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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric-of-service regulation to market-oriented environments for many U.S. electric generating plants. Our estimates of input their wholesale electricity markets improved the most. The results suggest modest medium-term efficiency benefits

Kammen, Daniel M.

2

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

3

Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Although many electricity providers will offer their services in a restructure U.S. electricity market, it is not clear which pow r producers industrial customers wil1 buy from. James Rouse, associate director of energy policy for Praxair, Inc., thinks...

Lowe, E. T.

4

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c vehicles (BEVs), create additional electricity demand, resulting in additional air emissions from powerEstimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce

Michalek, Jeremy J.

5

Reducing Power Factor Cost  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof EnergyReducing Peak DemandLow

6

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION .............................................................................13 Definition of Levelized Cost ........................................................................................................13 Levelized Cost Components

7

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION............................................................ 3 Definition of Levelized Cost.................................................................................... 3 Levelized Cost Categories

Laughlin, Robert B.

8

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are neededCost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b

Michalek, Jeremy J.

9

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help...

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the topic of the cost of fuel to general electricity for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

11

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California,The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic ElectricityThe Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Reducing Electricity Demand Charge for Data Centers with Partial Execution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Data centers are the powerhouse behind many Internet services today. A modern data centerReducing Electricity Demand Charge for Data Centers with Partial Execution Hong Xu Department@eecg.toronto.edu ABSTRACT Data centers consume a large amount of energy and incur substantial electricity cost

Li, Baochun

15

Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on transformative innovation in the domestic PV industry. With knowledge and expertise acquired from the PDIL pilot production line tools, Ampulse plans to design a full-scale production line to accommodate long rolls of metal foil. The Ampulse process 'goes straight from pure silicon-containing gas to high-quality crystal silicon film,' said Brent Nelson, the operational manager for the Process Development Integration Laboratory. 'The advantage is you can make the wafer just as thin as you need it - 10 microns or less.' Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon, though thin-film cells made of more exotic elements such as copper, indium, gallium, arsenic, cadmium, tellurium and others are making a strong push into the market. The advantage of silicon is its abundance, because it is derived from sand. Silicon's disadvantage is that purifying it into wafers suitable for solar cells can be expensive and energy intensive. Manufacturers add carbon and heat to sand to produce metallurgical-grade silicon, which is useful in other industries, but not yet suitable for making solar cells. So this metallurgical-grade silicon is then converted to pure trichlorosilane (SiCl3) or silane (SiH4) gas. Typically, the purified gas is then converted to create a silicon feedstock at 1,000 degrees Celsius. This feedstock is melted at 1,414 C and recrystallized into crystal ingots that are finally sawed into wafers. The Ampulse method differs in that it eliminates the last two steps in the traditional process and works directly with the silane gas growing only the needed silicon right onto a foil substrate. A team of NREL scientists had developed a way to use a process called hot-wire chemical vapor deposition to thicken silicon wafers with near perfect crystal structure. Using a hot tungsten filament much like the one found in an incandescent light bulb, the silane gas molecules are broken apart and deposited onto the wafer using the chemical vapor deposition technique at about 700 C - a much lower temperature than needed to make the wafer. The hot filament dec

Scanlon, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, independent system operators (ISOs) and others have published reports on the costs of transmission congestion. The magnitude of congestion costs cited in these reports has contributed to the national discussion on the current state of U.S. electricity transmission system and whether it provides an adequate platform for competition in wholesale electricity markets. This report reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, (1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and (2) enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is essential to understand who pays, how much, and how do they benefit in evaluating options (both transmission and non-transmission alternatives) to address transmission congestion. To describe the differences among published estimates of congestion costs, we develop and motivate three ways by which transmission congestion costs are calculated in restructured markets. The assessment demonstrates that published transmission congestion costs are not directly comparable because they have been developed to serve different purposes. More importantly, critical information needed to make them more comparable, for example in order to evaluate the impacts of options to relieve congestion, is sometimes not available.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

18

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by...

19

Reducing Power Factor Cost | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated |Reducing LED Costs ThroughReducing Power

20

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated |Reducing LED Costs Through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

22

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL COST REDUCTION VIA STEAM TURBINE COGENERATION LYNN B. DI TULLIO, P.E. Project Engineer Ewing Power Systems, Inc. South Deerfield, Mass. ABSTRACT Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used... mature technology. Steam turbines and engines have been used by industry to cogen erate power since before there were electric utilities. While the technology for turbines, generators and controls has continued to develop there is very little about...

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

23

Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

Andrepont, J. S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii Contents Introduction

25

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity amounts of electric power, which lead to high operational costs of cloud service providers. Reducing cloud environment by incorporating the diversity of time-varying electricity prices in different regions

Liang, Weifa

26

Cutting Down Electricity Cost in Internet Data Centers by Using Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cutting Down Electricity Cost in Internet Data Centers by Using Energy Storage Yuanxiong Guo energy storage capability in data centers to reduce electricity bill under real-time electricity market between cost saving and energy storage capacity. As far as we know, our work is the first to explore

Latchman, Haniph A.

27

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

28

Reducing Energy Costs in Internet-Scale Distributed Systems Using Load Shifting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-response technique where the system temporarily reduces its energy usage in response to pricing signals from a smart offline algorithm can achieve 12% energy cost savings for time-of-use electricity pricing, even when only-efficiency techniques. These include the availability of novel electricity pricing models to encourage greater energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

29

Risk management: Reducing brownfield cleanup costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing environmental protection with economic vitality is crucial to maintaining competitiveness in world markets. One key initiative that has been identified as important to both environmental protection and the economy is the redevelopment of brownfields. Brownfield redevelopment can stimulate local economies that have been devastated by lost jobs and can recycle industrial land use, thereby preserving undeveloped lands. Many existing brownfield sites appear on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priority List (NPL), which designates over 1200 sites and is expected to grow to more than 2000 by the end of the decade. EPA estimates the cost of remediating the sites on the current list will approach $30 billion, with the average cost of remediating a site close to $25 million. Thousands of additional brownfield sites that do not appear on the NPL are listed under state cleanup programs.

Graves, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

Suo, Zhigang

31

Sandia National Laboratories: reduce overall costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskite oxide High-Efficiencynitrousoverall costs

32

Reducing "Search Cost" and Risk in Energy-efficiency Investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing "Search Cost" and Risk in Energy-efficiency Investments: Two Success Stories Philip E "search Cost"and Risk in Energy-Eficiency Investments: Two Success Stories - 4.91 #12;Perspectives significant transaction costs related to searching for and analyzing information on prospective energy

33

Task force reduces stuck-pipe costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A task-force approach to stuck pipe has produced more than a 70% reduction in BP Exploration Operating Co.'s worldwide stuck-pipe costs during 1989 and 1990. We believe that these results have been primarily due to focusing our attention on improving personnel performance rather than to the introduction of new technology. Key elements in this paper of the efforts involved: Recognizing the importance of the drilling contractor and the service company staff's role in helping control stuck pipe; Promoting a rig-team approach to tackling the problem; Providing training on rig-team, stuck-pipe problem solving; and raising awareness of stuck pipe through a coordinated worldwide communications program among BP, contractors, and service companies.

Bradley, W.B. (BP Research, Houston, TX (US)); Jarman, D. (BP Exploration Operation Co., Aberdeen (GB)); Auflick, R.A.; Plott, R.S. (BP Exploration Operating Co., Houston, TX (US)); Wood, R.D. (BP Exploration Operating Co., London (GB)); Schofield, T.R. (BP Exploration Operating Co., Beijing (CN)); Cocking, D. (BP Exploration Operating Co., Ho Chi Minh City (CN))

1991-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and simple cycle costs are the result of a comprehensive survey of actual costs from the power plant developers in California who built power plants between 2001 and 2006. The other costs are based on actual in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

35

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the rising electricity costs and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

36

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

37

Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

PET: Reducing Database Energy Cost via Query Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PET: Reducing Database Energy Cost via Query Optimization Zichen Xu The Ohio State University xuz not necessarily have the shortest processing time. This demo proposal introduces PET ­ an energy-aware query op- timization framework that is built as a part of the PostgreSQL ker- nel. PET, via its power cost estimation

Tu, Yicheng

39

Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

Huffines, R.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

Sanders, Seth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

42

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting...

46

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting...

47

Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

Coughlin, Katie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

RESEARCH Open Access Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phase. We measured the metabolic energy consumption of seven subjects walking on a level treadmill at 1RESEARCH Open Access Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking during load. In this study, the design and testing of an autonomous leg exoskeleton is presented. The aim of the device

Herr, Hugh

49

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the premium value of solar PV power to 0%-20% again. Whilepower to that location. While few dispute that the direct cost of electricity from the currently available solar

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Review of cost estimates for reducing CO2 emissions. Final report, Task 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the ground breaking work of William Nordhaus in 1977, cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions have been developed by numerous groups. The various studies have reported sometimes widely divergent cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Some recent analyses have indicated that large reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions could be achieved at zero or negative costs (e.g. Rocky Mountain Institute 1989). In contrast, a recent study by Alan Manne of Stanford and Richard Richels of the Electric Power Research Institute (Manne-Richels 1989) concluded that in the US the total discounted costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 20 percent below the 1990 level could be as much as 3.6 trillion dollars over the period from 1990 to 2100. Costs of this order of magnitude would represent about 5 percent of US GNP. The purpose of this briefing paper is to summarize the different cost estimates for CO{sub 2} emission reduction and to identify the key issues and assumptions that underlie these cost estimates.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TERRORIST ATTACKS Zimmerman, R. CREATE REPORT Under FEMA Grant EMW-2004-GR-0112 May 31, 2005 Center for Risk and Economic #12;2 Abstract The major economic effects of electric power outages are usually associated with three

Wang, Hai

53

Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used...

Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Announces 27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces 27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,...

56

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that could be powered entirely by electricity using plug- in vehicles. Thus, plug-in vehicles have assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas

Michalek, Jeremy J.

57

Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »ExchangeDepartment ofManagementManagementReduce Hot Water Use

60

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, ``Monthly Power Plant Report.`` These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, Monthly Power Plant Report.'' These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Low Cost 2014, UMass Cranberry Station 1 REDUCING COSTS IN CRANBERRY MANAGEMENT 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014, UMass Cranberry Station 1 REDUCING COSTS IN CRANBERRY MANAGEMENT 2014 These are general the flood. Research has shown that holding LW for the full 4 weeks eliminates all overwintering cranberry at this link: http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cranberry_community_presentations/1/ Fertilizer Analyze all your

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

63

Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Lodging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are the loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. This report reviews methods to reduce MELs in lodging.

Rauch, Emily M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated |Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation

65

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses of the manufacturing cost of the key unique components of electric vehicles: batteries, fuel cells,

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns. The ownership costs of fuel cells fall in between.reduce the ownership cost of the fuel cell technologies byalternative options. Fuel cells cost the most, between $500~

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed...

Charles, D.

68

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs February 19, 2009 - 1:39pm Addthis Water heating can account for a significant...

69

Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

Bredemann, Michael V

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project researches the use of nanoscale materials (a broadly defined set of substances that haveNovel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge Dewatering Industrial process, requiring up to 6000 kilowatt hours/year per million gallons per day. Project Description

71

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts in 1984 to electric utility plants is presented, with some data provided for each year from 1979 through 1984. Data were collected on Forms FERC-423 and EIA-759. Fuels are coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. Data are reported by company and plant, by type of plant, and by State and Census Region, with US totals. This report contains information on fossil fuel receipts to electric utility plants with a combined steam capacity of 50 megawatts or larger. Previous reports contained data on all electric plants with a combined capacity of 25 megawatts or larger. All historical data in this publication have been revised to reflect the new reporting threshold. Peaking unit data are no longer collected. A glossary of terms, technical notes, and references are also provided. 7 figs., 62 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Low-Cost U.S. Manufacturing of Power Electronics for Electric...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Low-Cost U.S. Manufacturing of Power Electronics for Electric Drive Vehicles Low-Cost U.S. Manufacturing of Power Electronics for Electric...

73

US-ABC Collaborates to Lower Cost of Electric Drive Batteries...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

US-ABC Collaborates to Lower Cost of Electric Drive Batteries US-ABC Collaborates to Lower Cost of Electric Drive Batteries April 16, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Advanced...

74

Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR be sucient production at all times to meet the demand for electric power. If a low-cost generating unit fails uncertainty in the forecast of production costs. 1. Introduction One of the characteristics of electric power

Mazumdar, Mainak

77

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

78

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial cooling remains one of the largest potential areas for electrical energy savings in industrial plants today. This is in spite of a relatively small amount of attention paid to it by energy auditors and rebate program designers. US DOE...

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Implementing Energy Efficiency in Wastewater to Reduce Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the industrial world creating a quality product at minimum cost is the goal. In this environment all expenses are scrutinized, when they are part of the manufacturing process. However, even at the most conscientious facility the wastewater system...

Cantwell, J. C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be divided into two broad areas: ownership or sunk costs and operating or avoidable costs. These costs (sunk) costs Operating (avoidable) costs Interest on bonds Return to stockholders Property taxes

McCalley, James D.

82

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An advanced exhaust aftertreatment system developed to meet EPA 2010 and final Tier 4 emission regulations show substantial improvements in system performance while reducing system...

83

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ballasts can reduce lighting energy by 20 to 30 percent. * ENERGY STAR light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs can last 25 years without lamp replacement. Compact...

84

Why Pressure Reducing Valves (PVR's) are costing you money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

saving hundreds of thousands of dollars on your electric bill and taking only a minimal hit in the available heat content? Why let steam down and get no benefit from it, when putting it through a low pressure steam turbine coupled to a generator would...

Downing, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NASA Technical Memorandum 107050 An Accelerated Development,Reduced Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a "building block" fashion, a variety of single and multi-engine lunar and Mars vehicles can be configured, a single launch Mars cargo vehicle capable of -------______-_-_------ *Nuclear Propulsion Office "'Cost klbf NTR engines and the two standardized LH2 tank sizes developed for lunar and Mars cargo vehicle

Rathbun, Julie A.

86

Reducing Life Cycle Cost By Energy Saving in Pump Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% by the available NPSH. The system should provide the highest NPSHA that is cost effective. Losses in the pump suction line are therefore even more wasteful of energy than those on the discharge ? Suction pipes should avoid restrictions which can cause gas...

Bower, J. R.

