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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

FEMP-Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet details solar water heating and how to use the sun to heat domestic water in any climate. Document explains how solar water heating helps to save energy, reduce utility costs, and preserve the environment.

2

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Solar heat collector  

SciTech Connect

A solar heat collector comprises an evacuated transparent pipe; a solar heat collection plate disposed in the transparent pipe; a heat pipe, disposed in the transparent pipe so as to contact with the solar heat collection plate, and containing an evaporable working liquid therein; a heat medium pipe containing a heat medium to be heated; a heat releasing member extending along the axis of the heat medium pipe and having thin fin portions extending from the axis to the inner surface of the heat medium pipe; and a cylindrical casing surrounding coaxially the heat medium pipe to provide an annular space which communicates with the heat pipe. The evaporable working liquid evaporates, receiving solar heat collected by the heat collection plate. The resultant vapor heats the heat medium through the heat medium pipe and the heat releasing member.

Yamamoto, T.; Imani, K.; Sumida, I.; Tsukamoto, M.; Watahiki, N.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

Chao, Bei Tse (Urbana, IL); Rabl, Ari (Downers Grove, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Solar Heating Contractor Licensing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Michigan offers a solar heating contractor specialty license to individuals who have at least three years of experience installing solar equipment under the direction of a licensed solar contractor...

6

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Solar heat collector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heat collector is described that pre-heats water for a household hot water heating system, and also heats the air inside a house. The device includes solar heating panels set into an A-shape, and enclosing an area therein containing a water tank and a wristatic fan that utilize the heat of the enclosed air, and transmit the thermal energy therefrom through a water line and an air line into the house.

Sykes, A.B.

1981-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Air Heating Solar air heating systems use air as the working fluid for absorbing and transferring solar energy. Solar air collectors (devices to heat air...

9

Solar heating and you  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet for use with primary school classes describes what solar collectors are and how they work, passive solar rooms, flat-plate collectors, and why one should use solar heating systems. Making a solar air heater is described step-by-step with illustrations. A resource list for both students and teachers is provided for further information.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

FEMP--Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More than 1 million homeowners and 200,000 busi- More than 1 million homeowners and 200,000 busi- nesses in the United States are using the sun to heat domestic water efficiently in almost any climate. In summer, a solar system properly sized for a resi- dential building can meet 100% of the building's water-heating needs in most parts of the country. In winter, the system might meet only half of this need, so another source of heat is used to back up the solar system. In either case, solar water heating helps to save energy, reduce utility costs, and preserve the environment. A solar water-heating system's performance depends primarily on the outdoor temperature, the temperature to which the water is heated, and the amount of sunlight striking the collector-the device that actually captures the sun's energy.

11

Passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of passive solar space heating is presented indicating trends in design, new developments, performance measures, analytical design aids, and monitored building results.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Methods for reducing heat losses from flat plate solar collectors: Phase II. Final report, February 1, 1976--August 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improvements to flat plate solar collectors for heating and cooling of buildings were investigated through two parallel studies. The first study, which deals with the free convective heat loss from V-corrugated absorber plate to a plane glass cover, has shown that, for the same average spacing, the free convective heat loss is greater for a V-corrugated absorber plate than for a plane absorber plate. However, provided the average spacing is large enough, the amount of increase is slight. The second study, which deals with the free convective heat loss in a honeycomb solar collector in which the honeycomb consists of a set of horizontal partitions, or slits, has shown that provided the solar collector is tilted to near vertical, such a honeycomb gives equivalent or superior free convective loss suppression than does a square-celled honeycomb having the same amount of material. Correlation equations for the free convective heat loss are given for both studies.

Hollands, K.G.T.; Raithby, G.D.; Unny, T.E.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Solar Water Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publication provides basic informa- publication provides basic informa- tion on the components and types of solar water heaters currently available and the economic and environmental benefits of owning a system. Although the publica- tion does not provide information on building and installing your own system, it should help you discuss solar water heating systems intelligently with a solar equipment dealer. Solar water heaters, sometimes called

14

TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Passive Passive Solar Heating Applications StephenHEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS StephenMIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS Stephen

Selkowitz, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating Solar Power Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating...

16

Solar heat receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA); Hansen, Leif J. (Berkeley, CA); Evans, David B. (Orinda, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Solar heat receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solar heat regulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heat regulating device is described for selectively heating with sunlight the air inside a building having a window and shielding and insulating the air inside the building from the heat of sunlight outside the building including: a frame for mounting the solar heat regulating device inside the building and adjacent to the window; a plurality of hollow vanes, each of the vanes having at least one passageway for passing air therethrough; the vanes having a heat absorptive surface on a first side thereof which allows solar radiation impinging on the heat absorptive surface to heat the air contained in the one passageway of the vanes; the vanes having a heat reflective surface on a second side of the vanes which reflects the solar radiation impinging on the second side of the vanes and shields the inside of the building from solar radiation impinging on the vanes; and the vanes having side portions extending between the first and second sides of the vanes, the side portions, and the first and second sides forming the one passageway through each of the vanes, the side portions and the first and second sides of the vanes terminating in top end and bottom end portions.

Boynton, S.L.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Liquid Heating Solar liquid heating systems use a collector with a heat transfer or "working" fluid such as water, antifreeze (usually non-toxic propylene...

20

Solar home heating in Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet presents the fundamentals of solar heating for both new and existing homes. A variety of systems for space heating and household water heating are explained, and examples are shown of solar homes and installations in Michigan.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Lumsdaine, E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

23

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

24

Evaluating Incentives for Solar Heating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. t ~ Ii '.:)' NBSIR 76-1127(IE') Evaluating Incentives for Solar Heating Rosalie T. Ruegg Building Economics Section ...

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

Solar heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improved solar heating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Solar heated building structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heated building structure comprises an exterior shell including side walls and a roof section with the major portion of the roof section comprised of light transmitting panels or panes of material to permit passage of sunlight into the attic section of the building structure. The structure is provided with a central vertical hollow support column containing liquid storage tanks for the circulation and collection of heated water from a flexible conduit system located on the floor of the attic compartment. The central column serves as a heating core for the structure and communicates by way of air conduits or ducts with the living areas of the structure. Fan means are provided for continuously or intermittently circulating air over the hot water storage tanks in the core to transfer heat therefrom and distribute the heated air into the living areas.

Rugenstein, R.W.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Solar heated rotary kiln  

SciTech Connect

A solar heated rotary kiln utilized for decomposition of materials, such as zinc sulfate. The rotary kiln has an open end and is enclosed in a sealed container having a window positioned for directing solar energy into the open end of the kiln. The material to be decomposed is directed through the container into the kiln by a feed tube. The container is also provided with an outlet for exhaust gases and an outlet for spent solids, and rests on a tiltable base. The window may be cooled and kept clear of debris by coolant gases.

Shell, Pamela K. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Solar Pool Heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Solar Pool Heating Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Pool Heating Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolar...

30

Solar Space Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Solar Space Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Space Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarS...

31

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:58pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar...

32

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the solar-heated hot water. This heater can be seen inwater (solar heated, boosted, or heated entirely in the auxiliary heater)

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Window solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

The unit may be mounted either in a window or between the studs of a building that is to be supplied with solar heat. The bottom of the unit extends farther from the building than the top and is wider than the top of the unit such that the transparent side away from the building has an arcuate form and is gradually flared outwardly in a downward direction to increase the exposure to the sun during the day. A plurality of absorptive tubes within the unit are slanted from the upper portion of the unit downwardly and outwardly to the front arcuate portion of the bottom. Openings between the unit and the building are provided for air flow, and a thermostatically controlled fan is mounted in one of the openings. A baffle is mounted between the absorptive tubes and the mounting side of the solar heating unit, and the surfaces of the baffle and the absorptive tubes are painted a dull black for absorbing heat transmitted from the sun through the transparent, slanting side.

Davis, E.J.

1978-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

A solar heating unit is disclosed for disposition exteriorly of a building window for heating the air within the space interiorly of the window embodying a casing with a transverse divider for creating a rear passage and a front passage which are in communication in their lower portions. The upper end of the rear passage connects with the forward end of a rearwardly extending lower duct having a cool air inlet at the rearward end thereof. The upper end of the front passage connects with the forward end of an upper duct progressing rearwardly above the lower duct and with there being a warm air outlet at the rearward extremity thereof. A heat exchanger is disposed within the front passage for impingement thereon of solar radiation passing through a transparent panel defining the front of said casing. A thermal responsive closure is provided at the upper end of said front passage for closing same when the temperature within the front passage has descended to a predetermined level.

Grisbrook, R.B.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

Survey of hybrid solar heat pump drying systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar drying is in practice since the ancient time for preservation of food and agriculture crops. The objective of most drying processes is to reduce the moisture content of the product to a specified value. Solar dryers used in agriculture for food ... Keywords: coefficient of performance (COP), direct expansion SAHD, drying chamber, heat pump, solar assisted heat pumps dryer (SAHPD), solar fraction

R. Daghigh; K. Sopian; M. H. Ruslan; M. A. Alghoul; C. H. Lim; S. Mat; B. Ali; M. Yahya; A. Zaharim; M. Y. Sulaiman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NREL: Learning - Solar Process Heat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Heat Process Heat Photo of part of one side of a warehouse wall, where a perforated metal exterior skin is spaced about a foot out from the main building wall to form part of the transpired solar collector system. A transpired collector is installed at a FedEx facility in Denver, Colorado. Commercial and industrial buildings may use the same solar technologies-photovoltaics, passive heating, daylighting, and water heating-that are used for residential buildings. These nonresidential buildings can also use solar energy technologies that would be impractical for a home. These technologies include ventilation air preheating, solar process heating, and solar cooling. Space Heating Many large buildings need ventilated air to maintain indoor air quality. In cold climates, heating this air can use large amounts of energy. But a

37

Solar heating apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure concerns a collector for solar heating apparatus which is adapted for vertical mounting and utilizes air as the heat exchange medium. The collector comprises a glazed insulated box containing a group of energy transfer units, each of which is formed by a pair of similar open top metal foil pans having flat bottom walls which are in abutment and outwardly flaring conical side walls. The pans carry a black energy-absorbing coating and preferably their abutting walls contain registering air flow openings. The energy transfer units are stacked in interfitting relationship in rows and columns, with the axes of adjacent interfitted units in each row and in each column extending in mutually perpendicular directions. The collector may be combined with a fan unit adapted to fit a standard window, thereby providing a portable, economical, auxiliary heater for a room of a building.

Decker, C.R.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy Basics: Active Solar Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems based on the type of fluid-either liquid or air-that is heated in the solar energy collectors. The collector is the device in which a fluid is heated by the sun....

39

Passive solar heating and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive solar heating experience and analysis techniques are reviewed with emphasis on annual auxiliary heat requirement. The role of analysis in the design of passive solar buildings is discussed. Selected results for existing systems are presented for locations in Saudi Arabia and climatically similar locations in the US. Advanced systems in the research stage are described.

Jones, R.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper, because it is a good thermal conductor and has greater resistance to corrosion. Types of Heat Exchangers Solar water heating systems use three types of heat exchangers: Liquid-to-liquid A liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger uses a heat-transfer fluid that

42

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

43

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

44

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

45

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Active Solar Heating Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

46

Solar Thermal Process Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalPr...

47

Passive Solar Space Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Space Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePassive...

48

Utility solar water heating workshops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM option. The participants provided a range of ideas and suggestions regarding useful next steps for utilities and NREL. According to evaluations, the participants believed the workshops were very valuable, and they returned to their utilities with new information, ideas, and commitment.

Barrett, L.B. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar space heating system with heat input and building loadBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATINGBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of radiant heat to electricity by a heat pipe-turbogenerator combination is described. The heat pipe-tubogenerator assembly is suitably externally insulated, as by a vacuum shield, to prevent heat losses and heat is recovered from the condenser portion of the heat pipe and returned to the evaporator portions. An application of the generic invention is discussed which it is employed on wall or roof portions of a building and serves as at least a partial supporting structure for these. In another application the solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator may be incorporated in or used with reflective means, such as reflective sheet material of large area positioned to direct solar radiation onto the evaporator section of the heat pipe. The reflective means may be changed in position to follow the sun to produce maximum power during operation.

Decker, B.J.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transparent solar heat collector  

SciTech Connect

Infrared solar radiation is absorbed by a transparent converter glass for conversion of the infrared radiation into thermal energy. Liquid or air forms a transparent fluid medium that is conducted into heat transfer contact with the glass to carry the thermal energy away from the glass to a point of utilization. In one embodiment, the transparent converter glass consists of sintered particles of infrared absorptive glass located within a collector space formed within an all-glass panel. The panel includes glass walls extending outwardly of the walls forming the collector space. In a further embodiment, the transparent converter glass consists of elongated strips of infrared absorptive glass carried by support members so that the strips extend in a parallel, spaced-apart relation to form a venetian blind-like structure between glass panels. In a still further embodiment, the transparent converter glass consists of a slab of infrared absorptive glass extending vertically within a building structure to form a passageway for the flow of convectivelydriven air between the glass slab and two window panels forming a dry airspace therebetween. Instead of a thick unitary glass slab, smaller bricks of infrared absorptive glass are arranged to form courses of an internal wall within a building structure adjacent a glass window.

Deminet, C.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren �stergaard Jensen

53

Piedmont EMC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Piedmont EMC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program...

54

Passive solar heating of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar heating concepts--in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means--are described according to five general classifications: direct gain, thermal storage wall, solar greenhouses, roof ponds, and convective loops. Examples of each are discussed. Passive test rooms built at Los Alamos are described and results are presented. Mathematical simulation techniques based on thermal network analysis are given together with validation comparisons against test room data. Systems analysis results for 29 climates are presented showing that the concepts should have wide applicability for solar heating.

Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.; McFarland, R.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Solar Water Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Water Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarWaterHeat&oldid26719...

56

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:58pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography, NREL This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography, NREL What does this mean for me? If you live in a cold climate and have unobstructed access to the sun during the heating season, an active solar heating system might make sense for you. You can buy a manufactured active solar system or build your own.

57

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Basics Active Solar Heating Basics Active Solar Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:23pm Addthis There are two basic types of active solar heating systems based on the type of fluid-either liquid or air-that is heated in the solar energy collectors. The collector is the device in which a fluid is heated by the sun. Liquid-based systems heat water or an antifreeze solution in a "hydronic" collector, whereas air-based systems heat air in an "air collector." Both of these systems collect and absorb solar radiation, then transfer the solar heat directly to the interior space or to a storage system, from which the heat is distributed. If the system cannot provide adequate space heating, an auxiliary or back-up system provides the additional heat. Liquid systems are more often used when storage is included, and are well

59

Passive solar heating for buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A passive solar energy system is one in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means, that is by radiation, conduction, or natural convection. A survey of passive solar heating experience, especially in the U.S., is provided. Design approaches are reviewed and examples shown. Misconceptions are discussed. Advantages are listed. The Los Alamos program of performance simulation and evaluation is described and a simplified method of performance estimation is outlined.

Balcomb, J.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

DEVELOPMENT OF SOLAR DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors'and Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors'refrigeration systems for solar active heating and cooling

Dao, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building Technologies Office: Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative Search Search Help Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative EERE Building Technologies Office Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative...

62

Category:Solar Water Heating Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Water Heating Incentives Jump to: navigation, search Category for Solar Water Heating Incentives. Pages in category "Solar Water Heating Incentives" The following 200 pages...

63

Solar heating shingle roof structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. Shingles are assembled in a normal overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive shingles to provide a fluid path through the complete array. An inlet manifold is contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the lowest row of shingles.

Straza, G.T.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Experimental Research on Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the status quo that conventional energy sources are more and more reduced and environmental pollution is increasingly serious, this paper presents a new model system of conserving energy and environmental protection, namely, a Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage. In this system, solar energy is the major heat source for a heat pump, and the supplementary heat source is soil. The disagreement in time between the space heat load and heat collected by solar heat collector is solved by latent heat storage. In order to obtain such system running conditions and effects in different heating periods, an experiment has been carried out during the whole heating period in Harbin, China. The experimental results show that this system is much better for heating in initial and late periods than that in middle periods. The average heating coefficient is 6.13 for heating in initial and late periods and 2.94 for heating in middle periods. At the same time, this paper also predicts system running properties in other regions.

