical 50-MW, flashed-steam geothermal power plant employing 3-MW wells, 6,000-ft deep, the model predicts an electricity cost of 4.9 cents/kwh. With the DWD technology envisioned, the electricity cost could be reduced by nearly 20%, to less than 4 cents/kwh. Such a reduction in the cost of electricity would give geothermal power a competitive edge over other types of power at many locations across the US and around the world. It is thus believed that DWD technology could significantly expand the role of geothermal energy in providing efficient, environment-friendly electric generating capacity.

PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,DAVID A.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric restructuring, currently proposed in California and being reviewed elsewhere, can produce many opportunities for large companies to reduce their electricity costs. As the electricity market changes, electric utilities and other potential suppliers are likely to develop a portfolio of options and creative pricing to attract customers in a competitive market. In attempting to be "energy neutral," i.e., to be indifferent to energy costs in one state or utility service area versus another, many companies are looking at a corporate approach to energy procurement, similar to the procurement of other products. Industrial customers may be looking for regional or even national energy suppliers for their facilities. Electric utilities, in an attempt to be competitive and retain customers, will likely work to be this regional or national energy supplier. The expectation will be that these suppliers can offer competitive pricing and a portfolio of options from which to choose. These options may resemble those that have developed in the natural gas market as a result of restructuring in the fuels industry.

Lowe, E. T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce quantify the benefits of controlled charging of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Costs are determined expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c

McGaughey, Alan

9

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

10

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

11

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the data centers' energy consumptions, energy prices, and peak power prices, it becomes clear that we can two components: (1) the cost of energy consumed (energy price: $ per KWh), and (2) the cost. Unfortunately, these works did not consider energy prices, peak power costs, or any cooling issues

Bianchini, Ricardo

12

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks

McGaughey, Alan

13

Reducing Electricity and Network Cost for Online Service Providers in Geographically Located Internet Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online service providers(OSPs) have Internet data centers (IDCs) in multiple geographical locations in order to satisfy global user demand. Increased data centers consume a large amount of energy, and at the same time cause increased heat dissipation, ... Keywords: Internet data centers, green computing, electricity market, load dispatching, energy proportional

Xinying Zheng; Yu Cai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

15

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of the assessment recommendations is estimated to be $843,000 with a total implementation cost. Manufacturing at the facility includes both casting and extrusion processes. Process equipment, air compressors productivity. As a result, facility production costs can be reduced and profits can be increased. August 2001

16

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reducing Leaking Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Reducing Leaking Electricity Figure 1. Full and standby power draws of some compact audio systems. A surprisingly large number of appliances-from computer peripherals to cable TV boxes to radios-consume electricity even after they have been switched off. Other appliances, such as cordless telephones, remote garage door openers, and battery chargers don't get switched off but draw power even when they are not performing their principal functions. The energy used while the appliance is switched off or not performing its primary purpose is called "standby consumption" or "leaking electricity." This consumption allows TVs, VCRs and garage-door openers to be ready for instant-on with a remote control, microwave ovens to display a digital

18

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

19

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Does Competition Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 3 One exception is Hiebert (2002), who uses stochastic frontier production functions to estimate generation plant efficiency over 1988-1997. One set of independent variables he includes is indicators for regulatory orders or legislative enactment... to customers. Joskow (1974) and Hendricks (1975) demonstrate that frictions in cost-of-service regulation, particularly those arising from regulatory lag (time between price- resetting hearings), may provide some incentives at the margin for cost...

Markiewicz, Karl; Rose, Nancy L; Wolfram, Catherine

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specify for maximum energy savings Specify for maximum energy savings Windows must meet local energy code requirements. For even higher energy performance, consider ENERGY STAR windows, which are recommended for low-rise dwellings and are often suitable for mid-rise dwellings as well. For window and storm window options with superior performance in cold climates, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's highly insulating windows purchasing program (see next page). Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost Government or utility incentives and financing may be available for energy efficiency in low-income housing. Check www.dsireusa.org for up-to-date information on incentive

23

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reynolds Logistics Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on AddThis.com... July 23, 2011 Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs F ind out how Reynolds Logistics uses electric vehicles to offset petroleum

24

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. Past Incubator awardee, Innovalight, is creating high-efficiency, low-cost

26

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

27

Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency by reducing pumping costs through optimum pipe sizing.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reducing home heating and cooling costs  

SciTech Connect

This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

30

Controlling electrical costs with energy management  

SciTech Connect

Energy Management Systems have been proven to be extremely effective in reducing electrical energy costs. This particular system is also capable of monitoring natural gas usage and even regulating that usage with the control of valves. Controlling electrical energy usage must be a cooperative effort between the plant where the system is to be installed and the manufacturer of the Energy Management Controller. The latter can be assisted by being advised of which loads are able to be shed and how shedding those loads affect production.

Collins, W.M.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, 1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and 2)enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is

32

Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries September 9, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov Electricvehicles8331019248.jpg Electric vehicles lined up in Cascade Locks. Credit: Oregon Department of Transportation A better battery-one that is cheap and safe, but packs a lot of power-could lead to an electric vehicle that performs better than today's gasoline-powered cars, and costs about the same or less to consumers. Such a vehicle would reduce the United States' reliance on foreign oil and lower energy costs for the average American, so one of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) goals is to fund research that will revolutionize the performance of next-generation batteries. In honor of DOE's supercomputing month, we are highlighting some of the

33

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

34

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used in industry. However, smaller previously unfeasible applications can now be cost effective due to the packaged system approach which has become available in recent years. The availability of this equipment in a packaged system form makes it feasible to replace pressure reducing valves with turbine generator sets in applications with flows as low as 4000 pounds of steam per hour. These systems produce electricity for $0.01 to $.02 per kWh (based on current costs of gas and oil); system cost is between $200 and $800 per kW of capacity. Simple system paybacks between one and three years are common.

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructurethe cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers and stresses the importance of fully researching alternatives before committing to major equipment investments.

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

SciTech Connect

Recently, independent system operators (ISOs) and others have published reports on the costs of transmission congestion. The magnitude of congestion costs cited in these reports has contributed to the national discussion on the current state of U.S. electricity transmission system and whether it provides an adequate platform for competition in wholesale electricity markets. This report reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, (1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and (2) enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is essential to understand who pays, how much, and how do they benefit in evaluating options (both transmission and non-transmission alternatives) to address transmission congestion. To describe the differences among published estimates of congestion costs, we develop and motivate three ways by which transmission congestion costs are calculated in restructured markets. The assessment demonstrates that published transmission congestion costs are not directly comparable because they have been developed to serve different purposes. More importantly, critical information needed to make them more comparable, for example in order to evaluate the impacts of options to relieve congestion, is sometimes not available.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

43

Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on transformative innovation in the domestic PV industry. With knowledge and expertise acquired from the PDIL pilot production line tools, Ampulse plans to design a full-scale production line to accommodate long rolls of metal foil. The Ampulse process 'goes straight from pure silicon-containing gas to high-quality crystal silicon film,' said Brent Nelson, the operational manager for the Process Development Integration Laboratory. 'The advantage is you can make the wafer just as thin as you need it - 10 microns or less.' Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon, though thin-film cells made of more exotic elements such as copper, indium, gallium, arsenic, cadmium, tellurium and others are making a strong push into the market. The advantage of silicon is its abundance, because it is derived from sand. Silicon's disadvantage is that purifying it into wafers suitable for solar cells can be expensive and energy intensive. Manufacturers add carbon and heat to sand to produce metallurgical-grade silicon, which is useful in other industries, but not yet suitable for making solar cells. So this metallurgical-grade silicon is then converted to pure trichlorosilane (SiCl3) or silane (SiH4) gas. Typically, the purified gas is then converted to create a silicon feedstock at 1,000 degrees Celsius. This feedstock is melted at 1,414 C and recrystallized into crystal ingots that are finally sawed into wafers. The Ampulse method differs in that it eliminates the last two steps in the traditional process and works directly with the silane gas growing only the needed silicon right onto a foil substrate. A team of NREL scientists had developed a way to use a process called hot-wire chemical vapor deposition to thicken silicon wafers with near perfect crystal structure. Using a hot tungsten filament much like the one found in an incandescent light bulb, the silane gas molecules are broken apart and deposited onto the wafer using the chemical vapor deposition technique at about 700 C - a much lower temperature than needed to make the wafer. The hot filament dec

Scanlon, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Price of electricity tracks cost of living  

SciTech Connect

The retail price of electricity and the consumer price index are rising at about the same rate: 241.5 and 242.6, respectively, based on a 1967 index of 100. Increases in fossil fuel costs, wages, and the cost of borrowed funds have contributed to these changes. Details of the annual percentage changes are summarized in five tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Definition: Reduced Electricity Theft | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Theft Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Theft Smart meters can typically detect tampering. Moreover, a meter data management system can analyze...

46

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Definition: Reduced Electricity Losses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Losses Losses Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Losses Functions that provide this benefit could help manage peak feeder loads, reduced electricity throughput, locate electricity production closer to the load and ensure that voltages remain within service tolerances, while minimizing the amount of reactive power provided. These actions can reduce electricity losses by making the system more efficient for a given load served or by actually reducing the overall load on the system.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, reactive power, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Electricity_Losses&oldid=502644

48

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion...

49

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County,...

50

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Presentation covers...

51

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. What are the key facts? Reducing energy saves money and reduces pollution. When considering a renewable energy system purchase for your home, the first step is to lower your energy use through efficiency measures. Energy audits can help point you to the most effective ways to reduce energy in your home. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy

52

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy use in your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. What are the key facts? Reducing energy saves money and reduces pollution. When considering a renewable energy system purchase for your home, the first step is to lower your energy use through efficiency measures. Energy audits can help point you to the most effective ways to reduce energy in your home. Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy

53

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Non-Hardware Costs to Reducing Non-Hardware Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Reducing Non-Hardware Costs DOE supports efforts to dramatically reduce the non-hardware, balance of systems costs associated with solar energy systems. Representing as much as

54

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Electrical energy and cost savings potential at DOD facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce energy consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical energy consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of energy consumption patterns and energy and financial savings potential. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model Energy Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical energy conservation potential (ECP) and cost savings potential (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual energy cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual energy cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual energy costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

10 Strategic Steps to Reducing Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your company is looking at energy management as part of its overall strategy to reduce costs and improve profits, it is not alone. While energy prices have increased at a shocking rate, so has interest in environmental responsibility. Progressive organizations are exploring ways to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse gases. Some are even creating new positions for these issues, placing someone in charge of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The CSR's job is to help a company be more socially responsible and reduce harmful emissions. Energy management can accomplish both conservation and emission goals- plus, it lowers utility costs and strengthens your bottom line! In the past, reasonably priced energy made it difficult to justify new conservation projects. It was hard to meet the standard criteria of 2-3 years payback. However, natural gas prices have tripled in the last five years from $2 to over $6 per Dekatherm (Dth). Electric prices also have increased dramatically-by more than 100% in some parts of the country. These increased energy costs have made conservation projects more desirable. A natural gas improvement project that had a six-year payback five years ago may have less than a two-year payback today. New technologies also have helped drive down the payback of projects and opened up new areas for potential savings. The following paper looks at how the new market offers opportunities to reduce overall energy costs.

Swanson, G. A.; Haley, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Affordable housing: Reducing the energy cost burden  

SciTech Connect

Residential energy expenditures are a key determinant of housing affordability, particularly for lower Income households. For years, federal, state and local governments and agencies have sought to defray energy expenses and Increase residential energy efficiency for low Income households through legislative and regulatory actions and programs. Nevertheless, household energy costs continue to place a major burden on lower Income families. This issue paper was written to help formulate national energy policy by providing the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) with Information to help define the affordable housing issue; Identify major drivers, key factors, and primary stakeholders shaping the affordable housing issue; and review how responding to this Issue may impact EE`s goals and objectives and Influence the strategic direction of the office. Typically, housing affordability is an Issue associated with lower income households. This issue paper adopts this perspective, but it is important to note that reducing energy utility costs can make {open_quotes}better{close_quote} housing affordable to any household regardless of income. As energy efficiency is improved throughout all sectors of the economy, special consideration must be given to low income households. Of all households, low income households are burdened the most by residential energy costs; their residences often are the least energy-efficient and have the greatest potential for efficiency improvements, but the occupants have the fewest resources to dedicate to conservation measures. This paper begins with a definition of {open_quotes}affordability{close_quotes} as it pertains to total housing costs and summarizes several key statistics related to housing affordability and energy use by lower income households.

Lee, A.D.; Chin, R.I.; Marden, C.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Detecting leaks to reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how analyzing boilerhouse data in its manufacturing plants and applying algorithmic techniques is helping an automobile manufacturer run its utility operations more efficiently. Ford Motor Co., based in Dearborn, Michigan, is realizing significant energy savings, reducing capital expenditures, and minimizing wastewater disposal costs by diagnosing and quantifying leaks in its compressed air, steam/condensate, and process water systems by applying algorithms developed by Cleveland-based CEC Consultants Inc. These algorithms make use of readily available--and often already installed--instruments, such as vortex shedding meters, chart recorders, and data loggers, to compare how much utility use is needed for assembly and manufacturing equipment with how much is being generated.

Valenti, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Definition: Reduced Meter Reading Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meter Reading Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Meter Reading Cost Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) equipment eliminates the need to send someone to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Reducing the Costs of Manufacturing Flow...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and power generation. * Design and material cost reductions are a means to reducing battery costs. * Is it possible to accelerate the knowledge building that comes from...

62

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

63

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

64

Reducing the cost of top-drive installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To equip an older jackup, the Offshore Mercury, with a completely workable and reliable top drive at minimum cost and without sacrificing performance, Sonat Offshore Drilling installed a power-swivel drilling system that did not require heightening or strengthening the derrick. An electronic crown protection system was installed to allow the driller use of all available reduced crown clearance, thereby increasing drilling safety by reducing the probability of accidentally running the traveling block into the crown. In addition, they modified the DC-DC drilling power equipment to create a completely functional and low-cost alternative to installing additional AC power-generating capacity and an SCR system. When planning a cost-effective top-drive installation on the Offshore Mercury, they recognized that the rig did not fit the average jackup profile: It has a DC-DC electric power drilling system and only a 140-ft (43-m) derrick, rather than the more common SCR system and 147-ft (45-m) derrick. From costs studies made up to the middle of 1991, they believed they could save a significant amount if it were possible to install and use a top drive in a 147-ft (45-m) or even a 140-ft (43-m) derrick without having to extend and strengthen the derrick. This paper reviews the design of this system and the effectiveness of its performance.

Hock, C.J. (Sonat Offshore Drilling Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices,...

66

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

67

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

69

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory - Leaking Electricity Web Site http://Effort to Reduce Leaking Electricity Alan MEIER* & Benotfraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of electricity production costs from the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

The economics of the geopressured geothermal resource along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is assessed. Geopressured waters are nearly under twice the normal hydrostatic pressure and believed to be saturated with methane. The costs of generating electricity from this resource are estimated based on the description and conceptual development plans provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Methane content and selling prices are the most important factors affecting the commercial potential of geopressured resources--so it is important that electrical generation be viewed as a by-product of methane production. On the same incremental cost basis, the cost of electricity generated from the geohydraulic energy is potentially competitive with conventional energy sources. This would require development of a small commercial high pressure, hydraulic turbine to extract geohydraulic energy at the wellhead in plants of about 3 MW capacity. Price/quantity relationships are developed for electricity generation from geopressured resources for each of three development plans proposed by USGS. Studies, based on field constructed plants, indicated an optimum power plant size in the range of 20 to 60 MWe, depending on water temperature. However, if standardized thermal conversion power plants could be factory produced in the 6 MWe range competitively with larger field constructed plants, then the optimum plant size might be reduced to single wellhead units.Wellhead units would completely eliminate fluid transmission costs, but would probably incur higher costs for heat rejection, power plant operation, and electrical transmission. The upper cost target for competitive wellhead plants would be on the order of $800/kW in 1975 dollars.