87

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information Processing and Communications Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information of various societal and environmental mandates followed by a review of technologies, systems, and hardware

88

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renew- ables, The Electricity Journal, Volume 14 (2001),from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill VolatilityReal- Time Retail Electricity Pricing, Energy Journal,28(

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Minimizing Electricity Cost: Optimization of Distributed Internet Data Centers in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing Electricity Cost: Optimization of Distributed Internet Data Centers in a Multi-Electricity&M University, College Station, USA Email: lx@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract--The study of Cyber-Physical System (CPS, the power management problem for minimizing the total electricity cost has been overlooked

Liu, Xue

90

Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | DepartmentRecruitPumping Costs Through

91

THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

92

Reducing Energy Costs for IBM Blue Gene/P via Power-Aware Job Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Energy Costs for IBM Blue Gene/P via Power-Aware Job Scheduling Zhou Zhou1 , Zhiling Lan1 scheduling approach for HPC systems based on variable energy prices and job power profiles. In particular, we from produc- tion systems show that our power-aware job scheduling approach can reduce the energy cost

Feitelson, Dror

93

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue- ple users cooperate to perform load demand scheduling in order to minimize the electricity generation between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps up

Pedram, Massoud

95

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind Integration and Conservation Council Outline · Wind Integration Costs ­ Modeling Assumptions ­ Current methodology ­ Proposed and Conservation Council Wind Integration Costs · Reserving capacity for within-hour balancing is costly

97

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | DepartmentRecruitPumpingStudy |Reducing

98

Soil Segregation Methods for Reducing Transportation and Disposal Costs - 13544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where the selected alternative for contaminated soil is excavation and off-site disposal, the most significant budget items of the remedial action are the costs for transportation and disposal of soil at an off-site facility. At these sites, the objective is to excavate and dispose of only those soils that exceed derived concentration guideline levels. In situ soil segregation using gross gamma detectors to guide the excavation is often challenging at sites where the soil contamination is overlain by clean soil or where the contaminated soil is located in isolated, subsurface pockets. In addition, data gaps are often identified during the alternative evaluation and selection process, resulting in increased uncertainty in the extent of subsurface contamination. In response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District is implementing ex situ soil segregation methods. At the remediated Painesville Site, soils were excavated and fed through a conveyor-belt system, which automatically segregated them into above- and below-cleanup criteria discharge piles utilizing gamma spectroscopy. At the Linde Site and the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site, which are both in the remediation phase, soils are initially segregated during the excavation process using gross gamma detectors and then transported to a pad for confirmatory manual surveying and sampling. At the Linde Site, the ex situ soils are analyzed on the basis of a site-specific method, to establish compliance with beneficial reuse criteria that were developed for the Linde remediation. At the SLDA Site, the ex situ soils are surveyed and sampled based on Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) final status survey guidance to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels. At all three sites, the ex situ soils that meet the site- specific DCGLs are retained on-site and used as backfill material. This paper describes the ex situ soil segregation methods, the considerations of each method, and the estimated cost savings from minimizing the volume of soil requiring transportation and off-site disposal. (authors)

Frothingham, David; Andrews, Shawn; Barker, Michelle; Boyle, James; Buechi, Stephen; Graham, Marc; Houston, Linda; Polek, Michael; Simmington, Robert; Spector, Harold [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Elliott, Robert 'Dan' [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States)] [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reducing energy use comes at a costReducing energy use comes at a cost ----the EU casethe EU case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deputy Director and Chief Economist Centre for Global Energy StudiesCentre for Global Energy Studies Athens emissions, which are deemed to cause globalemissions, which are deemed to cause global warming regions ofsupplies (especially oil) from unstable regions of the world.the world. Why reduce energy use

100

Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of electricity changes over time depending because a schedule without considering variable energy charges might significantly increase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of a fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) for reducing the cost of photovoltaic wafers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines a wafer slicing technique developed by Crystal Systems, Inc. that reduces the cost of photovoltaic wafers. This fixed, abrasive slicing technique (FAST) uses a multiwire bladepack and a diamond-plated wirepack; water is the coolant. FAST is in the prototype production stage and reduces expendable material costs while retaining the advantages of a multiwire slurry technique. The cost analysis revealed that costs can be decreased by making more cuts per bladepack and slicing more wafers per linear inch. Researchers studied the degradation of bladepacks and increased wirepack life. 21 refs.

Schmid, F. (Crystal Systems, Inc., Salem, MA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

THE IMPACT OF SUBSIDY MECHANISMS ON BIOMASS AND OIL SHALE BASED ELECTRICITY COST PRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides electricity cost price estimates for biomass-based CHP plants and oil shale power plants to be constructed before 2013 and 2015 that can serve as references for more detailed case-specific studies. Calcula-tion results give electricity costs prices under different CO2 quota

E. Latov; A. Volkova; A. Siirde

103

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement, and abatement in this sector is a key determinant of economy-wide regulation costs. The complexity. It follows that assessing abatement potentials and price changes in the electricity sector with a partial

104

Multiobjective Design Optimization of Real-life Devices in Electrical Engineering: a Cost-effective Evolutionary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The optimal shape design of a shielded reactor, based on the optimization of both cost and performanceMultiobjective Design Optimization of Real-life Devices in Electrical Engineering: a Cost optimization of a device in electrical engineering, the exhaustive sampling of Pareto optimal front implies

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

105

Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases the Market Potential of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol prices depend heavily on the cost of the cellulase enzymes used to break down the biomass into fermentable sugars. To reduce these costs, NREL partnered with two leading enzyme companies, Novozymes and Genencor, to engineer new cellulase enzymes that are exceptionally good at breaking down cellulose. Genencor is now part of DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

To send or not to send: Reducing the cost of data transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as energy, where companies are billed by the total volume of utility consumed. For network bandwidth the 95th percentile) cost model. In other words, the time slots with the top 5 percent (in the case of 95To send or not to send: Reducing the cost of data transmission Leana Golubchik, Samir Khuller

Khuller, Samir

107

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWP-058 Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong? Richard Green Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;Electricity Transmission optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops

California at Berkeley. University of

109

Elections at what cost? The impact of electricity subsidies on groundwater extraction and agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity may better achieve the objective of social welfare maximization as compared to a private firmElections at what cost? The impact of electricity subsidies on groundwater extraction and agricultural production DRAFT Reena Badiani Katrina K. Jessoe January 23, 2011 Abstract In India, electric

Silver, Whendee

110

Cost Effectiveness of CO2 Mitigation Technologies and Policies in the Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Cost Effectiveness of CO2 Mitigation Technologies and Policies in the Electricity Sector. The costs and benefits of low carbon technology options are unique and affect different market participants in different ways. In this thesis, we examine the cost effectiveness of carbon mitigation technologies

111

High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy systems with high-performance homes and showing how they align with utility peak-demand reduction interests. In addition to substantial energy savings, solar electric home...

112

Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

Smith, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Multiple oligo nucleotide arrays: Methods to reduce manufacture time and cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The customized multiple arrays are becoming vastly used in microarray experiments for varies purposes, mainly for its ability to handle a large quantity of data and output high quality results. However, experimenters who use customized multiple arrays still face many problems, such as the cost and time to manufacture the masks, and the cost for production of the multiple arrays by costly machines. Although there is some research on the multiple arrays, there is little concern on the manufacture time and cost, which is actually important to experimenters. In this paper, we have proposed methods to reduce the time and cost for the manufacture of the customized multiple arrays. We have first introduced a heuristic algorithm for the mask decomposition problem for multiple arrays. Then a streamline method is proposed for the integration of different steps of manufacture on a higher level. Experiments show that our methods are very effective in reduction of the time and cost of manufacture of multiple arrays.

Ning, Kang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

MEW Efforts in Reducing Electricity and Water Consumption in Government and Private Sectors in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers, membership No. 1715. MEW EFFORTS IN REDUCING ELECTRICITY AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN KUWAIT Eng. Iqbal Al-Tayar Manager ? Technical Supervision Department Planning and Training Sector Ministry... of Electricity & Water (MEW) - Kuwait Historical Background - Electricity ? In 1913, the first electric machine was installed in Kuwait to operate 400 lambs for Al-Saif Palace. ? In 1934, two electric generators were installed with a total capacity of 60 k...

Al-Tayar, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL demonstrates that zonal climate control can reduce air conditioning power and improve range while maintaining driver thermal sensation.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen;

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high cost of power from solar photovoltaic (PV) panels hassolar panels can be more closely synchronized with system demand, but at a costcost of the solar PV installation is equivalent to purchasing each MWh over the life of the panels

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Time Domain Partitioning of Electricity Production Cost Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production cost models are often used for planning by simulating power system operations over long time horizons. The simulation of a day-ahead energy market can take several weeks to compute. Tractability improvements are often made through model simplifications, such as: reductions in transmission modeling detail, relaxation of commitment variable integrality, reductions in cost modeling detail, etc. One common simplification is to partition the simulation horizon so that weekly or monthly horizons can be simulated in parallel. However, horizon partitions are often executed with overlap periods of arbitrary and sometimes zero length. We calculate the time domain persistence of historical unit commitment decisions to inform time domain partitioning of production cost models. The results are implemented using PLEXOS production cost modeling software in an HPC environment to improve the computation time of simulations while maintaining solution integrity.

Barrows, C.; Hummon, M.; Jones, W.; Hale, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future James McNerney,a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and comparing different electricity generation technologies using total costs, rather than costs of single A Change decomposition 15 1. Introduction Coal generates two-fifths of the world's electricity [1Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future James Mc

122

Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed Internet Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed a major part of their running costs. Modern electric power grid provides a feasible way to dynamically and efficiently manage the electricity cost of distributed IDCs based on the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP

Rahman, A.K.M. Ashikur

123

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

125

PV Fact Sheets Argument B1Some people state that "The external costs of PV electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PV Fact Sheets Argument B1Some people state that "The external costs of PV electricity is much and the low one to thin-film cadmium telluride PV systems. Fossil fuel power plants PV displaces. 5.8 External

126

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electrically operated magnetic switch designed to display reduced leakage inductance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically operated magnetic switch is disclosed herein for use in opening and closing a circuit between two terminals depending upon the voltage across these terminals. The switch so disclosed is comprised of a ferrite core in the shape of a toroid having opposing ends and opposite inner and outer sides and an arrangement of electrically conductive components defining at least one current flow path which makes a number of turns around the core. This arrangement of components includes a first plurality of electrically conducive rigid rods parallel with and located outside the outer side of the core and a second plurality of electrically conductive rigid rods parallel with and located inside the inner side of the core. The arrangement also includes means for electrically connecting these rods together so that the define the current flow path. In one embodiment, this latter means uses rigid cross-tab means. In another, preferred embodiment, printed circuits on rigid dielectric substrates located on opposite ends of the core are utilized to interconnect the rods together. 10 figures.

Cook, E.G.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electrically operated magnetic switch designed to display reduced leakage inductance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically operated magnetic switch is disclosed herein for use in opening and closing a circuit between two terminals depending upon the voltage across these terminals. The switch so disclosed is comprised of a ferrite core in the shape of a toroid having opposing ends and opposite inner and outer sides and an arrangement of electrically conductive components defining at least one current flow path which makes a number of turns around the core. This arrangement of components includes a first plurality of electrically conducive rigid rods parallel with and located outside the outer side of the core and a second plurality of electrically conductive rigid rods parallel with and located inside the inner side of the core. The arrangement also includes means for electrically connecting these rods together so that the define the current flow path. In one embodiment, this latter means uses rigid cross-tab means. In another, preferred embodiment, printed circuits on rigid dielectric substrates located on opposite ends of the core are utilized to interconnect the rods together.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ownership Unbuilding in Electricity Markets - A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of the German TSO'S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OWNERSHIP UNBUNDLING IN ELECTRICITY MARKETS - A SOCIAL COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF THE GERMAN TSOS Gert Brunekreeft1 Jacobs University Bremen Campus Ring 1 D-28759 Bremen Germany Email: g.brunekreeft@jacobs-university.de Version 2, August 11... , 2008 Abstract: This paper presents a social cost benefit analysis of ownership unbundling (as compared to legal und functional unbundling) of the electricity transmission system operators in Germany. The study relies on the Residual Supply Index...

Brunekreeft, Gert

130

Reduced form electricity spot price modeling with a view towards spike risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced form electricity spot price modeling with a view towards spike risk Prof. Dr. Meyer. Februar 2010, 16:15 Uhr Seminarraum, Ludwigstra?e 33 I The recent deregulation of electricity markets has led to the creation of energy exchanges, where the electricity is freely traded. We study the most

Gerkmann, Ralf

131

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Web-based Security Cost Analysis in Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Web-based Security Cost Analysis in Electricity Markets Hong of transmission security constraints, transactions de- termined by market forces are feasible only when they are within the system's security limits. Thus, transactions in electricity markets need to be evaluated

Cañizares, Claudio A.

132

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix G: MCS Cost-effectiveness for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cost and savings assumptions used to establish the efficiency level that achieves all electricity and assumptions used to determine whether the regionally cost-effective efficiency levels are economically-1 shows the levels of energy efficiency assumed for new site built and manufactured homes built

133

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium (3.5% U-235) in a light water reactor has an energy content of 960MWhr/kg [2], or multiplying by 3.41 MBTU/MWhr, we get 3274MBTU/kg. The total cost of bringing uranium to the fuel rods of a nuclear power plant, considering mining, transportation, conversion1 , enrichment, and fabrication, has been estimated

McCalley, James D.

134

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Enriched uranium (3.5% U-235) in a light water reactor has an energy content of 960MWhr/kg [2], or multiplying by 3.41 MBTU/MWhr, we get 3274MBTU/kg. The total cost of bringing uranium to the fuel rods of a nuclear power plant, considering mining, transportation, conversion1 , enrichment, and fabrication, has

McCalley, James D.

135

Reducing the cost of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases using membrane technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of CO{sub 2} capture using membrane technology from coal-fired power-plant flue gas typically assume compression of the feed to achieve a driving force across the membrane. The high CO{sub 2} capture cost of these systems reflects the need to compress the low-pressure feed gas (1 bar) and the low CO{sub 2} purity of the product stream. This article investigates how costs for CO{sub 2} capture using membranes can be reduced by operating under vacuum conditions. The flue gas is pressurized to 1.5 bar, whereas the permeate stream is at 0.08 bar. Under these operating conditions, the capture cost is U.S. $54/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided compared to U.S. $82/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided using membrane processes with a pressurized feed. This is a. reduction of 35%. The article also investigates the effect on the capture cost of improvements in CO{sub 2} permeability and selectivity. The results show that the capture cost can be reduced to less than U.S. $25/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided when the CO{sub 2} permeability is 300 bar, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity is 250, and the membrane cost is U.S. $10/m{sup 2}.

Ho, M.T.; Allinson, G.W.; Wiley, D.E. [University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (Australia)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

ocietal pressures to reduce healthcare costs, coupled with the pharmaceutical industry's need to maintain its eco-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ocietal pressures to reduce healthcare costs, coupled with the pharmaceutical industry's need. Augsburger, PhD, is Shangraw Professor of Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics, all in the Department to maintain its eco- nomic incentive to develop new drugs, have required that the industry increase speed

Peng, Yun

138

Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel Use and Emissions from On policy harmonized Tax credits Anti-idling Low Carbon Fuel Standard #12;Lifecycle Emissions Modeled in TOP-HDV 5 Fuel production, refining, and distribution Material acquisition, processing, and vehicle assembly

California at Davis, University of

139

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Reducing the Vulnerability of Electric Power Grids to Terrorist Attacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a cascading outage analyzer that, given an initial disturbance on an electric power system, checks for thermal overloads, under-frequency and over-frequency conditions, and under-voltage conditions that would result in removal of elements from the system. The analyzer simulates the successive tripping of elements due to protective actions until a post-event steady state or a system blackout is reached.

Ross Baldick; Thekla Boutsika; Jin Hur; Manho Joung; Yin Wu; Minqi Zhong

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop,Cosmo Powertech Pvt Ltd

146

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet) Year53Electricity: 30 Years of

147

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEM with EDAXUpdated Capital Cost Estimates

148

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reducing Electrical Power Use with a Performance Based Incentive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Departmental Energy Management Program (DEMP) funded Model Program Study developed out of a potential DOE-ID Performance Based Incentive for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), lasting from October 2001 through May 2002, which stressed reductions in electrical usage. An analysis of demand usage obtained from monthly INEEL Power Management electric reports revealed reductions in demand from a majority of the site areas. The purpose of this Model Program study was to determine the methods and activities that were used at these site areas to achieve the reductions in demand and to develop these demand reduction methods and activities into a Model Program that could be shared throughout the INEEL and DOE complex-wide for additional demand savings. INEEL Energy Management personnel interviewed contacts from the eight areas which had achieved a consistent reduction in demand during the study period, namely, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Test Area North (TAN), Power Burst Facility (PBF), Test Reactor Area (TRA) including Advanced Test Reactor ATR), Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), and Materials Test Reactor (MTR) areas, Central Facilities Area (CFA), Specific Manufacturing Capability (SMC), Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANLW). The information that resulted from the interviews indicated that more than direct demand and energy reduction actions were responsible for the recorded reductions in demand. INEEL Energy Management identified five categories of actions or conditions that contributed to the demand reduction. These categories are Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D), employee actions, improvements, inactivation for maintenance, and processes. The following information details the findings from the study.