Han, Z.; Zheng, M.; Liu, W.; Wang, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assessment of solar heating and cooling techology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to assess in detail the state of the technology for solar heating and cooling of buildings, five 2-day meetings were held. The meeting subjects were solar collectors, thermal storage, air conditioning and heat pumps, systems and controls, and non-engineering aspects of solar energy. This is a condensation of these meetings, presenting for each topic discussed the details of the state of the art, the problem areas, and the objectives of necessary research and development. The existing state of technology for solar heating and cooling presents a mixed picture. Liquid-heating flat-plate solar collectors, for example, are in a rather mature stage, and there is a small, viable industry producing components. Even here, however, there are problems of materials which, if solved, can reduce collector cost, improve performance, or increase lifetime. In other areas such as, for example, desiccant chillers, passive concepts, and many of the systems categories, the technology is at an early stage of evolution, and much research and development remain to be done.

Balcomb, J.D.; Perry, J.E. Jr.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Solar space heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heating heating Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of solar space heating technology.)[1] Contents 1 Space Heating 2 Passive Solar Space Heating 3 Active Solar Space Heating 4 References Space Heating A solar space-heating system can consist of a passive system, an active system, or a combination of both. Passive systems are typically less costly and less complex than active systems. However, when retrofitting a building, active systems might be the only option for obtaining solar energy. Passive Solar Space Heating Passive solar space heating takes advantage of warmth from the sun through design features, such as large south-facing windows, and materials in the floors or walls that absorb warmth during the day and release that warmth

67

Solar heating/cooling and domestic hot-water systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing awareness of global warming forces policy makers and industries to face two challenges: reducing greenhouse gas emissions and securing stable energy supply against ever-increasing world energy consumption, which is projected to increase by ... Keywords: buildings heating, domestic hot-water, energetical analysis, renewable energy sources, solar cooling technologies, solar energy collection, solar thermal systems

Ioan Sârbu; Marius Adam

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Installation package for a solar heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installation information is presented for a solar heating system installed in Concho Indian School at El Reno, Oklahoma. This package includes a system Operation and Maintenance Manual, hardware brochures, schematics, system operating modes and drawings. The Solar Engineering and Equipment Company (SEECO) developed this prototype solar heating system consisting of the following subsystems: solar collectors, control and storage.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reducing fuel usage through applications of conservation and solar energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal technology, coupled with aggressive conservation measures, offers the prospect of greatly reducing the dependence of industry on oil and natural gas. The near-term market for solar technology is largely in industrial processes operating at temperatures below 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F). Such process heat can be supplied by the relatively unsophisticated solar equipment available today. The number and diversity of industrial plants using process heat at this temperature allows favorable matches between solar technologies and industrial processes. The problems involved with the installation and maintenance of conservation and solar equipment are similar. Both compete for scarce investment capital, and each complicates industrial operations and increases maintenance requirements. Technological innovations requiring new types of equipment and reducing the temperature requirements of industrial processes favor the introduction of solar hardware. The industrial case studies program at the Solar Energy Research Institute has examined technical, economic, and other problems facing the near-term application of solar thermal technology to provide industrial process heat. The plant engineer is in the front line of any measure to reduce energy consumption or to supplement existing fuel supplies. The conditions most favorable to the integration of solar technology are presented and illustrated with examples from actual industrial plants.

May, E. K.; Hooker, D. W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Definition: Passive solar heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar heating solar heating Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Passive solar heating Using the sun's energy to heat a building; the windows, walls, and floors can be designed to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter (and also to reject solar heat in the summer).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Daylighting, Passive Solar, heat, energy References ↑ http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/designing_remodeling/index.cfm/mytopic=10250 Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Passive_solar_heating&oldid=480581" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

71

Solar-heated rotary kiln  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar heated rotary kiln utilized for decomposition of materials, such as zinc sulfate is disclosed. The rotary kiln has an open end and is enclosed in a sealed container having a window positioned for directing solar energy into the open end of the kiln. The material to be decomposed is directed through the container into the kiln by a feed tube. The container is also provided with an outlet for exhaust gases and an outlet for spent solids, and rests on a tiltable base. The window may be cooled and kept clear of debris by coolant gases.

Shell, P.K.

1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Solar water heating: FEMP fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the sun to heat domestic water makes sense in almost any climate. Solar water heaters typically provide 40 to 80{percent} of a building's annual water-heating needs. A solar water-heating system's performance depends primarily on the outdoor temperature, the temperature to which the water is heated, and the amount of sunlight striking the collector.

Clyne, R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

List of Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 499 Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 499) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat

74

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat to water in a storage tank. Heat-transfer fluids, such as antifreeze, protect the solar collector from freezing in cold weather. Liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers have...

75

Solar space heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Solar space heating (Redirected from - Solar Ventilation Preheat) Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of solar space heating technology.)[1] Contents 1 Space Heating 2 Passive Solar Space Heating 3 Active Solar Space Heating 4 References Space Heating A solar space-heating system can consist of a passive system, an active system, or a combination of both. Passive systems are typically less costly and less complex than active systems. However, when retrofitting a building, active systems might be the only option for obtaining solar

76

Solar heating shingle roof structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet socket at the upper end and a fluid outlet plug at the lower end with a skirt at the lower end overlapping the plug. Shingles are assembled in an overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive longitudinally positioned shingles to provide fluid paths through the complete array. An inlet manifold is positioned at the upper end of the array or in the alternative contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the outlet of the lowest row of shingles.

Straza, G.T.

1981-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes how to save energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Active and passive solar heating of buildings  

SciTech Connect

An overview of both active and passive solar heating approaches for buildings is presented. Passive solar heating concepts--in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means--are described according to five classifications: direct gain, thermal storage wall, solar greenhouses, roof ponds, and convective loops. Results of simulation analyses are presented for a variety of climates. Active systems utilizing both liquid-heating collectors and air-heating collectors are described. Trends in the recent development of solar heating are discussed.

Balcomb, J.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating...

80

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solar Coronal Heating and Limb Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quiet solar coronal heating problem and the observed center-to-limb wavelength variations of the solar lines (limb effect) can be explained. In this paper the quantitative calculations for these two phenomena are presented.

Yi-Jia Zheng

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

air in an "air collector." Both of these systems collect and absorb solar radiation, then transfer the solar heat directly to the interior space or to a storage system, from which...

83

Solar Coronal Heating and Limb Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quiet solar coronal heating problem and the observed center-to-limb wavelength variations of the solar lines (limb effect) can be explained. In this paper the quantitative calculations for these two phenomena are presented.

Zheng, Yi-Jia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Read Energy Saver's article on solar heating systems to see whether see whether active solar heating is a good option for you. Most people are familiar with solar photovoltaic panels, but far fewer know about using solar as a source of heat in their homes. Active solar heating uses solar energy to heat fluid or air, which then transfers the solar heat

85

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

86

Solar Heated Pools for Your Commercial Property  

SciTech Connect

A brochure describing the energy-saving and cost-saving benefits of using solar water heating in commercial swimming pools.

American Solar Energy Society

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Innovative heat exchangers for solar water heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of two innovative collector-loop heat exchangers used in pumped circulation solar water heaters was investigated experimentally and numerically, and TRNSYS simulation models were… (more)

Soo Too, Yen Chean

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A physical mechanism of solar corona heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time profiles of solar soft X-ray microflares and structure soft X-ray solar corona thermal background are studied on RHESSI data. The observations of 2003 year are analyzed. Decrease fluxe of solar soft X-ray microflares and thermal background of solar corona in the X-ray range 2-15 kev are revealed. The new model of solar corona heating in based on this new data are suggested.

Mirzoeva, I K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solar pool heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Solar pool heating Jump to: navigation, search Pool Heating is a great use for solar energy. Solar pool heating systems can be very effective and inexpensive. The pool itself is the thermal storage unit and the existing pump that the pool uses will circulate the water through the solar collectors. Pool Covers Having a good pool cover is one of the best ways to conserve energy and use solar energy to heat the pool. If you don't have a pool cover the solar energy being used will be wasted and you will be using three times as much energy that is necessary. Solar Sun Rings- instead of using a full pool cover sun rings are

90

List of Solar Water Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Water Heat Incentives Solar Water Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 920 Solar Water Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-920) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - GEOSmart Financing Program (Arizona) Utility Loan Program Arizona Residential Solar Water Heat Photovoltaics No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas

91

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Anisotropic turbulent model for solar coronal heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context : We present a self-consistent model of solar coronal heating, originally developed by Heyvaert & Priest (1992), in which we include the dynamical effect of the background magnetic field along a coronal structure by using exact results from wave MHD turbulence (Galtier et al. 2000). Aims : We evaluate the heating rate and the microturbulent velocity for comparison with observations in the quiet corona, active regions and also coronal holes. Methods :The coronal structures are assumed to be in a turbulent state maintained by the slow erratic motions of the magnetic footpoints. A description for the large-scale and the unresolved small-scale dynamics are given separately. From the latter, we compute exactly (or numerically for coronal holes) turbulent viscosites that are finally used in the former to close self-consistently the system and derive the heating flux expression. Results : We show that the heating rate and the turbulent velocity compare favorably with coronal observations. Conclusions : Although the Alfven wave turbulence regime is strongly anisotropic, and could reduce a priori the heating efficiency, it provides an unexpected satisfactory model of coronal heating for both magnetic loops and open magnetic field lines.

B. Bigot; S. Galtier; H. Politano

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Heating & Acceleration of the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Heating & Acceleration of the Solar Wind Eliot Quataert (UC Berkeley) Collaborators: Steve & Slow Winds · The Puzzle of the High Frequency Cascade (or the lack thereof ....) · Possible Solutions #12;Background · Heating required to accelerate the solar wind · Early models invoked e- conduction

Wurtele, Jonathan

94

Definition: Solar Water Heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Solar Water Heating Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Solar Water Heating A low-energy intensive system that uses solar rays to heat water. It is a viable option in developing countries[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Solar water heating (SWH) or solar hot water (SHW) systems comprise several innovations and many mature renewable energy technologies that have been well established for many years. SWH has been widely used in Australia, Austria, China, Cyprus, Greece, India, Israel, Japan and Turkey. In a "close-coupled" SWH system the storage tank is horizontally mounted immediately above the solar collectors on the roof. No pumping is required as the hot water naturally rises into the tank through thermosiphon flow.

95

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS Mashuri L.CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS * • Mashuri L.consists of a hydronic solar space heating system with heat

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar energy for agricultural and industrial process heat  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art review of solar process heat is given; near term prospects are discussed; and the federal solar industrial process heat program is reviewed. Existing solar industrial process heat projects are tabulated. (WHK)

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

97

Windjammer solar-water-heating system. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the Windjammer Solar-Water-Heating System tests showed that it was not as an efficient system as a comparable conventional system for converting solar energy into heat energy. However, it was determined that the innovative mode used less electric back-up energy for water heating. Reduced fossil fuel energy consumption being the ultimate objective of a solar water heating, the principle employed has been shown to be a workable energy saving concept. The differential mode of temperature control emerged as the more efficient mode of operation for the innovative system and under comparable conditions is projected to be nearly equivalent to the conventional solar system. Although the concept has proven workable, the costs feasible, and the potential for considereable improvements exists, additional research and development is needed to advance the design into its most practical application.

Windham, J.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Loan Program (North Carolina...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program (North Carolina) Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Loan Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water...

99

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida) Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings...

100

Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (North...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program (North Carolina) Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Austin Energy - Solar Water Heating Rebate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Austin Energy - Solar Water Heating Rebate Austin Energy - Solar Water Heating Rebate Eligibility...

102

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Solar Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania) FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania)...

103

Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards Eligibility...

104

Expansion and Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expansion and Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in China Project Management Office Jump to: navigation, search Name Expansion and Improvement of Solar Water Heating...

105

German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Low-cost site-assembled solar collector designs for use with heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four low cost solar collector designs have been produced for use in solar assisted heat pump systems. Three principles guided the design: the use of air as the heat transfer medium, the use of on-site easy-to-install construction rather than modularized prefabricated construction, and the collection of solar energy at reduced temperatures.

Andrews, J W; Wilhelm, W

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE Solar Process Heat Program: FY1991 Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During fiscal year (FY) 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Process Heat Program implemented a Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies activity. For Program purposes, a prefeasibility study is an engineering assessment that investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a solar system for a specific application for a specific end-user. The study includes an assessment of institutional issues (e.g., financing, availability of insurance, etc.) that impact the feasibility of the proposed solar project. Solar process heat technology covers solar thermal energy systems (utilizing fiat plate or concentrating solar collectors) for water heating, water preheating, cooling/refrigeration, steam generation, ventilation air heating/preheating, etc. for applications in industry, commerce, and government.

Russell Hewett; Price Microfiche A

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more comfortable. First, the authors devised an experimental scheme and set up the laboratory. Second, we collected a great deal of data on the system in different situations. Finally, we conclude that such heating system is feasible and one of the best heating methods.

Wu, Z.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solar ponds for industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar ponds offer perhaps the simplest technique for conversion of solar energy to thermal energy, which can be used for industrial process heat. It is unique in its capability in acting both as collector and storage. Further, the cost of solar pond per unit area is less than any active collectors available today. Combination of these economic and technical factors make solar ponds attractive as a fuel saver in IPH applications. Detailed calculations are given for solar ponds in two specific applications: providing hot water for aluminum can washing in a manufacturing plant and hot water for washing in a large commercial laundry. With the help of computer codes developed at SERI for other solar IPH systems, it is shown that solar ponds are far more cost effective than any other solar IPH technology for these applications.

Brown, K.C.; Edesess, M.; Jayadev, T.S.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Solar heating and cooling diode module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency solar heating system comprising a plurality of hollow modular units each for receiving a thermal storage mass, the units being arranged in stacked relation in the exterior frame of a building, each of the units including a port for filling the unit with the mass, a collector region and a storage region, each region having inner and outer walls, the outer wall of the collector region being oriented for exposure to sunlight for heating the thermal storage mass; the storage region having an opening therein and the collector region having a corresponding opening, the openings being joined for communicating the thermal storage mass between the storage and collector regions by thermosiphoning; the collector region being disposed substantially below and in parallel relation to the storage region in the modular unit; and the inner wall of the collector region of each successive modular unit in the stacked relation extending over the outer wall of the storage region of the next lower modular unit in the stacked relation for reducing heat loss from the system. Various modifications and alternatives are disclosed for both heating and cooling applications.

Maloney, Timothy J. (Winchester, VA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Measuring solar heat reduction for draperies and fabric shades  

SciTech Connect

We are all familiar with the utility of draperies, curtains and shades to exclude unwanted solar gain, control glare, insulate windows and provide privacy. The manageability of these devices gives us a degree of control over our indoor environment. While fabric window coverings are widely used as interior shading devices, the analytical methods used to determine their effectiveness in reducing solar gains are relatively unsophisticated. Furthermore, with the recent emphasis on daylighting and visual and thermal comfort, the response to these shading devices to the varying direction of incident solar radiation has taken on a new importance. In this article, the authors review the historical development of analytical and experimental methods used to determine solar heat gain for draperies. The current state of these methods will be evaluated and issues related to their applicability to draperies and fabric shades are identified. Finally, recommendations to improve the accuracy and applicability of current solar heat gain methods are presented.