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information concerning the quality, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity in the United States.

Dean Fennell

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Title Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Publication Type Report...

74

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798...

75

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Cost Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on AddThis.com...

76

Automatic monitoring helps reduce lighting costs  

SciTech Connect

A Benton, Arkansas utility is using a dimmable ballast system to curb high-intensity-discharge (HID) lighting costs. The system also incorpoates a monitoring control system. This control automatically maintains minimum illumination levels.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Actions You Can Take to Reduce Cooling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Cooling Costs Cooling costs can be a substantial part of your facility's annual utility bill. A number of energy savings opportunities...

79

Definition: Reduced T&D Operations Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced T&D Operations Cost Automated or remote controlled operation of capacitor banks and feeder and line switches eliminates the...

80

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers December 21, 2011 - 12:49pm Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to reduce America's dependence on oil through advanced vehicle technologies, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced awards totaling nearly $7 million in research and development funding that will help to reduce the current costs of electric vehicle chargers by 50 percent over the next three years. With support from the Energy Department, manufacturers in California, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania will work to improve the development and design of charging equipment. This research will promote "smart"

82

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of Electric Vehicle Chargers December 21, 2011 - 12:49pm Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to reduce America's dependence on oil through advanced vehicle technologies, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced awards totaling nearly $7 million in research and development funding that will help to reduce the current costs of electric vehicle chargers by 50 percent over the next three years. With support from the Energy Department, manufacturers in California, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania will work to improve the development and design of charging equipment. This research will promote "smart"

83

Why Pressure Reducing Valves (PVR's) are costing you money  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout many manufacturing facilities, colleges, commercial sites or industrial complexes, pressure reducing valves (PRV's) provide a cheap, reliable method to produce low pressure steam from a high pressure source in order to meet a process requirement or heating load. This simple method of expanding steam in a PRV creates no work and supplies the same heat content available in the high pressure steam at a more manageable low pressure. What if you could produce the same low pressure steam while saving hundreds of thousands of dollars on your electric bill and taking only a minimal hit in the available heat content? Why let steam down and get no benefit from it, when putting it through a low pressure steam turbine coupled to a generator would produce the heat you need for process with the byproduct of onsite electrical generation. This paper analyzes the costs, concerns and benefits of replacing a pressure reducing valve with a Steam Turbine Generator set including illustrations of what the marginal fuel increase would be in order to take advantage of the added benefits of clean, cheap and reliable onsite power production.

Downing, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs May 3, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. Tracey A. LeBeau Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs What are the key facts? It's not uncommon for families in Alaska Native communities to spend nearly half of their monthly income on energy costs. To help these communities make smart energy choices, the Energy

85

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use electricity. Electric water heating -- Purchase an energy-efficient electric water heater and operate it efficiently. Or select an energy-efficient water heater that...

86

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rff.org/RFF/Documents/RFF-DP-09-48.pdf Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Screenshot References: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs[1] Abstract "We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payer-funded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy

87

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

88

Streamlining blade production would reduce turbine costs  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbine technology's overall future will see continuing increases in both size and higher operating temperatures, each contributing to improved energy conversion efficiency and reduced comparative capital outlay. Manufacturing technology will become even more relevant as blades acquire more sophisticated cooling or adopt the use of exotic refractory material such as crystal fibers and ceramics or both. The trend towards rising temperatures will continue. The incentives are high when it is realized that for every 100/sup 0/C increase in firing temperature there is a gain of approximately 18 percent in machine output and 2.7 percent increase in thermal efficiency.

Graham-Bryce, A.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

90

Production cost models with regard to liberalised electricity markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This book makes a contribution to the formulation and implementation of production cost models for the modelling of liberalized electricity markets by addressing issues associated (more)

Martinez Diaz, David Jos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reducing the Manufacturing Cost of Tubular SOFC Technology  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, Westinghouse Electric Corporation has made great strides in advancing tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology towards commercialization by the year 2001. In 1993, Westinghouse initiated a program to develop a `MWe Class` (1-3 MWe) pressurized SOFC (PSOFC) gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power system for distributed power applications because of its: (1) ultra high efficiency (approx. 63% net AC/LHV CH{sub 4}), (2) its compatibility with a factory packaged, minimum site work philosophy, and (3) its cost effectiveness. Since then two cost studies on this market entry product performed by consultants to the U.S. Department of Energy have confirmed Westinghouse cost studies that fully installed costs of under $1300/kWe can be achieved in the early commercialization years for such small PSOFC/GT power systems. The paper will present the results of these cost studies in the areas of cell manufacturing cost, PSOFC generator manufacturing cost, balance-of-plant (BOP) cost, and system installation cost. In addition, cost of electricity calculations will be presented.

George, R.A.; Bessette, N.F.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission, nor has the California Energy Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information and cost sensitivity analysis curves. The Energy Commission also uses the fixed cost data of the Model in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

95

Reducing energy use comes at a costReducing energy use comes at a cost ----the EU casethe EU case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YOUR LOGO HERECGES Reducing energy use comes at a costReducing energy use comes at a costDeputy Director and Chief Economist Centre for Global Energy StudiesCentre for Global Energy Studies AthensAthens ---- 88thth May 2008May 2008 Nuclear Energy WorkshopNuclear Energy Workshop ---- National Research Centre

96

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) The Edison...

97

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

Cavallo, A.J. [Cavallo (A.J.), Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs July 23, 2010 - 3:24pm Addthis Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? 70 street lights and 25 traffic signals to be replaced via Recovery Act. Town expects 10 percent reduction in energy costs. Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

100

Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs July 23, 2010 - 3:24pm Addthis Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Judith Mondre meets with members of the Mondre Energy team. | Photo courtesy of Judith Mondre Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? 70 street lights and 25 traffic signals to be replaced via Recovery Act. Town expects 10 percent reduction in energy costs. Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs August 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to develop clean, domestic energy sources, the Energy Department today announced a $4.5 million investment in two projects-led by Minnesota-based 3M and the Colorado School of Mines-to lower the cost, improve the durability, and increase the efficiency of next-generation fuel cell systems. This investment is a part of the Energy Department's commitment to maintain American leadership in innovative clean energy technologies, give American businesses more options to cut energy costs, and reduce our reliance on imported oil. "Fuel cell technologies have an important role to play in diversifying

102

Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases Market Potential of Biofuels...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research has led to improvements in sugar yields and dramatically reduced ethanol production costs. The importance of this research was recognized in 2004 by an R&D 100...

103

Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or less to consumers. Such a vehicle would reduce the United States' reliance on foreign oil and lower energy costs for the average American, so one of the Department of Energy's...

104

Reducing 'Search Cost' and Risk in Energy-efficiency Investments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This paper asserts that these programs have been successful because they reduce the two market barriers of high "search cost" and high perceived risks. Attachment Size PDF 770.7...

105

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

107

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of numbers of people affected DRAFT #12;6 · costs per hour of disruption or outage are used in conjunction with consequences in terms of duration, which is particularly common in electric power outages · costs per dollar for residences. Per Unit of Duration of Outage Duration as an influence in the cost of outages has received a lot

Wang, Hai

108

The reduced basis method for the electric field integral equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the reduced basis method (RBM) as an efficient tool for parametrized scattering problems in computational electromagnetics for problems where field solutions are computed using a standard Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the parametrized electric field integral equation (EFIE). This combination enables an algorithmic cooperation which results in a two step procedure. The first step consists of a computationally intense assembling of the reduced basis, that needs to be effected only once. In the second step, we compute output functionals of the solution, such as the Radar Cross Section (RCS), independently of the dimension of the discretization space, for many different parameter values in a many-query context at very little cost. Parameters include the wavenumber, the angle of the incident plane wave and its polarization.

Fares, M., E-mail: fares@cerfacs.f [2 Avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Hesthaven, J.S., E-mail: Jan_Hesthaven@Brown.ed [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Box F, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Maday, Y., E-mail: maday@ann.jussieu.f [Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Boite courrier 18, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Stamm, B., E-mail: stamm@math.berkeley.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Reducing Non-Hardware Costs DOE supports efforts to dramatically reduce the non-hardware, balance of systems costs associated with solar energy systems. Representing as much as 64% of the total installed system price, these "soft costs" include: Customer Acquisition Financing and Contracting Permitting, Interconnection, and Inspection Installation and Performance Operations and Maintenance. To meet SunShot goals, the industry must innovate new ways to automate and speed processes that make it easier for consumers, businesses, utilities, solar companies, and others to install solar projects. For example, novel software solutions now allow solar companies to design systems and provide accurate quotes using satellite images rather than conducting full site visits.

110

Electric Cable Reel Rubber-Tired Gantry Cranes: Costs and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Port equipment manufacturers have responded to the increased focus on air quality control by creating a variety of cleaner equipment and making more electric equipment available to ports. Included in this equipment is the rubber-tired gantry (RTG) crane, which was historically available only with a diesel engine. Electric cable reel RTG cranes, relatively new to the U.S. market, may reduce port crane operating costs due to their lower energy costs, higher energy efficiencies, and longer equipment life. E...

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Fresh Look at Integrating Supply-Side and Demand-Side Resources Speaker(s): Bill Kelly Robert Redlinger Date: January 19, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn The restructuring of the California electricity industry has not proceeded as intended. A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices, power outages, and a political and financial crisis for the State. This crisis will not be solved through increasing electricity supply alone. Energy industry observers agree that 1.) energy efficiency, 2.) distributed on-site generation, and 3.) price

112

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas, 2009­04­11). Plug-in vehicles, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric

Michalek, Jeremy J.

113

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

England. Huber, W. 1997. "Standby Power Consumption in U.S.1997. "Study on miscellaneous standby power consumption ofC. Murakoshi. 1997. " Standby Electricity Consumption in

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

OpenEI - Unit Cost Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at University of Texas at Austin http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode62

Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage...

115

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: a technology1998. An assessment of electric vehicle life cycle costs tothe benets of electric vehicles. Union of Concerned

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Forecasting Electric Vehicle Costs with Experience Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April, 5. R 2~1. Dino. "Forecasting the Price Evolution of 1ElectromcProducts," Ioumal of Forecasting, oL4, No I, 1985.costs and a set of forecasting tools that can be refined as

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Definition: Reduced Ancillary Service Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary Service Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary services are necessary to ensure the reliable and efficient operation of the grid. The level of ancillary services required at any point in time is determined by the grid operator and/or energy market rules. Ancillary services, including spinning reserve and frequency regulation, could be reduced if generators could more closely follow load; peak load on the system was reduced; power factor, voltage, and VAR control were improved; or information available to grid operators were improved.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms ancillary service, frequency regulation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in

119

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past June 7, 2012 - 2:48pm Addthis Franklin County Courthouse (Before) 1 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (Before) A court employee and news photographer survey the bomb damage in the Franklin County Courthouse's main courtroom in November 1969. Image: Courtesy of the Washington Missourian. Franklin County Courthouse (After) 2 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (After) The fully restored main courtroom includes the original 1930s paint colors and reproduction lighting. Image: Sallie Glaize Franklin County, MO Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy People across the country are looking for ways to make homes and buildings

120

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation November 19, 2013 - 3:49pm Addthis A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine cuts a thin steel plate that will be formed into lighting fixture housing. Wisconsin-based Eaton Corporation is developing a new manufacturing process that streamlines LED fixture designs. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine cuts a thin steel plate that will be formed into lighting fixture housing. Wisconsin-based Eaton Corporation is developing a new manufacturing process that streamlines LED fixture designs. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation A goniometer measures the photometric output distribution of an outdoor LED street light fixture. Researchers at Eaton are developing a new manufacturing process will enable LED chips to sit directly on heat sinks, improving heat transfer. | Photo courtesy of Eaton Corporation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs March 1, 2010 - 4:34am Addthis Using SiGen's new cutting process, less material is wasted in creating solar products like this, a breakthrough that is expected to help make solar power more affordable. | Photo courtesy SiGen Using SiGen's new cutting process, less material is wasted in creating solar products like this, a breakthrough that is expected to help make solar power more affordable. | Photo courtesy SiGen Joshua DeLung Silicon Genesis is a San Jose, Calif., company that is advancing the field of solar energy by developing a process that will virtually eliminate all waste when cutting materials needed to implement solar technology.

122

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past June 7, 2012 - 2:48pm Addthis Franklin County Courthouse (Before) 1 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (Before) A court employee and news photographer survey the bomb damage in the Franklin County Courthouse's main courtroom in November 1969. Image: Courtesy of the Washington Missourian. Franklin County Courthouse (After) 2 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (After) The fully restored main courtroom includes the original 1930s paint colors and reproduction lighting. Image: Sallie Glaize Franklin County, MO Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy People across the country are looking for ways to make homes and buildings

123

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Scheduling for Electricity Cost in Smart Grid Mihai Burcea1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheduling for Electricity Cost in Smart Grid Mihai Burcea1, , Wing-Kai Hon2 , Hsiang-Hsuan Liu2 management in smart grid. Consumers send in power requests with a flexible set of timeslots during which arising in "demand response manage- ment" in smart grid [7, 9, 18]. The electrical smart grid is one

Wong, Prudence W.H.

125

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Implementing Energy Efficiency in Wastewater to Reduce Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the industrial world creating a quality product at minimum cost is the goal. In this environment all expenses are scrutinized, when they are part of the manufacturing process. However, even at the most conscientious facility the wastewater system is often overlooked, just plain accepted as is. At many locations facility personnel are completely unaware of utility costs but more importantly they are not aware of their energy consumption. The Wisconsin Focus on Energy Industrial Program has surveyed and assessed many municipal and industrial wastewater systems across the state, identified opportunities to save energy and assisted in implementing energy efficiency modifications without adversely impacting the quality of the treatment system or the manufacturing process. In many instances not only did the energy efficiency modification result in reduced energy consumption and costs, it also reduced maintenance and down time while improving effluent quality. Most of the opportunities that were implemented were installed while the manufacturing operations remained in operation.

Cantwell, J. C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we examine some specific opportunities toreduce standby losses in electronic appliances. A review of powerconsumption levels for the major components responsible for standbyfunctions indicates that nearly all standby functions can be performedwith a total appliance standby power consumption of one watt or less. Wetherefore propose that standby losses be limited to one watt perappliance, a significant reduction from current levels for manyappliances. This target could be achieved with little or no extra cost tomanufacturers and could save over $2 billion in annual U.S. energy costs.Globally, a one-watt plan would lead to a significant reduction in carbonemissions.