M. Kathleen Nell

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

New ultra-deepwater rig with dual rotaries will reduce costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Discoverer Enterprise, a next generation, ultra-deepwater drill ship with a dual rotary system, will decrease drilling and completion costs by reducing bottom hole assembly (BHA) and tubular preparation time. Transocean Offshore received a contract from Amoco Corp. to build the ultra-deep floating rig and is scheduled to spud its first well in July 1998. It will generally work in water deeper than 6,000 ft. The rig design involves a new approach that addresses the overall well-construction process and equipment required to decrease significantly deepwater drilling time. The Discoverer is the first ultra-deepwater rig designed specifically for handling subsea completions and extended well tests. The paper discusses increased deepwater rig demand, rig construction costs, drillship design, well construction, development drilling, and cost justification.

Cole, J.C.; Herrmann, R.P.; Scott, R.J. [Transocean Offshore Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shaughnessy, J.M. [Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

154

Reducing the cost of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases using pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes have been used extensively for gas separation, especially in the separation of hydrogen from CO{sub 2}, and in air purification. The objective of this paper is to examine the economic feasibility of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) for recovering CO{sub 2} from postcombustion power plant flue gas. The analysis considers both high-pressure feed and vacuum desorption using commercial adsorbent 13X, which has a working capacity of 2.2 mol/kg and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 54. The results show that using vacuum desorption reduces the capture cost from US$57 to US$51 per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided and is comparable in cost to CO{sub 2} capture using conventional MEA absorption of US$49 per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is also presented showing the effect on the capture cost with changes in process cycle; feed pressure and evacuation pressure; improvements the adsorbent characteristics; and selectivity and working capacity. The results show that a hypothetical adsorbent with a working capacity of 4.3 mol/kg and a CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 150 can reduce the capture cost to US$30 per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided.

Ho, M.T.; Allinson, G.W.; Wiley, D.E. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Veeco Develops a Tool to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Brightness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of DOE funding, Veeco is working on reducing epitaxy costs and increasing LED efficiency by developing a physical vapor deposition (PVD) tool for depositing aluminum nitride buffer layers on LED substrates. PVD, also known as "sputtering," is an alternative to metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). PVD is a purely physical process that involves plasma sputter bombardment rather than a chemical reaction at the surface to be coated, as in MOCVD.

156

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cost-Effective Design of a Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] whereas the efficiency of an electric motor can reach 90% or even higher [13], and (ii) the kinetic energy% in the case of heavy city traffic [17]. As the only source of providing energy to the electric motor.g., in Tesla cars, Nissan Leaf, Ford Focus, etc.). The performance of the EES system in an EV is therefore

Pedram, Massoud

158

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing in Technology and Policy Abstract Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission

164

People are willing to bear costs to reduce emissions, but they are only willing to go so far.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People are willing to bear costs to reduce emissions, but they are only willing to go so far a small fraction of its subsidies on kerosene, diesel, and petroleum, with the inevitable result being. It says that even if people are willing to bear some costs to reduce emissions (and experience shows

Colorado at Boulder, University of

165

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-peak hours for delivery at times of peak usage. These pumped hydro sys

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

168

Costs and effects of electric-utility DSM programs: 1989--1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All US electric utilities are required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a comprehensive view of utility DSM-program costs and effects (energy savings and load reductions) for 1989, 1990, 1991, and 1992 as well as projections for 1993 and 1997.

Hirst, E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. This study was conducted by implementing both top-down and bottom-up strategies. The top-down approach used prosperity gaming methodology to identify future health care delivery needs. This effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements. The bottom-up approach identified and ranked interventional therapies employed in existing care delivery systems for a host of health-related conditions. Economic analysis formed the basis for development of care pathway interaction models for two of the most pervasive, chronic disease/disability conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Societal cost-benefit relationships based on these analyses were used to evaluate the effect of emerging technology in these treatment areas. 17 figs., 48 tabs.

Sill, A.E.; Warren, S.; Dillinger, J.D.; Cloer, B.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially radioactive waste. The proper management of the dismantling waste plays an important role for the time needed for the dismantling phase and thus is critical to the decommissioning cost. An efficient and thorough process for inventorying, characterization and categorization of the waste provides a sound basis for the planning process. As part of comprehensive decommissioning studies for Nordic NPPs, Westinghouse has developed the decommissioning inventories that have been used for estimations of the duration of specific work packages and the corresponding costs. As part of creating the design basis for a national repository for decommissioning waste, the total production of different categories of waste packages has also been predicted. Studsvik has developed a risk based concept for categorization and handling of the generated waste using six different categories with a span from extremely small risk for radiological contamination to high level waste. The two companies have recently joined their skills in the area of decommissioning on selected market in a consortium named 'ndcon' to further strengthen the proposed process. Depending on the risk for radiological contamination or the radiological properties and other properties of importance for waste management, treatment routes are proposed with well-defined and proven methods for on-site or off-site treatment, activity determination and conditioning. The system is based on a graded approach philosophy aiming for high confidence and sustainability, aiming for re-use and recycling where found applicable. The objective is to establish a process where all dismantled material has a pre-determined treatment route. These routes should through measurements, categorization, treatment, conditioning, intermediate storage and final disposal be designed to provide a steady, un-disturbed flow of material to avoid interruptions. Bottle-necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Bergh, Niklas; Hedin, Gunnar [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)] [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Using Batteries to Reduce the Power Costs of Internet-scale Distributed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost of Running an Internet-Scale Network 4 Server Cost (CapEx) Bandwidth From network provider Example

Berger, Emery

174

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility...

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Steam turbine maintenance and repair technology: Reducing planned-outage costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North American Electric Reliability Council (NAERC) reported that the average loss of equivalent availability per outage for a major fossil turbine overhaul is 323,000 MW-HR. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation and Storage Division, is in the first phase of a major research project to reduce the duration and/or frequency of steam turbine maintenance outages. This project consists of an assessment of the current state-of-the-art turbine maintenance and repair techniques and technologies. It is based on a review of current turbine maintenance practices of the US, European, Japanese, and Australian utility industries. Emphasized are maintenance and repair activities that have the most significant impact on outage duration or frequency. Twenty-six key turbine maintenance activities and the current best techniques were identified for use by utility maintenance personnel. Overall outage durations could be reduced if the duration of these activities were shortened or if they were performed more effectively. Recommended projects for development of advanced steam turbine maintenance technology were identified. 29 refs., 46 figs., 9 tabs.

Grace, H.P.; McClintock, M. (General Physics Corp., Columbia, MD (USA)); Lamping, G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The marginal costs and pricing of gas system upgrades to accommodate new electric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the coming years, competitive forces and restructuring in the electric industry can be expected to increase substantially the demand for gas delivery service to new electric generating units by local distribution companies (LDCs) and pipeline companies across the United States. In meeting this demand, it is important that the prices paid by electric generators for gas delivery service properly reflect the costs of the resources utilized in providing service to them in order that their decisions regarding what to build and where as well as the manner in which their units are dispatched are as efficient as possible from a societal standpoint. This will assure that society`s resources will be neither squandered nor underutilized in providing service to these generators and aid in assuring that, once built, the units are run in an efficient manner. While the most efficient solution to this problem is a secondary market in tradeable pipeline capacity rights, we do not have such a system in place at this time. Further, tradeable rights for LDC capacity may be difficult to establish. An interim solution that will work in the confines of the present system and not create problems for the transition to tradeable rights is required. This purpose of this paper is to set out the important first principals involved in applying marginal costing to the provision of gas delivery service to new electric generating units rather than to present empirical data on the marginal costs of such service. Experience has shown that marginal costs are usually unique to the particular situation being costed.

Ambrose, B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Z [UNIV OF MANCHESTER; Jaworski, A J [UNIV OF MANCHESTER

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Low-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-Cost Production of Hydrogen and Electricity Low-Cost

179

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Electricity Markets, Energy Modelling, Optimisation Models, JEL-classification: C61, Q41 Author Affiliations: Felix Msgens Graduate School of Risk Manage- ment and Institute of Energy Economics University of Kln Albertus... cycle ( maxt min,1t min,2t min maxt t 1 d d ? visualizes this structure. Figure 1: Energy Prices with Inter-temporal Constraints tmin,1 tmax P ric e tpart,2 tmin2tpart,1 tpart,3 Costs for Fuel + Start up + Part load operation Demand...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reducing power transients in diesel-electric dynamically positioned ships using re-positioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing power transients in diesel-electric dynamically positioned ships using re--A thrust allocation method with a functionality to assist power management systems by using the hull the power consumption in the thrusters when a sharp increase in power consumption is demanded elsewhere

Johansen, Tor Arne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type.

182

A hypothetical profile of ordinary steam turbines with reduced cost and enhanced reliability for contemporary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power steam turbines should be characterized with the reduced cost and enhanced reliability and designed on the basis of experience in steam turbine design and operation accumulated in the world`s practice for the latest years. Currently, such turbines have to be particularly matched with requirements of operation for deregulated power systems; so they should be capable of operating in both base-load and cycling modes. It seems reasonable to have such turbines with the single capacity about 250--400 MW, supercritical main steam pressure, and single steam reheat. This makes it possible to design such turbines with the minimum specific metal amount and length, with the integrated HP-IP and one two-flow LP cylinders. With existing ferritic and martensitic-class steels, the main and reheat steam temperatures can be chosen at the level of 565--580 C (1050--1075 F) without remarkable supplemental expenditures and a sacrifice of reliability. To reduce the capital cost and simplify operation and maintenance, the turbine`s regenerative system can be designed deaeratorless with motor-driven boiler-feed pumps. Such turbines could be used to replace existing old turbines with minimum expenditures. They can also be combined with large high-temperature gas-turbine sets to shape highly efficient combined-cycle units. There exist various design and technological decisions to enhance the turbine reliability and efficiency; they are well worked up and verified in long-term operation practice of different countries. For reliable and efficient operation, the turbine should be furnished with advanced automatic and automated control, diagnostic monitoring, and informative support for the operational personnel.

Leyzerovich, A.S. [Actinium Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reduced Space-Time and Time Costs Using Dislocation Codes and Arbitrary Ancillas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose two distinct methods of improving quantum computing protocols based on surface codes. First, we analyze the use of dislocations instead of holes to produce logical qubits, potentially reducing spacetime volume required. Dislocations induce defects which, in many respects, behave like Majorana quasi-particles. We construct circuits to implement these codes and present fault-tolerant measurement methods for these and other defects which may reduce spatial overhead. One advantage of these codes is that Hadamard gates take exactly $0$ time to implement. We numerically study the performance of these codes using a minimum weight and a greedy decoder using finite-size scaling. Second, we consider state injection of arbitrary ancillas to produce arbitrary rotations. This avoids the logarithmic (in precision) overhead in online cost required if $T$ gates are used to synthesize arbitrary rotations. While this has been considered before, we consider also the parallel performance of this protocol. Arbitrary ancilla injection leads to a probabilistic protocol in which there is a constant chance of success on each round; we use an amortized analysis to show that even in a parallel setting this leads to only a constant factor slowdown as opposed to the logarithmic slowdown that might be expected naively.

M. B. Hastings; A. Geller

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Costs of chronic disease and an alternative to reduce these costs: case study of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the efficiency of water supply systems taking into account water pricing, marketing, and treatment costs is proposed. This system treats and supplies water differently depending on the source of the water and if the end-use of the water is a potable or non...

Jang, Won-Ik

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas...

186

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost of ownership and environmental savings analyses: solar photovoltaic, wind, and fuel cellscost. ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS ANALYSIS Solar, wind, and fuel cellsanalysis results favor wind over solar and fuel cells in terms of both ownership cost and

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option. Solar photovoltaic needs to cut the cost by 50% orcost of ownership and environmental savings analyses: solar photovoltaic,

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURING THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SUPPLY Chris Y.Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partially

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Breakthrough in platinum structures maintains high catalytic activity and could lead to reduced costs for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs for hydrogen fuel cells, which hold the promise of powering vehicles and buildings. Hydrogen fuel be useful in hydrogen fuel cells while sharply driving down the cost compared to an all-platinum catalyst cells could power the vehicles of tomorrow. With platinum an essential catalyst in fuel cells

191

Reducing Idle Power Consumption in Office Spaces Saves U.S. Navy in Energy Costs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a two-year project to demonstrate energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has identified advanced plug load controls as a promising technology for reducing energy use and related costs in the U.S. Navy's Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) office spaces.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reach: A low cost-approach to reducing stack emissions and improving the performance of oil-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved oil combustion technology, based upon optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer design, has been retrofit to oil-fired boilers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, particulate matter emissions, and opacity, and to provide operational and performance benefits. This technology, referred to as REACH, can be retrofit to wall-fired and tangential-fired boilers at a cost of less than $0.75/kW, a fraction of the cost of installing new burners. The technology is compatible with conventional NO{sub x} controls such as overfire air, flue gas recirculation, and low-NO{sub x} burners, and can be combined with these techniques to further reduce NO{sub x} emissions. REACH has been applied to eighty boilers representing over 14,000 MW of generating capacity. This paper describes REACH technology, its applicability and cost, and the emissions and performance results achieved in full scale applications.

Giovanni, D.V.; McElroy, M.W.; Kerho, S.E. [Electric Power Technologies, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is fraction of total electricity consumption for commercialy) ! calculate total electricity consumption for the end-useis fraction of total electricity consumption for residential

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Energy Conservation Fund: Helping Corporations Develop Energy Conservation Strategies and Reduce Utility Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy conservation projects can save companies significant money over time and often pay for themselves very quickly. This is especially true with the dramatic increase in energy costs over the past few years. Yet convincing corporate decision...

Swanson, G. A.; Houston, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

Rakowski, James M.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the worlds roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the worlds roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the worlds roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

arXiv:cond-mat/0408020v12Aug2004 Electric generation of spin in crystals with reduced symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:cond-mat/0408020v12Aug2004 Electric generation of spin in crystals with reduced symmetry of spin accumulation in semiconduc- tors, we propose a way of generating a spin polarization in crystals with strong spin-orbit interac- tions. We show that, in the presence of an electric field, there exists

Niu, Qian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Novel, Low-Cost, Reduced-Sensor Approach for Providing Smart Renote Monitoring and Diagnostics for Packaged Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conceptually an approach to providing automated remote performance and conditioning monitoring and fault detection for air conditioners and heat pumps that shows great promise to reduce the capital and installation costs of such systems from over $1000 per unit to $200 to $400 per unit. The approach relies on non-intrusive electric load monitoring (NIELM) to enable separation of the power use signals of compressors and fans in the air conditioner or heat pump. Then combining information on the power uses and one or two air temperature measurements, changes in energy efficiency and occurrence of major faults would be detected. By decreasing the number of sensors used from between ten and twenty in current diagnostic monitoring systems to three for the envisaged system, the capital cost of the monitoring system hardware and the cost of labor for installation would be decreased significantly. After describing the problem being addressed and the concept for performance monitoring and fault detection in more detail, the report identifies specific conditions and faults that the proposed method would detect, discusses specific needs for successful use of the NIELM approach, and identifies the major elements in the path from concept to a commercialized monitoring and diagnostic system.

Brambley, Michael R.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The cost of reducing utility S02 emissions : not as low as you might think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A common assertion in public policy discussions is that the cost of achieving the SO2 emissions reductions under the acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act ("Title IV") has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV ...

Smith, Anne E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand...

Andrepont, J. S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Performance of reduced wall EPR insulated medium voltage power cables. Pat 1: Electrical characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paper insulated lead covered cables (PILC) have had a long and successful heritage. After almost 100 years, this design of cable is still in operation and continues to be manufactured. However, utilities are now looking for a reliable replacement for PILC cables. This is due to two primary reasons: (1) difficulty in installing and maintaining this type of cable and (2) increasing pressure to replace these cables due to environmental concerns. To date diameter limitations of conventional extruded dielectric cables has impeded their replacement in existing PILC conduits. This paper describes a study for the evaluation for reliably reducing the insulation thickness to achieve a lower diameter cable to effectively replace PILC cable in existing conduits. Part 1 of the investigation reviews the theory of insulation wall determination and the test program carried out to evaluate electrical performance of reduced wall EPR cables. Additionally, cable design concepts and constructions are discussed. In Part 2 the mechanical performance on conventional and reduced wall EPR insulated cables are evaluated. This is reported in a separate paper.