Grasso, M.M.; Hunn, B.D. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on transformative innovation in the domestic PV industry. With knowledge and expertise acquired from the PDIL pilot production line tools, Ampulse plans to design a full-scale production line to accommodate long rolls of metal foil. The Ampulse process 'goes straight from pure silicon-containing gas to high-quality crystal silicon film,' said Brent Nelson, the operational manager for the Process Development Integration Laboratory. 'The advantage is you can make the wafer just as thin as you need it - 10 microns or less.' Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon, though thin-film cells made of more exotic elements such as copper, indium, gallium, arsenic, cadmium, tellurium and others are making a strong push into the market. The advantage of silicon is its abundance, because it is derived from sand. Silicon's disadvantage is that purifying it into wafers suitable for solar cells can be expensive and energy intensive. Manufacturers add carbon and heat to sand to produce metallurgical-grade silicon, which is useful in other industries, but not yet suitable for making solar cells. So this metallurgical-grade silicon is then converted to pure trichlorosilane (SiCl3) or silane (SiH4) gas. Typically, the purified gas is then converted to create a silicon feedstock at 1,000 degrees Celsius. This feedstock is melted at 1,414 C and recrystallized into crystal ingots that are finally sawed into wafers. The Ampulse method differs in that it eliminates the last two steps in the traditional process and works directly with the silane gas growing only the needed silicon right onto a foil substrate. A team of NREL scientists had developed a way to use a process called hot-wire chemical vapor deposition to thicken silicon wafers with near perfect crystal structure. Using a hot tungsten filament much like the one found in an incandescent light bulb, the silane gas molecules are broken apart and deposited onto the wafer using the chemical vapor deposition technique at about 700 C - a much lower temperature than needed to make the wafer. The hot filament dec

Scanlon, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

InterTechnology Corporation technology summary, solar heating and cooling. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of systems technology for solar-thermal heating and cooling of buildings is given. Solar collectors, control systems for solar heating and cooling, selective surfaces, thermal energy storage, solar-assisted heat pumps, and solar-powered cooling systems are discussed in detail. Also, an ITC specification for a solar control system is included. (WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Report on Solar Water Heating Quantitative Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of a quantitative research study undertaken to better understand the marketplace for solar water-heating systems from the perspective of home builders, architects, and home buyers.

Focus Marketing Services

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Report on Solar Pool Heating Quantitative Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of a quantitative research study undertaken to better understand the marketplace for solar pool-heating systems from the perspective of residential pool owners.

Synapse Infusion Group, Inc. (Westlake Village, California)

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Gap between active and passive solar heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

Balcomb, J.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Implementation of solar industrial process heat: summary  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of solar industrial process heat systems will depend not only on the successful development of reliable and efficient solar technologies, but also on the intelligent and sound application of process engineering principles. This poses an important challenge which must be given increasing attention if SIPH systems are to be adopted by industry. (MOW)

Kearney, D. W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief descriptive overviews are presented of the design and operating characteristics of all commercial and Federal residential solar heating and cooling systems and of the structures themselves. Also included are available pictures of the buildings and simplified solar system diagrams. A list of non-Federal residential installations is provided.

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Investigation of a novel façade-based solar loop heat pipe water heating system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solar thermal is one of the most cost-effective renewable energy technologies, and solar water heating is one of the most popular solar thermal systems. Based… (more)

Wang, Zhangyuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Template Template Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D Kate Hudon National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kate.hudon@nrel.gov 303-275-3190 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The major market barrier for solar water heaters (SWHs) is installed cost. This project addresses this barrier by working with an industry research partner to evaluate innovative solutions that reduce the installed cost of a SWH by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Use of solar energy to produce process heat for industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role of solar energy in supplying heat and hot water to residential and commercial buildings is familiar. On the other hand, the role that solar energy may play in displacing imported energy supplies in the industrial and utility sectors often goes unrecognized. The versatility of solar technology lends itself well to applications in industry; particularly to the supplemental supply of process heat of all kinds. The realization of that potential will depend, however, on the identification of the most suitable applications and locations for industrial solar energy and the continued improvement in cost, durability, and reliability of solar equipment. The status of solar thermal technology for industrial process heat applications is surveyed, including a description of current costs and operating histories. Because the current status is unsatisfactory in view of the goals established by President Carter for solar industrial energy, the most important objectives to be met in improving system performance, reducing cost, and identifying markets for solar IPH are outlined. The effect of government tax policy will be of little impact until technical efficiency and cost effectiveness are significantly improved.

Brown, K.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solar Heat-Pipe Receiver Wick Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stirling-cycle engines have been identified as a promising technology for the conversion of concentrated solar energy into usable electrical power. In previous experimented work, we have demonstrated that a heat pipe receiver can significantly improve system performance-over a directly-illuminated heater head. The design and operating conditions of a heat pipe receiver differ significantly from typical laboratory heat pipes. New wick structures have been developed to exploit the characteristics of the solar generation system. Typically, these wick structures allow vapor generation within the wick. Conventional heat pipe models do not handle this enhancement yet it can more than double the performance of the wick. In this study, I develop a steady-state model of a boiling-enhanced wick for a solar heat pipe receiver. The model is used for design-point calculations and is written in FORTRAN90. Some limited comparisons have been made with actual test data.

Andraka, C.E.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings  

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings ... Heat is either reflected away from the building with radiant barriers, or heat is absorbed

124

List of Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 278 Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 278) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Corporate) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts Commercial Biomass Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Municipal Solid Waste Passive Solar Space Heat Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts General Public/Consumer Biomass

125

Self-contained passive solar heating system  

SciTech Connect

A self-contained passive solar heating system includes first and second heat pipes, each having a refrigerant medium therein, a condenser portion and an evaporator portion, with the condenser portion of the first heat pipe being coupled to the evaporator portion of the second heat pipe for transferring heat thereto when the pressure within the first heat pipe is greater than the pressure within the second heat pipe. The evaporator portion of the first heat pipe is adapted to be exposed to a source of heat and the condenser portion of the second heat pipe contacts a medium to be heated. A temperature control mechanism may be installed as the coupling between the first and second heat pipes for uncoupling the same when the temperature within the first heat pipe falls below a predetermined temperature. Also, a third heat pipe may be provided having a thermostatic portion operatively connected to the condenser portion of the second heat pipe by a piston means so that changes in pressure within the thermostatic portion occasioned by changes in temperature of the medium to be heated will cause movement of the pistons to vary the size of the condensing portion of the second heat pipe to increase or decrease the rate of heat transfer to the medium.

Maldonado, E.A.; Woods, J.E.

1983-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Coronal Heating versus Solar Wind Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parker's initial insights from 1958 provided a key causal link between the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. However, we still do not know what fraction of the solar wind's mass, momentum, and energy flux is driven by Parker-type gas pressure gradients, and what fraction is driven by, e.g., wave-particle interactions or turbulence. SOHO has been pivotal in bringing these ideas back to the forefront of coronal and solar wind research. This paper reviews our current understanding of coronal heating in the context of the acceleration of the fast and slow solar wind. For the fast solar wind, a recent model of Alfven wave generation, propagation, and non-WKB reflection is presented and compared with UVCS, SUMER, radio, and in-situ observations at the last solar minimum. The derived fractions of energy and momentum addition from thermal and nonthermal processes are found to be consistent with various sets of observational data. For the more chaotic slow solar wind, the relative roles of steady streamer-edge flows (as emphasized by UVCS abundance analysis) versus bright blob structures (seen by LASCO) need to be understood before the relation between streamer heating and and slow-wind acceleration can be known with certainty. Finally, this presentation summarizes the need for next-generation remote-sensing observations that can supply the tight constraints needed to unambiguously characterize the dominant physics.

Steven R. Cranmer

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

National solar heating and cooling programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of status reports on the national solar heating and cooling programs of seventeen countries participating in the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society's Solar Energy Pilot Study. These reports were presented in two special sessions of the 25th Congress of the International Solar Energy Society held in May 1979, in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. This information exchange activity was part of the two-year follow up (1978-1980) of the Solar Energy Pilot Study, which ended in October 1978.

Blum, S; Allen, J [eds.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Corrosion and scaling in solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion, as experienced in solar heating systems, is described in simplistic terms to familiarize designers and installers with potential problems and their solutions. The role of a heat transfer fluid in a solar system is briefly discussed, and the choice of an aqueous solution is justified. The complexities of the multiple chemical and physical reactions are discussed in order that uncertainties of corrosion behavior can be anticipated. Some basic theories of corrosion are described, aggressive environments for some common metals are identified, and the role of corrosion inhibitors is delineated. The similarities of thermal and material charactristics of a solar system and an automotive cooling system are discussed. Based on the many years of experience with corrosion in automotive systems, it is recommended that similar antifreezes and corrosion inhibitors should be used in solar systems. The importance of good solar system design and fabrication is stressed and specific characteristics that affect corrosion are identified.

Foresti, R.J. Jr.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program  

SciTech Connect

This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reducing home heating and cooling costs  

SciTech Connect

This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Siting Your Solar Water Heating System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Siting Your Solar Water Heating System Siting Your Solar Water Heating System Siting Your Solar Water Heating System May 30, 2012 - 2:46pm Addthis Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Before you buy and install a solar water heating system, you need to first consider your site's solar resource, as well as the optimal orientation and tilt of your solar collector. The efficiency and design of a solar water heating system depends on how much of the sun's energy reaches your building site. Solar water heating systems use both direct and diffuse solar radiation. Even if you don't live in a climate that's warm and sunny most of the time -- like the southwestern United States -- your site still might have an adequate solar resource. If your building site has unshaded areas and

133

Siting Your Solar Water Heating System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Siting Your Solar Water Heating System Siting Your Solar Water Heating System Siting Your Solar Water Heating System May 30, 2012 - 2:46pm Addthis Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Before you buy and install a solar water heating system, you need to first consider your site's solar resource, as well as the optimal orientation and tilt of your solar collector. The efficiency and design of a solar water heating system depends on how much of the sun's energy reaches your building site. Solar water heating systems use both direct and diffuse solar radiation. Even if you don't live in a climate that's warm and sunny most of the time -- like the southwestern United States -- your site still might have an adequate solar resource. If your building site has unshaded areas and

134

DOE Solar Process Heat Program: FY1991 Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During fiscal year (FY) 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Process Heat Program implemented a Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies activity. For Program purposes, a prefeasibility study is an engineering assessment that investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a solar system for a specific application for a specific end-user. The study includes an assessment of institutional issues (e.g., financing, availability of insurance, etc.) that impact the feasibility of the proposed solar project. Solar process heat technology covers solar thermal energy systems (utilizing flat plate or concentrating solar Collectors) for water heating, water preheating, cooling/refrigeration, steam generation, ventilation air heating/preheating, etc. for applications in industry, commerce, and government. The studies are selected for funding through a competitive solicitation. For FY 1991, six projects were selected for funding. As of August 31, 1992, three teams had completed their studies. This paper describes the prefeasibility studies activity, presents the results from the study performed by United Solar Technologies, and summarizes the conclusions from the studies that have been completed to date and their implications for the Solar Process Heat Program.

Hewett, R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

New and Underutilized Technology: Solar Water Heating | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heating Solar Water Heating New and Underutilized Technology: Solar Water Heating October 7, 2013 - 9:02am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for solar water heating within the Federal sector. Benefits Solar water heating uses solar thermal collectors to heat water. Application Solar water heating is applicable in most building categories. Climate and Regional Considerations Solar water heating is best in regions with high insolation. Key Factors for Deployment The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 30% of hot water demand in new Federal buildings and major renovations to be met with solar water heating equipment providing it is life-cycle cost effective. Federal agencies must consider collector placement location to optimize

136

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems May 16, 2013 - 3:02pm Addthis Illustration of a solar water heater. Illustration of a solar water heater. Heat-transfer fluids carry heat through solar collectors and a heat exchanger to the heat storage tanks in solar water heating systems. When selecting a heat-transfer fluid, you and your solar heating contractor should consider the following criteria: Coefficient of expansion - the fractional change in length (or sometimes in volume, when specified) of a material for a unit change in temperature Viscosity - resistance of a liquid to sheer forces (and hence to flow) Thermal capacity - the ability of matter to store heat Freezing point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a

137

Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimate solar heat gains in the cooling and heatingof E891BN solar irradiance economic value of annual heatingglobal solar re?ectance, ? R summer , and that the heating

Levinson, Ronnen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

List of Solar Pool Heating Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating Incentives Heating Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 118 Solar Pool Heating Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 118) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive Michigan Commercial Industrial Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Microturbines Photovoltaics

139

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power Systemfor Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Powerin parabolic trough solar power technology. Journal of Solar

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Santa Clara Water & Sewer- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1975, the City of Santa Clara established the nation's first municipal solar utility. Under the Solar Water Heating Program, the Santa Clara Water & Sewer Utilities Department supplies,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Solar heat storages in district heating Klaus Ellehauge Thomas Engberg Pedersen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2007 . #12;#12;Solar heat storages in district heating networks July 2007 Klaus Ellehauge 97 22 11 tep@cowi.dk www.cowi.com #12;#12;Solar heat storages in district heating networks 5 in soil 28 5.3 Other experienced constructions: 30 6 Consequences of establishing solar heat in CHP areas

142

Solar heating demonstration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demonstration involved a 4-panel solar collector mounted on the industrial arts building. A 120 gallon storage tank supplements a 66 gallon electric hot water heater which supplies hot water for 5 shop wash basins, girl's and boy's lavatories, and a pressure washer in the auto shop. The installation and educational uses of the system are described. (MHR)

Bonicatto, L.; Kozak, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tida...

Jackson, Brian; Barnes, Rory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intended to characterize sun-facing solar equipment, whosebe tilted toward the sun to reduce solar incidence angle.zenith sun (AM1) reasonably approximates the solar position

Levinson, Ronnen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Transparent heat mirrors for passive solar heating applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress in the development of transparent heat mirror coatings for energy-efficient windows and passive solar applications is reviewed. It appears that cost-efficient coatings promising savings of 25 to 75%, depending upon application, may be available to window manufacturers and homeowners in the next one to three years. Performance, applications, and limitations are discussed.

Selkowitz, S.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Renewable energy technologies for federal facilities: Solar water heating  

SciTech Connect

This sheet presents information on solar water heaters (passive and active), solar collectors (flat plate, evacuated tube, parabolic trough), lists opportunities for use of solar water heating, and describes what is required and the costs. Important terms are defined.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo...

148

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Energy Efficiency '''''This program reopened on October 3, 2011 for 2012 applications. Funding is limited and must be reserved through online application before the installation of qualifying solar water heating systems. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/renewable/solarThermal.asp Solar Water Heating] web site for more information.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar Thermal Water Heating rebate to customers who install water heaters. This program started after the original pilot

149

KIUC - Solar Water Heating Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with zero-interest loans for solar water heating systems. The loan is available for installations of new systems, or to replace solar water heating systems that are over 15...

150

KIUC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

800 rebate for each solar water heating system installed. The rebate is available for installations of new systems, or to replace solar water heating systems that are over 15...

151

Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed: Solar Energy Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Heat Battery Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed Solar energy capture in chemical form makes it storable and transportable January 11, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry,...

153

Liquid Metal, a Heat Transport Fluid for High Temperature Solar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for high efficiency and direct heat conversion into hydrogen, process heat and energy storage pushes the temperature for solar concentrator systems.

154

THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially replaces some of the primary oxide cations with selected secondary cations. This causes a lattice charge imbalance and increases the anion vacancy density. Such vacancies enhance the ionic mass transport and lead to faster re-oxidation. Reoxidation fractions of Mn3O4 to Mn2O3 and CoO to Co3O4 were improved by up to 16 fold through the addition of a secondary oxide. However, no improvement was obtained in barium based mixed oxides. In addition to enhancing the short term re-oxidation kinetics, it was found that the use of mixed oxides also help to stabilize or even improve the TES properties after long term thermal cycling. Part of this improvement could be attributed to a reduced grain size in the mixed oxides. Based on the measurement results, manganese-iron, cobalt-aluminum and cobalt iron mixed oxides have been proposed for future engineering scale demonstration. Using the cobalt and manganese mixed oxides, we were able to demonstrate charge and discharge of the TES media in both a bench top fixed bed and a rotary kiln-moving bed reactor. Operations of the fixed bed configuration are straight forward but require a large mass flow rate and higher fluid temperature for charging. The rotary kiln makes direct solar irradiation possible and provides significantly better heat transfer, but designs to transport the TES oxide in and out of the reactor will need to be defined. The final reactor and system design will have to be based on the economics of the CSP plant. A materials compatibility study was also conducted and it identified Inconel 625 as a suitable high temperature engineering material to construct a reactor holding either cobalt or manganese mixed oxides. To assess the economics of such a CSP plant, a packed bed reactor model was established as a baseline. Measured cobalt-aluminum oxide reaction kinetics were applied to the model and the influences of bed properties and process parameters on the overall system design were investigated. The optimal TES system design was found to be a network of eight fixed bed reactors at 18.75 MWth each with charge and

PROJECT STAFF

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Solar collector and heat and cold generator  

SciTech Connect

This invention is directed to a collector designed and positioned for installations within a predetermined range of latitudes without modification of collector position, construction, or tracking the sun's movement, and comprises a generator of hot or cold fluid by solar energy collection during the day to heat the fluid and/or chilling of the fluid at nocturnal nighttime.