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EFFECT OF REDUCED U-235 PRICE ON FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the effect of changes in natural uranium cost and in separative work charges on fuel cycle costs in nuclear power plants. Reactors considered were a Dresden-type boiling water reactor (BWR) and a Yankee- type pressurized water reactor (PWR), with net power ratings of 100, 300, and 500 Mwe. Fuel cycle costs were calculated for these reactors, using either enriched uranium or U/sup 235/-thorium as the fuel material. The price schedule for uranium was based on a feed material cost of /kg uranium as UF/sub 6/ and separative work costs of /kg uranium (Schedule B) and /kg uranium (Schedule C). The present AEC price schedule for enriched uranium was also used for purposes of a reference case. The results indicate that a reduction in present enriched uranium price to that given by Schedule B would reduce fuel cycle costs for the BWR plants by 0.4 to 0.5 mill/kwh for the enriched-uranium cycle, and 0.4 to 0.7 mill/kwh for the thorium cycle. Reductions in fuel cycle costs for the PWR plants were 0.5 to 0.7 and 0.4 to 0.75 mill/kwh, respectively, for the same situations. (auth)

Bennett, L.L.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Will electricity market reform likely reduce retail rates?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To win public support, proponents for electricity market reform to introduce competition often promise that the post-reform retail rates will be lower than the average embedded cost rates that would have prevailed under the status quo of a regulated monopoly. A simple economic analysis shows that such a promise is unlikely to occur without the critical assumption that the post-reform market has marginal costs below average costs. (author)

Woo, C.K.; Zarnikau, Jay

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

132

Strategies to address transition costs in the electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Transition costs are the potential monetary losses that electric- utility shareholders, ratepayers, or other parties might experience because of structural changes in the electricity industry. Regulators, policy analysts, utilities, and consumer groups have proposed a number of strategies to address transition costs, such as immediately opening retail electricity markets or delaying retail competition. This report has 3 objectives: identify a wide range of strategies available to regulators and utilities; systematically examine effects of strategies; and identify potentially promising strategies that may provide benefits to more than one set of stakeholders. The many individual strategies are grouped into 6 major categories: market actions, depreciation options, rate-making actions, utility cost reductions, tax measures, and other options. Of the 34 individual strategies, retail ratepayers have primary or secondary responsibility for paying transition costs in 19 of the strategies, shareholders in 12, wheeling customers in 11, taxpayers in 8, and nonutility suppliers in 4. Most of the strategies shift costs among different segments of the economy, although utility cost reductions can be used to offset transition costs. Most of the strategies require cooperation of other parties, including regulators, to be implemented successfully; financial stakeholders must be engages in negotiations that hold the promise of shared benefits. Only by rejecting ``winner-take-all`` strategies will the transition-cost issue be expeditiously resolved.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting these comments in response to the above-referenced request for information (RFI) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE). In the RFI, DOE is again asking for information on ways to streamline and to reduce the burden imposed by its regulations. Reg review - DOE RFI - EEI cmts 5-29-12.pdf More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 47328 EEI Comments in response to DOE regulatory review RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798

136

Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major problem associated with energy conservation projects is how to estimate the financial savings associated with a reduction in energy consumption. Although many conservation projects can be implemented in a matter of months, the energy savings may extend over a period of years or decades. The decision to initiate a conservation project often hinges upon the favorable outcome of an "engineering economics" or "present worth" analysis which compares present costs and future incomes. For a conservation project, four sets of data are required for the economic analysis: project cost, rate of return or discount rate, the amount of energy saved, and the future price of energy. Estimating the future price of electricity requires considerable effort since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used to estimate system costs for an electric utility with various mixes of power plants. The electricity costs can then be used to determine the economic value of various conservation projects.

Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Review of cost estimates for reducing CO2 emissions. Final report, Task 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the ground breaking work of William Nordhaus in 1977, cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions have been developed by numerous groups. The various studies have reported sometimes widely divergent cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Some recent analyses have indicated that large reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions could be achieved at zero or negative costs (e.g. Rocky Mountain Institute 1989). In contrast, a recent study by Alan Manne of Stanford and Richard Richels of the Electric Power Research Institute (Manne-Richels 1989) concluded that in the US the total discounted costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 20 percent below the 1990 level could be as much as 3.6 trillion dollars over the period from 1990 to 2100. Costs of this order of magnitude would represent about 5 percent of US GNP. The purpose of this briefing paper is to summarize the different cost estimates for CO{sub 2} emission reduction and to identify the key issues and assumptions that underlie these cost estimates.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% oncommissioning project costs and savings. Commissioning isproportional to total project cost. The nature of activities

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Tri-State's service area includes parts of Fannin County, Georgia; Polk County, Tennessee; and Cherokee County, North Carolina. Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs Tri-State Electric Membership Cooperative (Tri-State) is a distribution rural electric cooperative that primarily serves more than 12,000 rural customers, many of whom have low-incomes living at or near poverty level across a multi-state region (see map). Under their smart grid project, Tri-State has replaced conventional electromechanical meters with solid-state smart meters and implemented advanced electricity service programs in order to give customers greater control over their energy use and costs.

142

A stochastic model for the measurement of electricity outage costs  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

Grosfeld-Nir, A.; Tishler, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

New electric technologies to reduce global warming impacts  

SciTech Connect

Advanced electric technologies hold significant potential to reduce global warming impact through reduction of primary fuel needed to power end-use applications. These reductions can occur in two forms: (1) reduced kilowatt-hour usage and power plant emissions through efficiency improvements and technological enhancements of existing electrically-driven applications; (2) the development of new electric technologies to replace traditional fossil-fuel driven applications which can result in less overall primary energy consumption and lower overall emissions. Numerous new electric technologies are presently being developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. The technologies reviewed in this paper include: Microwave Fabric Dryer, Advanced Heat Pumps, Heat Pump Water Heater, Infrared Sand Reclaimer, Freeze Concentration, Membrane Water Recovery, Microwave Petrochemical Production, Infrared Drying, and Electric Vehicles. Full commercialization of these technologies can result in significant energy savings and CO[sub 2] reductions, in addition to improving the competitiveness of businesses using these technologies.

Courtright, H.A. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Lodging  

SciTech Connect

Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are the loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. This report reviews methods to reduce MELs in lodging.

Rauch, Emily M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

148

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

149

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

150

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

151

Will stranded cost recovery distort Pennsylvania`s electricity market?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is ironic indeed that the forecasting errors of Keystone State utilities that have led to today`s claims of stranded costs are now to be remediated in new legislation which, unaccountably, utterly fails to take account of the same problem: utility forecasting errors. On December 3, 1996, the Governor of Pennsylvania signed into law the Electricity Generation Customer Choice and Competition Act (66 Pa. C.S. 2801 et seq.). The Act set in motion an ambitious timetable for restructuring Pennsylvania`s electric utility industry to substantially deregulate its generation component. Customer choice of electricity supplier is to be phased in over a two year period beginning January 1, 1999. As indicated by the appearance of the word {open_quotes}competition{close_quotes} in the official title of the Act, the resulting institutional transformation is expected to foster free market competition in the generation and retail sale of electricity. However, there is already dispute among the Act`s commentators and critics, who are legion, as to whether its strategy for achieving this commendable objective will produce significant cost savings to consumers any time soon. One need look no further than the Act`s transition cost recovery provisions to find cause for skepticism. Section 2808 of the Act empowers the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to impose, for a period of up to nine years from January 1, 1997 (or longer at the Commission`s discretion), a {open_quotes}competitive transition charge{close_quotes} (CTC) upon {open_quotes}every customer accessing the transmission or distribution network.{close_quotes} The CTC is intended to afford Pennsylvania`s regulated electric utilities the opportunity to recover those of their {open_quotes}transition or stranded costs{close_quotes} (collectively {open_quotes}stranded costs{close_quotes}) approved by the Commission.

Caplan, R.L. [Caplan & Luber, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix to develop its 7700 Amonix to develop its 7700 system, which drastically reduces the requirement for costly solar cells by using Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight 500 times onto small, highly efficient photovoltaic cells. This reduces the cell area so that expensive solar cell materials can be replaced with inexpensive plastic lenses. Amonix Inc. (Torrance, CA), founded in 1989, develops and

153

Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial cooling remains one of the largest potential areas for electrical energy savings in industrial plants today. This is in spite of a relatively small amount of attention paid to it by energy auditors and rebate program designers. US DOE tool suites, for example, have long focused on combustion related systems and motor systems with a focus on pumps and compressors. A chilled water tool designed by UMass was available for some time but is no longer being supported by its designers or included in the government tool website. Even with the focus on motor systems, auditing programs like the DOE's Industrial Assessment Center program show dramatically less energy savings for electrical based systems than fossil fueled ones. This paper demonstrates the large amount of increased saving from a critical review of plant chilled water systems with both hardware and operational improvements. After showing several reasons why cooling systems are often ignored during plant energy surveys (their complexity, lack of data on operations etc.), three specific upgrades are considered which have become more reliable and cost effective in the recent past. These include chiller changeouts, right sizing of systems with load matching, and floating head pressures as a retrofit. Considerations of free cooling and improved cooling tower operations are shown as additional "big hitters. It is made clear that with appropriate measurements and an understanding of the cooling system, significant savings can be obtained with reasonable paybacks and low risk.

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Incremental cost of electricity used as backup for passive heated homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of passive technologies on a north-central US utility has been studied. A method of utility cost and fuel use analysis, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to compute the long run incremental costs and incremental fuel use required for supplementary electricity to houses with Trombe walls or with direct gain features. For comparison, a reference house with no passive features and a house with an energy conservation design were also analyzed. The results show that the total long run incremental cost to the utility of providing supplementary power to the passive houses costs no more than the cost to supply electricity to heat the reference house or the conservation house. An analysis of the annual homeowner costs for the various types of heating systems suggests that the Trombe wall technology is not promising for use in this climate. The passive technologies, as modelled in this study reduced the requirements for conventional energy by about 10% (7 to 10 kilojoules/year). For all of the house types studied, the use of electricity for heating, instead of oil or gas, reduced the overall (utility plus residential) use of oil or gas by only about 30 to 40% even out through the 1990's.

Martorella, J; Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgDesigning Renewable Electricity Policies to Reduce Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of renewable electricity policies to promote investment in wind, solar, and other types of renewable generators exist across the United States. The federal renewable energy investment tax credit, the federal renewable energy production tax credit, and state renewable portfolio standards are among the most notable. Whether the benefits of promoting new technology and reducing pollution emissions from the power sector justify these policies costs has been the subject of considerable debate. We argue in this paper that the debate is misguided because it does not consider two important interactions between renewable electricity generators and the rest of the power system. First, the value of electricity from a renewable generators depends on the generation and investment it displaces. Second, a large increase in renewable generation can reduce electricity prices, increasing consumption and emissions from fossil generators, and offsetting some of the environmental benefits of the policies. Two policy conclusions follow. First, existing renewable electricity policies can be redesigned to promote investment in the highest-value generators, which can greatly reduce the cost of achieving a given emissions reduction. Second, subsidies financed out of general tax revenue reduce emissions less than subsidies financed by charges to electricity consumers.

Reduce Emissions; Harrison Fell; Joshua Linn; Clayton Munnings

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electricity Cost and Firm Performance: Evidence from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the widely acknowledged importance of infrastructure for economic growth, there has been relatively little research on how infrastructure affects the decisions of firms. Using data on Indian manufacturing firms, this paper provides evidence on how electricity prices affect a firms industry choice and productivity growth. I construct an instrument for electricity price as the interaction between the price of coal paid by power utilities, which is arguably exogenous to firm characteristics, and the initial share of thermal generation in a states total electricity generation capacity. I find that, in response to an exogenous increase in electricity price, firms reduce their electricity consumption and switch to industries with less electricity-intensive production processes. I also find that firm output, machine intensity and labor productivity decline with an increase in electricity price. In addition to these level effects, I show that firm output and productivity growth rates are negatively affected by high electricity prices. These results suggest that electricity constraints faced by firms may limit a countrys growth by leading firms to operate in industries with fewer productivity-enhancing opportunities.

Ama Baafra Abeberese

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines for monitoring and tracking of utilities are provided. These recommendations, methods, and guidelines are the result of on-site work for schools and hospitals . Recently completed energy usage survey and observations of several hospitals in Texas are included. Opportunities exist for schools, hospitals, and other buildings t o achieve significant dollar savings by good utility management. Understanding utility rate structures is essential for minimizing energy costs. The authors' data is for Texas schools and hospitals, but the principles presented apply to other geographic areas.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

159

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE: PROSPECTS FOR REDUCING ITS COST  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh would make nuclear power competitive with conventional power in lowcost coal areas if capital and operating costs can be brought to within about 10 percent of those of coal-fired plants. Substantial decreases in fuel fabrication cost are anticipated by 1970: other costs in the fuel cycle are expccted to remain about the same as at present. Unit costs and irradiation levels that would be needed to give a fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh are believed to be attainable by 1970. (auth)

Albrecht, W.L.

1959-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Capping the electricity cost of cloud-scale data centers with impacts on power markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel electricity cost capping algorithm that not only minimizes the electricity cost of operating cloud-scale data centers, but also enforces a cost budget on the monthly electricity bill. Our solution first explicitly models the impacts of power demands on electricity prices and the power consumption of cooling and networking in the minimization of electricity cost. In the second step, if the electricity cost exceeds a desired monthly budget due to unexpectedly high workloads, our solution guarantees the quality of service for premium customers and trades off the request throughput of ordinary customers. We formulate electricity cost capping as two related constrained optimization problems and propose an efficient algorithm based on mixed integer programming. Simulation results show that our solution outperforms the state-ofthe-art solutions by having lower electricity costs and achieves desired cost capping with maximized request throughput.

Yanwei Zhang; Yefu Wang; Xiaorui Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Cost-Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payerfunded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy prices, income, and weather. We estimate that model using nonlinear least squares for two different utility samples. Based on the results for the most complete sample, we find that DSM expenditures over the last 18 years have resulted in a central estimate of 1.1 percent electricity savings at a weighted average cost to utilities (or other program funders) of about 6 cents per kWh saved. Econometrically-based policy simulations find that incremental DSM spending by utilities that had no or relatively low levels of average DSM spending per customer in 2006 could produce 14 billion kWh in additional savings at an expected incremental cost to the utilities of about 3 cents per kWh saved.

Toshi H. Arimura; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Does EIA have data on the costs for electricity transmission and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA does not have data on the costs to build or operate electricity transmission lines and distribution networks. However, ...

167

Improve Performance and Reduce Cost of Any Lithium-Ion Battery  

TM Microstructured components for high-performance lithium batteries www.porouspower.com Symmetrix - Improve Performance & Reduce Cost of Any ...

168

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs February 19, 2009 - 1:39pm Addthis Water heating can account for a significant portion of your energy costs. Purchasing a new ENERGY STAR® water heater is just one way to save on your water heating bills. The Energy Savers Tips site lists other strategies you can use to cut your water heating costs. How do you reduce your water heating costs? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Energy Savers Guide: Tips on Saving Money and Energy at Home How Do You Save on Lighting Costs? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs

170

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

171

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

SciTech Connect

Many domestic appliances and commercial equipment consume some electric power when they are switched off or not performing their primary purpose. The typical loss per appliance is low (from 1 to 25 W) but, when multiplied by the billions of appliances in houses and in commercial buildings, standby losses represent a significant fraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to reduce standby losses have appeared in different parts of the world. One proposal, the 1-watt plan, seeks to harmonize these initiatives by establishing a single target for all appliances. This paper explains the background to the 1-watt plan, identifies some unresolved aspects, and gives some estimates of energy savings.

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjrn Sdal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bringing Electric Cars to Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation choices toward reduced social and envi- Electric Performance, and and Cooperative Development, ronmental costs.

Sperling, Daniel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Costs with an Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School ener- gy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002-and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and 2006. Improving a school's energy efficiency doesn't have to cost millions. In fact, schools can cut their energy expenses by 5 to 20 percent simply by efficiently managing and operating physical plants. This holds true regardless of the age of a school building. A smart O&M program can improve an existing school's energy performance An O&M program can be a simple initiative or a

175

Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

Berry, D.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cost-reduced Cable Delivery for the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the issue of cost-effective optical fibre cable delivery within current projections of fibre build. The implications are generally valid for fibre to the home (FTTH), but additional considerations will apply. The challenge lies in ...