Cinquemani, P.L.; Wen, Y.; Kuchta, F.L.; Doench, C. [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)] [Pirelli Cable Corp., Lexington, SC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

Jehlik, Forrest [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of Production PVD-AIN Buffer Layer System and Processes to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE has set aggressive goals for solid state lighting (SSL) adoption, which require manufacturing and quality improvements for virtually all process steps leading to an LED luminaire product. The goals pertinent to this proposed project are to reduce the cost and improve the quality of the epitaxial growth processes used to build LED structures. The objectives outlined in this proposal focus on achieving cost reduction and performance improvements over state-of-the-art, using technologies that are low in cost and amenable to high efficiency manufacturing. The objectives of the outlined proposal focus on cost reductions in epitaxial growth by reducing epitaxy layer thickness and hetero-epitaxial strain, and by enabling the use of larger, less expensive silicon substrates and would be accomplished through the introduction of a high productivity reactive sputtering system and an effective sputtered aluminum-nitride (AlN) buffer/nucleation layer process. Success of the proposed project could enable efficient adoption of GaN on-silicon (GaN/Si) epitaxial technology on 150mm silicon substrates. The reduction in epitaxy cost per cm{sup 2} using 150mm GaN-on-Si technology derives from (1) a reduction in cost of ownership and increase in throughput for the buffer deposition process via the elimination of MOCVD buffer layers and other throughput and CoO enhancements, (2) improvement in brightness through reductions in defect density, (3) reduction in substrate cost through the replacement of sapphire with silicon, and (4) reduction in non-ESD yield loss through reductions in wafer bow and temperature variation. The adoption of 150mm GaN/Si processing will also facilitate significant cost reductions in subsequent wafer fabrication manufacturing costs. There were three phases to this project. These three phases overlap in order to aggressively facilitate a commercially available production GaN/Si capability. In Phase I of the project, the repeatability of the performance was analyzed and improvements implemented to the Veeco PVD-AlN prototype system to establish a specification and baseline PVD-AlN films on sapphire and in parallel the evaluation of PVD AlN on silicon substrates began. In Phase II of the project a Beta tool based on a scaled-up process module capable of depositing uniform films on batches of 4or 6 diameter substrates in a production worthy operation was developed and qualified. In Phase III, the means to increase the throughput of the PVD-AlN system was evaluated and focused primarily on minimizing the impact of the substrate heating and cooling times that dominated the overall cycle time.

Cerio, Frank

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Looney, Brian B.; Seaman, John; Kmetz, Thomas

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component...

Skelton, J.

209

Energy Department Awards Nearly $7 Million for Research to Reduce Costs of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusiness Competition |Storage Technologies in Fuel CellElectric

210

Beyond Energy Savings: Case Studies on Enhancing Productivity and Reducing Costs Through Energy Efficiency Investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

productivity. Anheuser-Busch Companies. Inc. Bio-Energy Recoverv In response to rising fuel prices in the hite 1970s, Anheuser-Busch looked for ways to gain control over energy and other utility costs. The company began exploring anaerobic treatment... of organic nutrients in wastewater, in which bacteria consume organic compounds under water, releasing biogas that bubbles to the top of the tank. The biogas (mostly methane) is collected and used for fuel (bio-energy recovery), and solid waste...

Pye, M.

211

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

New pilot saves customers money and reduces BPA reserve requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

paced energy schedules, increasing the electric grid's flexibility to absorb changes in wind energy generation and reducing costs for both the customers and BPA. Portland General...

213

New membranes could speed the biofuels conversion process and reduce cost  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ORNL researchers have developed a new class of membranes that could enable faster, more cost efficient biofuels production. These membranes are tunable at the nanopore level and have potential uses in separating water from fuel and acid from bio-oils. The membrane materials technology just won an R&D 100 award. ORNL and NREL are partnering, with support from the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, to determine the best uses of these membranes to speed the biofuels conversion process. Development of the membranes was funded by DOE BETO and ORNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

Hu, Michael

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

New membranes could speed the biofuels conversion process and reduce cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL researchers have developed a new class of membranes that could enable faster, more cost efficient biofuels production. These membranes are tunable at the nanopore level and have potential uses in separating water from fuel and acid from bio-oils. The membrane materials technology just won an R&D 100 award. ORNL and NREL are partnering, with support from the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, to determine the best uses of these membranes to speed the biofuels conversion process. Development of the membranes was funded by DOE BETO and ORNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

Hu, Michael

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies | Department ofMeasuring the Costs of U.S.

216

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Fact Sheet, 2014 |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslieEnergy LoanOfficialLow-CostALTEXDepartment

217

Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Lazy Means Smart: Reducing Repair Bandwidth Costs in Erasure-coded Distributed Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ditional bandwidth savings. 1. INTRODUCTION Erasure coding schemes, e.g. Reed-Solomon (RS) codes on the example of Reed-Solomon codes, and then explain the repair bandwidth problem. In an RS(n,k) stor- age scheme. 4. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY Evaluating the efficacy of lazy recovery in reducing repair bandwidth

Alvisi, Lorenzo

219

Abstract --Photonic integration significantly reduces power consumption, cost, and size while it  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cooling: instead of many thermoelectric (TE) coolers used in many packaged chips, a single TE cooler can the network operators to equip itself with a large cooling system, and spend ~$1.5 million per year, just (thousands!) discrete modules. 1. Reduced optical power losses: the optical signal stays on-chip all the time

Kolner, Brian H.

220

Design of an Actinide-Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low-Cost Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University Research Consortium (URC) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, material compatibility, plant engineering, and coolant activation. In the area of core neutronic design, the reactivity vs. burnup and discharge isotopics of both non-fertile and fertile fuels were evaluated. An innovative core for pure actinide burning that uses streaming, fertile-free fuel assemblies was studied in depth. This particular core exhibits excellent reactivity performance upon coolant voiding, even for voids that occur in the core center, and has a transuranic (TRU) destruction rate that is comparable to the proposed accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) facility. These studies suggest that a core can be designed to achieve a long life while maintaining safety and minimizing waste. In the area of material compatibility studies, an experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials has been designed and built at the INEEL. The INEEL forced-convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The corrosion cell is being used to test steel that is commercially available in the United States to temperatures above 650C. Progress in plant engineering was made for two reactor concepts, one utilizing an indirect cycle with heat exchangers and the other utilizing a direct-contact steam cycle. The evaluation of the indirect cycle designs has investigated the effects of various parameters to increase electric production at full power. For the direct-contact reactor, major issues related to the direct-contact heat transfer rate and entrainment and carryover of liquid lead-bismuth to the turbine have been identified and analyzed. An economic analysis approach was also developed to determine the cost of electricity production in the lead-bismuth reactor. The approach will be formulated into a model and applied to develop scientific cost estimates for the different reactor designs and thus aid in the selection of the most economic option. In the area of lead-bismuth coolant activation, the radiological hazard was evaluated with particular emphasis on the direct-contact reactor. In this system, the lack of a physical barrier between the primary and secondary coolant favors the release of the alpha-emitter Po?210 and its transport throughout the plant. Modeling undertaken on the basis of the scarce information available in the literature confirmed the importance of this issue, as well as the need for experimental work to reduce the uncertainties on the basic characteristics of volatile polonium chemical forms.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Davis, Cliff Bybee; MIT folks

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wind Turbine Control Design to Reduce Capital Costs: 7 January 2009 - 31 August 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report first discusses and identifies which wind turbine components can benefit from advanced control algorithms and also presents results from a preliminary loads case analysis using a baseline controller. Next, it describes the design, implementation, and simulation-based testing of an advanced controller to reduce loads on those components. The case-by-case loads analysis and advanced controller design will help guide future control research.

Darrow, P. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reduced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 RevisionDivisionReduced intermittency in

223

Reducing communication costs in the conjugate gradient algorithm on distributed memory multiprocessors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard formulation of the conjugate gradient algorithm involves two inner product computations. The results of these two inner products are needed to update the search direction and the computed solution. In a distributed memory parallel environment, the computation and subsequent distribution of these two values requires two separate communication and synchronization phases. In this paper, we present a mathematically equivalent rearrangement of the standard algorithm that reduces the number of communication phases. We give a second derivation of the modified conjugate gradient algorithm in terms of the natural relationship with the underlying Lanczos process. We also present empirical evidence of the stability of this modified algorithm.

D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

225

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity...

Ragsdale, K.

226

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, becauseof the retail cost and the break-even gasoline price, foreven gasoline prices at least double, and initial retail

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRICES The price forecasts for coal, fuel oil and natural gas are described in Appendix B. COAL-FIRED STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANTS Coal-fired steam-electric power plants are a mature technology, in use for over a century. Coal is the largest source of electric power in the United States as a whole, and the second

229

Development of a fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) for reducing the cost of photovoltaic wafers. Final subcontract report, 9 January 1991--14 April 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines a wafer slicing technique developed by Crystal Systems, Inc. that reduces the cost of photovoltaic wafers. This fixed, abrasive slicing technique (FAST) uses a multiwire bladepack and a diamond-plated wirepack; water is the coolant. FAST is in the prototype production stage and reduces expendable material costs while retaining the advantages of a multiwire slurry technique. The cost analysis revealed that costs can be decreased by making more cuts per bladepack and slicing more wafers per linear inch. Researchers studied the degradation of bladepacks and increased wirepack life. 21 refs.

Schmid, F. [Crystal Systems, Inc., Salem, MA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Thermal plant bids and market clearing in an electricity pool minimization of costs vs. minimization of consumer payments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spanish wholesale electricity market has started on January 1, 1998. Though it is based on simple price/quantity bids, it incorporates some provisions to take thermal plant running requirements into account. This paper presents these rules and its mathematical treatment, focusing on a possible implementation of the minimum income condition, which allows thermal generators to declare minimum stable loads. It also shows another key point in the debate: whether the algorithm should minimize costs or consumer payments.

Alonso, J.; Trias, A.; Gaitan, V.; Alba, J.J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads in response to a utility signal, represent a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Issue Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads (Figure 1). The testing covered four Lighting the Way to Demand ResponseLighting the Way to Demand Response California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief PIER

232

New top layer reduces the"wiggle"that degrades the conversion of light to electricity in solar cells by absorbing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New top layer reduces the"wiggle"that degrades the conversion of light to electricity in solar cells by absorbing light within a specific wavelength. Today's thin-film solar cells could not function light to pass through to the cell's active layers. Until recently, TCOs were seen as a necessary

233

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy flows in the building electrical load tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .intrinsic property of energy load trees is additivity - thevisualization of energy flows in the load tree, as shown in

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer the potential for physical flexibility.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in solar photovoltaics are urgently needed to increase the performance and reduce the cost of harvesting solar power. Solution-processed photovoltaics are cost-effective to manufacture and offer.Controllingthecollectionandminimizingthetrappingofchargecarriersattheseboundariesiscrucialtoefficiency. Materials interface engineering for solution-processed photovoltaics Michael Graetzel1 , René A. J. Janssen2

235

Minimum Cost Path Problem for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling grid-connected hybrid electric vehicles using advisor, in: Applications and Advances, 2001. The Sixteenth Annual Battery Con- ference on, IEEE. pp.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= the efficiency of the propane space heater (BTU-delivered/the efficiency of the heater, and the cost of propane. The

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the gasoline-equivalent fuel retail price, excluding exciseprice is the full retail price of gasoline, including allon the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, because

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reducing Customer Acquisition Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof Energy Redefining9 *America

239

OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The findings of this study indicate that potential exists in non-building applications to save energy and costs. This potential could save billions of federal dollars, reduce reliance on fossil fuels, increase energy independence and security, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Federal Government has nearly twenty years of experience with achieving similar energy cost reductions, and letting the energy costs savings pay for themselves, by applying energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) inits buildings. Currently, the application of ESPCs is limited by statute to federal buildings. This study indicates that ESPCs can be a compatible and effective contracting tool for achieving savings in non-building applications.

Williams, Charles; Green, Andrew S.; Dahle, Douglas; Barnett, John; Butler, Pat; Kerner, David

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Using architecture information and real-time resource state to reduce power consumption and communication costs in parallel applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As computer systems grow in both size and complexity, the need for applications and run-time systems to adjust to their dynamic environment also grows. The goal of the RAAMP LDRD was to combine static architecture information and real-time system state with algorithms to conserve power, reduce communication costs, and avoid network contention. We devel- oped new data collection and aggregation tools to extract static hardware information (e.g., node/core hierarchy, network routing) as well as real-time performance data (e.g., CPU uti- lization, power consumption, memory bandwidth saturation, percentage of used bandwidth, number of network stalls). We created application interfaces that allowed this data to be used easily by algorithms. Finally, we demonstrated the benefit of integrating system and application information for two use cases. The first used real-time power consumption and memory bandwidth saturation data to throttle concurrency to save power without increasing application execution time. The second used static or real-time network traffic information to reduce or avoid network congestion by remapping MPI tasks to allocated processors. Results from our work are summarized in this report; more details are available in our publications [2, 6, 14, 16, 22, 29, 38, 44, 51, 54].

Brandt, James M.; Devine, Karen D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Gentile, Ann C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Leung, Vitus J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Olivier, Stephen Lecler [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Bunde, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Deveci, Mehmet; Catalyurek, Umit V.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Electricity transmission pricing : how much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a thirteen node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorporating ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

247

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

147 Lifecycle cost (break-even gasoline price): base-casegrease. 37B part: Fuel Gasoline, for the conventional ICEVs.BTU-from-battery to mi/BTU-gasoline. C OST SUMMARY (F ORD T

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Estimating Marginal Cost of Quality Improvements: The Case of the UK Electricity Distribution Companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of operational and capital expenditures (Totex) as the dependent variable. Improving quality of services involves operating cost (Opex) and capital cost (Capex) for the utilities. Due to the presence of possible trade-offs between Opex and Capex (Giannakis et... saving Opex than by an equal amount of Capex reduction (Ofgem, 2003a). Hence, in order to examine existence of different strategies in the UK utilities to improve quality, and to ascertain whether the current regulation has distorted the allocation...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Orea, Luis; Pollitt, Michael G.

250

Energy costs of heating and cooling homes continue to increase. Both rural and urban homeowners can reduce these costs by strategically planting trees in their landscape. In  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy costs of heating and cooling homes continue to increase. Both rural and urban homeowners can save energy costs while beautifying your property. Summer Cooling: In the summer months we want to keep to the south, we want our south facing windows to be un-obstructed by trees so passive solar energy from

Blanchette, Robert A.

251

Energy 101: Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, store managers are intimidated. 5 So what are the solutions? A data acquisition system. Pro-active with alarming and demand-response. Is there staff to maintain and ensure a response? Passive. Acquire the data and then evaluate and assess... is not required, this will prevent the requirement for additional costs of installing an OAT sensor at the building and potentially adding costs to the datalogger hardware or configuration. If possible, it is best to use and on-site OAT sensor. If a demand-response...

Herrin, D. G.