Risser, J.A.

1982-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

Prototype solar heating and hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a collection of two quarterly status reports from Colt, Inc., covering the period from October 1, 1977 through June 30, 1978. Colt is developing two prototype solar heating and hot water systems consisting of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, hot water, and auxiliary energy. The two systems are being installed at Yosemite, California and Pueblo, Colorado.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Inexpensive solar-wood water heating combinations  

SciTech Connect

A promising batch heater recently built and now being tested consists of lengths of eight-inch galvanized culvert pipe painted with semiselective black coating, hooked in series and tied in as part of a passive closed loop, unpressurized solar-wood water heating combination. One 10-foot length of eight-inch culvert contains 14.6 gallons of water. Eight-inch culvert provides a near optimum surface area per unit volume ratio, resulting in quicker, more efficient solar water heating. Moreover, the proposed arrangement minimizes the mixing of hot with cold water as warm water is used, often a problem with many types of batch heaters. Details for constructing this type of batch heater are provided. The system is an unpressurized, closed loop set-up, which means that the same liquid circulates continually from solar heater to wood heater to storage tank heat exchanger. The collector design is a variation on the inverted batch heater which takes its inspiration from a number of solar designers of similar units and introduces several additional measures to take advantage of the wood heating connection and to improve the design based on operating experience.

Poitras, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the simulation and the analysis of a solar flat plate collectors combined with a compression heat pump is carried out. The system suggested must ensure the heating of a building without the recourse to an auxiliary energy source in complement of this heating system. The system is used to heat a building using heating floor. The building considered is located in Constantine-East of Algeria (Latitude 36.28 N, Longitude 6.62 E, Altitude 689m). For the calculation, the month of February was chosen, which is considered as the coldest month according to the weather data of Constantine. The performances of this system were compared to the performances of the traditional solar heating system using solar collectors and an auxiliary heating load to compensate the deficit. In this case a traditional solar heating system having the same characteristics with regard to the solar collecting area and the volume of storage tank is used. It can be concluded that the space heating system using a solar energy combined with heat pump improve the thermal performance of the heat pump and the global system. The performances of the heating system combining heat pump and solar collectors are higher than that of solar heating system with solar collectors and storage tank. The heat pump assisted by solar energy can contribute to the conservation of conventional energy and can be competitive with the traditional systems of heating.

Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A collection of quarterly reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company covering the period July 12, 1976, through December 31, 1977, is presented. AiResearch Manufacturing Company is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25 and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Portable type solar heat cooker assembly  

SciTech Connect

A portable type solar heat cooker assembly including a cooking glass tube comprising an outer bottomed glass tube and an inner bottomed glass tube coated with a selective absorption film showing a high absorptivity in the solar radiation spectrum zone and a low absorptivity in the heat radiation spectrum zone. The inner tube is coaxially inserted into the outer tube and hermetically sealed together at their open ends, with a space therebetween being evacuated to vacuum. A case is provided to open on hinges and to receive the cooking glass tube at its central portion. A curved reflector is bisymmetrically provided on the case, which forms a reflex mirror for the solar rays when the case is opened. A tiltable stand attached to the outside of the case is provided to support the case in an inclined state.

Takeuchi, H.; Mikiya, T.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Progress Energy Carolinas - SunSense Commercial Solar Water Heating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fed. Government, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government, Nonprofit, Schools, State Government Eligible Technologies Solar Water Heat Active Incentive No Implementing...

162

Experimental Research of Sleeping Bed Integrated with PCM Heat Storage and Solar Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper puts forward a new way of using solar energy and Phase Change Material (PCM): the integration of PCM, sleeping bed and solar energy. The cavity of sleeping bed is filled with PCM. The sleeping bed is a heat storage device charged by solar ... Keywords: Solar heating, Sleeping bed, PCM heat storage

Guoqing Yu; Ji Qiang; Huizhong Zhao; Zonghu Lv

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Control system for solar heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A control system is being developed that will be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systems covering a wide range of configurations, and using different operating strategies that may be optimal for different climatic regions. To insure widespread applicability of the control system, it is being designed to allow for modification for operating with essentially all practical heating and cooling system configurations and control algorithms simply by interchange of replaceable modules in the circuitry. An experimental heating and cooling system, the main purpose of which is to allow testing and exercise of the controller, was designed so that it could be operated in these various configurations.

Wahlig, M.; Binnall, E.; Dols, C.; Graven, R.; Selph, F.; Shaw, R.; Simmons, M.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermosyphon heat exchangers are used in indirect solar water heating systems to avoid using a pump to circulate water from the storage tank to the heat exchanger. In this study, the authors consider the effect of heat exchanger design on system performance. They also compare performance of a system with thermosyphon flow to the same system with a 40W pump in the water loop. In the first part of the study, the authors consider the impact of heat exchanger design on the thermal performance of both one- and two-collector solar water heaters. The comparison is based on Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) OG300 simulations. The thermosyphon heat exchangers considered are (1) a one-pass, double wall, 0.22 m{sup 2}, four tube-in-shell heat exchanger manufactured by AAA Service and Supply, Inc., (the Quad-Rod); (2) a two-pass, double wall, 0.2 m{sup 2}, tube-in-shell made by Heliodyne, Inc., but not intended for commercial development; (3) a one-pass, single wall, 0.28 m{sup 2}, 31 tube-in-shell heat exchanger from Young Radiator Company, and (4) a one-pass single-wall, 0.61 m{sup 2}, four coil-in-shell heat exchanger made by ThermoDynamics Ltd. The authors compare performance of the systems with thermosyphon heat exchangers to a system with a 40 W pump used with the Quad-Rod heat exchanger. In the second part of the study, the effects of reducing frictional losses through the heat exchanger and/or the pipes connecting the heat exchanger to the storage tank, and increasing heat transfer area are evaluated in terms of OG300 ratings.

Davidson, J.; Liu, W.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

166

Solar heating and cooling. Research and development: project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Conservation and Solar Applications Solar Heating and Cooling Research and Development Program is described. The evolution of the R and D program is described and the present program is outlined. A series of project descriptions summarizes the research and development presently supported for further development of collectors, thermal energy storage and heat exchangers, heat pumps, solar cooling, controls, and systems. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Value of solar thermal industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Lakeland Electric - Solar Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakeland Electric - Solar Water Heating Program Lakeland Electric - Solar Water Heating Program Lakeland Electric - Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date June 2010 State Florida Program Type Other Incentive Provider Lakeland Electric Lakeland Electric, a municipal utility in Florida, is the nation's first utility to offer solar-heated domestic hot water on a "pay-for-energy" basis. The utility has contracted with a solar equipment vendor, Regenesis Lakeland, LLC, to install solar water heaters on participating customers' homes. Lakeland Electric bills the customer $34.95 per month regardless of use. Each solar heater is metered and equipped with a heating element timer as a demand management feature. The $34.95 monthly charge is a bulk energy

170

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Solar Water Heating Rebate | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tallahassee Utilities - Solar Water Heating Rebate Tallahassee Utilities - Solar Water Heating Rebate City of Tallahassee Utilities - Solar Water Heating Rebate < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 450 Provider City of Tallahassee Utilities The City of Tallahassee Utilities offers a $450 rebate to homeowners* and homebuilders who install a solar water-heating system. This rebate may be applied to a first-time installation or to the replacement of an older solar water-heating system. Homebuilders may also apply for the rebate when installing a solar water heater on a new home. Pool heating systems are not eligible for the rebate. The homeowner must allow the City of Tallahassee to conduct an energy audit

171

4240 Carson Street, Suite 102 Denver, CO 80239 www.sre3.com SOLAR ELECTRIC SOLAR WATER HEATING ENERGY AUDITS A/C & HEATING INSULATION LIGHTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4240 Carson Street, Suite 102 Denver, CO 80239 www.sre3.com SOLAR ELECTRIC SOLAR WATER HEATING for homeowners, businesses, and government entities that assist them in lowering utility bills, reducing a unique solutions approach based on the RE3 concept, which includes: · Review ­ current energy usage

Colorado at Boulder, University of

172

Introduction to solar heating and cooling design and sizing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is designed to introduce the practical aspects of solar heating/cooling systems to HVAC contractors, architects, engineers, and other interested individuals. It is intended to enable readers to assess potential solar heating/cooling applications in specific geographical areas, and includes tools necessary to do a preliminary design of the system and to analyze its economic benefits. The following are included: the case for solar energy; solar radiation and weather; passive solar design; system characteristics and selection; component performance criteria; determining solar system thermal performance and economic feasibility; requirements, availability, and applications of solar heating systems; and sources of additional information. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,900 Program Info Funding Source New Hampshire Renewable Energy Fund (REF) Start Date 04/21/2010 Expiration Date When funding is exhausted State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500, $1,700 or $1,900, depending on annual estimated system output Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission New Hampshire offers a rebate for residential solar water-heating systems and solar space-heating systems. The rebate is equal to $1,500 for systems with an annual estimated output of 5.5 MMBTU to 19.9 MMBTU; $1,700 for

174

Thermoeconomic Analysis of a Solar Heat-Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a solar energy heat-pump system and analyzes the thermoeconomics. The results show that the solar energy heat-pump system can be operated in different modes and used for room heating in winter and cooling in summer and/or heating a hot water supply. The results also show that the efficiency of the system's components and how the investment costs greatly affect the wide acceptability and use of the system. Solar energy is clean and renewable and having not to pay the solar energy costs, the solar energy heat-pump system is still attractive and will have a large market.

Gao, Y.; Wang, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Beaches Energy Services - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beaches Energy Services - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Beaches Energy Services - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Beaches Energy Services - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate One rebate per customer Rebates will not exceed purchase price Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solar Water Heater: $500 Provider Beaches Energy Services Beaches Energy Services offers a solar water heating rebate to their residential customers. This $500 rebate applies to new systems which are properly installed and certified. New construction and solar pool heating systems do not qualify for the rebate payment. Systems must be installed by a licensed Florida contractor and must be FSEC certified. Rebates will not

176

Sustainable Heat Power Europe GmbH formerly Solar Heat Power Europe GmbH |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Power Europe GmbH formerly Solar Heat Power Europe GmbH Heat Power Europe GmbH formerly Solar Heat Power Europe GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Heat & Power Europe GmbH (formerly Solar Heat & Power Europe GmbH) Place Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany Sector Solar Product Engineering company involved in the project development, design and construction of solar thermal, PV and biogas power plants. References Sustainable Heat & Power Europe GmbH (formerly Solar Heat & Power Europe GmbH)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sustainable Heat & Power Europe GmbH (formerly Solar Heat & Power Europe GmbH) is a company located in Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany .

177

A new paradigm for solar coronal heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar coronal heating problem refers to the question why the temperature of the Sun's corona is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of its surface. Almost 70 years after the discovery, this puzzle is still one of the major challenges in astrophysics. The current basic paradigm of coronal heating is unable to explain all the observational features of the heating. Here we argue that a new paradigm is required to solve the puzzle in a self-consistent manner. The alternative approach is based on the kinetic theory of drift waves. We show, with qualitative and quantitative arguments, that the drift waves have the potential to satisfy all coronal heating requirements.

Vranjes, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

AWSWAH - the heat pipe solar water heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all weather heat pipe solar water heater (AWSWAH) comprising a collector of 4 m/sup 2/ (43 ft/sup 2/) and a low profile water tank of 160 liters (42 gal.) was developed. A single heat pipe consisting of 30 risers and two manifolds in the evaporator and a spiral condenser was incorporated into the AWSWAH. Condensate metering was done by synthetic fiber wicks. The AWSWAH was tested alongside two conventional solar water heaters of identical dimensions, an open loop system and a closed loop system. It was found that the AWSWAH was an average of 50% more effective than the open system in the temperature range 30-90 /sup 0/C (86-194 /sup 0/F). The closed loop system was the least efficient of the three systems.

Akyurt, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs March 1, 2010 - 4:34am Addthis Using SiGen's new cutting process, less material is wasted in creating solar products like this, a breakthrough that is expected to help make solar power more affordable. | Photo courtesy SiGen Using SiGen's new cutting process, less material is wasted in creating solar products like this, a breakthrough that is expected to help make solar power more affordable. | Photo courtesy SiGen Joshua DeLung Silicon Genesis is a San Jose, Calif., company that is advancing the field of solar energy by developing a process that will virtually eliminate all waste when cutting materials needed to implement solar technology.

180

CONTROLS FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING  

SciTech Connect

An experimental test facility for solar heating and cooling has been constructed to evaluate the operation and performance of an LBLdeveloped solar controller that has promising commercial potential. The LBL controller was designed to be intermediate in performance between a simple differential thermostat and an on-line microprocessor. The PROM~based controller operates the solar system according to a preprogrammed algorithm that translates operating state conditions (fluid temperatures, switch positions, comparator outputs) into a set of operating instructions (open or close valves, turn pumps on or off). The operating algorithm can be changed by reprogramming or exchanging the plug-in integrated circuit component, or by changing the sensors selected for comparison. The experimental solar heating system can be operated using different control algorithms, input meteorological conditions, and output load demands. In FY 1979 the test facility became operational and initial testing began. Emphasis has been on refinement of system instrumentation and the development of necessary computer software to run the facility and perform data analysis. Preliminary energy balance experiments with the load and collector loops under microcomputer control were successfully completed in November 1979. Experiment modifications have been completed to permit variable-flow and proportional-flow control of the collector loop. A series of experimental comparisons of proportional and on/off collector loop strategies are planned using typical meteorological year data. The evaluation of configurations for combined domestic hot water and heating systems has begun to determine necessary experiment modifications to test one and two tank domestic hot water systems in combination with hydronic space heating systems. Other work has included the application of theoretical models to describe dynamic collector operation and building temperature response. Theoretical analysis of the energy collection performance of on/off and proportional flow control collector loop strategies has been completed. Papers have been presented at the Second System Simulation and Economics Conference held in January 1980 in San Diego. Technical program support activities, in cooperation with SERI and SAN, are continuing.

Warren, Mashuri L.; Schiller, Steven R.; Wahlig, Michael

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Passive vapor transport solar heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage with Embedded Heat Pipes for Concentrating Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An innovative, novel concept of combining heat pipes with latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications is explored. The… (more)

Robak, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Residential solar heating at no cost to the homeowner  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a method making solar heating economically desireable by choosing the types of systems and levels of fuel savings that permit a well-designed simple system to be installed with no cash outlay on the part of the homeowner and no increase in the cash flow experienced. In some cases, the cash flow may actually be reduced. The method assists installers in determining where efforts can most profitably be placed and suggests that they are a part of the overall financing scheme, since they can frequently locate the proper lending agency to finance the projects. Limited experience has already shown the methods herein described to be useful. Solar heating should increase in importance as more installers employ the suggested methods of selecting installations and of financing them.

Newton, A.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications November 1, 2011 Tweet EmailPrint The current levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from concentrated solar power (CSP) is ~ $0.11/kWh. The U.S. Department of Energy has set goals to reduce this cost to ~$0.07/kWh with 6 hours of storage by 2015 and to ~$0.05/kWh with 16 hours of storage by 2020. To help meet these goals, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory are working to improve the overall CSP plant efficiency by enhancing the thermophysical properties of heat transfer

186

EWEB - Residential Solar Water Heating Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EWEB - Residential Solar Water Heating Loan Program EWEB - Residential Solar Water Heating Loan Program EWEB - Residential Solar Water Heating Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate $7,000 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Up to 75% of system cost after rebate Provider Eugene Water and Electric Board Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) offers residential customers a loan and cash discount program called, "The Bright Way To Heat Water." The program is designed to promote the installation of solar water heaters and solar pool heating systems. It began in May 1990 as part of a demand-side management initiative. The loans have been offered since May 1995. EWEB provides all funding for both loans and cash discounts. Customers may

187

Solar Water Heating Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heating Incentive Program Solar Water Heating Incentive Program Solar Water Heating Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies by sector, location, technology, and electric or gas provider; see below for details Program Info Start Date October 2003 State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by sector, water heating fuel, and electric or gas provider; see below for details Provider Energy Trust of Oregon Beginning in the fall of 2003, Energy Trust of Oregon's Solar Water Heating (SWH) Incentive Program offers incentives to customers of Pacific Power, PGE, NW Natural Gas and Cascade Natural Gas who install solar water or pool

188

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of telegraph services - Once per 500 years (ice cores) - Solar-terrestrial connection - Interplanetary space of radiators - Dust environment - Cp/Cg problems - Solar panels and power #12;Solar Probe Plus 2018 launch 35Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric dark energy problem Stuart D. Bale

191

South River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

South River Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is providing rebates to encourage their customers to install solar water heating systems. To be eligible for the rebate solar collectors must have...