A. J. Mayhew; D. J. Stockton

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renew- ables, The Electricity Journal, Volume 14 (2001),from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill VolatilityReal- Time Retail Electricity Pricing, Energy Journal,28(

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borenstein, Severin. Electricity Rate Structures and thePrice of Electricity Annual Real Interest Rate DiscountedReal Price of Electricity Annual Real Interest Rate Table 4:

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Opportunities for reducing product costs in indirect liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MITRE indirect liquefaction simulation model for the advanced configuration that includes Shell gasification and slurry-phase F-T synthesis was downsized to coincide with the Bechtel/Amoco conceptual plant with a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per stream day. Then the kinetic parameters used by Bechtel/Amoco in the slurry F-T model were substituted in the model. This resulted in the same per pass conversion and in the same number of reactors as estimated in the Bechtel basecase. The total capital cost for this plant was estimated to be $2982 million using the MITRE model. This agrees well with the preliminary Bechtel/Amoco capital cost of $2961 million for the same size plant(3). Once the WM simulation of the basecase plant was shown to be in agreement with the Bechtel/Amoco case, the analysis of further potential cost reductions beyond the basecase could be investigated. This analysis only investigated the potential cost reductions that could result from improvements in the F-T area of the conceptual plant. This is the area that is impacted by the research and development underway in the indirect program. The cost impact of the following potential improvements were investigated using the MITRE simulation model: Doubling the baseline catalyst activity; doubling the catalyst loading; and doubling the superficial gas velocity.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; ElSawy, A. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Lithium-Ion Battery Cost and Advanced Battery Technologies Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batteries are a critical cost factor for plug-in electric vehicles, and the current high cost of lithium ion batteries poses a serious challenge for the competitiveness of Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEVs). Because the market penetration of PEVs will depend heavily on future battery costs, determining the direction of battery costs is very important. This report examines the cost drivers for lithium-ion PEV batteries and also presents an assessment of recent advancements in the growing attempts to ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicles Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehiclestires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Available Technologies: Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a method that reduces the expense of capturing carbon dioxide generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. This technology ...

184

Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost - Energy Innovation ...  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a method that reduces the expense of capturing carbon dioxide generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. This technology ...

185

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. 2004. Electricity Transmission in aInterruptions to U.S. Electricity Customers. September. (Cost Models in Electricity Planning and Pricing.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. MELs are a large percentage of total building energy loads. This report reviews methods for reducing MELs in Banks. Reducing MELs in a bank setting requires both local and corporate action. Corporate action centers on activities to prioritize and allocate the right resources to correct procurement and central control issues. Local action includes branch assessment or audits to identify specific loads and needs. The worksheet at the end of this guide can help with cataloging needed information and estimating savings potential. The following steps provide a guide to MEL reductions in Bank Branches. The general process has been adapted from a process developed for office buildings the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, 2011).

Rauch, Emily M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

189

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Costs Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

190

O&M First! Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs Heating accounts for a significant energy load and usually presents a number of opportunities to improve performance and...

191

Hybrid vehicle potential assessment. Volume 10. Electric and hybrid vehicle cost handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this interim cost handbood is to provide a consistent single-point source of data and procedures for estimating the costs of electric and hybrid vehicles. These costs include manufacturing, acquisition (purchase price), operating, and life cycle. Each suggested Cost Estimating Relation (CER) presented herein is a result of the compilation of currently existing cost estimates and cost relationships. No independent cost analysis was performed for this handbook, nor was any analysis performed to rework existing cost data for consistency in all primary assumptions. The cost data is presented in terms of major component and subassembly costs so that any vehicle (electric, hybrid, or conventional) can be costed. The cost estimating relations presented in this handbook are subjective averages of the several independent estimates for each component.

Heft, R.C.; Heller, S.C.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Competition Work in Electricity. John Wiley and Sons.Report on the New York Electricity Markets. June. Patton,Market Report: New York Electricity Markets. April. PJM (PJM

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auto Industry Models to Review Electric Vehicle Costing andElectric Vehicles in the Nation's Energy Future , DE86-003295, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, November (1984). Auto industry

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjusting for Time-Varying Production SACRAMENTO flat-rateSolar Photovoltaic Electricity Production Severin BorensteinPhotovoltaic Electricity Production Severin Borenstein 1

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) two-way communications which allow customers to monitor their electricity consumption and take steps to better manage their electric bills; 2) a voluntary, pre-payment...

197

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wholesale electricity trade, and enable consumers to seekelectricity markets rely on offer-based, centralized, wholesale tradeas reported in the trade press. These electricity hub prices

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during electricity transmission and distribution increasesand distribution infrastructure if less electricity needselectricity, and also ignores the potential savings in transmission and distribution

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs 7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems November 15, 2011 - 4:52pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative, Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $7 million to reduce the non-hardware costs of residential and commercial solar energy installations. Made available through the SunShot Incubator Program, this funding will support the development of tools and approaches that reduce non-hardware, or "soft" costs, such as installation, permitting, interconnection, and inspection. These expenses can amount to up to half of the cost of residential systems. The Incubator will make the process of

200

Low-cost load research for electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) developed two pragmatic approaches to meet most load-research objectives at a substantially lower cost than would be incurred with traditional techniques. GVEA serves three customer classes, with most of its load in the Fairbanks area. GVEA's new approaches simulate load curves for individual customer classes to the degree necessary to meet most load-research objectives for the utility, including applications to cost-of-service analysis, rate design, demand-side management, and load forecasting. These approaches make class load-shape information available to utilities that cannot otherwise afford to develop such data. Although the two approaches were developed for a small utility, they are likely to work at least as well for medium and large utilities. The first approach simulates class curves by combining load data from system feeders with information on customer mix and energy usage. GVEA's supervisory control and data acquisition system gives hourly data on feeder loads, and its billing database provides the number of customers and kilowatt-hour usage by customer class on each feeder. The second approach enhances load-research results by redefining target parameters. Data from several like-hours are used to calculate substitutes for the parameters traditionally defined from single-hour data points. The precision of peak responsibility estimates, for example, can be improved if several of the highest hourly demands in a given time period are used rather than the single highest hourly demand. Arguably, use of several highest hourly demands can also improve the reliability of the allocation of responsibility.

Gray, D.A.; Butcher, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

202

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, ... How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants?

203

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants 2006 and 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0191(2007) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants 2006 and 2007 December 2008 Energy Information Administration

204

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

206

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities use more electricity for distribution (48 millionthe most electricity for distribution. For the utilitiesUse Treatment electricity cost Distribution electricity use

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Emission Cuts Realities Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electric power transmission and distribution systems: costs and their allocation. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Transmission and distribution costs contribute significantly to the total costs of providing electrical service. The costs derived from the transmission and distribution (TandD) system have historically comprised about 2/3 the costs of producing and delivering electricity to residential-commercial customers, and over 1/3 the total costs supplying electricity to large industrial customers. This report: (1) estimates the differences in transmission and distribution equipment required to serve industrial and residential-commercial customers and allocates to the above two customer classes the average costs of installing this equipment; (2) estimates the costs of operation and maintenance of the transmission and distribution system, and allocates these costs to the customer classes; and (3) calculates the TandD derived average costs for the two customer classes. (GRA)

Baughman, M.L.; Bottaro, D.J.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

212

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down January 13, 2012 - 1:29pm Addthis Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager The record number of electric-drive vehicles on the floor of Detroit's

213

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called "antiquated" and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability

214

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations June 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the availability of more than $27 million in new funding that will reduce the non-hardware costs of solar energy projects, a critical element in bringing down the overall costs of installed solar energy systems. The funding will support a $12.5 million challenge to encourage cities and counties to compete to streamline and digitize permitting processes, as

215

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, 27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations June 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the availability of more than $27 million in new funding that will reduce the non-hardware costs of solar energy projects, a critical element in bringing down the overall costs of installed solar energy systems. The funding will support a $12.5 million challenge to encourage cities and counties to compete to streamline and digitize permitting processes, as

216

Reducing the cost of quality (COQ) through increased product reliability and reduced process variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Dell, Inc. (Dell) spends millions of dollars each year to prevent product defects from reaching the end customer and to manage those product defects that have escaped to the end customer. The cost of the equipment, ...

Schiveley, Steven C. (Steven Charles), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Report: New York Electricity Markets. April. PJM (PJM Interconnection, LLC).2002. PJM Interconnection State of the Market Report 2001.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per kWh produced than baseload coal, nuclear or combined-even. The model includes a baseload technology with high ?annual production cost are: Baseload (coal) Cost = $208247/M

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Definition: Reduced T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost The cost of sending technicians into the field to check equipment condition is high. Moreover, to ensure that they maintain equipment sufficiently, and identify failure precursors, some utilities may conduct equipment testing and maintenance more often than is necessary. Online diagnosis and reporting of equipment condition would reduce or eliminate the need to send people out to check equipment resulting in a cost savings.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_T%26D_Equipment_Maintenance_Cost&oldid=417296"

223

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

224

OR Forum---Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been touted as a transportation technology with lower fuel costs and emissions impacts than other vehicle types. Most analyses of PHEVs assume that the power system operator can either directly or indirectly ... Keywords: environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Ramteen Sioshansi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-058 Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong? Richard Green Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;Electricity Transmission optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops

California at Berkeley. University of

226

Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Cost of Transmission for Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 1 The Cost of Transmission Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 2009 #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Implications and Future Work #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 3 Motivation

227

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007: $91 million (both in Real $2007) n EIA staff resource distribution has tracked changing energy markets and information needs Resource Management Oil & Gas Coal, Nuclear, Electric, Alt Fuels Energy Markets & End Use Integrated Analysis / Forecasting Information Technology

229

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are a form of distributed generation. The current directPV. As a form of distributed generation, solar PV is alsoprovisions for distributed generation. hour when electricity

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

231

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

233

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Enables Energy Efficiency Strategies, Ongoing Commissioning and Improved Operational Control Harry Sim CEO Cypress Envirosystems harry.sim@cypressenvirosystems.com www.cypressenvirosystems.com NASA Ames Reduced Project Cost by Over 80% with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies * Legacy Pneumatic Thermostats  Waste energy  High maintenance costs  Uncomfortable occupants  No visibility * Project Scope  14 buildings  1,370 pneumatic thermostats  Integration with campus BAS  Diagnostics for ongoing commissioning * Traditional DDC Retrofit  Cost over $4.1 million  Asbestos exposure/abatement  Occupants significantly disrupted

234

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Validated Feasibility Study of Integrally Stiffened Metallic Fuselage Panels for Reducing Manufacturing Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continual need to reduce airframe cost and the emergence of high speed machining and other manufacturing technologies has brought about a renewed interest in large-scale integral structures for aircraft applications. Applications have been inhibited, ...

Pettit R. G.; Wang J. J.; Toh C.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fossil Energy RD&D: Reducing the Cost of CCUS for Coal Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy RD&D: Reducing the Cost of CCUS for Coal Power Plants Revision 1, January 31, 2012 DOENETL-20121550 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

237

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

School Project Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project EnergySmart Schools fact sheet on how school operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel can play a...

238

Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases the Market Potential of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol prices depend heavily on the cost of the cellulase enzymes used to break down the biomass into fermentable sugars. To reduce these costs, NREL partnered with two leading enzyme companies, Novozymes and Genencor, to engineer new cellulase enzymes that are exceptionally good at breaking down cellulose. Genencor is now part of DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed intention to install, provides the means for obtaining lower purchased power costs. The functionality of a standby power system and its inherent value in the coming free market purchase of electrical energy are added benefits. Project feasibility, conceptual design, on-site generation facility requirements, interconnection requirements, and operation and maintenance costs will be examined. Installation costs in the range of $350 to $400 per KW and operating costs of approximately $0.06 to $0.07 per kWhr compared to purchased power rates determine the feasibility of an on-site generation system. In some cases avoided demand charges offer an opportunity for savings such that special rates are not needed for a feasible project. Depending on the manufacturer, low capital cost diesel generators are available in 1000 to 2000 KW blocks. Capacity requirements determine the number of engines required. Large capacity installations are somewhat restricted by voltage and current ratings. Some variants for multiple engine generator installations will yield greater reliability or lower costs depending on objectives. Specific requirements for basic building blocks of an on-site generation system will be examined as well as an example of a 5,500 KW installation. IEA provides an alternative to installing and operating an on-site generation system. IEA owns and operates diesel standby generation systems for customers, with responsibility for all maintenance and operation as well as associated costs. This allows customers to focus on core business, not the generation of electrical energy.

Charles, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modeling of Cost Curves 1.0 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs. Some typical average costs of fuel are given in the following table for coal, petroleum [1] Petroleum [2] Natural Gas [3] All Fossil Fuels Receipts (Billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion

McCalley, James D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Introduction to the OR Forum Article: Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions by Ramteen Sioshansi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comment on Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions by Ramteen Sieshansi. Keywords: energy, environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Edieal J. Pinker

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by low price caps, the di?erence between solar PV powersolar PV power using hourly wholesale electricity prices and5. Real-time Prices for Valuing the Power from Solar PVs As

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have seen several electricity rate structure changes in thefor more electricity, and those on reduced rates have morerate structure was introduced that increased the cost of electricity

Lai, Judy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost of Advanced Fuel Cells Minnesota Company 3M Awarded $3 Million by Energy Department to Reduce Cost of Advanced Fuel Cells March 29, 2012 - 4:20pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above approach to American energy, the Energy Department today announced the investment of $3 million to 3M Company in St. Paul, Minnesota, to lower the cost of advanced fuel cell systems by developing cost-effective, durable, and highly efficient fuel cell components. The 3-year project will focus on boosting the performance of fuel cell systems for vehicles and stationary applications while driving down costs. These investments are a part of the Department's commitment to U.S. leadership in innovative fuel cell

245

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

246

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting April 14, 2010 What's On the Minds of Your Utilities?  Transformation of the Electricity Industry  Emerging smart technology  Financial reform  Reliability  Major initiatives to address climate change  Gaps / Lack of Clarity in Federal / State Decisions on Infrastructure and Market Issues  Operating in a carbon constrained world EEI  Our members serve 95% of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry,  and represent approximately 70% of the U.S. electric power industry.  We also have more than 80 international electric companies as Affiliate Members  Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and

247

Hotel dual-cogeneration plant saving 33% on electricity costs  

SciTech Connect

Hotel Del Coronado in California has two cogeneration systems in operation, one gas turbine based, the other an advanced solar photovoltaic installation which cuts its electric bill by $400,000 per year. In order to make the new installation as unobstrusive as possible, the gas turbine and waste heat boiler units were placed underground. The sunlight-to-electricity efficiency of the photovoltaic cogeneration system is about 8% and the thermal conversion efficiency about 50%. That makes for an overall 58% cogeneration efficiency. The design uses silicon solar cells specially designed for concentrator application.

Stambler, I.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Potential to Reduce CO2 Emissions by Expanding End-Use Applications of Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the sources of electricity production, the use of electricity can be a contributing factor to net CO2 emissions. What is less obvious is that using efficient end-use electric technologies has the potential save energy and decrease overall CO2 emissions substantially. The two main mechanisms for saving energy and reducing CO2 emissions with electric end-use technologies are (1) upgrading existing electric technologies, processes, and building energy systems; and (2) expanding end-use applica...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499  

SciTech Connect

Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

Smith, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fiscal interactions and the costs of controlling pollution from electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I quantify the costs of controlling SO{sub 2}, carbon, and NOx emissions from power generation, accounting for interactions between environmental policies and the broader fiscal system. I distinguish a dirty technology (coal) that satisfies baseload demand and a clean technology (gas) that is used at peak period, and I distinguish sectors with and without regulated prices. Estimated emissions control costs are substantially lower than in previous models of fiscal interactions that assume a single, constant-returns technology and competitive pricing. The results are reasonably robust to alternative scenarios, such as full price deregulation, and market power in the deregulated sector.

Parry, I.W.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry  

SciTech Connect

The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns about natural gas prices and the findings reportedACEEE). 2003. Natural Gas Price Effects of Energy EfficiencyGas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Electrically operated magnetic switch designed to display reduced leakage inductance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically operated magnetic switch is disclosed herein for use in opening and closing a circuit between two terminals depending upon the voltage across these terminals. The switch so disclosed is comprised of a ferrite core in the shape of a toroid having opposing ends and opposite inner and outer sides and an arrangement of electrically conductive components defining at least one current flow path which makes a number of turns around the core. This arrangement of components includes a first plurality of electrically conducive rigid rods parallel with and located outside the outer side of the core and a second plurality of electrically conductive rigid rods parallel with and located inside the inner side of the core. The arrangement also includes means for electrically connecting these rods together so that the define the current flow path. In one embodiment, this latter means uses rigid cross-tab means. In another, preferred embodiment, printed circuits on rigid dielectric substrates located on opposite ends of the core are utilized to interconnect the rods together.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electrically operated magnetic switch designed to display reduced leakage inductance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically operated magnetic switch is disclosed herein for use in opening and closing a circuit between two terminals depending upon the voltage across these terminals. The switch so disclosed is comprised of a ferrite core in the shape of a toroid having opposing ends and opposite inner and outer sides and an arrangement of electrically conductive components defining at least one current flow path which makes a number of turns around the core. This arrangement of components includes a first plurality of electrically conducive rigid rods parallel with and located outside the outer side of the core and a second plurality of electrically conductive rigid rods parallel with and located inside the inner side of the core. The arrangement also includes means for electrically connecting these rods together so that the define the current flow path. In one embodiment, this latter means uses rigid cross-tab means. In another, preferred embodiment, printed circuits on rigid dielectric substrates located on opposite ends of the core are utilized to interconnect the rods together. 10 figures.