253

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Cost Benefit Analysis of a V2G-Capable Electric School Bus Compared to a Traditional Diesel School Bus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cost Benefit Analysis of a V2G-Capable Electric School Bus Compared to a Traditional Diesel analysis of a V2G-capable electric school bus compared to a traditional diesel school bus. Applied Energy (rmccorma@udel.edu) 1 Center for Carbon-Free Power Integration, University of Delaware ISE Lab, Newark, DE

Firestone, Jeremy

256

Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Comparison of costs for solar electric sources with diesel generators in remote locations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for remote regions all over the world. Factors such as reliability, maintenance, and comparative costs, Center for Industrial and Institutional Development, University of New Hampshire, U.S.A. (Re.çu le 10 as general acceptance by the people in question, and the availabilityof skilled technicians for maintenance

Boyer, Edmond

258

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF COST EFFECTIVE SURFACE MOUNTED WATER TURBINES FOR RURAL ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model and design of hydro dynamically balanced rotor. Small-scale hydro power is the key source of serving the ever increasing demand of power requirements in the shortest time are driving forces for small/low head hydro power generation. This project intends to design and develop cost effective design

Sóbester, András

259

Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on cost and energy density from changes in cell capacity, parallel cell groups, and manufacturing capabilities are easily assessed with the model. New proposed materials may also be examined to translate bench-scale values to the design of full-scale battery packs providing realistic energy densities and prices to the original equipment manufacturer. The model will be openly distributed to the public in the year 2011. Currently, the calculations are based in a Microsoft{reg_sign} Office Excel spreadsheet. Instructions are provided for use; however, the format is admittedly not user-friendly. A parallel development effort has created an alternate version based on a graphical user-interface that will be more intuitive to some users. The version that is more user-friendly should allow for wider adoption of the model.

Nelson, P. A.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Broad Initiatives/Sharp Focus- Cuts Electricity Consumption 15%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of electrical consumption can payout in reduced energy costs. Continuous monitoring of electrical usage coupled with improvements and optimization in system(s) operations can have a favorable impact on annual operating expenditures. Further...

Gialanella, V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Assessment Training Reduces Energy Costs for the U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam: Success Stories (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam experiences considerable energy cost and use savings after implementing training from NREL's energy assessment training.

Not Available

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fact #791: August 5, 2013 Comparative Costs to Drive an Electric Vehicle |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112:ofElectric Vehicle Purchases |Use

263

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNationalMarketsMillion DOEEnergyCost-Effective

266

Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

Trivedi, Sudhir B. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Kutcher, Susan W. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Rosemeier, Cory A. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Mayers, David [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Singh, Jogender [Pennsylvania State University

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach To Auxiliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger; Kanchan Angal; Steve Brewer; Steve Kraihanzel; Lenny Schrank; Jason Wolf

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach to Auxilliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger Jr.; Keith Seymour; Kanchan Angal; Jason Wolf; Steve Brewer; Leonard Schrank

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Revised maps and associated data show potential mercury, sulfur, and chlorine emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin. Existing coal mining and coal washing practices result in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hot-side ESP, cold-side ESP, or hot-side ESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cold-side ESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum net mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and Low Cost: Robustness to Geographic and Consumer-Usage Variation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes a battery optimization and trade-off analysis for Li-ion batteries used in EVs and PHEVs to extend their life and/or reduce cost.

Smith, K.; Markel, T.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dimming controls for electric lighting have been one of the mainstays of the effort to use daylighting to reduce annual lighting energy consumption. The coincidence of daylighting with electric utility peak demand makes daylighting controls an effective strategy for reducing commercial building peak electric loads. During times of energy shortage, there is a greatly increased need to reduce electricity use during peak periods, both to ease the burden on electricity providers and to control the operating costs of buildings. The paper presents a typical commercial building electric demand profile during summer, and shows how daylighting-linked lighting controls and load shedding techniques can reduce lighting at precisely those times when electricity is most expensive. We look at the importance of dimming for increasing the reliability of the electricity grid in California and other states, as well as examine the potential cost-effectiveness of widespread use of daylighting to save energy and reduce monthly electricity bills.

Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

Validation of the Electrical Properties of the ITER ICRF Antenna using Reduced-Scale Mock-Ups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental measurements on reduced-scale mock-ups allow validating the electrical properties and RF numerical optimization of the ITER ICRF antenna. Frequency response in the different regions of the antenna is described and key parameters for performance improvement are given. Coupling is improved by acting on the front-face geometry (strap width, antenna box depth and vertical septa recess). The 4-port junction acts as a frequency filter and together with the service stub performs pre-matching in the whole frequency band. Influence of the Faraday screen on coupling is limited. The effect of voltage limitation on the maximum total radiated power is given. The importance of a good decoupling network and of grounding is emphasized. Finally the control of the antenna wave spectrum is performed by implementing feedback controlled load-resilient matching and decoupling options and control algorithms are tested.

Dumortier, Pierre; Durodie, Frederic; Grine, Djamel; Kyrytsya, Volodymyr; Louche, Fabrice; Messiaen, Andre; Vervier, Michel; Vrancken, Mark [LPP-ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Belgian State Association, CYCLE, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

273

Guidelines for DHDD approval of reduced F&A Cost Rates on research proposals A. Authority of DHDD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the standard CSM rate: 1. Sponsor must be a domestic (federal, state or local) government or non the full direct cost, including academic-year faculty time 4. The award is a research-initiation grant. Is eligible for the research-initiation grant under the sponsor's terms c. Has a faculty development plan

274

A Comprehensive Approach to Reduce the Energy Cost of Network of Datacenters Baris Aksanli, Jagannathan Venkatesh, Tajana Rosing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the energy cost estimation by 2.6x. Keywords- Datacenter, energy, green energy, job migration I. INTRODUCTION energy [10]. Renewable energy prediction can be used to decrease the variability of local green energy the impact of new technology and policies in datacenter WAN, such as energy- proportional routing and green

Simunic, Tajana

275

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Does competition reduce costs? : assessing the impact of regulatory restructuring on U.S. electric generation efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the allocative efficiency benefits of competition are a tenet of microeconomic theory, the relation between competition and technical efficiency is less well understood. Neoclassical models of profit-maximization ...

Rose, Nancy L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of Shipment Notice) Federal Records CenterHVACUSSouth

278

The environmental and cost impacts of vehicle electrification in the Azores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric vehicles (EVs) have the potential to reduce transportation sector CO? emissions in So Miguel, an island in the Azores, while simultaneously reducing mobility operating costs. This thesis attempts to quantify the ...

Parness, Maximilian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Costs - 13422  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance. (authors)

Eddy-Dilek, Carol A; Looney, Brian B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Gaughan, Thomas; Kmetz, Thomas [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States); Seaman, John [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small buildings and small portfolios (SBSP) sector face a number of barriers that inhibit SBSP owners from adopting energy efficiency solutions. This pilot project focused on overcoming two of the largest barriers to financing energy efficiency in small buildings: disproportionately high transaction costs and unknown or unacceptable risk. Solutions to these barriers can often be at odds, because inexpensive turnkey solutions are often not sufficiently tailored to the unique circumstances of each building, reducing confidence that the expected energy savings will be achieved. To address these barriers, NREL worked with two innovative, forward-thinking lead partners, Michigan Saves and Energi, to develop technical solutions that provide a quick and easy process to encourage energy efficiency investments while managing risk. The pilot project was broken into two stages: the first stage focused on reducing transaction costs, and the second stage focused on reducing performance risk. In the first stage, NREL worked with the non-profit organization, Michigan Saves, to analyze the effects of 8 energy efficiency measures (EEMs) on 81 different baseline small office building models in Holland, Michigan (climate zone 5A). The results of this analysis (totaling over 30,000 cases) are summarized in a simple spreadsheet tool that enables users to easily sort through the results and find appropriate small office EEM packages that meet a particular energy savings threshold and are likely to be cost-effective.

Langner, R.; Hendron, B.; Bonnema, E.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Awardee share: 378,732 - Funding for FY10: 627,151 * Barriers - Ground Source Heat Pumps - Reduce levelized cost of electricity (ton) by 30% by 2016 * Partners - Bob...

282

Energy Department Announces New Investments to Drive Cost-Competitive...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

over the next two decades could save the U.S. 250 billion in energy costs and reduce electricity consumption for lighting by nearly 50 percent. By 2030, LED lighting is...

283

Integrated Ice Storage/Sprinkler HVAC System Sharply Cuts Energy Costs and Air-Distribution First Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated ice thermal storage/sprinkler HVAC systems developed and applied by the author in several commercial applications shift a major portion of electric utility demand to cheaper off-peak hours, while also reducing significantly the first cost...

Meckler, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

'Tilted' Industrial Electric Rates: A New Negative Variable for Energy Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cost of purchased electricity for industry is rising even faster than for other sectors. Conventional means of reducing power costs include internal techniques like load management, demand controls and energy conservation. External mechanisms...

Greenwood, R. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

286

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Regional transmission pricing. 4. Retail access. 5.cost. Regional transmission pricing is designed to make each

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Alliance, Electric Motor Management. 2001. Motor2002. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Marketaccessed March 23, Motors Electric motors represent one of

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determining Electric Motor Load and Efficiency. Among theEnergy Efficiency Alliance, Electric Motor Management. 2001.Energy Efficiency Alliance, Electric Motor Management. 2001.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Semi-exact concentric atomic density fitting: Reduced cost and increased accuracy compared to standard density fitting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A local density fitting scheme is considered in which atomic orbital (AO) products are approximated using only auxiliary AOs located on one of the nuclei in that product. The possibility of variational collapse to an unphysical attractive electron state that can affect such density fitting [P. Merlot, T. Kjrgaard, T. Helgaker, R. Lindh, F. Aquilante, S. Reine, and T. B. Pedersen, J. Comput. Chem. 34, 1486 (2013)] is alleviated by including atom-wise semidiagonal integrals exactly. Our approach leads to a significant decrease in the computational cost of density fitting for HartreeFock theory while still producing results with errors 25 times smaller than standard, nonlocal density fitting. Our method allows for large HartreeFock and density functional theory computations with exact exchange to be carried out efficiently on large molecules, which we demonstrate by benchmarking our method on 200 of the most widely used prescription drug molecules. Our new fitting scheme leads to smooth and artifact-free potential energy surfaces and the possibility of relatively simple analytic gradients.

Hollman, David S. [Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, University of Georgia, 1004 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States) [Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, University of Georgia, 1004 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Schaefer, Henry F. [Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, University of Georgia, 1004 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, University of Georgia, 1004 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Valeev, Edward F. [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs EV battery degradation costs electricity sales fixedand sales, DER capital costs, fuel costs, demand response measures and EV

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh Universitys approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.

None

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Planning electricity transmission to accommodate renewables: Using two-stage programming to evaluate flexibility and the cost of disregarding uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a stochastic two-stage optimisation model that captures the multistage nature of electricity transmission planning under uncertainty and apply it to a stylised representation of the Great Britain (GB) network. In our model, a proactive...

van der Weijde, Adriaan Hendrik; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR) by modulating

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

300

A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real for optimizing their utility bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tensor hypercontracted ppRPA: Reducing the cost of the particle-particle random phase approximation from O(r?{sup 6}) to O(r?{sup 4})  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, interest in the random-phase approximation (RPA) has grown rapidly. At the same time, tensor hypercontraction has emerged as an intriguing method to reduce the computational cost of electronic structure algorithms. In this paper, we combine the particle-particle random phase approximation with tensor hypercontraction to produce the tensor-hypercontracted particle-particle RPA (THC-ppRPA) algorithm. Unlike previous implementations of ppRPA which scale as O(r{sup 6}), the THC-ppRPA algorithm scales asymptotically as only O(r{sup 4}), albeit with a much larger prefactor than the traditional algorithm. We apply THC-ppRPA to several model systems and show that it yields the same results as traditional ppRPA to within mH accuracy. Our method opens the door to the development of post-Kohn Sham functionals based on ppRPA without the excessive asymptotic cost of traditional ppRPA implementations.

Shenvi, Neil; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

federal agency responsible for helping build and support infrastructure related to rural electricity,

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) low cost generator design using power MOSFET and Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit as high voltage DC source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Non-ionizing radiation therapy for cancer using pulsed electric field with high intensity field has become an interesting field new research topic. A new method using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a novel means to treat cancer. Not like the conventional electroporation, nsPEFs able to create nanopores in all membranes of the cell, including membrane in cell organelles, like mitochondria and nucleus. NsPEFs will promote cell death in several cell types, including cancer cell by apoptosis mechanism. NsPEFs will use pulse with intensity of electric field higher than conventional electroporation, between 20100 kV/cm and with shorter duration of pulse than conventional electroporation. NsPEFs requires a generator to produce high voltage pulse and to achieve high intensity electric field with proper pulse width. However, manufacturing cost for creating generator that generates a high voltage with short duration for nsPEFs purposes is highly expensive. Hence, the aim of this research is to obtain the low cost generator design that is able to produce a high voltage pulse with nanosecond width and will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Method: Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit will boost the input of 220 volt AC into high voltage DC around 1500 volt and it will be combined by a series of power MOSFET as a fast switch to obtain a high voltage with nanosecond pulse width. The motivation using Cockcroft-Walton multiplier is to acquire a low-cost high voltage DC generator; it will use capacitors and diodes arranged like a step. Power MOSFET connected in series is used as voltage divider to share the high voltage in order not to damage them. Results: This design is expected to acquire a low-cost generator that can achieve the high voltage pulse in amount of ?1.5 kV with falltime 3 ns and risetime 15 ns into a 50? load that will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Further detailed on the circuit design will be explained at presentation.

Sulaeman, M. Y.; Widita, R. [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3a: Low Rank Coal to Electricity: IGCC Cases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:Cost Study Manual Cost

306

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3b: Low Rank Coal to Electricity: Combustion Cases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:Cost Study Manual Cost

307

Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

Jones, E.; Eto, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy, and Jeannie Albrecht  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin--Flattening household electricity demand reduces generation costs, since costs are disproportionately affected by peak demands. While the vast majority of household electrical loads are interactive and have little scheduling

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

309

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Arizona Corporation Commission requires electric utilities to conduct a cost/benefit analysis to compare the cost of line extension with the cost of installing a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)...

311

COMPLEAT (Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies): A planning tool for publicly owned electric utilities. [Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies (Compleat)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COMPLEAT takes its name, as an acronym, from Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies. It is an electric utility planning model designed for use principally by publicly owned electric utilities and agencies serving such utilities. As a model, COMPLEAT is significantly more full-featured and complex than called out in APPA's original plan and proposal to DOE. The additional complexity grew out of a series of discussions early in the development schedule, in which it became clear to APPA staff and advisors that the simplicity characterizing the original plan, while highly desirable in terms of utility applications, was not achievable if practical utility problems were to be addressed. The project teams settled on Energy 20/20, an existing model developed by Dr. George Backus of Policy Assessment Associates, as the best candidate for the kinds of modifications and extensions that would be required. The remainder of the project effort was devoted to designing specific input data files, output files, and user screens and to writing and testing the compute programs that would properly implement the desired features around Energy 20/20 as a core program. This report presents in outline form, the features and user interface of COMPLEAT.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis based on ELECTRE and AHP methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis on a case of freight transport between Paris and Marseille. Keywords: Supply chain, Environmental impacts with lower environmental impacts, such as rail and waterways. The dilemma here is that all motorized modes

Boyer, Edmond

314

Energy-efficiency standards for homes have the potential to reduce energy consumption and peak electrical demand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Issue Energy-efficiency standards for homes have the potential to reduce energy consumption HVAC system efficiency, including problems with airflows, refrigerant system components, and ductwork standards, but little data is available on the actu- al energy performance of new homes. The Solution

315

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE EMERGING HYBRID-ELECTRIC AND DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES TOof the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies tomodern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cost Analysis of Electric Grid Enhancement Utilizing Distributed Generation in Post-War Reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instruction, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to

Darol D. M. Fiala; Daniel Nussbaum; Jomana Amara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

Nix, R.G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen fuel by electrolysis meeting equal consumer costhydrogen fuel production by water electrolysis to provide lower fuel costFig. 2: Cost hydrogen bywater of (Coil) electrolysis as

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electric trade in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

High Power SiC Modules for HEVs and PHEVs Abstract--With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, inverter, efficiency, hybrid electric vehicle, HEV, PHEV. I. INTRODUCTION Development of power electronics system in an under-the-hood high temperature environment. Development of new power devices is a critical aspect for future power electronic applications along with new topologies and control techniques

Tolbert, Leon M.