192

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Maternal and Infant Mortality with a Solar Suitcase: The Power to Save Lives Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Hal Aronson Karina Garbesi Laura Stachel Date: February 23,...

193

NREL: News - NREL Releases New Roadmap to Reducing Solar PV ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

113 NREL Releases New Roadmap to Reducing Solar PV "Soft Costs" by 2020 September 25, 2013 The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently issued...

194

Biomass processing and solar process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which biomass can supply useful energy depends on the available integrated solar flux density over the year, the photosynthesis yield, the harvest factor, the energy gain, and the conversion efficiency of biomass into the desired energy carrier. Using these factors, an equation is presented to determine the area required for a given annual demand. In particular, the production of ethanol from biomass is considered, based on recent data from the national alcohol program Proalcool in Brazil. Finally, an estimate is given how solar process heat can improve the yield of alcohol or provide other base material for the chemical industry such as ethylene and synthesis gas from biomass. 9 references, 4 tables.

Sizmann, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

All Green Residential Solar Energy to Heat Absorption Cooling / Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all-green residential solar to heat absorption cooling / heating system system is designed. It describes the components of the system and working principle, and analyze the prospects of the system and academic value. Finally, To Changsha, for example, ... Keywords: solar, ground-source heat pump, absorption, heat tube

Xu Feng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Design and operation of solar thermal heat transfer systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of heat transfer systems in the collection and use of solar energy is discussed. The success or failure of many solar energy systems has been determined by the design of the heat transfer system. This report includes a short summary of some of the DOE sponsored solar industrial process heat sites. From the design, construction, and operation of these systems many lessons were learned which will be important to designers and potential users of solar thermal systems. Also included is a discussion of solar collector foundation over-design that has increased the collector system costs.

Rush, E.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Boiler efficiency methodology for solar heat applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of boiler efficiency measurements which can be applied to evaluate the performance of steam-generating boilers via both the direct and indirect methods. This methodology was written to assist industries in calculating the boiler efficiency for determining the applicability and value of thermal industrial heat, as part of the efforts of the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) funded by Sandia National Laboratories. Tables of combustion efficiencies are enclosed as functions of stack temperatures and the amount of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the gas stream.

Maples, D.; Conwell, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Boiler Efficiency Inst.; Pacheco, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Experimental Research of an Active Solar Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Solar is an abundant renewable energy, which is used more and more frequently with the emphasis on environment protection, especially in building heating. The different devised methods between an active solar heating system and normal heating system are discussed in this paper. Based on the design, construction, testing and economic analysis of a demonstration project with the solar heating system, this paper discusses how to connect the solar energy collector with the electricity heater and heating system in order to achieve the best state of comfort and energy savings. The real cost of running is calculated and compared with that of other heating methods. The traits and the scope of applications of the solar heating system and the problems in designing, installing and operating are indicated in this paper.

Gao, X.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Impact of Heat Transfer Media on Materials for Concentrated Solar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impact of Heat Transfer Media on Materials for Concentrated Solar Power. Author(s), Dane Wilson. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Dane Wilson.

200

Scaling law for the heating of solar coronal loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report preliminary results from a series of numerical simulations of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations, used to describe the dynamics of magnetic loops in active regions of the solar corona. A stationary velocity field is applied at the photospheric boundaries to imitate the driving action of granule motions. A turbulent stationary regime is reached, characterized by a broadband power spectrum $E_k\\simeq k^{-3/2}$ and heating rate levels compatible with the heating requirements of active region loops. A dimensional analysis of the equations indicates that their solutions are determined by two dimensionless parameters: the Reynolds number and the ratio between the Alfven time and the photospheric turnover time. From a series of simulations for different values of this ratio, we determine how the heating rate scales with the physical parameters of the problem, which might be useful for an observational test of this model.

Pablo Dmitruk; Daniel Gomez

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

202

The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Forman, Miriam A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Arizona Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Maricopa Association of Governments In an effort to promote uniformity, the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) approved standard procedures for securing necessary electrical/building permits for residential (single-family) and commercial PV systems. These procedures are a part of the MAG Building Code Standards. The standards address requirements for the solar installation, plans,

204

Solar heating system final design package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary Systems has taken its Series V Solar Heating System and developed it to a degree acceptable by local codes and regulatory agencies. The system is composed of the Series V warm air collector, the LCU-110 logic control unit and the USU-A universal switching and transport unit. The collector was originally conceived and designed as an integrated roof/wall system and provides a dual function in the structure. The collector serves both as a solar energy conversion system and as a structural weather resistant skin. The collector can be fabricated in any length from 12 to 24 feet. This provides maximum flexibility in design and installation. The LCU-110 control unit provides totally automatic control over the operation of the system. It receives input data from sensor probes in collectors, storage and living space. The logic is designed so as to make maximum use of solar energy and minimize use of conventional energy. The USU-A transport and switching unit is a high-efficiency air-handling system equipped with gear motor valves that respond to outputs from the control system. The fan unit is designed for maximum durability and efficiency in operation, and has permanently lubricated ball bearings and excellent air-handling efficiency.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Experimental performance of solid-gas chemical heat pump in solar chemical heat pump dryer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer has been designed, fabricated and tested. The performance of the system has been studied under the meteorological conditions of Malaysia. The system consists of four mean components: solar collector (evacuated ... Keywords: coefficient of performance, drying, energy density, evacuated tubes solar collector, reactor temperature, solid gas chemical heat pump

M. Ibrahim; K. Sopian; A. S. Hussein; W. R. W. Daud; A. Zaharim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Economics of the attached solar greenhouse for home heating  

SciTech Connect

For several years, passive solar heating has been considered to be very attractive (economically and otherwise) for home heating in the U.S. Unfortunately passive systems are not as easily analyzed as active systems from an engineering and economic performance point of view. This problem is addressed, and an economic assessment of the solar greenhouse is given. Using simple heat balance analysis, a greenhouse performance model is developed for assessing heat available for home space conditioning from an add-on solar greenhouse. This forms the basis for an engineering-economic model for assessing the economic viability of the add-on solar greenhouse for home heating. Model variables include climatic factors, local costs, alternate fuels and system size. This model is then used to examine several locations in the U.S. for the economic attractiveness of the add-on solar greenhouse for space heating.

Kolstad, C.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Valley Electric Association - Solar Water Heating Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Valley Electric Association - Solar Water Heating Program Valley Electric Association - Solar Water Heating Program Valley Electric Association - Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Loan Program Provider Valley Electric Association Valley Electric Association (VEA), a nonprofit member owned cooperative, developed the domestic solar water heating program to encourage energy efficiency at the request of the membership. VEA partnered with Great Basin College to train and certify installers, creating jobs in the community, and also with Rheem Manufacturing and a local licensed contractor to install the units. A site visit is performed to determine the best installation and system design for each member. Members have the option of

208

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

209

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date 11/30/2009 Expiration Date 03/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $286/system Provider Duquesne Light Company Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a flat rebate of $286 per qualifying system. Various equipment, installation, contractor, and warranty requirements apply, as summarized above and described in more detail in program documents. Customers must

210

Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $450 Rebates must not exceed purchase price Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $450 per system Provider City of Lake Worth Utilities The City of Lake Worth Utilities (CLWU), in conjunction with Florida Municipal Power Agency, offers rebates to customers who purchase and install a solar water heating system for residential use. A rebate of $450 per system is available to eligible applicants. Eligible equipment must be located on customer premises within the CLWU service territory, and must

211

Experiment System Analysis of an Indirect Expansion Solar Assisted Water Source Heat Pump Radiant Floor Heating System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar assisted water source heat pump for Radiant Floor Heating (SWHP-RFH) experimental system with heat pipe vacuum tube solar collector as heating source and radiant floor as terminal device is proposed in the paper. The Mathematics Model of dynamic ... Keywords: solar energy, water source heat pump, radiant floor heating systems, system dynamic COP

Qu Shilin; Ma Fei; Liu Li; Yue Jie

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling of Performance, Cost, and Financing of Concentrating Solar, Photovoltaic, and Solar Heat Systems (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 in Boulder, Colorado, discusses the modeling, performance, cost, and financing of concentrating solar, photovoltaic, and solar heat systems.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christiansen, C.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Glass-heat-pipe evacuated-tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, R.D.; VanSant, J.H.

1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Heating remote rooms in passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote rooms can be effectively heated by convection through a connecting doorway. A simple steady-state equation is developed for design purposes. Validation of a dynamic model is achieved using data obtained over a 13-day period. Dynamic effects are investigated using a simulation analysis for three different cases of driving temperature; the effect is to reduce the temperature difference between the driving room and the remote room compared to the steady-state model. For large temperature swings in the driving room a strategy which uses the intervening door in a diode mode is effective. The importance of heat-storing mass in the remote room is investigated.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

TRNSYS simulation of solar water heating system in Iraq  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to model and verify a direct solar water heating system in Baghdad, Iraq using TRNSYS software to meet the demand of hot water for 25 persons. This is achieved by using 10 m2 of a flat plate collector and 600 ... Keywords: Baghdad-Iraq, TRNSYS, solar, water heating

M. N. Mohammed; M. A. Alghoul; Kh. Abulqasem; Alshrif. Mustafa; Kh. Glaisa; P. Ooshaksaraei; M. Yahya; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solar heating of buildings and domestic hot water  

SciTech Connect

Design criteria and cost analysis methods are presented for the sizing and justification of solar heat collectors for augmentation of potable water heaters and space heaters. Sufficient information is presented to enable engineers to design solar space and water heating systems or conduct basic feasibility studies preparatory to design of large installations. Both retrofit and new installations are considered. (WDM)

Beck, E.J. Jr.; Field, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Active space heating and hot water supply with solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic assessments are given of solar water heaters, both circulating, and of air-based and liquid-based solar space heating systems. Both new and retrofit systems are considered. The technical status of flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors and of thermal storage is also covered. Non-technical factors are also briefly discussed, including the participants in the use of solar heat, incentives and deterrents. Policy implications are considered as regards acceleration of solar use, goals for solar use, means for achieving goals, and interaction of governments, suppliers, and users. Government actions are recommended. (LEW)

Karaki, S.; Loef, G. O.G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a typical h"ydronic solar heating system for differentlarger by the active solar heating system. its, Schiller,Klein, and J, A. Duffie, "Solar Heating Design", (New York:

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DRAFT INTERIM REPORT: NATIONAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR PASSIVE AND HYBRID SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Involvement in Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Section C:performance of passive solar heating and cooling systems.the design of passive solar heating and cooling systems, J

Authors, Various

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

RESIDENTIAL ON SITE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS: A PROJECT EVALUATION USING THE CAPITAL ASSET PRICING MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of an On Site Solar Heating System. CML w c6782 Residential On"Site Solar Heating Systems: A ·p-r~jectof an On Site Solar Heating System. Representation of

Schutz, Stephen Richard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. [43] WHOembody a stand-alone solar heating system. It is assumedrecent growth in solar-thermal heating (Weiss et al. [42]),

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DETAILED LOOP MODEL (DLM) ANALYSIS OF LIQUID SOLAR THERMOSIPHONS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n s of the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling Research anof a Thermic Diode Solar Heating System, 11 presented theof Materials Used in Solar Heating and Cooling (SHAC)

Mertol, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PROGRAM SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BRANCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'6782 Program Support for Solar Heating and Marlo Martin andPROGRAN SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine the building response to the solar heating system.on building comfort of an active solar heating system wherethe building response to a typical h"ydronic solar heating

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Entergy New Orleans - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy New Orleans - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Entergy New Orleans - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Louisiana) Entergy New Orleans - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential Solutions: $1000/improvement Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State Louisiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount kWh savings(annual) x $0.34/kWh Provider Energy Smart Solutions Center Entergy New Orleans offers a Solar Water Heater Rebate pilot program designed to help residential customers make energy efficiency improvements. Rebates will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis and reflected on the invoice as a discount. All systems must be OG 300 rated and incentive amount is based on kWh savings. Walk-through energy assessments

227

High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

Cameron, C.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

None,

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the incident solar spectrum but must also have a highH I I \\j 6000 0 K solar spectrum I ! >.o .AA l--- visible

Selkowitz, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Comparison of heat transfer in solar collectors with heat pipe versus flow through absorbers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of heat transfer in solar collectors with heat pipe absorbers is compared to that for collectors with flow through absorbers. Both pumped and thermosiphon systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids are discussed. In these applications the heat pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat pipe condenser and system manifold. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow through absorber.

Hull, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Rules of thumb for passive solar heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rules of thumb are given for passive solar systems for: (1) sizing solar glazing for 219 cities, (2) sizing thermal storage mass, and (3) building orientation.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Performance comparison between air and liquid residential solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of system performance for the flat plate liquid-heating system in CSU Solar House I, the evacuated-tube collector system in Solar House I, and the flat plate air-heating system in CSU Solar House II are described for selected months of the 1976 and 1977 heating seasons. Only space and domestic water heating data are compared. The flat plate air- and liquid-heating collectors operating with complete heating systems have nearly equal efficiencies when based upon solar flux while the collector fluids are flowing, but approximately 40% more energy is collected during a heating season with the air-heating system because the air system operates over a longer period of the day. On the basis of short-term data, the evacuated tube collector array on Solar House I is about 27% more efficient than the flat plate air-heating collector array on Solar House II based on gross roof area occupied by the collectors and manifolds.

Karaki, S.; Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

234

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

235

Heat pipe dynamics. Final report, April 30, 1981. [Uses of heat pipe, especially in solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A heat-pipe flat plate solar collector is constructed like a typical flat plate collector with the exception that individual heat pipes are attached to the collector surface to transfer collected heat via a phase change from collector surface into an attached jacket containing a phase change material. The efficiency of such a collector was measured roughly. Also briefly described are: a heat-pipe heat exchanger, heat-pipe heat exchanger freeze proofing, heat-pipe attic ventilation, transfer of light bulb heat via a heat pipe to heat water, heat recovery via heat pipe, cooling of oil in engines and transmissions via heat pipe, a tracking reflector, automatic sun tracker, single-stroke vacuum pump for heat-pipe manufacture, and heat pipe heat transfer from rock bed. (LEW)

Norman, R.M. Sr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Commercial building unitary heat pump system with solar heating. Final report, May 1, 1976--October 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A generalized dynamic computer program (SYRSOL) has been developed for the mathematical simulation of the thermal behavior of multi-zone solar heated buildings. The system modeled employs a series of water-to-air heat pumps connected in a closed loop, flat-plate liquid cooled solar collector, a water storage tank, and a cooling tower. Weather data are represented by sinusoids, which provide a convenient and economical alternative to weather tapes. Results indicate that the use of sinusoidal functions for temperature and monthly average values for cloud cover is quite realistic and accurate. Temperature functions for thirteen cities are presented. A preliminary analysis has been done of the feasibility of using solar-energized desiccant dehumidification systems to reduce summer cooling loads. Service hot water production using a water-to-water heat pump from the storage tank is shown to be highly effective and idle solar collectors can be used directly to make service hot water in the summer. A new mathematical heat pump heating model, in which the COP increases linearly with the source water temperature, has been developed and incorporated into SYRSOL. The computer simulation capability has been extended from a heating season to an entire year. The results of some experiments, that have improved the COP of a heat pump, are also reported.