Cook, E.G.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Reducing Operations and Maintenance Costs of Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses opportunities for utilities to reduce fire protection operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. A number of these opportunities have been implemented by some utilities and can be implemented now by others. Other opportunities can be implemented in the short term with some additional development. These other opportunities are amenable to cooperative projects with costs shared by multiple utilities. There is also a group of opportunities that are probably best developed on an industry w...

1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Direct Costs and Benefits of US Electric Utility Divestitures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We find that divestiture reduces distribution efficiency but increases power sourcing efficiency. Both effects depend on the amount of own nuclear generation output but not fossil-fuel or hydro output. The net present value for all divestitures in our...

Triebs, Thomas P.; Pollitt, Michael G.; Kwoka, John E.

257

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Award-winning alloys could reduce costs for chemical and petrochemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award-winning alloys could reduce costs for chemical and petrochemical Award-winning alloys could reduce costs for chemical and petrochemical industries Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Award-winning alloys could reduce costs for chemical and petrochemical industries This macrophotograph compares commercial nickel-based Alloy 600 (top) and Argonne's new alloy after 5,700 hours of exposure to the same metal-dusting environment at 593°C

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large cooling systems typically represent substantial capital investments and incur high operating energy costs. Cooling loads tend to peak during times of year and times of day when high ambient temperatures create a maximum demand for power, and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand is reduced, time-of day energy costs can be minimized, and real-time variations in power value can be used to the advantage of the energy consumer.

Andrepont, J. S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Addthis Description Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs. Speakers Carlos Alvarez, LeAnn Oliver, Steve Kronheim, Jorge Gonzalez, Kathleen Woods-Richardson Duration 2:05 Topic Commercial Heating & Cooling Energy Sources Innovation Energy Economy Energy Sector Jobs Credit Energy Department Video Thank you for coming to celebrate a milestone in Miami-Dade. We are going to be turning biogas into energy. In Miami-Dade County, we've been a leader in the whole sustainability effort. I met with our sustainability

263

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reducing the Vulnerability of Electric Power Grids to Terrorist Attacks  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a cascading outage analyzer that, given an initial disturbance on an electric power system, checks for thermal overloads, under-frequency and over-frequency conditions, and under-voltage conditions that would result in removal of elements from the system. The analyzer simulates the successive tripping of elements due to protective actions until a post-event steady state or a system blackout is reached.

Ross Baldick; Thekla Boutsika; Jin Hur; Manho Joung; Yin Wu; Minqi Zhong

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity in the state. The OSEST project is designed to identify the general configuration of the optimal electric supply system resulting from coordinated system planning and operation from a statewide perspective. The Optimized Generation Planning Program (OGP) and Multi-Area Production Simulation Program with Megawatt Flow (MAPS/MWFLOW) are two computer programs developed by General Electric that are being used in the study. Both of these programs perform production costing calculations to evaluate the performance of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Ragsdale, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Watt when being OFF or on standby. The challenge may appearAction to Reduce Standby Power Waste of Electricalon www.iea.org/standby/ . 18 & 19 .01.99 Siderius Hans-Paul,

Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Styrofoam cups are one of many Styrofoam cups are one of many products made from styrene monomer. Exelus Inc. (Livingston, NJ), established in 2000, develops and licenses "Cleaner-by- Design" chemical technologies to produce a vast array of products and materials used in consumer goods, transportation, and food processing. Currently, the company's principal process technologies are: ExSact - a refining technology that overcomes the environmental concerns, safety hazards and rising costs associated with conventional liquid acid technologies ExSyM - energy efficient, low cost SM production technology BTG - efficient, cost-effective conversion of biomass to clean, high-octane, gasoline-compatible fuel http://www.exelusinc.com/ New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces

275

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New England Wind Forum: Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Figure 1: Average Cumulative Wind and Wholesale Power Prices by Region The chart shows average cumulative wind and wholesale power prices by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version. View a larger version of the graph. In terms of direct costs, larger wind farms in windier areas are now considered economically competitive with "conventional" fossil fuel power plants in many locations. In New England, direct costs for wind power at larger sites with strong winds are approaching the cost of alternatives, particularly given the recent high natural gas and oil prices. Figure 1 compares wind contract prices1 with wholesale electricity market prices in different U.S. regions for 2006. Although not directly comparable to wind prices due to wind's production timing and intermittence, the value of wind Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets, and the cost of wind integration and transmission, the average wholesale market energy price is a good indicator of the cost of alternative generation options. This graph demonstrates several points:

278

Batteries for electric drive vehicles: Evaluation of future characteristics and costs through a Delphi study  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty about future costs and operating attributes of electric drive vehicles (EVs and HEVs) has contributed to considerable debate regarding the market viability of such vehicles. One way to deal with such uncertainty, common to most emerging technologies, is to pool the judgments of experts in the field. Data from a two-stage Delphi study are used to project the future costs and operating characteristics of electric drive vehicles. The experts projected basic vehicle characteristics for EVs and HEVs for the period 2000-2020. They projected the mean EV range at 179 km in 2000, 270 km in 2010, and 358 km in 2020. The mean HEV range on battery power was projected as 145 km in 2000, 212 km in 2010, and 244 km in 2020. Experts` opinions on 10 battery technologies are analyzed and characteristics of initial battery packs for the mean power requirements are presented. A procedure to compute the cost of replacement battery packs is described, and the resulting replacement costs are presented. Projected vehicle purchase prices and fuel and maintenance costs are also presented. The vehicle purchase price and curb weight predictions would be difficult to achieve with the mean battery characteristics. With the battery replacement costs added to the fuel and maintenance costs, the conventional ICE vehicle is projected to have a clear advantage over electric drive vehicles through the projection period.

Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

280

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Reducing Electrical Power Use with a Performance Based Incentive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Departmental Energy Management Program (DEMP) funded Model Program Study developed out of a potential DOE-ID Performance Based Incentive for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), lasting from October 2001 through May 2002, which stressed reductions in electrical usage. An analysis of demand usage obtained from monthly INEEL Power Management electric reports revealed reductions in demand from a majority of the site areas. The purpose of this Model Program study was to determine the methods and activities that were used at these site areas to achieve the reductions in demand and to develop these demand reduction methods and activities into a Model Program that could be shared throughout the INEEL and DOE complex-wide for additional demand savings. INEEL Energy Management personnel interviewed contacts from the eight areas which had achieved a consistent reduction in demand during the study period, namely, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Test Area North (TAN), Power Burst Facility (PBF), Test Reactor Area (TRA) including Advanced Test Reactor ATR), Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), and Materials Test Reactor (MTR) areas, Central Facilities Area (CFA), Specific Manufacturing Capability (SMC), Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANLW). The information that resulted from the interviews indicated that more than direct demand and energy reduction actions were responsible for the recorded reductions in demand. INEEL Energy Management identified five categories of actions or conditions that contributed to the demand reduction. These categories are Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D), employee actions, improvements, inactivation for maintenance, and processes. The following information details the findings from the study.

M. Kathleen Nell

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Develop nickel--zinc battery suitable for electric vehicle propulsion. Task A: design and cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-month design and cost study for the use of nickel--zinc batteries in electric vehicles is presented. Battery configuration is analyzed, and expected performance is set forth. Current development problems concern component materials and capacity decline on cycling, electrolyte maintenance, and thermal characteristics. The manufacturing process is outlined, and estimates are made for cost, materials requirements, capital needs, etc. 61 figures, 24 tables. (RWR)

None

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fischer, William H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Meyer, Jeffry R. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

291

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

293

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

SciTech Connect

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-peak hours for delivery at times of peak usage. These pumped hydro sys

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Estimating the marginal cost of reducing global fossil fuel CO[sub 2] emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates the marginal, total, and average cost and effectiveness of carbon taxes applied either by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) members alone, or as part of a global cooperative strategy, to reduce potential future emissions and their direct implications for employment in the US coal industry. Two sets of cases are examined, one set in which OECD members acts alone, and another set in which the world acts in concert. In each case set taxes are examined which achieve four alternative levels of emissions reduction: halve the rate of emissions growth, no emissions growth, 20[percent] reduction from 1988 levels, and 50[percent] reduction from 1988 levels. For the global cooperation case, carbon tax rates of [dollar sign]32, [dollar sign]113, [dollar sign]161, and [dollar sign]517 per metric ton of carbon (mtC) were needed in the year 2025 to achieve the objectives. Total costs were respectively [dollar sign]40, [dollar sign]178, [dollar sign]253, and [dollar sign]848 billions of 1990 US dollars per year in the year 2025. Average costs were [dollar sign]32, [dollar sign]55, [dollar sign]59, and [dollar sign]135 per mtC. Costs were significantly higher in the cases in which the OECD members states acted alone. OECD member states, acting alone, could not reduce global emissions by 50[percent] or 20[percent] relative to 1988, given reference case assumptions regarding developing and recently planned nations economic growth.

Edmonds, J.; Barns, D.W.; McDonald, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Persuading consumers to reduce their consumption of electricity in the home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous work has identified that providing real time feedback or interventions to consumers can persuade consumers to change behaviour and reduce domestic electricity consumption. However, little work has investigated what exactly those feedback mechanisms ...

Alan F. Smeaton, Aiden R. Doherty

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wireless Smart Sensor Development Update: Applying Technology to Reduce Fire Watch Costs and to Improve Coverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart Sensor product development for the use of fire watch improvement has been initiated by EPRI for the purposes of understanding the current state and/or industry available systems for electronically supporting the performance of existing work activities and/or providing for performance enhancement through cost effective monitoring and automation capabilities. The use of wireless technologies will allow a greater ease of deployment, reduced response time, and increased efficiency for fire watch equipm...

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* Industrial Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA E-mail: mmazumd be sucient production at all times to meet the demand for electric power. If a low-cost generating unit fails variable because it depends upon two uncertain quantities, demand and the availability of the generating

Mazumdar, Mainak

303

Cost and design study for electric vehicle lead--acid batteries  

SciTech Connect

A design and cost study for electric-vehicle lead--acid batteries is presented; a research and development program leading to demonstration and testing of 20- to 30-kWh batteries is proposed. Both flat pasted and tubular positive electrodes are included. Detailed testing programs are set forth. 110 figures, 8 tables (RWR)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

305

Low cost, compact, and high efficiency traction motor for electric and hybrid electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new motor drive, the switched reluctance motor drive, has been developed for hybrid-electric vehicles. The motor drive has been designed, built and tested in the test bed at a near vehicle scale. It has been shown that the switched reluctance motor drive is more suitable for traction application than any other motor drive.

Ehsani, Mark

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P.C. Sernia and G.R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P, vehicle driving range, battery pack lifetime, and potential reductions in system lifecycle cost costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle operation

Walker, Geoff

307

Perception of price when price information is costly: evidence from electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic theory predicts that a well-informed consumer facing multiple prices responds to marginal price rather than to average price because he equates benefits with costs at the margin. The marginal price postulate, however, may not be true if information regarding marginal price is costly. Residential consumption of electricity is an example of a good for which it is costly to determine marginal price since the price changes with quantity purchased according to a declining-block schedule. If the cost of determining marginal price exceeds its expected benefits, the consumer will base his consumption on simpler information rather than on marginal price. The most obvious candidate is the monthly bill. Since electricity expenditures are greater than they would be if priced at marginal price, perceived price is anticipated to be higher than marginal price. The model includes a price perception variable that depends on the complexity of the rate structure as measured by the ratio of average to marginal price. Pooled annual data from 1960 to 1980 on the seven Ohio electric utilities are used for estimation. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the residential consumer responds to average price. Further, the expected increase in consumer's surplus, if marginal price were correctly perceived, is calculated at the sample mean and found to be negligible compared to any possible cost of determining marginal price.

Shin, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An estimate of the cost of electricity production from hot-dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an estimate of the cost to produce electricity from hot-dry rock (HDR). Employment of the energy in HDR for the production of electricity requires drilling multiple wells from the surface to the hot rock, connecting the wells through hydraulic fracturing, and then circulating water through the fracture system to extract heat from the rock. The basic HDR system modeled in this paper consists of an injection well, two production wells, the fracture system (or HDR reservoir), and a binary power plant. Water is pumped into the reservoir through the injection well where it is heated and then recovered through the production wells. Upon recovery, the hot water is pumped through a heat exchanger transferring heat to the binary, or working, fluid in the power plant. The power plant is a net 5.1-MW[sub e] binary plant employing dry cooling. Make-up water is supplied by a local well. In this paper, the cost of producing electricity with the basic system is estimated as the sum of the costs of the individual parts. The effects on cost of variations to certain assumptions, as well as the sensitivity of costs to different aspects of the basic system, are also investigated.

Pierce, K.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

310

Comparative costs of flexible package cells and rigid cells for lithium-ionhybrid electric vehicle batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We conducted a design study to compare the manufacturing costs at a level of 100,000 hybrid vehicle batteries per year for flexible package (Flex) cells and for rigid aluminum container (Rigid) cells. Initially, the Rigid cells were considered to have welded closures and to be deep-drawn containers of about the same shape as the Flex cells. As the study progressed, the method of fabricating and sealing the Rigid cells was expanded to include lower cost options including double seaming and other mechanically fastened closures with polymer sealants. Both types of batteries were designed with positive electrodes containing Li(Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} and graphite negative electrodes. The use of a different combination of lithium-ion electrodes would have little effect on the difference in costs for the two types of cells. We found that 20-Ah cells could be designed with excellent performance and heat rejection capabilities for either type of cell. Many parts in the design of the Flex cells are identical or nearly identical to those of the Rigid Cell, so for these features there would be no difference in the cost of manufacturing the two types of batteries. We judged the performance, size and weight of the batteries to be sufficiently similar that the batteries would have the same value for their application. Some of the design features of the Flex cells were markedly different than those of the deep-drawn and welded Rigid cells and would result in significant cost savings. Fabrication and processing steps for which the Flex cells appear to have a cost advantage over these Rigid cells are (1) container fabrication and sealing, (2) terminal fabrication and sealing, and (3) intercell connections. The costs of providing cooling channels adjacent to the cells and for module and battery hardware appear to favor Rigid cell batteries slightly. Overall, Flex cell batteries appear to have an advantage of about $1.20-$3.70 per cell for a 25-kW Battery of 20 cells or about $24 to $74 per battery. Container experts assisted with this study, including a paid consultant and personnel at container manufacturing companies. Some of the companies are considering entering the business of manufacturing containers for hybrid vehicle battery manufacturers. For this reason they provided valuable guidance on overall approaches to reducing the costs of the cell containers. They have retained the description of some specific designs and procedures for future possible work with battery manufacturers, with whom they are now in contact. Through the guidance of these experts, we determined that a new type of container could be manufactured that would have the best features of performance and low cost of both the Rigid and Flex containers. For instance, the aluminum layer in a tri-layer sheet can be sufficiently thick to form a rigid container that can be fabricated in two halves, much like a Flex container, and mechanically joined at the edges for strength. In addition to the mechanical joint, this container can be sealed at the edges, much like a Flex container, by means of an inner polymer liner that can be heat-sealed or ultrasonically welded. The terminals can be flat strips of metal sealed into the top of the container as part of the edge sealing of the container, as for the Flex cell. Ridges can be stamped into one side of the container to provide cooling channels and the exterior layer of the container stock can be coated with a thin, electrically insulating, polymer layer. We expect this type of container will provide excellent sealing and durability and be less expensive than either the Flex or the Rigid container, which the study initially considered. A major cost for the original Rigid container is the welding required for sealing the container. However, the welding of the current collector tabs to the terminal piece may be even more complex and costly than welding the container. It is important, therefore, to develop an inexpensive procedure for attachment of the foils to the terminal pieces. A lower-cost procedure, such as

Nelson, P. A.; Jansen, A. N.