326

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs, EV battery degradation costs, and sales. min C ?????electricity sales, $ Electricity exchange with EVs D EV m,h

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

One-Axis Trackers -- Improved Reliability, Durability, Performance, and Cost Reduction; Final Subcontract Technical Status Report, 2 May 2006 - 31 August 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this subcontract is to reduce the total cost of electricity generated by single-axis tracking solar energy systems for utility and other large-scale commercial applications by improving performance and reliability and by reducing installation time, cost, and environmental impact.

Shingleton, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs offer a sustainable transportation option, provide a cost-competitive alternative for drivers, reduce dependence on imported oil, and enable global economic leadership and job growth.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations...

Verma, Ankit

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

Rugh, J. P.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electric trade in the United States, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

10 Kammen and others/p. 1 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that stretches from fossil fuel­powered conventional vehicles (CVs) through hybrid electric vehicles 1-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Daniel M. Kammen1 , Samuel M. Arons, Derek M. Lemoine and Holmes Hummel Cars per year.2 Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could alter these trends. On a vehicle technology spectrum

Kammen, Daniel M.

335

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost and the marginal fuel savings (assuming a base case of ten cents per kWhper kWh, which would bring it in line with the break-even costcost per mile: electricity vs. gasoline PRICE OF ELECTRICITY ($/kWh)

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization.

Kickuth, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.kickuth@insel.ch; Anderson, Suzanne [Inselspital, University of Berne, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology (Switzerland); Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard [Inselspital, University of Berne, Department of Hematology (Switzerland); Eggli, Stefan [Inselspital, University of Berne, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Switzerland); Triller, Juergen [Inselspital, University of Berne, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology (Switzerland)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low energy Carbon emissions a b s t r a c t Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing of resource cost scenarios, most coal power plants would be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear

Kammen, Daniel M.

340

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of reliability, resource options, wholesale competition and market power, cost of electricity to consumers, environmental quality, or other? Are these consequences so...

342

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light- Dutyreduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologiessignificantly reduce their CO2 emissions. These technologies

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

achieving low CoE for hydrogen production. Although other WEfor competitive hydrogen production, such advanced targetsElectricity and Hydrogen Fuel Production from Multi-Unit

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Estimating the costs of nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on this topic is fairly confusing. Some present electricity production using nuclear power as an affordable of costs and draw a distinction between a private cost and a social cost. The private cost is what evaluating the costs it is impossible to establish the cost price, required to compare electricity production

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

345

Electric retail market options: The customer perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Exploring Smart Grid and Data Center Interactions for Electric Power Load Balancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, when large data centers suddenly increase their energy consumption in low price regions, they may of a data center consumes a tremendous amount of electricity, and the energy cost accounts for a large portion of the data center's operation cost. This leads to a growing interest towards reducing the energy

Huang, Jianwei

347

Estimated Savings from Turning Off Unnecessary Electrical Loads During Unoccupied Periods at the Langford Architecture Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in those studios during unoccupied hours. Turning off the lights on the third and fourth floor studios would reduce the electricity cost by $4,757 per year and the associated heating and cooling costs by an additional $583 for a total savings of $5...

Soebarto, V. I.; Haberl, J. S.; Degelman, L. O.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Cost-effective particulate control options at Potomac Electric Power Company's Dickerson Station: An integrated approach to current and future particulate limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dickerson Generating Station evaluated several particulate control options to identify the most cost-effective option. The study's goals were to: eliminate the particulate scrubber and its high maintenance costs, and incorporate flexibility for low-sulfur coal and possible stricter emission limits. Each of the three Dickerson 190 MW units has a small 37-year-old electrostatic precipitator and a wet particulate scrubber. The study evaluated alternatives to replace the scrubber and enhance ESP performance: Existing ESP alternatives--Extend height of existing ESP; Flue gas conditioning. Scrubber stream alternatives--Partial-flow ESP or pulse jet baghouse. Full-flow alternatives--Supplemental ESP; COHPAC baghouse; replacement ESP or baghouse. A technical and economic prescreening eliminated some of the options. Capital, operating, and life cycle costs were estimated for the remaining options to determine the most cost-effective alternative. This paper will present the technical and economic evaluations done for this study, including performance and costs.

Christoffersen, S.W.; Rouse, G.T.; Krasnopoler, M.J.; Chapowski, J.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Reducing emissions by addressing steam turbine inefficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that inefficient steam turbines increase fossil plant emissions because additional fuel must be burned to meet the power output requirements. During a turbine outage, plant performance and maintenance staff make and prioritize repair decisions within tight time and budget constraints. This paper describes how Georgia Power identifies performance losses of degraded components in the steam path and determines their impact on heat rate. Turbine performance is assessed by a steam path audit program that Encotech has developed and make available to utilities. Georgia Power has conducted several operating tests that give good correlation with audit results. Georgia Power uses the audit information to make the most cost-effective repairs to maintain a low heat rate and to reduce emissions. The Clean Air Act presents electric utilities with the challenge of reducing emissions from fossil plants in the most cost-effective way possible. Meeting the stack emissions limitations often translates to large capital expenditures and increased cycle heat rate. One resource the electric utilities have to reduce the costly impact of compliance with the Clean Air Act is control over the efficiency of their steam turbines.

Harris, J.C. (Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Cioffi, D.H. (Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

Nix, R.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to update costs of specific equipment, raw material or labor or CAPEX and OPEX of entire plants Cost Indices

Boisvert, Jeff

353

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

354

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating, given the higher cost per KWh for electricity, aaverage cost of electrical energy per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

SciTech Connect: Cost analysis of energy storage systems for...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility...

356

Do You Have Adequate Staffing to Keep Costs Under Control?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Competitive pressures have forced companies to seek reduced costs through reduced staffing. The emphasis has been on fixed cost control at the expense of some loss in variable cost control. Restructuring through reduced staffing has some pitfalls...

Mergens, E. H.

357

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tariff-driven demand response in these buildings. By usingbuilding electricity costs distributed energy resources costs fuel costs demand responsebuilding energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response.

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cost of documenting the NISC project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project team selected a computer-based approach for the NISC project record management system. The team is convinced that this approach did cut direct costs . The major advantage, that the team believes did help the project, comes in the area of having just one central point for all design and construction information related to the project . The other benefit to the project will come over the thirty-year design life of the project through reduced costs to design changes to the facility . The team estimates that a reasonable saving for the project (including future modifications) will be about $2,OOOK or about 3% of the project construction costs . The cost increase of scanning non-electric documents will decrease for other projects in the future as more project related information is computer generated . Many the subcontractors on the NISC project had not completely converted to computer based systems for there own internal operation during the life of the NISC project. However, as more project related documents are generated in electronic form this type of cost will reduce .

Stutz, R. A. (Roger Alan)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Today, the United States spends about $400 billion each year on imported oil. To realize a secure energy future, America must break its dependence on imported oil and its volatile costs. The transportation sector accounts for about 70% of U.S. oil demand and holds tremendous opportunity to increase America's energy security by reducing oil consumption. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R and D) on vehicle technologies which can stem America's dependence on oil, strengthen the economy, and protect the environment. Hybrid-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles can significantly improve fuel economy, displacing petroleum. Researchers are making batteries more affordable and recyclable, while enhancing battery range, performance, and life. This research supports President Obama's goal of putting 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The program is also working with businesses to develop domestic battery and electric-drive component plants to improve America's economic competitiveness globally. The program facilitates deployment of alternative fuels (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, propane, and natural gas) and fuel infrastructures by partnering with state and local governments, universities, and industry. Reducing vehicle weight directly improves vehicle efficiency and fuel economy, and can potentially reduce vehicle operating costs. Cost-effective, lightweight, high-strength materials can significantly reduce vehicle weight without compromising safety. Improved combustion technologies and optimized fuel systems can improve near-and mid-term fuel economy by 25% for passenger vehicles and 20% for commercial vehicles by 2015, compared to 2009 vehicles. Reducing the use of oil-based fuels and lubricants in vehicles has more potential to improve the nation's energy security than any other action; even a 1% improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency would save consumers more than $4 billion annually.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluation of a Current Source Active Power Filter to Reduce the DC Bus Capacitor in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system, additional heat, audible noise, mechanical stress, and vibration [1]. DC bus harmonic current- powered three-phase inverter is used to drive the traction motor. Due to the switching behavior combustion engine, electric motor, and energy storage device (for example, batteries and ultracapacitors

Tolbert, Leon M.

362

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs March 31, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis...

363

Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of...

364

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective.

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A restructuring agenda for developing competitive retail electric markets that is based on a low-cost, real-time, smart-kilowatt-hour meter adapter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes six agenda items that should expedite a politically smooth transition into a most efficient economically viable market-driven public power system. The agenda would introduce: the virtual marketplace for retail electric power, smart meters, smart meter readers, near-real-time load balancing and load apportionment, advanced supply and demand or commodity-style pricing, and reliability metering.

Chasek, N.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Well-to-Wheel Energy, Emissions, and Cost Analysis of Electricity and Fuel Used in Conventional and Electrified Vehicles, and Their Connection to a Sustainable Energy Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced in creating the electricity through a full Life Cycle Analysis. As a result, proper comparison of electrified and conventional vehicles must include a complete Well-to-Wheel (WtW) study including the emissions generated through production and use...

Strecker, Bryan Anthony

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas...

368

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet) Year JanInformation Administration

369

Sandia National Laboratories: reduce wind energy costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskite oxideplatform size requirements

370

Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Science Foundation Industry Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project

373

LOW COST HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER (HPWH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water heating accounts for the second largest portion of residential building energy consumption, after space conditioning. Existing HPWH products are a technical success, with demonstrated energy savings of 50% or more compared with standard electric resistance water heaters. However, current HPWHs available on the market cost an average of $1000 or more, which is too expensive for significant market penetration. What is needed is a method to reduce the first cost of HPWHs, so that the payback period will be reduced from 8 years to a period short enough for the market to accept this technology. A second problem with most existing HPWH products is the reliability issue associated with the pump and water loop needed to circulate cool water from the storage tank to the HPWH condenser. Existing integral HPWHs have the condenser wrapped around the water tank and thus avoid the pump and circulation issues but require a relatively complex and expensive manufacturing process. A more straightforward potentially less costly approach to the integral, single package HPWH design is to insert the condenser directly into the storage tank, or immersed direct heat exchanger (IDX). Initial development of an IDX HPWH met technical performance goals, achieving measured efficiencies or energy factors (EF) in excess of 1.79. In comparison conventional electric water heaters (EWH) have EFs of about 0.9. However, the initial approach required a 2.5" hole on top of the tank for insertion of the condenser - much larger than the standard openings typically provided. Interactions with water heater manufacturers indicated that the non standard hole size would likely lead to increased manufacturing costs (at least initially) and largely eliminate any cost advantage of the IDX approach. Recently we have been evaluating an approach to allow use of a standard tank hole size for insertion of the IDX condenser. Laboratory tests of a prototype have yielded an EF of 2.02.

Mei, Vince C [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A High Performance, Energy Efficient GALS Processor Microarchitecture with Reduced Implementation Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A High Performance, Energy Efficient GALS Processor Microarchitecture with Reduced Implementation Complexity £ YongKang Zhu , David H. Albonesi Ý and Alper Buyuktosunoglu ? Department of Electrical, achieves impressive energy savings for a relatively low per- formance cost. However, the approach requires

Albonesi, David H.

375

Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

Robinson, A. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Case Study: Sustained Utility Cost Reduction in a Large Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This case study presents results of a systematic utility cost reduction plan implemented at a 450,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in a hot and humid climate. Electricity, natural gas, and water usage were all reduced on an absolute basis in both...

Fiorino, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the request of a customer or a potential customer, Colorado electric utilities are required to conduct a cost comparison of a photovoltaic (PV) system to any proposed distribution line extension...

378

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Statewide Electrical Energy Cost Savings and Peak Demand Reduction from the IECC Code-Compliant, Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed in Texas was determined using the annual surveys, National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) (NAHB 2001?2005 and 2009-2010)4. Figure 6 shows the ratio of the single family residences in Texas by type of heating system for Climate Zone 2 (CZ 2... for New Homes (Paquette et al. 2010), the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings (Amann et al. 2007), and the similar incremental cost analysis studies in Texas (Malhotra et al. 2008; Kim et al...

Kim, H; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

380

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:Cost Study Manual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs, andrequirements, usage patterns, tariffs, and incentives. Toassessment Electricity tariff Natural gas tariff Technology

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

383

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effects of reduced voltage on the operation and efficiency of electric systems. Volume 3. Field tests in a northern utility service area. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 of this three-volume report for RP1419-1 describes the tests on selected residential, commercial, and small industry areas of the Detroit Edison Company system and the statistical analysis performed on the test data gathered. The purpose of the field testing was to provide data to analyze changes in energy consumption due to changes in feeder voltage levels. Detroit Edison was chosen to represent a winter peaking load area. Original intent was to present these results simultaneously with results from a summer peaking load area, Texas Electric Service Company (TESCO). Unavoidable delays retarded the Detroit study results to this Volume 3. TESCO results were reported in Volume 1, and the Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) program for these studies was presented in Volume 2 in the form of a User's Manual.

Chen, M.S.; Shoults, R.R.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic analysis indicates that hydrogen could be produced for $3.79 per gge at an electricity cost of $0.05/kWh by the lower-cost PEM electrolyzer developed in this project, assuming high-volume production of large-scale electrolyzer systems.

Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

:,/0$5 Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets :,/0$5 :LQG 3RZHU ,QWHJUDWLRQ LQ /LEHUDOLVHG (OHFWULFLW\\ 0DUNHWV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:,/0$5 Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets 1 :,/0$5 :LQG 3RZHU ,QWHJUDWLRQ a cost-effective integration of wind power in large liberalised electricity systems. The main recommendations concern reducing imbalances caused by wind power by bidding closer to delivery hour

387

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 56, NO. 2, MARCH 2007 557 Modeling of a Series Hybrid Electric High-Mobility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Electric High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle Margaret Ducusin, Associate Member, IEEE to reduce fuel costs and gas emissions, the U.S. Army is looking into replacing their diesel high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV) with hybrid electric vehicles. The aim of this paper is to present

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

388

Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were...

Fiorino, D. P.

389

Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steam from two on-site powerhouses (one coal-fired and one natural gas-fired) and from gas-fired and waste heat boilers in its four hydrocarbon cracking plants. The challenge was to find a way to reduce costs and improve reliability of procuring and... the electricity required by TEX and sells excess power to wholesale customers in the region. It provides a large portion of TEX steam requirements, with sufficient reliability such that TEX decommissioned its coal-fired powerhouse and reduced operations...

Ratheal, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Electric vehicles move closer to market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports that though battery technology is currently limiting the growth of EVs, the search for improvements is spurring innovative engineering developments. As battery makers, automakers, national laboratories, and others continue their search for a practical source of electric power that will make electric vehicles (EVs) more viable, engineers worldwide are making progress in other areas of EV development. Vector control, for example, enables better regulation of motor torque and speed; composite and aluminum parts reduce the vehicle`s weight, which in turn reduces the load on the motor and battery; and flywheel energy storage systems, supercapacitors, regenerative brake systems, and hybrid/electric drive trains increase range and acceleration. Despite efforts to develop an electric vehicle from the ground up, most of the early EVs to be sold in the United States will likely be converted from gasoline-powered vehicles. Chrysler Corp., for example, is expected to sell electric versions of its minivans and build them on the same assembly line as its gasoline-powered vehicles to reduce costs. The pace of engineering development in this field is fast and furious. Indeed, it is virtually impossible to monitor all emerging EV technology. To meet their quotas, the major automakers may even consider buying credits from smaller, innovative EV manufacturers. But whatever stopgap measures vehicle makers take, technology development will be the driving force behind long-term EV growth.