Drucker, E.E.; Ucar, M.; LaGraff, J.E.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,500 or 50% of installed cost; $2,000 for systems purchased by 12/31/13 Program Info Funding Source LIPA Efficiency Long Island Program Start Date December 2010 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $20 per kBTU (based on SRCC collector rating) Bonus Incentive for systems purchased by 12/31/13: 2 Collector system: $500 bonus rebate 1 Collector system: $250 bonus rebate Provider Long Island Power Authority '''''Note: For system purchased by December 31, 2013, LIPA is providing a

238

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development: quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences, multiple-family residences and commercial applications. This document describes the progress of the program during the fifth program quarter, 1 July 1977 to 30 September 1977.

Not Available

1977-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development: quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress of the program for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test is described for the period, 1 January 1978 through 31 March 1978. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences, multiple-family residences, and commercial applications.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Manual for participants in the solar heating/cooling seminars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was intended as a text for participants in the Solar Heating/Cooling seminars presented in conjunction with the ERDA Transportable Solar Laboratory in various regions of the US. The seminar was designed to introduce the practical aspects of solar heating/cooling systems to HVAC contractors, architects, engineers, and other interested individuals. The two-day course enabled the attendees to assess potential solar applications in their geographic area, including tools to do a preliminary design of the system and to analyze its economic benefits. (WDM)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modelling and simulation of elements for solar heating and daylighting  

SciTech Connect

Through the development of highly efficient transparent insulation materials (TIM), new opportunities are appearing in the field of daylighting and passive solar space heating. The simulation program WANDSIM, developed at the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), models the dynamic performance of three important elements for daylighting and passive solar space heating; window glazing; transparently insulated masonry; transparently insulated glass wall. Selected simulation results of each type are represented and compared under thermal and daylighting aspects. The advantages of the transparently insulated glass wall, a new combined passive space heating and daylighting system, in economy and comfort are verified.

Wilke, W.S.; Schmid, J. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Solare Energiesysteme, Freiburg (West Germany))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measuring solar reflectance - Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective ''cool colored'' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland US latitudes, this metric R{sub E891BN} can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear sky air mass one global horizontal (''AM1GH'') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. (author)

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul [Heat Island Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Active solar heating-and-cooling system-development projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) projects with industry and academic institutions directed toward the development of cost effective, reliable, and publically acceptable active solar heating and cooling systems are presented. A major emphasis of the program is to insure that the information derived from these projects is made available to all members of the solar community who will benefit from such knowledge. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief summary of each of the 214 projects that were active during Fiscal Year 1980, and to provide sufficient information to allow the reader to acquire further details on specific projects. For clarity and convenience, projects are organized by either the program element or technology group as follows: (1) Program elements - Rankine Solar Cooling Systems; Absorption Solar Cooling Systems; Desiccant Solar Cooling Systems; Solar Space Heating Systems; Solar Hot Water Systems; Special Projects; and (2) Technology Groups - Solar Collector Technology; Solar Storage Technology; Solar Controls Technology; Solar Analysis Technology; and Solar Materials Technology. For further convenience, this book contains three indices of contracts, with listings by (1) organization, (2) contract number and (3) state where the project is performed. A brief glossary of terms used is also included at the end of the book.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of heat Heat exchangers between the collectors andlocated access hole. The heat exchanger for the domestic hotmains is preheated by a heat exchanger immersed in the main

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Passive thermosyphon solar heating and cooling module with supplementary heating. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of three quarterly reports from Sigma Research, Inc., covering progress and status from January through September 1977. Sigma Research is developing and delivering three heat exchangers for use in a solar heating and cooling system for installation into single-family dwellings. Each exchanger consists of one heating and cooling module and one submersed electric water heating element.

Not Available

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparative performance of solar heating systems in the national solar data network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). The NSDN consists of instrumented solar energy systems in buildings selected as part of the National Solar Heating and Demonstration Program. For the past five years data has been obtained on a 24-hour basis. The purpose of the NSDN is to assist in the development of solar technologies for buildings by providing data and information on the effectiveness of particular solar technologies and the areas of improvement. This paper presents the most recent composite results of analysis performed by Vitro Laboratories of solar space heating data for active sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). The results presented have been developed on the basis of analysis of instrumented sites maintained through the 1981-1982 heating season.

Rossi, S.M.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solar Water Heating Requirement for New Residential Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Requirement for New Residential Construction Water Heating Requirement for New Residential Construction Solar Water Heating Requirement for New Residential Construction < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Hawaii Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism In June 2008, Hawaii enacted legislation, [http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2008/bills/SB644_CD1_.htm SB 644], with the intent to require solar water-heating (SWH) systems to be installed on all single-family new home construction, with a few exceptions. This legislation had several errors that were corrected by legislation passed during the 2009 legislative session. In June 2009, HB 1464 was signed by the governor and addressed the errors in the previous

248

The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence of residential solar water heating on electric utility demand. The electric demand of solar water hears was found to be approximately 0.39 kW lass than conventional electric water heaters during the late late afternoon, early evening period in the summer months when the Austin utility experiences its peak demand. The annual load factor would be only very slightly reduced if there were a major penetration of solar water heaters in the all electric housing sector. Thus solar water heating represents beneficial load management for utilities experiencing summer peaks.

Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed: Solar Energy Capture in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Heat Rechargeable Heat Battery Rechargeable Heat Battery's Secret Revealed Solar energy capture in chemical form makes it storable and transportable January 11, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry, Energy Technologies, Franklin Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 6008 2011-01-11-Heat-Battery.jpg A molecule of fulvalene diruthenium, seen in diagram, changes its configuration when it absorbs heat, and later releases heat when it snaps back to its original shape. Image: Jeffrey Grossman Broadly speaking, there have been two approaches to capturing the sun's energy: photovoltaics, which turn the sunlight into electricity, or solar-thermal systems, which concentrate the sun's heat and use it to boil water to turn a turbine, or use the heat directly for hot water or home

250

Designing passive solar buildings to reduce temperature swings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Control of temperature swings is a major consideration in design of passive solar heated buildings - especially so as the designer seeks to achieve most of the building heat from the sun. Observations of temperature swings in several passive buildings are cited. Methods of temperature control are discussed, both by means of control intervention such as using of auxiliary backup heating, ventilation, and blowers, and by means of building design. The design approach is preferred as the main course with the intervention techniques used for fine tuning.

Balcomb, D.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of system cost Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $15.00/therm Provider Southwest Gas Corporation '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southwest Gas is no longer accepting applications for the current program year. Systems installed during the current program year will not be eligible for a rebate in the next program

252

Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Template Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D Kate Hudon National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kate.hudon@nrel.gov 303-275-3190 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office...

253

Ocala Utility Services - Solar Hot Water Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Ocala Utility Services - Solar Hot Water Heating Rebate Program Ocala Utility Services - Solar Hot Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate One rebate per account Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $450 per system Provider Ocala Utility Services The Solar Water Heater Rebate Program is offered to residential retail electric customers by the City of Ocala Utility Services. Interested customers must complete an application and receive approval from the Ocala Utility Services before installing equipment. The application can be found on the [http://www.ocalafl.org/COO3.aspx?id=947 program web site.] The system must be installed by a licensed Florida contractor on the customer's

254

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: 30% of system cost or $3,000, whichever is less Small Commercial: 30% of system cost or $7,500, whichever is less Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County Facilities: 50% of system cost or $30,000, whichever is less Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential and Small Business: $14.50 per therm Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County

255

GreyStone Power- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative serving 103,000 customers in Georgia, introduced a solar water heating rebate in March 2009. This $500 rebate is available to customers regardless of...

256

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power Speaker(s): Zack Norwood Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will examine the potential for the mild...

257

Conserving Energy and Heating Your Swimming Pools with Solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measures (see table on page 2). Conserving Energy and Heating Your Swimming Pool with Solar Energy CLEARINGHOUSE ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY T O F E N E R G Y D E P...

258

High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation UCLA, UCB, Yale Award Number: DE-EE0005941 | January 9, 2013 | Sungtaek Ju 1.1 Thermochemistry modeling Identified promising...

259

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

260

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program (Idaho)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Restaurateur designs and installs passive solar heating/cooling system  

SciTech Connect

An example of the use of passive solar heating and cooling systems by a Wisconsin restaurateur is discussed. The greenhouse effect is used on three sides of the restaurant's exterior walls. A dozen water-to-air electric heat pumps handle the restaurant's heating and cooling chores. The system doesn't require any fossil fuel for heating or cooling.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating systems. The analysis was made without site specific ata other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include systeem candidates, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and coolin systems for installation and operational test. Two-heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multi-Family Residences (MFR) and commercial applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multiple-Family Residences (MFR), and commerical applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Proceedings of the solar industrial process heat symposium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the symposium was to review the progress of various solar energy systems currently under design for supplying industrial process heat. Formal presentations consisted of a review of solar energy applications in industrial process heat as well as several on-going project reviews. An Open Forum was held to solicit the comments of the participants. The recommendations of this Open Forum are included in these proceedings. Eighteen papers were included. Separate abstracts were prepared for each paper.

none,

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Passive-Solar-Heating Analysis: a new ASHRAE manual  

SciTech Connect

The forthcoming ASHRAE book, Passive Solar Heating Analysis, is described. ASHRAE approval procedures are discussed. An overview of the contents is given. The development of the solar load ratio correlations is described, and the applicability of the analysis method is discussed.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Parabolic-Trough Solar Water Heating--FTA, 022798m FTA trough...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parabolic-Trough Solar Water Heating--FTA, 022798m FTA trough Parabolic-Trough Solar Water Heating--FTA, 022798m FTA trough Federal Technology Alert covers parabolic-trough solar...

267

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to create the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Thermal Low-Income program for single and multifamily residential...

268

Case for utility involvement in solar-domestic water heating  

SciTech Connect

Credibility of system performance over an extended period of time is still a major concern for prospective buyers of solar-collector systems. Although Congress has enacted solar legislation with the intention of assisting homeowners in the adoption of solar energy, it apparently did not consider which organizational entities could best address the concerns of the consumer and accelerate the adoption of solar energy for domestic hot water heating. This article points out that legislation which does not encourage full participation by utilities in the marketing of solar energy has produced very low adoption rates compared to the size of the solar market potential. It also describes some of the empirical results of one utility company's efforts with a large-scale solar demonstration program, and presents some findings for the investor-owned utility industry to consider before Congress takes additional legislative action in this area. 11 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Smackey, B.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-Family Low-Income: $3,750 Multi-Family Low-Income: $500,000 Program Info Funding Source Ratepayer Funds Start Date 3/29/2012 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Step 1 Incentive Rates (contact utility to determine current incentive levels): Single-Family Low-Income: $25.64 per therm displaced Multi-Family Low-Income: $19.23 per therm displaced The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to

270

Solar-assisted heat pump system for cost-effective space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of heat pumps for the utilization of solar energy is studied. Two requirements for a cost-effective system are identified: (1) a special heat pump whose coefficient of performance continues to rise with source temperature over the entire range appropriate for solar assist, and (2) a low-cost collection and storage subsystem able to supply solar energy to the heat pump efficiently at low temperatures. Programs leading to the development of these components are discussed. A solar assisted heat pump system using these components is simulated via a computer, and the results of the simulation are used as the basis for a cost comparison of the proposed system with other solar and conventional systems.

Andrews, J W; Kush, E A; Metz, P D

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair May 30, 2012 - 2:35pm Addthis Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar energy systems require periodic inspections and routine maintenance to keep them operating efficiently. Also, from time to time, components may need repair or replacement. You should also take steps to prevent scaling, corrosion, and freezing. You might be able to handle some of the inspections and maintenance tasks on your own, but others may require a qualified technician. Ask for a cost estimate in writing before having any work done. For some systems, it may

272

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Solar Water Heating FTA, 024922m FTA solwat heat.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Technology Alert A series of energy efficient technology guides prepared by the New Technology Demonstration Program Solar Water Heating Well-Proven Technology Pays Off in Several Situations Solar water heating is a well-proven and readily available technology that directly substitutes renewable energy for conventional water heating. This Federal Technology Alert (FTA) of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), one of a series on new energy- efficient technologies and renewable energy technologies, describes the various types of solar water heating systems, the situations in which solar water heating is likely to be cost- effective, considerations in selecting and designing a system, and basic steps for installing a system. There are a variety of different types

274

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation October 3, 2008 - 11:09am Addthis John Lippert If you pay your own energy bills, you don't need to be reminded that energy prices are escalating. Energy price projections for this coming winter are not encouraging. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential natural gas prices during the upcoming heating season (October though March) are projected to average $14.93 per Mcf, an increase of about 17% compared to last year's heating season. Residential heating oil prices are projected to average $4.13 per gallon this winter, an increase of about 25%. What if you live in an all-electric house? Many utilities are continuing to pursue retail electricity rate increases in response to power generation

275

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation October 3, 2008 - 11:09am Addthis John Lippert If you pay your own energy bills, you don't need to be reminded that energy prices are escalating. Energy price projections for this coming winter are not encouraging. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential natural gas prices during the upcoming heating season (October though March) are projected to average $14.93 per Mcf, an increase of about 17% compared to last year's heating season. Residential heating oil prices are projected to average $4.13 per gallon this winter, an increase of about 25%. What if you live in an all-electric house? Many utilities are continuing to pursue retail electricity rate increases in response to power generation

276

Bazhou Deli Solar Energy Heating Co Ltd aka Deli Solar PRC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bazhou Deli Solar Energy Heating Co Ltd aka Deli Solar PRC Bazhou Deli Solar Energy Heating Co Ltd aka Deli Solar PRC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bazhou Deli Solar Energy Heating Co Ltd (aka Deli Solar (PRC)) Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 65700 Sector Biomass, Solar Product Seller of solar thermal water heating systems, PV-powered lamps and small-scale biomass space heating devices. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Direct-contact air/molten salt heat exchange for solar-thermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat exchangers employing direct contact between molten draw salt and air were studied for use in solar industrial process heat (IPH) systems. Direct-contact systems consisting of a fin-tube preheater and a spray or packed column were compared to conventional heat exchangers. Direct contact reduced the IPH system cost by 5% to 10%. The direct-contact heat exchangers cost only 15% to 30% as much as comparable conventional exchangers. However, the rate of salt degradation by CO/sup 2/ and H/sub 2/O must be determined to see if it is acceptable.

Wright, J.D.; d'Agincourt, C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

California Solar Initiative - Pilot Solar Water Heating Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

280

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program calls for the development and delivery of eight (was 12) prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two (was 6) heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences (SFR), multiple-family residences (MFR) and commercial applications. This document describes the progress of the program during the eighth program quarter, 1 April 1978 to 30 June 1978.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Solar assisted heat pump on air collectors: A simulation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heating system of the bioclimatic building of the Greek National Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) comprises two heating plants: the first one includes an air source heat pump, Solar Air Collectors (SACs) and a heat distribution system (comprising a fan coil unit network); the second one is, mainly, a geothermal heat pump unit to cover the ground floor thermal needs. The SAC configuration as well as the fraction of the building heating load covered by the heating plant are assessed in two operation modes; the direct (hot air from the collectors is supplied directly to the heated space) and the indirect mode (warm air from the SAC or its mixture with ambient air is not supplied directly to the heated space but indirectly into the evaporator of the air source heat pump). The technique of the indirect mode of heating aims at maximizing the efficiency of the SAC, saving electrical power consumed by the compressor of the heat pump, and therefore, at optimizing the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump due to the increased intake of ambient thermal energy by means of the SAC. Results are given for three research objectives: assessment of the heat pump efficiency whether in direct or indirect heating mode; Assessment of the overall heating plant efficiency on a daily or hourly basis; Assessment of the credibility of the suggested simulation model TSAGAIR by comparing its results with the TRNSYS ones. (author)

Karagiorgas, Michalis; Galatis, Kostas; Tsagouri, Manolis [Department of Mechanical Engineering Educators, ASPETE, N. Iraklio, GR 14121 (Greece); Tsoutsos, Theocharis [Environmental Engineering Dept., Technical University of Crete, Technical University Campus, GR 73100, Chania (Greece); Botzios-Valaskakis, Aristotelis [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), 19th km Marathon Ave., GR 19001, Pikermi (Greece)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coil (G) of the absorption chiller (or boiler of a Rankineor heat input to the absorption chiller of approximately

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Parabolic-Trough Solar Water Heating--FTA, 022798m FTA trough  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parabolic-trough solar water heating is Parabolic-trough solar water heating is a well-proven technology that directly sub- stitutes renewable energy for conventional energy in water heating. Parabolic-trough collectors can also drive absorption cooling systems or other equipment that runs off a thermal load. There is considerable potential for using these technologies at Federal facil- ities in the Southwestern United States or other areas with high direct-beam solar radi- ation. Facilities such as jails, hospitals, and barracks that consistently use large volumes of hot water are particularly good candi- dates. Use of parabolic-trough systems helps Federal facilities comply with Executive Order 12902's directive to reduce energy use by 30% by 2005 and advance other efforts to get the Federal government to set a good

285

Solar Water Heating: What's Hot and What's Not  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A handful of electric utilities in the United States now pay incentives to their customers to install solar water heaters or are developing programs to do so. The solar water heater incentives are part of a broader utility demand-side management program designed to reduce system demand during peak summer hours. Solar hot water has the potential to generate significant savings during periods of high solar intensity. For summer peaking utilities, these periods of high solar intensity coincide with the overall system peak. This paper discusses the basics of analyzing solar water heaters as a demand-side management measure. In addition, four utility solar water heater incentive programs are studied in detail. The paper describes each program and notes the stage of development. Where such information is available, incentive amounts and cost-effectiveness calculations are included.