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

312

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anticipated future growth in imported natural gas, reducing natural gas prices may well enhance social welfareEasing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply on the findings of a recent study that I helped manage and conduct, a study titled "Easing the Natural Gas Crisis

313

Research on reducing costs of underground ventilation networks in South African mines / Warren Christopher Kukard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??South Africa is currently facing a major electricity crisis due to the continuous growth in electricity demand. Eskom, the largest electricity supplier in South Africa, (more)

Kukard, Warren Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Photovoltaics for municipal planners. Cost-effective municipal applications of photovoltaics for electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet is intended for city and county government personnel, as well as community organizations, who deal with supplying, regulating, or recommending electric power resources. Specifically, this document deals with photovoltaic (PV) power, or power from solar cells, which is currently the most cost-effective energy source for electricity requirements that are relatively small, located in isolated areas, or difficult to serve with conventional technology. Recently, PV has been documented to be more cost-effective than conventional alternatives (such as line extensions or engine generators) in dozens of applications within the service territories of electric, gas, and communications utilities. Here, we document numerous cost-effective urban applications, chosen by planners and utilities because they were the most cost-effective option or because they were appropriate for environmental or logistical reasons. These applications occur within various municipal departments, including utility, parks and recreation, traffic engineering, transportation, and planning, and they include lighting applications, communications equipment, corrosion protection, irrigation control equipment, remote monitoring, and even portable power supplies for emergency situations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black, Marija Ilic, IEEE Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black This survey contains a sample of the available technologies for implementing residential electricity services understanding of the potential for implementation of residential services. The estimation of the costs

Ilic, Marija D.

316

Labor costs may be reduced . . . Research yields size-controlling rootstocks for peach production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doyle David Ramming Production costs in peaches are highlyby UC and USDA. production costs could be substantiallyDRAFT T he annual production costs for peaches grown in

DeJong, Theodore M.; Johnson, R. Scott; Doyle, James F.; Ramming, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of Low Cost Carbonaceous Materials for Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report on the US DOE CARAT program describes innovative R & D conducted by Superior Graphite Co., Chicago, IL, USA in cooperation with researchers from the Illinois Institute of Technology, and defines the proper type of carbon and a cost effective method for its production, as well as establishes a US based manufacturer for the application of anodes of the Lithium-Ion, Lithium polymer batteries of the Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicles. The three materials each representing a separate class of graphitic carbon, have been developed and released for field trials. They include natural purified flake graphite, purified vein graphite and a graphitized synthetic carbon. Screening of the available on the market materials, which will help fully utilize the graphite, has been carried out.

Barsukov, Igor V.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative-condenser size on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A special study was conducted to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 30/sup 0/F in order to achieve the lowest cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Does Weather Explain the Cost and Quality? An Analysis of UK Electricity Distribution Companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and business consumers are described in Yu et al. (2007). Energy loss (EL) is measured in GWh and valued at average industrial electricity price. The price of Opex and Totex is by convention set to 1. The weather data were obtained from the UK... www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Does Weather Explain the Cost and Quality Performance? An Analysis of UK Electricity Distribution Companies EPRG Working Paper 0827 Cambridge Working Paper...

Yu, William; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

320

Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Z [UNIV OF MANCHESTER; Jaworski, A J [UNIV OF MANCHESTER

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Role of gas and steam turbines to reduce industrial plant energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Data are given to help industry select the economic fuel and economic mix of steam and gas turbines for energy-conservation measures and costs. Utilities and industrials can no longer rely on a firm supply of natural gas to fuel their boilers and turbines. The effect various liquid fuels have on gas turbine maintenance and availability is summarized. Process heat requirements per unit of power, process steam pressure, and the type of fuel will be factors in evaluating the proper mix of steam and gas turbines. The plant requirements for heat, and the availability of a reliable source of electric power will influence the amount of power (hp and kW) that can be economically generated by the industrial. (auth)

Wilson, W.B.; Hefner, W.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-building-electric (WBE) 15-minute interval data is an extremely low-cost, easy approach to reap an immediate reduction in energy consumption. With the advance of lower cost Internet based metering technology integrated with TCP/IP Internet communications, equipment costs and installation issues are not the issues as were in the past. The challenge is to be able to interpret the data and then implement actions to correct operational and equipment problems and anomalies. This paper will address the types of data acquisition equipment and systems available and the different components of a data. Lastly, actual graphs of data will be presented to demonstrate how to dissect and analyze a data set and then implement measures that will optimize operations and maintenance of which will effect a reduction in energy costs.

Herrin, D. G.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates in

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

325

Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Total Cost of Ownership Model for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has grown dramatically in the past three years, but the central question concerning PEV acceptance in the marketplace still remains: When compared to a hybrid or conventional vehicle, is a PEV worth the additional up-front cost to consumers? Given the incomplete understanding of changes in driving patterns due to vehicle purchases, the baseline analysis described in this report does not model customer adaptation, nor does it attempt to address non-tangible ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Unneeded electric plant's cost draws manufacturer shutdown threat  

SciTech Connect

If the Big Rivers Electric Corp. succeeds in raising its rates to cover the cost of surplus capacity resulting from new constrcution, an aluminum smelter threatens to stop manufacturing, which would raise rates even higher for the remaining consumers. Efforts to sell power out of state and to generate financial assistance from the Rural Electrification Administration are underway. The comment period for rate intervenors ends in mid November.

Efron, S.

1984-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A conceptual framework for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of projects to reduce GHG emissions and sequester carbon  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a conceptual framework for evaluating the cost of projects to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs). The evaluation of cost-effectiveness should account for both the timing of carbon emissions and the damage caused by the atmospheric stock of carbon. We develop a conceptual basis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of projects in terms of the cost of reducing atmospheric carbon (CRAC) and other GHGs. CRAC accounts for the economic discount rate, alternative functional forms of the shadow price, the residence period of carbon in the atmosphere, and the multiple monetary benefits of projects. The last item is of particular importance to the developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Norgaard, R.; Makundi, W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Prospects for hydrogen production by water electrolysis to be competitive with conventional methods. [Areas of research to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

With the impending unavailability of oil and natural gas, hydrogen will be produced on a large scale in the United States (1) from coal, or (2) by water electrolysis using electricity derived from nuclear or solar energy. In many parts of the world which lack fossil fuels, the latter will be the only possible method. The cost of purification of hydrogen produced from fossil fuels will increase its cost to about the same level as that of electrolytic hydrogen. When hydrogen is required in relatively small quantities too, the electrolytic method is advantageous. To minimize the cost of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis, it is necessary to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies. Areas of research, which will be necessary to achieve these goals are: (1) maximization of surface areas of electrodes; (2) use of thin electrolyte layers; (3) increase of operating temperature in alkaline water electrolysis cells to about 120-150/sup 0/C; (4) selection and evaluation of separator materials; (5) electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen electrode reaction; (6) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes; and (7) photoelectrochemical effects. The progress made to date and proposed studies on these topics are briefly dealt with in this paper. The General Electric Solid Polymer Water Electrolyzer and Teledyne Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells, both operating at about 120-150/sup 0/C, look mostpromising in achieving the goals of low capital cost and high energy efficiency. (auth)

Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The impact of electricity pricing schemes on storage adoption in Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ontario electrical grid is sized to meet peak electricity load. If this worst-case load were reduced, the government and Ontario tax-payers could defer large infrastructural costs, reducing the cost of generation and electricity prices. Storage, ...

Tommy Carpenter; Sahil Singla; Parsiad Azimzadeh; S. Keshav

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Std Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW AverageStd Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW Average3-2. Logged Outage Cost per Annual kWh Figure 3-3. Logged

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles : How does one determine their potential for reducing U.S. oil dependence?  

SciTech Connect

Estimation of the potential of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV's) ability to reduce U.S. gasoline use is difficult and complex. Although techniques have been proposed to estimate the vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) that can be electrified, these methods may be inadequate and/or inappropriate for early market introduction circumstances. Factors that must be considered with respect to the PHEV itself include (1) kWh battery storage capability; (2) kWh/km depletion rate of the vehicle (3) liters/km use of gasoline (4) average daily kilometers driven (5) annual share of trips exceeding the battery depletion distance (6) driving cycle(s) (7) charger location [i.e. on-board or off-board] (8) charging rate. Each of these factors is actually a variable, and many interact. Off the vehicle, considerations include (a) primary overnight charging spot [garage, carport, parking garage or lot, on street], (b) availability of primary and secondary charging locations [i.e. dwellings, workplaces, stores, etc] (c) time of day electric rates (d) seasonal electric rates (e) types of streets and highways typically traversed during most probable trips depleting battery charge [i.e. city, suburban, rural and high vs. low density]; (f) cumulative trips per day from charger origin (g) top speeds and peak acceleration rates required to make usual trips. Taking into account PHEV design trade-off possibilities (kW vs. kWh of battery, in particular), this paper attempts to extract useful information relating to these topics from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), and the 2005 American Housing Survey (AHS). Costs per kWh of PHEVs capable of charge depleting (CD) all-electric range (CDE, or AER) vs. those CD in 'blended' mode (CDB) are examined. Lifetime fuel savings of alternative PHEV operating/utilization strategies are compared to battery cost estimates.

Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Duoba, M.; Alexander, M.; Energy Systems; EPRI

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

payback time versus building size Project costs and energyPayback time (commissioning cost/annual energy savings) lessenergy payback time of 41 years, while the proper allocation of costs and

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) have been promoted as the least-cost approach to meeting steadily increasing energy demand. However, it is unclear whether DER deployment can maintain or improve the electric power supply reliability and quality currently available to consumers. This report address two key factors relating to this question: 1) characteristics of existing power supply reliability, and 2) costs resulting from supply interruptions characteristic of the existing power grid. Interruption cost data collected by the University of Saskatchewan was used in conjunction with data generated by the Census Bureaus Annual Survey of Manufacturers (Census Bureau, 1995), along with industry shares of gross domestic product (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995a) and gross output (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995b) to derive interruption cost estimates for U.S. industries at the 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level, as well as for broader sectors and the U.S. economy. Interruption cost estimates are presented as a function of outage duration (e.g., 20 minutes, 1-hour, 3-hour), and are normalized in terms of dollars per peak kW.

Balducci, P. J.; Roop, J. M.; Schienbein, L. A.; DeSteese, J. G.; Weimar, M. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Optimal study of distributed generation impact on electrical distribution networks using GA and generalized reduced gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the effect of Distributed Generators (DG) existence in the electrical power distribution networks taking IEEE 14 and IEEE 30 bus test feeders as proposed systems. The analysis is done to examine the effect on the overall system losses ... Keywords: IEEE 14 bus system, IEEE 30 bus system and optimization, distributed generator (DG), generalized reduced gradient (GRG), genetic algorithms (GA)

Samuel Raafat Fahim; Walid Helmy; Hany M. Hasanien; M. A. L. Badr

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nissan and Centro partner to reduce energy cost 20% through improved metering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centro Inc. Nissan Centro Inc. Nissan 321 Hill Avenue 983 Nissan Drive Nashville, TN 37210 Smyrna, TN 37167 Business: Flow Control Distributor & Representative Business: Automobile Manufacturing Brad Davis Chris Goddard Territory Manager Environmental Engineer Phone: 615-255-2220 Phone: 615-459-1633 Email: bdavis@centromemphis.com Email: chris.goddard@nissan-usa.com Nissan and Centro partner to reduce energy cost 20% through improved metering Project Scope Nissan wanted to precisely measure consumption by department in their Smyrna facility. For low pressure natural gas applications, Nissan sought a simple, reliable metering device with no moving parts. Centro determined that the Aaliant Target Flow meter and the Fox Thermal Mass Flow meter would meet

339

GAO-05-897 Department of Energy: Additional Opportunities Exist for Reducing Laboratory Contractors' Support Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Energy Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives September 2005 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Additional Opportunities Exist for Reducing Laboratory Contractors' Support Costs GAO-05-897 What GAO Found United States Government Accountability Office Why GAO Did This Study Highlights Accountability Integrity Reliability www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-897. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Jim Wells at (202) 512-3841 or wellsj@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-05-897, a report to the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives September 2005 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Additional Opportunities Exist for

340

A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Forest Products: Georgia-Pacific's Insulation Upgrade Leads to Reduced Fuel Costs and Increased Process Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This Steam Challenge Case Study looks at how the company, by insulating steam lines and replacing steam traps, was able to reduce fuel costs, increase process efficiency, and improve plant safety.

Ericksen, E.

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Options for Reducing Environmental-Related Utility Costs Associated With Dielectric Fluids Employed in Cables and Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents results of a literature review and technical workshop on environmental management of dielectric fluids, with emphasis on those properties that strongly influence transport, fate, impacts, and costs of a dielectric fluid release into the environment. From this basis, options are presented for new or modified dielectric fluids that could reduce environmental impacts and lower management costs.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and refrigeration mechanics and installers; 80,000 electrical and electronics repairers for commercial and industrial

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Workshop Proceedings,J. Oros, President, Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, Inc. ,Hydride Batteries for Electric Vehicles, presented at the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5718 5718 Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Kristina Hamachi LaCommare and Joseph H. Eto Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley Berkeley, California 94720 Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2004 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMP/EMP-pubs.html This work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution, Energy Storage Program and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76F00098. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

347

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Total Cost of Ownership for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles: Fall 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic growth over the last three years in the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has resulted in many unanswered questions concerning total cost of ownership (TCO). In June 2013, EPRI released a public study that presented a new way of analyzing driving data for the purpose of calculating TCO for PEV ownership (EPRI report 3002001728). That studywhich focused on the 2013 Chevrolet Volt and 2013 Nissan LEAFused a full years worth of driving data to calculate the TCO of ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Increase Your Boiler Pressure to Decrease Your Electric Bill: The True Cost of CHP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of small scale steam turbine generator projects are installed as an afterthought to overall plant design. As a plant manager or process engineer, the primary concern is providing the process with the thermal load it needs at the lowest $ per Btu. The viability of installing a steam turbine generator set comes after the plant is in operation and pressure reducing valves (PRV's) have been installed, providing the opportunity has been proven to be sufficient for onsite power generation. This methodology produces reliable systems that operate with whatever steam conditions were present. What if users could take a step back to the initial design of the steam boiler? Plant engineers can proactively analyze the impact of folding a steam turbine generator set into the overall plant design at the pre-construction phase, significantly decreasing total energy costs and reducing the net $ per Btu. This paper analyzes the costs and benefits of integrating a steam turbine generator set into the initial boiler plant design, with marginal fuel increase and equipment cost yet providing the added benefit of clean, low cost and reliable onsite power production.