O`Connor, L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluating cost-reduction alternatives and low-cost sourcing opportunities for aerospace castings and forgings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As companies continue to outsource large portions of their manufacturing, managing costs in the supply chain is increasingly important in reducing overall costs and remaining competitive. Low-cost sourcing has become an ...

Obermoller, Amber J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls Hydroelectric Project: Final technical and construction cost report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to fulfill part of the requirement of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number FC07-80ID12125 of the Small Scale Hydropower Program and is submitted on behalf of the Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. of Gaffney, South Carolina. The project was initially studied in 1978 with construction commencing in January, 1984. The primary work elements of the project consisted of the renovation of an existing dam and a new powerhouse. The dam was rehabilitated and flashboards were installed along the top of the structure. The powerhouse was supplied with a single open pit turbine and a new substation was constructed. The project generated power in December of 1985 but has been plagued with numerous problems compounded by a flood in March, 1987 causing extensive damages. The flood of March, 1987 resulted in filing of litigative action by the developers against their project managers and engineers which has yet to reach settlement and will possibly culminate in court sometime during the fall of 1988.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Metal-Air Electric Vehicle Battery: Sustainable, High-Energy Density, Low-Cost Electrochemical Energy Storage Metal-Air Ionic Liquid (MAIL) Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: ASU is developing a new class of metal-air batteries. Metal-air batteries are promising for future generations of EVs because they use oxygen from the air as one of the batterys main reactants, reducing the weight of the battery and freeing up more space to devote to energy storage than Li-Ion batteries. ASU technology uses Zinc as the active metal in the battery because it is more abundant and affordable than imported lithium. Metal-air batteries have long been considered impractical for EV applications because the water-based electrolytes inside would decompose the battery interior after just a few uses. Overcoming this traditional limitation, ASUs new battery system could be both cheaper and safer than todays Li-Ion batteries, store from 4-5 times more energy, and be recharged over 2,500 times.

None

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill....

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Electric Power Monthly, June 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The Electric Power Monthly contains information from three data sources: the Form EIA-759, 'Monthly Power Plant Report'; the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, 'Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants{sup ;} and the Form EIA-826, {sup M}onthly Electric Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions'. The Form EIA-759 collects data from all operators of electric utility generating plants (except those having plants solely on standby), approximately 800 of the more than 3,200 electric utilities in the United States. To reduce the reporting burden for utilities, the FERC Form 423 and Form EIA-826 data are based on samples, which cover less than 100 percent of all central station generating utilities. The FERC Form 423 collects data from steam-electric power generating plants with a combined installed nameplate capacity of 50 megawatts or larger (approximately 230 electric utilities). The 50-megawatt threshold was established by FERC. The Form EIA-826 collects sales and revenue data in the residential, commercial, industrial, and other sectors of the economy. Other sales data collected include public street and highway lighting, other sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, and interdepartmental sales. Respondents to the Form EIA-826 were statistically chosen and include approximately 225 privately and publicly owned electric utilities from a universe of more than 3,200 utilities. The sample selection for the Form EIA-826 is evaluated annually. Currently, the Form EIA-826 data account for approximately 83 percent of the electricity sales in the United States. Sources of data are described in more detail in the Technical Notes of the Electric Power Annual (DOE/EIA-0348).

NONE

1988-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electric Bike Use in China and Their Impacts on the Environment, Safety, Mobility and Accessibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits! and! costs! of! electric! bikes! are! relative!would! otherwise! use! if! electric! bikes! were! banned. !That! is,! if! an! electric! bike! user! would! otherwise!

Cherry, Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs References . . Coal-Electric Generation Technologyon coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissionson coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissions

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and corresponding direct electricity sector costs, includingand avoids electricity-sector water consumption. At the sameNew Wind Fig. 5. Electricity sector capacity by technology

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NREL Helps Cool the Power Electronics in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing and demonstrating innovative heat-transfer technologies for cooling power electronics devices in hybrid and electric vehicles. In collaboration with 3M and Wolverine Tube, Inc., NREL is using surface enhancements to dissipate heat more effectively, permitting a reduction in the size of power electronic systems and potentially reducing the overall costs of electric vehicles.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cost Efficient Datacenter Selection for Cloud Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Efficient Datacenter Selection for Cloud Services Hong Xu, Baochun Li henryxu, bli and performance. They need an effective way to direct the user requests to a suitable datacenter, in a cost efficient manner. Previ- ous work focused mostly on the electricity cost of datacenters. The approaches

Li, Baochun

407

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steel and glass. Pins, glass beads and headers are assembled manually and are put in a carbon tray. Carbon trays are put in furnaces (ovens) which are maintained at a constant temperature between 160Q-2000F and have an exothermic gas environment.... At this time, company registers its peak demand. Company keeps all furnaces on and keep them available for workers in case they will need it for their products. On average, no more than two furnaces will have same temperature and exothermic gas...

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

408

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel the "Power Ring" with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing a radial gap shear-force levitator that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

411

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for reduced cost of lightweight materials while meeting national objectives for improved fuel economy * Specific technology improvements affecting major cost drivers detrimental...

414

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reliable renewable energy for a new electric infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is workshop is about methodologies, tools, techniques, models, training, codes and standards, etc., that can improve reliability of systems while reducing costs. We've intentionally scaled back on presentation time to allow more time for interaction. Sandia's PV Program Vision - Recognition as a world-class facility to develop and integrate new photovoltaic components, systems, and architectures for the future of our electric/energy delivery systems.

Hanley, Charles J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Electrically heated particulate filter with reduced stress  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter comprising an inlet for receiving exhaust gas. A zoned heater is arranged in the inlet and comprises a resistive heater comprising N zones, where N is an integer greater than one. Each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates others of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reducing Transient and Steady State Electricity Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, single-stage heat pump air conditioner (AC). To study this setup, we have built the Berkeley Retrofitted that are used by HVAC equipment. Many homes use a single- stage heat pump that cools air at a constant rate , Fellow IEEE, and Claire Tomlin, Fellow IEEE ABSTRACT | Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC

Culler, David E.

418

Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

Ammerman, Curtt Nelson [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Within-Day Recharge of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Energy Impact of Public Charging Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the role of public charging infrastructure in increasing the share of driving on electricity that plug-in hybrid electric vehicles might exhibit, thus reducing their gasoline consumption. Vehicle activity data obtained from a global positioning system tracked household travel survey in Austin, Texas, is used to estimate gasoline and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Drivers within-day recharging behavior, constrained by travel activities and public charger availability, is modeled. It is found that public charging offers greater fuel savings for hybrid electric vehicles s equipped with smaller batteries, by encouraging within-day recharge, and providing an extensive public charging service is expected to reduce plug-in hybrid electric vehicles gasoline consumption by more than 30% and energy cost by 10%, compared to the scenario of home charging only.

Dong, Jing [ORNL; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Renewable build-up pathways for the US: Generation costs are not system costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transition to a future electricity system based primarily on wind and solar PV is examined for all regions in the contiguous US. We present optimized pathways for the build-up of wind and solar power for least backup energy needs as well as for least cost obtained with a simplified, lightweight model based on long-term high resolution weather-determined generation data. In the absence of storage, the pathway which achieves the best match of generation and load, thus resulting in the least backup energy requirements, generally favors a combination of both technologies, with a wind/solar PV energy mix of about 80/20 in a fully renewable scenario. The least cost development is seen to start with 100% of the technology with the lowest average generation costs first, but with increasing renewable installations, economically unfavorable excess generation pushes it toward the minimal backup pathway. Surplus generation and the entailed costs can be reduced significantly by combining wind and solar power, and/or a...

Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Jacobson, Mark Z; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

422

Ceramic electrical insulation for electrical coils, transformers, and magnets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature electrical insulation is described, which is suitable for electrical windings for any number of applications. The inventive insulation comprises a cured preceramic polymer resin, which is preferably a polysiloxane resin. A method for insulating electrical windings, which are intended for use in high temperature environments, such as superconductors and the like, advantageously comprises the steps of, first, applying a preceramic polymer layer to a conductor core, to function as an insulation layer, and second, curing the preceramic polymer layer. The conductor core preferably comprises a metallic wire, which may be wound into a coil. In the preferred method, the applying step comprises a step of wrapping the conductor core with a sleeve or tape of glass or ceramic fabric which has been impregnated by a preceramic polymer resin. The inventive insulation system allows conducting coils and magnets to be fabricated using existing processing equipment, and maximizes the mechanical and thermal performance at both elevated and cryogenic temperatures. It also permits co-processing of the wire and the insulation to increase production efficiencies and reduce overall costs, while still remarkably enhancing performance.

Rice, John A. (Longmont, CO); Hazelton, Craig S. (Lafayette, CO); Fabian, Paul E. (Broomfield, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Efficient, High-Torque Electric Vehicle Motor: Advanced Electric Vehicle Motors with Low or No Rare Earth Content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: QM Power will develop a new type of electric motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs without the use of rare-earth-based magnets. Many of todays EV motors use rare earth magnets to efficiently provide torque to the wheels. QM Powers motors would contain magnets that use no rare earth minerals, are light and compact, and can deliver more power with greater efficiency and at reduced cost. Key innovations in this project include a new motor design with iron-based magnetic materials, a new motor control technique, and advanced manufacturing techniques that substantially reduce the cost of the motor. The ultimate goal of this project is to create a cost-effective EV motor that offers the rough peak equivalent of 270 horsepower.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Optimization Online - Option - Alloction funds- Transaction costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 18, 2009 ... The replication strategy allows reducing transaction cost effects. ... the empirical evidence poses the case of a short-term investment, on CAC40...

Nader Trabelsi

2009-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

INDEX - a solution to the high cost of processing transient workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1985 twelve midwestern utilities formed the Nuclear Employee Data System for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Region III (NEDS III) group. These utilities are Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Commonwealth Edison Company, Consumers Power Company, Detroit Edison Company, Illinois Power Company, Indiana and Michigan Electric Company, Iowa Electric Light and Power Company, Northern States Power Company, Toledo Edison Company, Union Electric Company, and Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. Early in 1986, Kansas Gas and Electric of NRC's Region IV joined the group and a cost-benefit study of a nuclear employee data system was initiated. The purpose of this system is to reduce the cost of processing workers requiring unescorted access to nuclear power plants. The involved utilities continued this project as the Integrated Nuclear Data Exchange (INDEX). In 1987 the following additional utilities joined INDEX: Houston Lighting and Power, Pacific Gas and Electric, Texas Utilities Electric Company, Arkansas Power and Light, Louisiana Power and Light, Systems Energy Resources Inc., and Southern California Edison. This paper summarizes the results of the study and discusses the current status of the program.

Stroupe, E.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Western Massachusetts Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Massachusetts Electric (WMECO) helps commercial and industrial customers offset the additional costs of purchasing and installing energy efficient equipment. WMECO offers rebates for...

427

Stearns Electric Association- Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stearns Electric Association, through a program offered by Rural Utilities Services, offers its members low-interest Energy Resource Conservation (ERC) loans. The complete cost of making approved...

428

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs October 20, 2014 - 5:00pm...

430

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

431

Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems Energy Department Announces 7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems November 15, 2011 -...

432

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power...

Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

434

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and...

435

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05-1 Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: Investment allocated

Boisvert, Jeff

436

Electric Motor Maintenance & Repair for Long Term Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy costs to operate electric motors can be a significant part of an operating budget. For example, a recent survey of California water departments reveals energy costs for pumping and treating water may be 25% of operating costs. Strategies...

Brithinee, W. P.

437

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vehicle and fuel cell engine capital cost is alreadyKammen DM. Fuel cell system economics: comparing the cost oflow cost for grid electricity (relative to fuel cell

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

up, thereby reducing the carbon footprint of the electricityreductions in the carbon footprint of the electricityoption for reducing the carbon footprint of the electricity

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electric power monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electric power monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

442

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel-cell vehicles in 2030. This comparative analysis, based on costfuel cell or hydrogen ICE) and all-electric vehicles. According to the analysis, the societal cost

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric...

444

Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for...

445

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to the Rooftop Practical...

446

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning with Renewable Resources. The Electricity14 4.1 Renewable Resources20 5. Renewable Resource Cost and Performance

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Clean Energy and the Electric System: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing energy demand and/ or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiativessuch as goals, standards, codes, funds and programscan generate many benefits including: Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on electric system benefits. Whats Inside: Why assess electric system benefits? How can state and local governments estimate potential electric system benefits? Quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in direct energy benefits. How to find more information. What are clean energy initiatives? Clean energy initiatives are policies and programs that state and local governments are using to save energy, improve air quality, reduce carbon emissions, support electric system reliability and security, and improve economic development. Examples include: Energy efficiency policies that reduce demand for energy, such as: Building codes for energy efficiency in both commercial and residential buildings; energy efficiency portfolio standards; public benefit funds for energy efficiency; and appliance efficiency standards. Energy supply policies that increase the use of renewables and clean sources, such as: Clean distributed generation and net metering interconnection standards; output-based environmental regulations; public benefit funds for clean energy supply; combined heat and power; and renewable portfolio standards. Clean energy initiatives reduce demand for fossil-fuel powered electricity and increase electricity generated with clean, renewable energy, contributing to a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system. Specifically, energy efficiency and/or renewable energy are resources that can: Avoid costs typically associated with conventional generation, including: Fuel, variable operation, and maintenance costs; emissions allowances; costs of emission Greenhouse gas (GHG) related policies that measure or limit emissions, such as: GHG registries, mandatory GHG reporting; CO offset requirements;

unknown authors

449

Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with todays state-of-the-art technologies. 1366s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and thus the volume and cost of a capacitor. The drive methodology is based on a segmented drive system that does not add switches or passive components but involves reconfiguring inverter switches and motor stator winding connections in a way that allows the formation of multiple, independent drive units and the use of simple alternated switching and optimized Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) schemes to eliminate or significantly reduce the capacitor ripple current.

Su, Gui Jia

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

PEM Electrolyzer Incorporating an Advanced Low-Cost Membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified hydrogen production by electrolysis of water at forecourt stations as a critical technology for transition to the hydrogen economy; however, the cost of hydrogen produced by present commercially available electrolysis systems is considerably higher than the DOE 2015 and 2020 cost targets. Analyses of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer systems indicate that reductions in electricity consumption and electrolyzer stack and system capital cost are required to meet the DOE cost targets. The primary objective is to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective energy-based system for electrolytic generation of hydrogen. The goal is to increase PEM electrolyzer efficiency and to reduce electrolyzer stack and system capital cost to meet the DOE cost targets for distributed electrolysis. To accomplish this objective, work was conducted by a team consisting of Giner, Inc. (Giner), Virginia Polytechnic Institute & University (VT), and domnick hunter group, a subsidiary of Parker Hannifin (Parker). The project focused on four (4) key areas: (1) development of a high-efficiency, high-strength membrane; (2) development of a long-life cell-separator; (3) scale-up of cell active area to 290 cm2 (from 160 cm); and (4) development of a prototype commercial electrolyzer system. In each of the key stack development areas Giner and our team members conducted focused development in laboratory-scale hardware, with analytical support as necessary, followed by life-testing of the most promising candidate materials. Selected components were then scaled up and incorporated into low-cost scaled-up stack hardware. The project culminated in the fabrication and testing of a highly efficient electrolyzer system for production of 0.5 kg/hr hydrogen and validation of the stack and system in testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Hamdan, Monjid [Giner, Inc.] [Giner, Inc.

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

THE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Energy and the Costs of Production.............................................................5 2 and Local Energy Benefits of PV.......................................15 5. CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSIONTHE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC APPLICATIONS FOR DELAWARE'S POULTRY FARMS FINAL REPORT

Delaware, University of

454

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by...