Stein, J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain  

SciTech Connect

Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain  

SciTech Connect

Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Austin Energy- Solar Water Heating Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Austin Energy offers its residential, commercial, and municipal customers up front rebates or a low interest loan for the purchase and installation of solar hot water heaters. Because the program...

289

Solar heating system installed at Stamford, CT. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the solar heating system installed at the Lutz-Sotire Partnership Executive East Office Building, Stamford, Connecticut. The information consists of description of system and components, operation and maintenance manual, as-built drawings and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the heating requirements. The solar facility has 2,561 sq. ft. of liquid flat plate collectors and a 6000 gallon, stone lined, well-insulated storage tank. Freeze protection is provided by a 50 percent glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. From the storage tank, solar heated water is fed into the building's distributed heat pump loop via a modulating three-way valve. If the storage tank temperature drops below 80/sup 0/F, the building loop may be supplied from the existing electrical hot water boilers. The Executive East Office Building is of moderate size, 25,000 sq. ft. of heated space in 2 1/2 stories. The solar system makes available for other users up to 150 KVA of existing electrical generating capacity.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following tasks; solar heating with isothermal collector operation and advanced control strategy; solar cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling system development; solar house III -- development and improvement of solar heating systems employing boiling liquid collectors; generic solar domestic water heating systems; advanced residential solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems; management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program; and field monitoring workshop.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. 1984 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following areas: coordination of research and development on solar heating and cooling; performance testing of solar collectors; performance of solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems using evacuated collectors; central solar heating plants with seasonal storage; passive and hybrid solar low energy buildings; and solar radiation and pyranometry studies. Planning was also initiated for a proposed materials research and testing task. (LEW)

Blum, S.B. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Santa Clara Water and Sewer - Solar Water Heating Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water and Sewer - Solar Water Heating Program Water and Sewer - Solar Water Heating Program Santa Clara Water and Sewer - Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Commercial Heating & Cooling Program Info State California Program Type Leasing Program Provider City of Santa Clara Water and Sewer Utility In 1975, the City of Santa Clara established the nation's first municipal solar utility. Under the Solar Water Heating Program, the Santa Clara Water and Sewer Utilities Department supplies, installs and maintains solar water heating systems for residents and businesses. In addition, the city has also installed solar energy equipment for a number of its own facilities. Solar equipment is available from the city for heating swimming pools,

293

Summer-heat-gain control in passive-solar-heated buildings: fixed horizontal overhangs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An aspect of passive cooling relates to cooling load reduction by the use of solar controls. When there is a substantial winter heating requirement, and when the winter heating needs are met in part by a passive solar heating system, then the potential aggravation of summer cooling loads by the heating system is an important design issue. A traditional solution is the use of a fixed, horizontal shading overhang. An approach to quantitative design rules for the sizing of a shading overhang to minimize total annual space conditioning energy needs is outlined.

Jones, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deposition rates and production costs were reviewed todiscussion of heat mirror production cost Most of our effortcoating plastic film. Production costs for coating glass

Selkowitz, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Cooperation of heat pump and solar system in the common power unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper explains new possibilities of heat pumps usage in the common power units. The result of applied research is an examination of heat pump and active solar system cooperation eligibility. The aspects of such a cooperation are examined mainly from ... Keywords: combined heating system, heat pump, heating factor, heating factor increase, natural energy, solar system

Mastny Petr

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Study on Hybrid Solar Energy and Ground-Source Heat Pump System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aim at the weakness of more influenced by the environment etc. factor and the heat flow density lower when the solar energy was make use of heating, so the design method of the hybrid solar energy and ground-source heat pump is proposed, and the operating ... Keywords: solar energy, ground-source, heat pump, coefficient of performance

Liu Yi; Li Bing-xi; Zhou Yi; Fu Zhong-bin; Xu Xin-hai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Performance estimates for attached-sunspace passive solar heated buildings  

SciTech Connect

Performance predictions have been made for attached-sunspace types of passively solar heated buildings. The predictions are based on hour-by-hour computer simulations using computer models developed in the framework of PASOLE, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) passive solar energy simulation program. The models have been validated by detailed comparison with actual hourly temperature measurements taken in attached-sunspace test rooms at LASL.

McFarland, R.D.; Jones, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap K. Hudon, T. Merrigan, J. Burch and J. Maguire National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-54793 August 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap K. Hudon, T. Merrigan, J. Burch and J. Maguire National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. SHX1.1001 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-54793 August 2012

299

Transparent heat mirrors for solar-energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Transparent heat-mirror films, which transmit solar radiation but reflect ir thermal radiation, have potentially important applications in solar/thermal/electric conversion, solar heating, solar photovoltaic conversion, and window insulation. We have used rf sputtering to prepare two types of films: TiO/sub 2//Ag/TiO/sub 2/ and Sn-doped In/sub 2/O/sub 3/. To characterize the properties of heat-mirror films for solar-energy collection, we define the parameters ..cap alpha../sub eff/, the effective solar absorptivity, and epsilon/sub eff/, the effective ir emissivity. For our Sn-doped In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ films, ..cap alpha../sub eff//epsilon/sub eff/ is comparable to the values of ..cap alpha../epsilon reported for the leading selective absorbers. Even higher values of ..cap alpha../sub eff//epsilon/sub eff/ are obtained for the TiO/sub 2//Ag/TiO/sub 2/ films.

Fan, J.C.C.; Bachner, F.J.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Active solar heating and cooling information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating and cooling were set up, which is responsible for the space heating and cooling and domestic hot water for a residential block. Through hourly simulation, the performance and the economics of such systems were analyzed, for the different tank volumes, operating modes and weather conditions. The results show that 1) for most areas of China, the solar systems with seasonal storage can save energy; 2) for areas with cold winter and hot summer, it is suitable to store heat from summer to winter and store cold energy from winter to summer, but for chilly areas, it is suitable to only store heat from summer to winter; 3) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 2~3, the system performance is optimal and the payback period is shortest for most areas of north China; and 4) if cooling storage is needed, the seasonal storage coupled with short-term storage may raise the solar fraction largely.

Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Listerhill, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar system was installed into a new buildng and was designed to provide 79% of the estimated annual space heating load and 59% of the estimated annual potable hot water requirement. The collectors are flat plate, liquid manufactured by Reynolds Metals Company and cover a total area of 2344 square feet. The storage medium is water inhibited with NALCO 2755 and the container is an underground, unpressurized steel tank with a capacity of 5000 gallons. This final report describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility and contains detailed drawings of the completed system.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solar heating and cooling commercialization research program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercialization Research Program has addressed a recognized need to accelerate the commercialization of solar products. The development of communication techniques and materials for a target group of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) wholesalers and distributors has been the primary effort. A summary of the program, the approach to the development of the techniques and materials, the conclusions derived from seminar feedback, the development of additional research activities and reports and the recommendations for follow-on activities are presented. The appendices offer detailed information on specific elements of the research effort.

Christensen, D.L.; Tragert, W.; Weir, S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

None

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

Intermittent Dissipation and Local Heating in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence for inhomogeneous heating in the interplanetary plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

Osman, K T; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wind heat transfer coefficient in solar collectors in outdoor conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of wind heat transfer coefficient, h{sub w}, is required for estimation of upward losses from the outer surface of flat plate solar collectors/solar cookers. In present study, an attempt has been made to estimate the wind induced convective heat transfer coefficient by employing unglazed test plate (of size about 0.9 m square) in outdoor conditions. Experiments, for measurement of h{sub w}, have been conducted on rooftop of a building in the Institute campus in summer season for 2 years. The estimated wind heat transfer coefficient has been correlated against wind speed by linear regression and power regression. Experimental values of wind heat transfer coefficient estimated in present work have been compared with studies of other researchers after normalizing for plate length. (author)

Kumar, Suresh; Mullick, S.C. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market environment for solar water heating technology has changed substantially with the successful introduction of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs). The addition of this energy-efficient technology to the market increases direct competition with solar water heaters (SWHs) for available energy savings. It is therefore essential to understand which segment of the market is best suited for HPWHs and focus the development of innovative, low-cost SWHs in the market segment where the largest opportunities exist. To evaluate cost and performance tradeoffs between high performance hot water heating systems, annual energy simulations were run using the program, TRNSYS, and analysis was performed to compare the energy savings associated with HPWH and SWH technologies to conventional methods of water heating.

Hudon, K.; Merrigan, T.; Burch, J.; Maguire, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida Solar Energy Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. Information is provided on the system's test, operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings. The Center's office building, approximately 5000 square feet of space, with solar air conditioning and heating as a demonstration of the technical feasibility is located just north of Port Canaveral, Florida. The system was designed to supply approximately 70% of the annual cooling and 100% of the heating load. The project provides unique high-temperature, non-imaging, non-tracking, evacuated-tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection.

Hankins, J.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Solar heating of integrated greenhouse-animal shelter systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical procedure to determine the effectiveness of greenhouses as solar collectors was presented. This procedure was used to predict the effect of several construction parameters on solar radiation input to greenhouses. The orientation of the greenhouse was found to be the most effective construction parameter controlling solar radiation input to greenhouses. The effective albedo of the plant canopy was also found to be a significant factor. A new solar greenhouse design, suitable for high latitude regions was developed. The results showed that an internal solar collector could be incorporated as an integral part of the greenhouse design. The concept developed could be used as a free-standing greenhouse or in a combination with livestock building. The efficiency of the solar input was investigated for the conventional and the shed greenhouses, both as a free-standing unit and a greenhouse-animal shelter system, using computer simulation analyses. The results indicated that the efficiency of solar input is highly dependent on location; the effect of location on the shed type design is more profound. A typical case of a greenhouse-hog barn production system was investigated using computer simulation analyses. The results showed that such a food production system achieves a significant reduction in conventional fuel consumption due to both animal waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization.

Ben-Abdallah, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ausra Inc Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd SHP | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd SHP Inc Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd SHP Jump to: navigation, search Name Ausra Inc (Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd (SHP)) Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94303 Sector Solar Product US-based solar thermal electrical generation (STEG) company owned by AREVA Group. References Ausra Inc (Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd (SHP))[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ausra Inc (Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd (SHP)) is a company located in Palo Alto, California . References ↑ "Ausra Inc (Formerly Solar Heat and Power Pty Ltd (SHP))" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ausra_Inc_Formerly_Solar_Heat_and_Power_Pty_Ltd_SHP&oldid=342438

313

Solar and seasonal dependence of ion frictional heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Ion frictional heating constitutes one of the principal mechanisms whereby energy, originating in the solar wind, is deposited into the Earth's ionosphere and ultimately the neutral atmosphere. Common programme observations by the EISCAT UHF radar system, spanning the years 1984 to 1995, provide the basis for a comprehensive statistical study of ion frictional heating, results of which are documented in this and a previous paper by the authors. In the present work, the authors demonstrate the solar and seasonal dependence of the universal time distribution of frictional heating, and explain these results with reference to corresponding dependences of the ion velocity. Although EISCAT observes a signi®cant increase in the occurrence of enhanced ion velocities associated with increased solar activity, the latter characterised according to the prevailing 10.7 cm solar ¯ux, this is not re¯ected to such an extent in the occurrence of frictional heating. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the decreased neutral atmosphere response times associated with active solar conditions, resulting from the higher ionospheric plasma densities present. Seasonal e€ects on the diurnal distribution of ion frictional heating are well explained by corresponding variations in ionospheric convection, the latter principally a result of geometrical factors. It is noted that, over the entire dataset, the variations in the unperturbed F-region ion temperature, required to implement the identi®cation criterion for ion heating, are highly correlated with model values of thermospheric temperature. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density). 1

J. A. Davies; M. Lester; I. W. Mccrea

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Federal technology alert. Parabolic-trough solar water heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic-trough solar water heating is a well-proven renewable energy technology with considerable potential for application at Federal facilities. For the US, parabolic-trough water-heating systems are most cost effective in the Southwest where direct solar radiation is high. Jails, hospitals, barracks, and other facilities that consistently use large volumes of hot water are particularly good candidates, as are facilities with central plants for district heating. As with any renewable energy or energy efficiency technology requiring significant initial capital investment, the primary condition that will make a parabolic-trough system economically viable is if it is replacing expensive conventional water heating. In combination with absorption cooling systems, parabolic-trough collectors can also be used for air-conditioning. Industrial Solar Technology (IST) of Golden, Colorado, is the sole current manufacturer of parabolic-trough solar water heating systems. IST has an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract with the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance and install parabolic-trough solar water heating on an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) basis for any Federal facility that requests it and for which it proves viable. For an ESPC project, the facility does not pay for design, capital equipment, or installation. Instead, it pays only for guaranteed energy savings. Preparing and implementing delivery or task orders against the IDIQ is much simpler than the standard procurement process. This Federal Technology Alert (FTA) of the New Technology Demonstration Program is one of a series of guides to renewable energy and new energy-efficient technologies.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Turbulent Heating in the Solar Wind and in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we calculate the turbulent heating rates in the solar wind using the Kolmogorov-like MHD turbulence phenomenology with Kolmogorov's constants calculated by {\\it Verma and Bhattacharjee }[1995b,c]. We find that the turbulent heating can not account for the total heating of the nonAlfv\\'enic streams in the solar wind. We show that dissipation due to thermal conduction is also a potential heating source. Regarding the Alfv\\'enic streams, the predicted turbulent heating rates using the constants of {\\it Verma and Bhattacharjee }[1995c] are higher than the observed heating rates; the predicted dissipation rates are probably overestimates because Alfv\\'enic streams have not reached steady-state. We also compare the predicted turbulent heating rates in the solar corona with the observations; the Kolmogorov-like phenomenology predicts dissipation rates comparable to the observed heating rates in the corona [{\\it Hollweg, }% 1984], but Dobrowoly et al.'s generalized Kraichnan model yields heating rates much less than that required.

Mahendra K. Verma

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Turbulent Heating in the Solar Wind and in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we calculate the turbulent heating rates in the solar wind using the Kolmogorov-like MHD turbulence phenomenology with Kolmogorov’s constants calculated by Verma and Bhattacharjee [1995b,c]. We find that the turbulent heating can not account for the total heating of the nonAlfvénic streams in the solar wind. We show that dissipation due to thermal conduction is also a potential heating source. Regarding the Alfvénic streams, the predicted turbulent heating rates using the constants of Verma and Bhattacharjee [1995c] are higher than the observed heating rates; the predicted dissipation rates are probably overestimates because Alfvénic streams have not reached steady-state. We also compare the predicted turbulent heating rates in the solar corona with the observations; the Kolmogorov-like phenomenology predicts dissipation rates comparable to the observed heating rates in the corona [Hollweg, 1984], but Dobrowoly et al.’s generalized Kraichnan model yields heating rates much less than that required. 1 1

Mahendra K. Verma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

OpenEI/PageKeyword solar home heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search A list of all pages that have property "OpenEIPageKeyword" with value "solar home heating" Gateway:Solar + Property: OpenEIPageKeyword Value: solar home...