Downing, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A performance standards approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from electric power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} emission performance standard policies outlined in this paper could complement a cap-and-trade program that puts a price on carbon and serve to significantly reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions from coal use for electricity generation. Emission performance standards have a long history in the United States and have been successfully used to control emissions of various air pollutants from electric generators. This paper explores the rationale for using emission performance standards and describes the various types of performance standard policies. Emission performance standards that address CO{sub 2} emissions could promote the deployment of carbon capture and storage technology coupled with new and existing coal-fueled electric power plants. 28 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Rubin, E.S. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative condenser pinch points on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief study was conducted in support of the DOE/DGHT Heat Cycle Research Program to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F (3 to 4/sup 0/C) for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 15/sup 0/F (8/sup 0/C) in order to achieve the highest plant net geofluid effectiveness, and approximately 30/sup 0/F (17/sup 0/C) to attain the minimum cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative energies: solar photovoltaic, wind and fuelof solar photovoltaic devices is the energy conversiongenerated electric energy by the photovoltaic devices. The

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas supplied to the fuel cell power plant is only involved in a chemical oxidation process, instead of burning, in the electricity generation

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Berkeley CA. Electric Power Research Institute.Spectrum, 30 (6), 40. Electric Power Research Institute.Applications. Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the local/electricity distribution level, storage canthat the U.S. electricity distribution system is designed toto the design of electricity distribution systems, larger

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BPA, Southern Company, Duke Energy, Southern California1999) Niagara Mohawk (1985) Duke Energy Company (1992, 1997)Gas and Electric, and Duke Energy) the same customer classes

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANUFACTURING THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SUPPLY Chris Y.Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partially

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduce customers electricity bills, and help to protect thetotal bill 6 , and average cost of electricity. Table 3bill on a PDP day (sum of all charges) Average $/kWh for electricity

Lai, Judy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

VMFlow: leveraging VM mobility to reduce network power costs in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Networking costs play an important role in the overall costs of a modern data center. Network power, for example, has been estimated at 10-20% of the overall data center power consumption. Traditional power saving techniques in data centers focus on ... Keywords: VM placement, energy and power management, green networking, networking aspects in cloud services

Vijay Mann; Avinash Kumar; Partha Dutta; Shivkumar Kalyanaraman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicles Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehiclestires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand ForecastsFinal Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

High Power SiC Modules for HEVs and PHEVs Abstract--With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electric machinery (APEEM) activity is to develop technology towards achieving overall electric propulsion of these components. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) cost targets for the APEEM as established by DOE for PHEVs. Research in eliminating the low temperature loop and using the engine coolant for the APEEM shows

Tolbert, Leon M.

367

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Reducing the Costs of Manufacturing Flow Batteries - Dhruv Bhatnagar, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Costs of Manufacturing Flow Batteries the Costs of Manufacturing Flow Batteries Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND No. 2011-XXXXP Next Steps 1. Continued outreach with other with other manufacturers 2. Characterization of the flow battery manufacturing process and determination of process issues 3. Evaluation of the fuel cell, other battery and other industry manufacturing process to address issues identified 4. Coordination with PNNL flow battery component cost

368

Cost-effective applications of photovoltaics for electric utilities: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost targets for the large-scale entry of photovoltaic (PV) systems keep moving, subject to the vagaries of global oil prices and the economic health of the world. Over the last four decades since a practical PV device was announced, costs have come down by a factor of 20 or more and this downward trend is expected to continue, albeit at a slower pace. Simultaneously, conversion efficiencies have nearly tripled. There are many applications today for which PV is cost-effective. In recognition of this, utility interest in PV is increasing and this is manifested by projects such as PVUSA and Central and South West`s renewable resource development effort. While no major technical barriers for the entry of PV systems have been uncovered, several key issues such as power quality, system reliability, ramp rates, spinning reserve requirements, and misoperation of protection schemes will have to be dealt with as the penetration of this technology increases. PV is still in the evolutionary phase and is expected to grow for several decades to come. Fueled by environmental considerations, interest in PV is showing a healthy rise both in the minds of the public and in the planning realms of the electric power community. In recognition of this, the Energy Development Subcommittee of the IEEE Energy Development and Power Generation Committee organized a Panel Session on photovoltaics applications at the 1993 International Joint Power Generation Conference held in Kansas City, Missouri. Summaries of the four presentations are assembled here for the benefit of the readers of this Review.

Bigger, J.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy supply pattern. On the other hand, wind electricity, with an ownership costcost. ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS ANALYSIS Solar, wind, and fuel cells are all considered as clean and renewable energy

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today...

372

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental savings from solar PV falls in the middle ofCO 2 saving through use of solar PV, wind, and fuel cell2 savings. The cost of solar PV falls in the middle of these

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Case Study: Georgia-Pacific Reduces Outside Fuel Costs and Increases Process Efficiency with Insulation Upgrade Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Georgia-Pacific plywood plant located in Madison, Georgia recently decided to insulate their steam lines for energy conservation, improved process efficiency and personnel protection. The goal of the project was to eliminate dependency on purchased fuel. Georgia-Pacific realized immediate and significant results and reduced fuel cost by about one third over a one year period.

Jackson, D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

MARK-OPT: A Concurrency Control Protocol for Parallel B-Tree Structures to Reduce the Cost of SMOs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a new concurrency control protocol for parallel B-tree structures capable reducing the cost of structure-modification-operation (SMO) compared to the conventional protocols such as ARIES/IM and INC-OPT. We call this protocol ... Keywords: B-tree, concurrency control, index, latch, parallel DB

Tomohiro Yoshihara; Dai Kobayashi; Haruo Yokota

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Reducing electricity cost through virtual machine placement in high performance computing clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we first study the impact of load placement policies on cooling and maximum data center temperatures in cloud service providers that operate multiple geographically distributed data centers. Based on this study, we then propose dynamic ... Keywords: computing cloud, cooling, energy, multi-data-center

Kien Le; Ricardo Bianchini; Jingru Zhang; Yogesh Jaluria; Jiandong Meng; Thu D. Nguyen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the worlds roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the worlds roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the worlds roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

Rakowski, James M.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reduced-order model for electrical impedance tomography based on proper orthogonal decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging modality in which the conductivity distribution inside a target is reconstructed based on voltage measurements from the surface of the target. Reconstructing the conductivity distribution is known to be an ill-posed inverse problem, the solutions of which are highly intolerant to modelling errors. In order to achieve sufficient accuracy, very dense meshes are usually needed in a finite element approximation of the EIT forward model. This leads to very high-dimensional problems and often unacceptably tedious computations for real-time applications. In this paper, the model reduction in EIT is considered within the Bayesian inversion framework. We construct the reduced-order model by proper orthogonal decompositions (POD) of the electrical conductivity and the potential distributions. The associated POD modes are computed based on a priori information on the conductivity. The feasibility of the reduced-order model is tested both numerically and with experimental data. In the selected test cases, the proposed model reduction approach speeds up the computation by more than two orders of magnitude in comparison with the conventional EIT reconstruction, without decreasing the quality of the reconstructed images significantly.

Antti Lipponen; Aku Seppnen; Jari Kaipio

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

The cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure to carcinogens in Harris County by a abating chemical plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

The work examines the engineering reasonableness and the cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure to carcinogens n ambient air by abating emissions of organic chemicals in waste gas streams from chemical plants in Harris County, Texas, which contains the large chemical manufacturing complex in the Houston ship channel areas. The work also examined the cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure through changing the way vent streams are released to the atmosphere. The achievable exposure reductions are estimated by use of 1980 census data and of ambient concentration estimates. The ambient concentration estimates are calculated using the Texas Climatological Model Version 2 (TCM-2) and publicly available emissions inventory collected by the Texas Air Control Board. The TCM-2 is based on the steady state Gaussian plume hypothesis, Briggs plume rise formations, Pasquill-Gifford dispersion coefficient approximations, and first order pollutant decay. The cost estimates rely on published studies and on the waste gas stream parameters of the chemical plant vents. The cost effectiveness results are compared with the cost effectiveness of controls typically applied to new sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are controlled because of their contribution to ozone air pollution, not because of the carcinogenicity of their emissions.

Price, J.H. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Pilot Evaluation of Electricity-Reliability and Power-in the Economic Value of Electricity Reliability to the U.S.of the economic value of electricity reliability, the U.S.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved asin data used for cost estimates. At the other extreme,Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on surveys that

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the United States (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ever power-quality- cost estimate of $26 billion per yearcovers. Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on whatof uncertainty in the cost estimates that have been prepared

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal hydride (NiMH) battery costs, several dierent ``in other cases. The battery cost per mile is low in partstorage energy and hence battery cost required to supply

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The cost of reducing utility S02 emissions : not as low as you might think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common assertion in public policy discussions is that the cost of achieving the SO2 emissions reductions under the acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act ("Title IV") has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV ...

Smith, Anne E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles: Social costs and benets in France. TransportationTransportation Research Part D 6 (2001) 371404 Table 5 The social cost

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost  

SciTech Connect

A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Truck Stop Electrification: A Cost-Effective Solution to Reducing Truck Idling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Truck stop electrification (TSE) allows truckers to "plug in" their vehicles while stopped, in order to operate air conditioning, heating, and appliances without any engine idling. Truck stop electrification technologies fall into two major categories: "off-board" and "on-board" systems. Off-board systems are fixed, stand-alone units installed at the truck parking space. These systems provide heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), and may also include AC electrical power and entertainment, co...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy Conservation Fund: Helping Corporations Develop Energy Conservation Strategies and Reduce Utility Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation projects can save companies significant money over time and often pay for themselves very quickly. This is especially true with the dramatic increase in energy costs over the past few years. Yet convincing corporate decision makers of their value is challenging, since most plants with limited capital tend to direct resources toward projects that increase production rather than toward those that save energy. The irony is that production projects may not realize savings if markets change, while conservation improvements usually change a plant's infrastructure in ways that ensure continued savings. Establishing a business unit or department focused on energy cost reduction and investing its profits in an Energy Conservation Fund (ECF) is part of a total energy approach that helps corporations identify projects, dedicate funds and implement changes. It makes conservation improvement projects more attractive on the front end, so companies can enjoy the long-term benefits.

Swanson, G. A.; Houston, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Emissions Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Prepared under Task No. WR61.2001 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

392

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Tower Systems to develop the Wind Tower Systems to develop the Space Frame tower, a new concept for wind turbine towers. Instead of a solid steel tube, the Space Frame tower consists of a highly optimized design of five custom-shaped legs and interlaced steel struts. With this design, Space Frame towers can support turbines at greater heights, yet weigh and cost less than traditional steel tube towers. Wind Tower Systems LLC (now

393

A comparison of estimates of cost-effectiveness of alternative fuels and vehicles for reducing emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) is a measure of the monetary value of resources expended to obtain reductions in emissions of air pollutants. The CER can lead to selection of the most effective sequence of pollution reduction options. Derived with different methodologies and technical assumptions, CER estimates for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) have varied widely among pervious studies. In one of several explanations of LCER differences, this report uses a consistent basis for fuel price to re-estimate CERs for AFVs in reduction of emissions of criteria pollutants, toxics, and greenhouse gases. The re-estimated CERs for a given fuel type have considerable differences due to non-fuel costs and emissions reductions, but the CERs do provide an ordinal sense of cost-effectiveness. The category with CER less than $5,000 per ton includes compressed natural gas and ed Petroleum gas vehicles; and E85 flexible-fueled vehicles (with fuel mixture of 85 percent cellulose-derived ethanol in gasoline). The E85 system would be much less attractive if corn-derived ethanol were used. The CER for E85 (corn-derived) is higher with higher values placed on the reduction of gas emissions. CER estimates are relative to conventional vehicles fueled with Phase 1 California reformulated gasoline (RFG). The California Phase 2 RFG program will be implemented before significant market penetration by AFVs. CERs could be substantially greater if they are calculated incremental to the Phase 2 RFG program. Regression analysis suggests that different assumptions across studies can sometimes have predictable effects on the CER estimate of a particular AFV type. The relative differences in cost and emissions reduction assumptions can be large, and the effect of these differences on the CER estimate is often not predictable. Decomposition of CERs suggests that methodological differences can make large contributions to CER differences among studies.

Hadder, G.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of Production PVD-AIN Buffer Layer System and Processes to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The DOE has set aggressive goals for solid state lighting (SSL) adoption, which require manufacturing and quality improvements for virtually all process steps leading to an LED luminaire product. The goals pertinent to this proposed project are to reduce the cost and improve the quality of the epitaxial growth processes used to build LED structures. The objectives outlined in this proposal focus on achieving cost reduction and performance improvements over state-of-the-art, using technologies that are low in cost and amenable to high efficiency manufacturing. The objectives of the outlined proposal focus on cost reductions in epitaxial growth by reducing epitaxy layer thickness and hetero-epitaxial strain, and by enabling the use of larger, less expensive silicon substrates and would be accomplished through the introduction of a high productivity reactive sputtering system and an effective sputtered aluminum-nitride (AlN) buffer/nucleation layer process. Success of the proposed project could enable efficient adoption of GaN on-silicon (GaN/Si) epitaxial technology on 150mm silicon substrates. The reduction in epitaxy cost per cm{sup 2} using 150mm GaN-on-Si technology derives from (1) a reduction in cost of ownership and increase in throughput for the buffer deposition process via the elimination of MOCVD buffer layers and other throughput and CoO enhancements, (2) improvement in brightness through reductions in defect density, (3) reduction in substrate cost through the replacement of sapphire with silicon, and (4) reduction in non-ESD yield loss through reductions in wafer bow and temperature variation. The adoption of 150mm GaN/Si processing will also facilitate significant cost reductions in subsequent wafer fabrication manufacturing costs. There were three phases to this project. These three phases overlap in order to aggressively facilitate a commercially available production GaN/Si capability. In Phase I of the project, the repeatability of the performance was analyzed and improvements implemented to the Veeco PVD-AlN prototype system to establish a specification and baseline PVD-AlN films on sapphire and in parallel the evaluation of PVD AlN on silicon substrates began. In Phase II of the project a Beta tool based on a scaled-up process module capable of depositing uniform films on batches of 4or 6 diameter substrates in a production worthy operation was developed and qualified. In Phase III, the means to increase the throughput of the PVD-AlN system was evaluated and focused primarily on minimizing the impact of the substrate heating and cooling times that dominated the overall cycle time.

Cerio, Frank

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power in real time (costs per kWh at time of system peak canto large increases in marginal costs per kWh, because of the

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

398

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combination of high oil costs, concerns about oil security and availability, and air quality issues related to vehicle emissions are driving interest in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs are similar to conventional hybrid electric vehicles, but feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows electricity from the grid to replace a portion of the petroleum-fueled drive energy. PHEVs may derive a substantial fraction of their miles from grid-derived electricity, but without the range restrictions of pure battery electric vehicles. As of early 2007, production of PHEVs is essentially limited to demonstration vehicles and prototypes. However, the technology has received considerable attention from the media, national security interests, environmental organizations, and the electric power industry. The use of PHEVs would represent a significant potential shift in the use of electricity and the operation of electric power systems. Electrification of the transportation sector could increase generation capacity and transmission and distribution (T&D) requirements, especially if vehicles are charged during periods of high demand. This study is designed to evaluate several of these PHEV-charging impacts on utility system operations within the Xcel Energy Colorado service territory.

Parks, K.; Denholm, P.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel engines operating the rig pose the problems of low efficiency and large amount of emissions. In addition the rig power requirements vary a lot with time and ongoing operation. Therefore it is in the best interest of operators to research on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations. There are various sources of alternate energy storage/reuse. A quantitative comparison of physical size and economics shows that rigs powered by the electrical grid can provide lower cost operations, emit fewer emissions, are quieter, and have a smaller surface footprint than conventional diesel powered drilling. This thesis describes a study to evaluate the feasibility of adopting technology to reduce the size of the power generating equipment on drilling rigs and to provide ?peak shaving? energy through the new energy generating and energy storage devices such as flywheels. An energy audit was conducted on a new generation light weight Huisman LOC 250 rig drilling in South Texas to gather comprehensive time stamped drilling data. A study of emissions while drilling operation was also conducted during the audit. The data was analyzed using MATLAB and compared to a theoretical energy audit. The study showed that it is possible to remove peaks of rig power requirement by a flywheel kinetic energy recovery and storage (KERS) system and that linking to the electrical grid would supply sufficient power to operate the rig normally. Both the link to the grid and the KERS system would fit within a standard ISO container. A cost benefit analysis of the containerized system to transfer grid power to a rig, coupled with the KERS indicated that such a design had the potential to save more than $10,000 per week of drilling operations with significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, and smaller size well pad.