455

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Electric Currents Electric Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Problem 3: At $0.095/kWh, what does it cost to leave a 25W porch light on day and night for a year = 219000 Watt- hour = 219kWh. So, total cost = 219 x$0.095 = $20.8 #12;Problem 4: A 100 W light bulb has of charge per unit time: = . Unit of current: Ampere (A). The purpose of a battery is to produce

Yu, Jaehoon

457

MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 1 Electrical measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

position between coil windings. Circuit designed to have zero output at equilibrium. MTSC735, Spring 20081 MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 1 Electrical measurements Critical to all/reducing noise from measurements MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 2 Measurements Believe nothing

Plaisted, David A.

458

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hidden Costs of Energy Chris Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;What are the real costs of energy? · Unpriced components · Production · Distribution · Consumption2 fertilization #12;Electricity #12;#12;Injuries #12;#12;#12;#12;Other electricity · Nuclear · Wind in Africa · Regression analysis: T & P vs conflict ­ 100 deaths in a year, at least one government ­Range

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

None

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Costs of Growing Broilers Under Cotract.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................ Interest 6 ...... Taxes 6 Other Costs of the Broiler Grower . 6 Heat for Brooding 6 . . . . Electr~c~ty for Lighting ......................................................... 6 Labor-Regular Care... .......................................................... 6 Labor-Catching Birds ....................................................... 6 Cleaning Out Manure ......................................................... 6 Costs and Returns-Contract Broiler Production .......................... 6 Part...

Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs); Stone, B. H.; Wormeli, B. C. (Ben C.)

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Estimating the manufacturing cost of purely organic solar cells Joseph Kalowekamo 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a levelized cost of electricity (LEC) of between 49 and 85/kWh. In order to achieve a more competitive COE that into a levelized electricity cost (LEC). We find that there is a great deal of uncertainty about the capital costs., Estimating the manufacturing cost of purely organic solar cells, Sol. Energy (2009), doi:10.1016/j

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

465

Cost-Effectiveness: Implication for Bonneville and Utility Programs Council document 2007-23 August 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incentives paid by utilities are less than present value of the avoided cost of alternative electricity1 Cost-Effectiveness: Implication for Bonneville and Utility Programs Council document 2007 found to be cost effective if the electric system paid all the costs. Council plan conservation targets

466

Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates Peter Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption Page 2 Executive Summary Reducing our dependence to electric vehicles (EVs)1 is core to reducing reliance on fossil fuels and driving smart growth

Holsinger, Kent

467

Electric-drive tractability indicator integrated in hybrid electric vehicle tachometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indicator, system and method of indicating electric drive usability in a hybrid electric vehicle. A tachometer is used that includes a display having an all-electric drive portion and a hybrid drive portion. The all-electric drive portion and the hybrid drive portion share a first boundary which indicates a minimum electric drive usability and a beginning of hybrid drive operation of the vehicle. The indicated level of electric drive usability is derived from at least one of a percent battery discharge, a percent maximum torque provided by the electric drive, and a percent electric drive to hybrid drive operating cost for the hybrid electric vehicle.

Tamai, Goro; Zhou, Jing; Weslati, Feisel

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

468

Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rate and Cost Issues with Renewable Development Workshop,and Issues. Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Latham, NY.of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation (

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electric power monthly, May 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Electric power monthly, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The solar electric power outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outlook for solar electric power plants is discussed. The following topics are discussed: Amoco/Envon solar vision, multi-megawatt solar power projects, global carbon dioxide emission estimates, pollution and electric power generation, social costs of pollution economies of scale, thin-film power module, rooftop market strategy, regulatory issues regarding rooftop systems, and where do we go from here?

Kemp, J.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Highly Efficient Electric Motor Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering capabilities · Develop & launch products beyond fan & pump applications, i.e. · Electric vehicle performance for same cost Replaces or simplifies mechanical belts, pulleys and gearboxes Delivers 2X torque and Menlo Ventures Low-cost manufacturing automation developed POs received for early products Projected

473

An Assessment of the Economics of Future Electric Power Generation Options and the Implications for Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the potential range of electric power costs for some major alternatives to fusion electric power generation when it is ultimately deployed in the middle of the 21st century and, thus, offers a perspective on the cost levels that fusion must achieve to be competitive. The alternative technologies include coal burning, coal gasification, natural gas, nuclear fission, and renewable energy. The cost of electricity (COE) from the alternatives to fusion should remain in the 30-50 mils/kWh (1999 dollars) range of today in carbon sequestration is not needed, 30-60 mils/kWh if sequestration is required, or as high as 75 mils/kWh for the worst-case scenario for cost uncertainty. The reference COE range for fusion was estimated at 70-100 nmils/kWh for 1- to 1.3-GW(e) scale power plants. Fusion costs will have to be reduced and/or alternative concepts derived before fusion will be competitive with the alternatives for the future production of electricity. Fortunately, there are routes to achieve this goal.

Delene, J.G.; Hadley, S.; Reid, R.L.; Sheffield, J.; Williams, K.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A Second Opinion is Worth the Cost - 12479  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper, 'A Second Opinion is Worth the Cost', shows how a second opinion for a Department of Energy (DOE) Project helped prepare and pass a DOE Order 413.3A 'Program and Project Management for the acquisition of Capital Assets' Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM) required External Independent Review (EIR) in support of the approved baseline for Critical Decision (CD) 2. The DOE project personnel were informed that the project's Total Project Cost (TPC) was going to increase from $815 million to $1.1 billion due to unforeseen problems and unexplained reasons. The DOE Project Team determined that a second opinion was needed to review and validate the TPC. Project Time and Cost, Inc. (PT and C) was requested to evaluate the cost estimate, schedule, basis of estimate (BOE), and risk management plan of the Project and to give an independent assessment of the TPC that was presented to DOE. This paper will demonstrate how breaking down a project to the work breakdown structure (WBS) level allows a project to be analyzed for potential cost increases and/or decreases, thus providing a more accurate TPC. The review Team's cost analyses of Projects identified eight primary drivers resulting in cost increases. They included: - Overstatement of the effort required to develop drawings and specifications. - Cost allocation to 'Miscellaneous' without sufficient detail or documentation. - Cost for duplicated efforts. - Vendor estimates or quotations without sufficient detail. - The practice of using the highest price quoted then adding an additional 10% mark-up. - Application of Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA) highest level quality requirements when not required. - Allocation of operational costs to the Project Costs instead of to the Operating Expenses (OPEX). OPEX costs come from a different funding source. - DOE had not approved the activities. By using a Team approach with professionals from cost, civil, mechanical, electrical, structural and nuclear disciplines and by performing a Line by Line, WBS element by WBS element review of the Projects' CD-2 baseline package helped the DOE Project Team experience success. The second opinion that PT and C provide by conducting a Pre-EIR review of the Project baseline package and the cost review of the TPC helped the DOE Team pass the CD-2 EIR and reduced the TPC. The Line-by-Line review of the DOE Project identified opportunities to reduce the TPC from $1.1 billion to $740.8 million, thus realizing a saving of approximately $359.2 million, or roughly 32% of the original TPC. This significant cost savings underscores the cost in obtaining the second opinion. This same Line by Line review can be applied to any DOE project in the Energy Management or Weapons complex. In the case of this DOE Project a second opinion was worth the cost. (authors)

Madsen, Drew [Project Time and Cost Inc. (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as "intermittent") output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

10 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results The...

477

The Economics of Steam Electric Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by manufacturers, data available from past installations and recent installations. 7) Labor costs were based on labor rates in ~he Lansing, Michigan area. 8) Power plant labor and supervision costs were based on manning data supplied by the Board of Water...-service. No other figures, including labor, fuel cost, outside services and other costs have been escalated. 12) Operating costs were established, based on steam generation. Credit has been allotted to any program for the electric power generated during...

Ophaug, R. A.; Birget, C. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

479

Employee Replacement Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Replacement Costs Arindrajit Dube, Eric Freeman andproperties of employee replacement costs, using a panel2008. We establish that replacement costs are sub- stantial

Dube, Arindrajit; Freeman, Eric; Reich, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Das, (2006) Reducing Electricity Deficit through EnergyLV supply. Figure 12: Electricity Productivity (Commercialan interesting result. The electricity productivity in both

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduced electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EA-1723: General Motors LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application White Marsh, Maryland and Wixom, Michigan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEs Proposed Action is to provide GM with $105,387,000 in financial assistance in a cost sharing arrangement to facilitate construction and operation of a manufacturing facility to produce electric motor components and assemble an electric drive unit. This Proposed Action through the Vehicle Technologies Program will accelerate the development and production of electric-drive vehicle systems and reduce the United States consumption of petroleum. This Proposed Action will also meaningfully assist in the nations economic recovery by creating manufacturing jobs in the United States in accordance with the objectives of the Recovery Act.

482

Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This study showed that advanced energy technologies are economical for many customers on the two SCE circuits analyzed, providing certain customers with considerable energy cost savings. Using reasonable assumptions about market penetration, the study showed that adding distributed generation would reduce peak demand on the two circuits enough to defer the need to upgrade circuit capacity. If the DE is optimally targeted, the deferral could economically benefit SCE, with cost savings that outweigh the lost revenues due to lower sales of electricity. To a lesser extent, economically justifiable energy-efficiency, photovoltaic technologies, and demand response could also help defer circuit capacity upgrades by reducing demand.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Boost Converters for Gas Electric and Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are driven by at least two prime energy sources, such as an internal combustion engine (ICE) and propulsion battery. For a series HEV configuration, the ICE drives only a generator, which maintains the state-of-charge (SOC) of propulsion and accessory batteries and drives the electric traction motor. For a parallel HEV configuration, the ICE is mechanically connected to directly drive the wheels as well as the generator, which likewise maintains the SOC of propulsion and accessory batteries and drives the electric traction motor. Today the prime energy source is an ICE; tomorrow it will very likely be a fuel cell (FC). Use of the FC eliminates a direct drive capability accentuating the importance of the battery charge and discharge systems. In both systems, the electric traction motor may use the voltage directly from the batteries or from a boost converter that raises the voltage. If low battery voltage is used directly, some special control circuitry, such as dual mode inverter control (DMIC) which adds a small cost, is necessary to drive the electric motor above base speed. If high voltage is chosen for more efficient motor operation or for high speed operation, the propulsion battery voltage must be raised, which would require some type of two-quadrant bidirectional chopper with an additional cost. Two common direct current (dc)-to-dc converters are: (1) the transformer-based boost or buck converter, which inverts a dc voltage, feeds the resulting alternating current (ac) into a transformer to raise or lower the voltage, and rectifies it to complete the conversion; and (2) the inductor-based switch mode boost or buck converter [1]. The switch-mode boost and buck features are discussed in this report as they operate in a bi-directional chopper. A benefit of the transformer-based boost converter is that it isolates the high voltage from the low voltage. Usually the transformer is large, further increasing the cost. A useful feature of the switch mode boost converter is its simplicity. Its inductor must handle the entire current, which is responsible for its main cost. The new Z-source inverter technology [2,3] boosts voltage directly by actively using the zero state time to boost the voltage. In the traditional pulse width modulated (PWM) inverter, this time is used only to control the average voltage by disconnecting the supply voltage from the motor. The purpose of this study is to examine the Z-source's potential for reducing the cost and improving the reliability of HEVs.

McKeever, JW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

484

Abstract--It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical vehicles (EV). The storage capacity of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system operator (DSO) optimizes the cost of EV charging while taking substation transformer capacity and mitigate its intermittency. However, EV charging may have negative impact on the power grid. This paper effort to reduce the carbon foot print of electrical power industry has resulted in significant increase

Mahat, Pukar

485

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Advanced low-cost SIC and GaN wide...

486

Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home (Brochure)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

A consumer guide about solar electricity for the home. Includes information about types of solar electric systems, how to choose a system, financing, and costs.

487

Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A consumer guide about solar electricity for the home. Includes information about types of solar electric systems, how to choose a system, financing, and costs.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium GHG emissions rate Variable costand Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium GHG emissions rate (CO 2 -eq/kWh) Cost

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

A lower cost development path for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If two features of the inertial fusion process are exploited successfully, they can lead to significantly lower costs for demonstrating the feasibility of commercial electric power production from this source of energy. First, fusion capsule ignition and burn physics is independent of reaction chamber size and hydrodynamically-equivalent capsules can be designed to perform at small yield, exactly as they do at large yield. This means that an integrated test of all power plant components and feasibility tests of various reaction chamber concepts can be done at much smaller sizes (about 1--2 m first wall radius) and much lower powers (tens of MWs) than magnetic fusion development facilities such as ITER. Second, the driver, which is the most expensive component of currently conceived IFE development facilities, can be used to support more than one experiment target chamber/reactor (simultaneously and/or sequentially). These two factors lead to lower development facility costs, modular facilities, and the planning flexibility to spread costs over time or do several things in parallel and thus shorten the total time needed for development of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). In this paper the authors describe the general feature of a heavy ion fusion development plan that takes advantage of upgradable accelerators and the ability to test chambers and reactor systems at small scale in order to reduce development time and costs.

Hogan, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Meier, W.R. [Shafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Wakefield, MA (United States)

1993-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

490

CO2 Capture Using Electrical Energy: Electrochemically Mediated Separation for Carbon Capture and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: MIT and Siemens Corporation are developing a process to separate CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants by using electrical energy to chemically activate and deactivate sorbents, or materials that absorb gases. The team found that certain sorbents bond to CO2 when they are activated by electrical energy and then transported through a specialized separator that deactivates the molecule and releases it for storage. This method directly uses the electricity from the power plant, which is a more efficient but more expensive form of energy than heat, though the ease and simplicity of integrating it into existing coal-fired power plants reduces the overall cost of the technology. This process could cost as low as $31 per ton of CO2 stored.

None

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

492

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets Erin T. Mansur and Matthew W. White October 2007 ­ Draft Abstract Electricity markets exhibit two different forms of organization costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

493

Conservation Stand! Reducing My Commute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. + Diverts plastic waste for food production. + Placed beside window, replaces light input with solarConservation Stand! Reducing My Commute 72.6 mi to 5.1 mi #12;#12;Conserving Water and Energy or contribution to sedimentation. + Food produced on site without transportation costs. - Depends on energy input

Schweik, Charles M.

494

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be recovered through variable, volume-based charges per kilowatt-hour (kWh). At the same time, however, someEXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST REDUCTIONS The Current Terrain In recent years, electric utilities have experienced

495

Chapter three Assessing the Electric System Benefits of Clean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean energy programs and policies can help states achieve their goal of providing a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system that addresses multiple challenges, including: ??Lowering energy costs for customers and utilities alike, particularly during periods of peak electricity demand; 1 ??Improving the reliability of the electricity system and averting blackouts at a lower cost; Document map Chapter one

unknown authors

496

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Report of the project PUSHING A LEAST COST INTEGRATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report of the project PUSHING A LEAST COST INTEGRATION OF GREEN ELECTRICITY INTO THE EUROPEAN GRID: Cost and Technical Constraints of RES-E Grid Integration I The GreenNet project: Client: European GreenNet Cost and Technical Constraints of RES-E Grid Integration Work Package 2 within the 5th

498

DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

499

Novel, low-cost separator plates and flow-field elements for use in PEM fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells offer promise for a wide range of applications including vehicular (e.g., automotive) and stationary power generation. The performance and cost targets that must be met for PEM technology to be commercially successful varies to some degree with the application. However, in general the cost of PEM fuel cell stacks must be reduced substantially if they are to see widespread use for electrical power generation. A significant contribution to the manufactured cost of PEM fuel cells is the machined carbon plates that traditionally serve as bipolar separator plates and flow-field elements. In addition, carbon separator plates are inherently brittle and suffer from breakage due to shock, vibration, and improper handling. This report describes a bifurcated separator device with low resistivity, low manufacturing cost, compact size and durability.

Edlund, D.J. [Northwest Power Systems, LLC, Bend, OR (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

NREL Sheds Light on Integration Costs of Variable Generation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, lack of fuel consumptionNREL Sheds Light on Integration Costs of Variable Generation and Cost-Causation Integration costs are generally manageable, but calculating costs is challenging. Renewable energy generation sources