Verma, Ankit

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the relationship between wind power class and cost is showncosts associated with wind power. The cost implications ofprice electricity, wind power directly reduces exposure to

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification Testimony Prepared for a Hearing on Power Generation

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture for Localized Electrical Energy Reduction, Generation, and Sharing) [46] is the smart-grid

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Public release of optimization of metallization scheme for thin emitter wrap-through solar cells for higher efficiency, reduced precious metal costs, and reduced stress.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Back-contact crystalline-silicon photovoltaic solar cells and modules offer a number of advantages, including the elimination of grid shadowing losses, reduced cost through use of thinner silicon substrates, simpler module assembly, and improved aesthetics. While the existing edge tab method for interconnecting and stringing edge-connected back contact cells is acceptably straightforward and reliable, there are further gains to be exploited when you have both contact polarities on one side of the cell. In this work, we produce 'busbarless' emitter wrap-through solar cells that use 41% of the gridline silver (Ag) metallization mass compared to the edge tab design. Further, series resistance power losses are reduced by extraction of current from more places on the cell rear, leading to a fill factor improvement of about 6% (relative) on the module level. Series resistance and current-generation losses associated with large rear bondpads and busbars are eliminated. Use of thin silicon (Si) wafers is enabled because of the reduced Ag metallization mass and by interconnection with conductive adhesives leading to reduced bow. The busbarless cell design interconnected with conductive adhesives passes typical International Electrotechnical Commission damp heat and thermal cycling test.

Ruby, Douglas Scott; Murphy, Brian (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Meakin, David (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Jason (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Hacke, Peter (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Framework for Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of Investments in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric vehicles151including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery-only vehicles151are desirable alternatives to vehicles powered by internal combustion engines because they produce considerably less or no direct emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants that are attributed to the transportation sector. However, they use electricity to charge their batteries, the generation of which consumes fossil fuels (in some cases, coal), which increases the emission of th...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the product of the cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with theper kg (rather than the cost per kWh) as a function of the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

product of an assumed cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with thethis battery has a low cost per kWh, and relatively few kWh

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Wind Turbine Control Design to Reduce Capital Costs: 7 January 2009 - 31 August 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report first discusses and identifies which wind turbine components can benefit from advanced control algorithms and also presents results from a preliminary loads case analysis using a baseline controller. Next, it describes the design, implementation, and simulation-based testing of an advanced controller to reduce loads on those components. The case-by-case loads analysis and advanced controller design will help guide future control research.

Darrow, P. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluating electricity theft detectors in smart grid networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity theft is estimated to cost billions of dollars per year in many countries. To reduce electricity theft, electric utilities are leveraging data collected by the new Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and using data analytics to identify ...

Daisuke Mashima; Alvaro A. Crdenas

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change in Consumer Electricity Bills Net Impact of RPS onon Natural Gas and Electricity Bills (2003-2020, 7% realelectricity sector should consider the potentially beneficial cross-sector impact of that diversification on natural gas prices and bills.

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification Testimony Prepared for a Hearing on Power Generation Resource Incentives &

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Modeling System); POEMS (Policy Office Electricity Modeling System), CRA (Charles River Associates), NANGAS (North American Natural Gas Analysis

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Spatial Arbitrage to Reduce "Seams? across Electricity System Control Areas: An Experimental Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most markets are restricted in their spatial size by transportation costs, physical barriers, institutional impediments and differing exchange conventions. Yet, if price differences across those boundaries substantially exceed the cost of surmounting ...

Richard E. Schuler

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The model electric restaurant  

SciTech Connect

Restaurants are the most intensive users of energy of all types of commercial buildings. As a result, they have some of the highest energy costs. New and existing restaurants are important customers to electric utilities. Many opportunities exist to use electricity to improve restaurant energy performance. This report discusses a project in which computer simulations were used to investigate restaurant energy subsystem performance and to assess the potential for electric equipment to reduce energy consumption, reduce peak demand improve load factors, and reduce energy cost in new all-electric restaurants. The project investigated typical restaurant designs for all-electric and gas/electric facilities and compared them to high efficiency electric options in all-electric restaurants. This analysis determined which investiments in high-efficiency electric equipment are attractive for restaurant operators. Improved equipment for food preparation, heating and cooling, ventilation, sanitation, and lighting subsystem was studied in cafeteria, full menu, fast food, and pizza restaurants in Atlanta, Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. In addition to the actual rate structures, four synthetic rate structures were used to calculate energy costs, so that the results can be applied to other locations. The results indicate that high efficiency and improved all-electric equipment have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption, peak demand, and operating costs in almost all restaurants in all locations. The all-electric restaurants, with a combination of improved equipment, also offer the customer a competitive choice in fuels in most locations. 12 refs., 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Frey, D.J.; Oatman, P.A. (Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Claar, C.N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Integrated Chiller System Reduce Building Operation and Maintenance Costs in Cold Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although water-cooled chillers are more energy efficient than air-cooled chillers, a majority of chilled water systems use air-cooled chillers. In cold weather climates, air-cooled chillers are capable of functioning in low ambient temperatures with few operational concerns, where as water-cooled chiller systems must be equipped to prevent cooling tower freezing. The integrated chiller system attempts to take advantage of each chiller's strengths and eliminate any cold weather operational concerns. An integrated chiller system includes a cooling tower and air-cooled condenser. During the summer, both the cooling tower and air condenser can be operated. In cold weather, the cooling tower is drained and the air condenser is used to dissipate the heat of the cooling system. The integrated chiller system eliminates the water storage tank and frequent charging and discharging of the cooling tower system. It reduces the size of the mechanical room and simplifies the operation of the system. The integrated chiller system is most suitable in climates where the mechanical cooling is required on a short-term basis during cold weather periods. This paper presents the system configuration, system design, optimal control, and energy impact. An example is used to demonstrate the design concepts of the integrated chiller systems.

Sheets, N.; Liu, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting these comments in response to the above-referenced request for information (RFI) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE).

423

Reducing Emissions of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Mercury from Electric Power Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis responds to a request from Senators Bob Smith, George Voinovich, and Sam Brownback to examine the costs of specific multi-emission reduction strategies

J. Alan Beamon

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electricity transmission pricing : how much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a thirteen node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorporating ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

426

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that by reducing natural gas demand, deployment of renewableto drive, growth in natural gas demand. For example, fromby reducing natural gas demand, increased diversification

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Chapter 3 Appendices 1 Appendix 3A: Levelized Cost of Electricity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs of coal, capital, and labor in Table 3A.1, natural gas with CCS becomes economic at the prices of higher than 100$/ tCO2 for a range $2­6$/MMBtu natural gas prices. At the higher natural gas prices, coal-Cost Generation Technology Zones for Coal and Natural Gas with and without CCS for Different Natural Gas Prices

Reuter, Martin

430

Wind Power Impacts on Electric Power System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective on Work to Date; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility system planners and operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output may increase the operating costs of the system. This concern arises because the system must maintain an instantaneous balance between the aggregate demand for electric power and the total power generated by all power plants feeding the system. This is a highly sophisticated task that utility operators and automatic controls perform routinely, based on well-known operating characteristics for conventional power plants and a great deal of experience accumulated over many years. System operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output will force the conventional power plants to provide compensating variations to maintain system balance, thus causing the conventional power plants to deviate from operating points chosen to minimize the total cost of operating the system. The operators' concerns are compounded by the fact that conventional power plants are generally under their control and thus are dispatchable, whereas wind plants are controlled instead by nature. Although these are valid concerns, the key issue is not whether a system with a significant amount of wind capacity can be operated reliably, but rather to what extent the system operating costs are increased by the variability of the wind.

Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting these comments in response to the above-referenced request for information (RFI) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE). In the RFI, DOE is again...

432

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policies on the natural gas market. References American Council for an Energy-Energy Modeling System); POEMS (Policy Office Electricity Modeling System), CRA (Charles River Associates), NANGAS (North American

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption for the end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current year

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Developing a Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mineral Carbonation Reaction Processes to Reduce CO2 Mineral Sequestration Process Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mineral Carbonation Reaction Processes to Reduce CO 2 Mineral Sequestration Process Cost Michael J. McKelvy (mckelvy@asu.edu; 480-965-4535), Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya (chizmesh@asu.edu; 480-965-6072), Hamdallah Bearat (Hamdallah.Bearat@asu.edu; 480-965-2624), Renu Sharma (Renu.Sharma@asu.edu; 480-965-4541), and Ray W. Carpenter (carpenter@asu.edu; 480-965-4549) Center for Solid State Science and Science and Engineering of Materials PhD Program, P.O. Box 871704, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 USA ABSTRACT The potential environmental effects of increasing atmospheric CO 2 levels are of major worldwide concern. One alternative for managing CO 2 emissions is carbon sequestration: the capture and secure confinement of CO

436

OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

Kraft, E.H.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

Upgrade of Compressed Air Control System Reduces Energy Costs at Michelin Tire Plant. Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Project Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study highlights the upgraded compressed air system at a Michelin tire manufacturing plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The controls upgrade project enabled multiple compressor operation without blow-off, and significantly reduced energy costs.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Planning electricity transmission to accommodate renewables: Using two-stage programming to evaluate flexibility and the cost of disregarding uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncertainty,ECIU),andthevalueofbeingableto postpone decisions until some uncertainty is resolved (the expected cost of ignoring optionality, ECIO). These indices quantify, in different ways, the benefits of considering Thirdly,concernaboutclimate... thetotalgenerationcapacityateachbusor ineachzone.Thiscapacity isoften taken to be a function of uncertain electricity demand, or simply presumed to have an exogenousprobabilitydistribution.Otherrisksthathavebeenconsideredbysomeofthese models are...

van der Weijde, Adriaan Hendrik; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy  

SciTech Connect

During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

Charges, Costs and Market Power in the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 July 2010 For Immediate Release: UC Berkeley Study Touts Economic Benefits of a Feed-In Tariff examining the economic benefits of a comprehensive Feed-In Tariff (FIT). The analysis shows that enacting price, long-term contract for a utility to buy electricity produced by renewable energy generators

Feigon, Brooke

444

Analysis of FERC's Final EIS for Electricity Open Access & Recovery of Stranded Costs  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Reviews the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for its electricity transmission system open access prepared in April 1996 and uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to analyze the open access rule (Orders 888 and 889).

Robert T. Eynon

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Gas turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. First annual publication, 1972  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 1972, gas turbine power plants owned and operated by U.S. utilities had a capacity of 27,918 MW. Data from the 1972 annual reports filed with the Federal Power Commission by utility systems are presented which show the plant cost, generating expenses, capacity and generation, and plant and equipment characteristics of 299 gas turbine plants. (LCL)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

447

Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on cost and energy density from changes in cell capacity, parallel cell groups, and manufacturing capabilities are easily assessed with the model. New proposed materials may also be examined to translate bench-scale values to the design of full-scale battery packs providing realistic energy densities and prices to the original equipment manufacturer. The model will be openly distributed to the public in the year 2011. Currently, the calculations are based in a Microsoft{reg_sign} Office Excel spreadsheet. Instructions are provided for use; however, the format is admittedly not user-friendly. A parallel development effort has created an alternate version based on a graphical user-interface that will be more intuitive to some users. The version that is more user-friendly should allow for wider adoption of the model.

Nelson, P. A.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Grounding electrode and method of reducing the electrical resistance of soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first solution of an electrolyte is injected underground into a volume of soil having negative surface charges on its particles. A cationic surfactant suspended in this solution neutralizes these surface charges of the soil particles within the volume. Following the first solution, a cationic asphalt emulsion suspended in a second solution is injected into the volume. The asphalt emulsion diffuses through the volume and electrostatically bonds with additional soil surrounding the volume such that an electrically conductive water repellant shell enclosing the volume is formed. This shell prevents the leaching of electrolyte from the volume into the additional soil. The second solution also contains a dissolved deliquescent salt which draws water into the volume prior to the formation of the shell. When electrically connected to an electrical installation such as a power line tower, the volume constitutes a grounding electrode for the tower.

Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tarrifs on PHEV Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&M Project 2A: R&M Project 2A: Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy Resources Locally on System Performance and Costs Tim Mount, Eilyan Bitar and Ray Zimmerman Cornell University Alberto Lamadrid Lehigh University CERTS Review, Cornell, August 6 th - 7 th , 2013 An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage (Mount) PART II: Ramping* (Lamadrid) PART III: Robust Optimization* (Bitar) *(Note: This is a new part of the project that began on 3/30/13) 2 OUTLINE OF THE PRESENTATION An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage Wooyoung Jeon Hao Lu Jung Youn Mo 3 An NSF I/UCRC Context of the Research: An Integrated Multi-Scale Framework 4 SuperOPF  Costs PEV charger capacities  Commuting Patterns  Nodal Capabilities

452

Energy accounting - Tracking electric use and cost with a spreadsheet program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One definition of Energy Accounting is a formal method of recording and analyzing energy use and costs. Records of monthly energy use and cost are organized into managerial reports. Would you manage a business or organization without using a financial accounting system. You could not make sound decisions or expenditures or budgets and you could not tell if the business was healthy or operating at a loss. The same principles apply to energy management. Without an energy accounting system, a manager cannot make informed decisions on operations, projects, or even identify patterns in energy use that may affect the facility or business. Yet many businesses and property managers have no method for Energy Accounting in their operations. Energy accounting is a key element in a successful energy management program. The conservation staff at Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) have developed an easy to use PC spreadsheet program that is available to Energy Managers to use in starting an energy accounting system.

Weisner, R.; Codina, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III that we sub- sume supply technologies in different groups. To be more precise, we distinguish 16 supply technology groups (nuclear, three lignite, four hard coal, two combined cycle gas turbine, three open cycle gas turbine, two oil... shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component of that wide-ranging program focused on industrial compressed air systems as the target for such electric use reductions. What stands out about the compressed air effort is that customer acceptance of the program was very high (8 out of 10 customer sites implemented at least some of the efficiency projects recommended in the program's air system audits) and overall savings levels were more than 3X the original program goal (550 kW vs. 1730 kW). XENERGY, Inc. designed and carried out the program on behalf of PG&E. Key features of the program included working with compressed air system distributors to identify and qualify good customer leads and post-audit technical assistance to help customer implement recommended projects. This paper reviews the project and outlines some of the lessons learned in completing the project."

Skelton, J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

present concerns about natural gas prices and the findingsEconomy (ACEEE). 2003. Natural Gas Price Effects of EnergyGas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

paper CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants. We thank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in CO2 emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that is, the critical value in the charge for CO2 emissions that would justify investment in CCS capabilities. Our analysis takes explicitly into account that the supply of electricity at the wholesale level (generation) is organized competitively in some U.S. jurisdictions, while in others a regulated utility provides integrated generation and distribution services. For either market structure, we find that emissions charges in the range of $25-$30 per tonne of CO2 would be the break-even value for adopting CCS capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants are substantially higher, near $60 per tonne. Our break-even estimates serve as a basis for projecting the change in electricity prices once carbon emissions become costly. CCS capabilities effectively put an upper bound on the rise in electricity prices. We estimate this bound to be near 30 % at the retail level for both coal and natural gas plants. In contrast to the competitive power supply scenario, however, these price increases materialize only gradually for a regulated utility. The delay in price adjustments reflects that for regulated

Stefan Reichelstein; Erica Plambeck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of the electricity industrys evolution. To aidsome aspects of electricity industry restructuring throughbegan restructuring the U.S. electricity industry in 1996 by

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles: A Technology and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment for Battery Electric Vehicles, Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of affordable advanced battery technology is a crucial challenge to the growth of the electric-drive vehicle (EDV) market. This study assesses the state of advanced battery technology for EDVs, which include battery electric vehicles (BEVs), power assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEV 0s -- hybrids without electric driving range), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and fuel cell vehicles. The first part of this study presents assessments of current battery performance and cycle life ca...

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

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