318

Expansion and Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in China  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in China Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in China Project Management Office Jump to: navigation, search Name Expansion and Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in China Project Management Office Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100038 Sector Buildings, Solar Product The programme focuses on the development of high-quality and attractive-looking model designs for integrating solar water heaters (SWH) into buildings in China. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

DETAILED LOOP MODEL (DLM) ANALYSIS OF LIQUID SOLAR THERMOSIPHONS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Solar Tank Warm Water Hot Water Heater Water Tank Heatsolar thermosiphon water heaters with heat exchangers in storage tanks.solar water heater with a heat exchanger in the storage tank.

Mertol, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Wind energy/geothermic/solar heating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

I've observed three distinct ''camps'' of renewable energy resources; WIND, Geothermic, and Solar. None of the three are completely adequate for the NE by themselves. I observe little effort to combine them to date. My objective has been to demonstrate that the three can be combined in a practical system. To mitagate the high cost and poor payback for individual residences, I believe neighborhoods of 4 to 5 homes, apartment complexes or condominiums could form an Energy Association alloting a piece of ground (could be a greenbelt) which would contain the well or wells, solar boosted underground water storage and the Solar banks. These are the high cost items which could be prorated and ammortized by the Association. Easements would permit each residence underground insulated water lines for individual heat pump conversions to existing forced air furnaces. Where regulations permit, an individual home could erect his own windmill to belt drive his freon compressor. With or without the optional windmill the water to freon heat pump with its solar boosts on the well water, will enjoy COP's (coefficient of Performances or times better than electric resistance heat) beyond anything on the market today. In a neighborhood energy association, all trenching could be done together all plumbing could be one contract and they could qualify for quantity discounts on heat pump units, chillers and components and installation.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Solar-assisted heat pump field performance evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An analysis carried out to determine some guidelines to use in laying out six ground coil installations is summarized. The installation of the solar-assisted ground coupled heat pumps is described. The instrumentation employed at each of the installations in order to obtain performance data is discussed. (MHR)

1980-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of monthly status reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company, who is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of solar driven absorption air conditioners and heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of absorption refrigeration systems for solar active heating and cooling applications. The approaches being investigated are those using air-cooled condenser-absorbers and those leading to coefficient of performances (COP) that increase continuously with heat source temperature. This is primarily an experimental project, with the emphasis on designing, fabricating and testing absorption chillers in operating regimes that are particularly suited for solar energy applications. The first phase of this project has been concluded and has experimentally demonstrated that the conventional single-effect ammonia-water absorption cycle can be used (with minor modifications) for solar cooling. The second phase of this project explores the commercial potential of the single-effect (SE) NH/sub 3//H/sub 2/O absorption air conditioner. (WHK)

Dao, K.; Wahlig, M.; Wali, E.; Rasson, J.; Molishever, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solar energy collector for mounting over windows of buildings for space heating thereof  

SciTech Connect

The ornamental design for a solar energy collector for mounting over windows of buildings for space heating thereof, as shown.

Arrington, P.M.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Water Consumption from Freeze Protection Valves for Solar Water Heating Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in the use of freeze protection valves for solar domestic water heating systems in cold climates.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy conservation by adaptive control for a solar heated building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Identification and optimal control techniques are combined to form an adaptive optimal control strategy which is used to minimize the auxiliary energy consumption for a solar heated building. The adaptive optimal control strategy is described and application of the adaptive optimal controller to the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system in an appropriate building is modeled. The building used is the newly completed National Security and Resources Study Center (NSRSC) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The NSRSC uses an 8000 sq. ft. solar collector to provide energy for heating and cooling the building. A cost functional to define optimal performance of the HVAC system and an identification process to produce a linearized building model are combined to yield an adaptive linear regulator solution. Although solar energy is used for both heating and cooling the NSRSC, only the results from the heating simulation are available for presentation here. Energy savings predicted by the model when compared to a conventional control system are described and an alternate system configuration is briefly discussed. Plans for actual implementation of the adaptive optimal controller are discussed.

Farris, D.R.; Melsa, J.L.; Murray, H.S.; McDonald, T.E.; Springer, T.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient Worksheet WS-3R Residential (Page 1 of 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient Worksheet WS-3R Residential (Page 1 of 2) Site Address: Enforcement Table for Fenestration Products (Table 116-B of the Standards), NFRC certified data, or Solar Heat Gain SHGCmin Total SHGC Note: Calculated Solar Heat Gain Coefficient values for Total SHGC may be used directly

328

Kolmogorov versus IroshnikovKraichnan spectra: Consequences for ion heating in the solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating in the solar wind C. S. Ng,1 A. Bhattacharjee,2 D. Munsi,2 P. A. Isenberg,2 and C. W. Smith2 an open question, theoretically as well as observationally. The ion heating profile observed in the solar. Recently, a solar wind heating model based on Kolmogorov spectral scaling has produced reasonably good

Ng, Chung-Sang

329

A modular phase change heat exchanger for a solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular energy storing heat exchanger designed to use pentaerythritol for thermal storage (solid-solid phase change at 182 C) is tested in an oven by circulating heat transfer oil which is electrically heated in a manner to simulate a concentrating solar collector. Three efficiencies for heating the system under controlled and measured power input are determined - the heat exchanger efficiency, the efficiency of the heater with distribution lines, and the total system efficiency. Thermal energy retention times and cooking extraction times are determined, and along with the efficiencies, are compared with the results previously reported for a nonmodular heat exchanger. The modular configuration provides a highly improved extraction rate for cooking due to its wrap-around character and its increased surface-to-volume ratio. A full scale glass model of the copper tubing of the system is described and flow observations reported demonstrating how uniformly the parallel pumping branches perform and how trapped air pockets affect pumping power. A technique for measuring pumping power is described and its application to the system is quantified to show that less than 1 watt is required to circulate the heat transfer oil even when the system includes the solar collector and its longer connecting tubes.

Bushnell, D.L.; Sohi, M. (Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Solar heat pipe testing of the Stirling thermal motors 4-120 Stirling engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stirling-cycle engines have been identified as a promising technology for the conversion of concentrated solar energy into usable electrical power. A 25kW electric system takes advantage of existing Stirling-cycle engines and existing parabolic concentrator designs. In previous work, the concentrated sunlight impinged directly on the heater head tubes of the Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) 4-120 engine. A Sandia-designed felt-metal-wick heat pipe receiver was fitted to the STM 4-120 engine for on-sun testing on Sandia`s Test Bed Solar Concentrator. The heat pipe uses sodium metal as an intermediate two-phase heat transfer fluid. The receiver replaces the directly-illuminated heater head previously tested. The heat pipe receiver provides heat isothermally to the engine, and the heater head tube length is reduced, both resulting in improved engine performance. The receiver also has less thermal losses than the tube receiver. The heat pipe receiver design is based on Sandia`s second-generation felt-wick heat pipe receiver. This paper presents the interface design, and compares the heat pipe/engine test results to those of the directly-illuminated receiver/engine package.

Andraka, C.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Moss, T.A.; Adkins, D.R.; Moreno, J.B.; Gallup, D.R.; Cordeiro, P.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johansson, S. [Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Convection heat loss from cavity receiver in parabolic dish solar thermal power system: A review  

SciTech Connect

The convection heat loss from cavity receiver in parabolic dish solar thermal power system can significantly reduce the efficiency and consequently the cost effectiveness of the system. It is important to assess this heat loss and subsequently improve the thermal performance of the receiver. This paper aims to present a comprehensive review and systematic summarization of the state of the art in the research and progress in this area. The efforts include the convection heat loss mechanism, experimental and numerical investigations on the cavity receivers with varied shapes that have been considered up to date, and the Nusselt number correlations developed for convection heat loss prediction as well as the wind effect. One of the most important features of this paper is that it has covered numerous cavity literatures encountered in various other engineering systems, such as those in electronic cooling devices and buildings. The studies related to those applications may provide valuable information for the solar receiver design, which may otherwise be ignored by a solar system designer. Finally, future development directions and the issues that need to be further investigated are also suggested. It is believed that this comprehensive review will be beneficial to the design, simulation, performance assessment and applications of the solar parabolic dish cavity receivers. (author)

Wu, Shuang-Ying; Xiao, Lan; Li, You-Rong [College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cao, Yiding [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Analysis of selected surface characteristics and latent heat storage for passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an analysis of the value of various technical improvements in the solar collector and thermal storage subsystems of passive solar residential, agricultural, and industrial systems for two regions of the country. The evaluated improvements are: decreased emissivity and increased absorptivity of absorbing surfaces, decreased reflectivity, and decreased emissivity of glazing surface, and the substitution of sensible heat storage media with phase change materials. The value of each improvement is estimated by the additional energy savings resulting from the improvement.

Fthenakis, V.; Leigh, R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Testing of Stirling engine solar reflux heat-pipe receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alkali metal heat-pipe receivers have been identified as a desirable interface to couple a Stirling-cycle engine with a parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflux receiver provides power nearly isothermally to the engine heater heads while de-coupling the heater head design from the solar absorber surface design. The independent design of the receiver and engine heater head leads to high system efficiency. Heat pipe reflux receivers have been demonstrated at approximately 30 kW{sub t} power throughput by others. This size is suitable fm engine output powers up to 10 kW{sub e}. Several 25-kW{sub e}, Stirling-cycle engines exist, as well as designs for 75-kW{sub t} parabolic dish solar concentrators. The extension of heat pipe technology from 30 kW{sub t} to 75 kW{sub t} is not trivial. Heat pipe designs are pushed to their limits, and it is critical to understand the flux profiles expected from the dish, and the local performance of the wick structure. Sandia has developed instrumentation to monitor and control the operation of heat pipe reflux receivers to test their throughput limits, and analytical models to evaluate receiver designs. In the past 1.5 years, several heat pipe receivers have been tested on Sandia`s test bed concentrators (TBC`s) and 60-kW{sub t} solar furnace. A screen-wick heat pipe developed by Dynatherm was tested to 27.5 kW{sub t} throughput. A Cummins Power Generation (CPG)/Thermacore 30-kW{sub t} heat pipe was pushed to a throughput of 41 kW{sub t} to verify design models. A Sandia-design screen-wick and artery 75-kW{sub t} heat pipe and a CPG/Thermacore 75-kW{sub t} sintered-wick heat pipe were also limit tested on the TBC. This report reviews the design of these receivers, and compares test results with model predictions.

Rawlinson, S.; Cordeiro, P.; Dudley, V.; Moss, T.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Comparative performance of two types of evacuated tube solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. The progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of evacuated tube solar collectors have been operated in space heating, cooling and domestic hot water heating systems in Colorado State University Solar House I. An experimental collector from Corning Glass Works supplied heat to the system from January 1977 through February 1978, and an experimental collector from Philips Research Laboratory, Aachen, which is currently in use, has been operating since August 1978. A flat absorber plate inside a single-walled glass tube is used in the Corning design, whereas heat is conducted through a single glass wall to an external heat exchanger plate in the Philips collector. In comparison with conventional flat-plate collectors, both types show reduced heat losses and improved efficiency. For space heating and hot water supply in winter, the solar delivery efficiency of the Corning collector ranged from 49% to 60% of the incident solar energy. The portion of the space heating and domestic hot water load carried by solar energy through fall and winter ranged from 50% to 74%, with a four-month contribution of 61% of the total requirements. Data on the Philips collector are currently being analyzed.

Conway, T.M.; Duff, W.S.; Lof, G.O.G.; Pratt, R.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of a 75-kW heat-pipe receiver for solar heat-engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program is now underway to develop commercial power conversion systems that use parabolic dish mirrors in conjunction with Stirling engines to convert solar energy to electric power. In early prototypes, the solar concentrator focused light directly on the heater tubes of the Stirling engine. Liquid-metal heat-pipes are now being developed to transfer energy from the focus of the solar concentrator to the heater tubes of the engine. The dome-shaped heat-pipe receivers are approximately one-half meters in diameter and up to 77-kW of concentrated solar energy is delivered to the absorber surface. Over the past several years, Sandia National Laboratories, through the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, has conducted a major program to explore receiver designs and identify suitable wick materials. A high-flux bench-scale system has been developed to test candidate wick designs, and full-scale systems have been tested on an 11-meter test-bed solar concentrator. Procedures have also been developed in this program to measure the properties of wick materials, and an extensive data-base on wick materials for high temperature heat pipes has been developed. This paper provides an overview of the receiver development program and results from some of the many heat-pipe tests.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Joule Heating and Anomalous Resistivity in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as $2.5 \\times 10^9$ Amperes (Spangler 2007). These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al (2007). This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of $3 \\times 10^5$. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007) are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivity is enormously increased relative to the Spitzer value. However, the same model for turbulent current sheets used to calculate the heating rate also gives an electron drift speed which can be comparable to the electron thermal speed, and larger than the ion acoustic speed. It is therefore possible that the coronal current sheets are unstable to current-driven instabilities which produce high levels of waves, enhance the resistivity and thus the heating rate.

Steven R. Spangler

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Reduced-risk HTGR concept for industrial-heat application  

SciTech Connect

The industrial process heat market has been identified as major market for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), however, this market introduces stringent availability requirements on the reactor system relative to electric plants which feed a large existing grid. The characteristics and requirements of the industrial heat markets are summarized; the risks associated with serving this market with a single large HTGR will be discussed; and the modular concept, which has the potential to reduce both safety and investment risks, will be described. The reference modular concept described consists of several small, relatively benign nuclear heat sources linked together to supply heat energy to a balance-of-plant incorporating a process gas train/thermochemical pipe line system and a normal steam-electric plant.

Boardman, C.E.; Lipps, A.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Market development directory for solar industrial process heat systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this directory is to provide a basis for market development activities through a location listing of key trade associations, trade periodicals, and key firms for three target groups. Potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers were identified as the prime targets for market development activities. The bulk of the directory is a listing of these two groups. The third group, solar IPH equipment manufacturers, was included to provide an information source for potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers. Trade associates and their publications are listed for selected four-digit Standard Industrial Code (SIC) industries. Since industries requiring relatively lower temperature process heat probably will comprise most of the near-term market for solar IPH systems, the 80 SIC's included in this chapter have process temperature requirements less than 350/sup 0/F. Some key statistics and a location list of the largest plants (according to number of employees) in each state are included for 15 of the 80 SIC's. Architectural/engineering and consulting firms are listed which are known to have solar experience. Professional associated and periodicals to which information on solar IPH sytstems may be directed also are included. Solar equipment manufacturers and their associations are listed. The listing is based on the SERI Solar Energy Information Data Base (SEIDB).

None

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Performance of solar heating and cooling systems: Solid desiccant cooling/fresh air heating with evacuated-tube collectors in CSU Solar House I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In keeping with the national energy policy goal of fostering an adequate supply of energy at a reasonable cost, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) supports a variety of programs to promote a balanced and mixed energy resource system. The mission of the DOE Solar Buildings Research and Development Program is to support this goal, by providing for the development of solar technology alternatives for the buildings sector. It is the goal of the Program to establish a proven technology base to allow industry to develop solar products and designs for buildings that are economically competitive and can contribute significantly to building energy supplies nationally. Toward this end, the program sponsors research activities related to increasing the efficiency, reducing the cost, and improving the long-term durability of passive and active solar systems for building water and space heating, cooling, and daylighting applications. These activities are conducted in four major areas: Advanced Passive Solar Materials Research, Collector Technology Research, Cooling Systems Research, and Systems Analysis and Applications Research.

Loef, G.O.G.; Beba, S.; Cler, G.; Birdsong, M.; McLay, B.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The turbocompressor comprises a power turbine and a compressor turbine having respective rotors and on a common shaft, rotatably supported by bearings. A first working fluid is supplied by a power loop and is expanded in the turbine. A second working fluid is compressed in the turbine and is circulated in a heat pump loop. A lubricant is mixed with the second working fluid but is excluded from the first working fluid. The bearings are cooled and lubricated by a system which circulates the second working fluid and the intermixed lubricant through the bearings. Such system includes a pump, a thermostatic expansion valve for expanding the working fluid into the space between the bearings, and a return conduit system for withdrawing the expanded working fluid after it passes through the bearings and for returning the working fluid to the evaporator. A shaft seal excludes the lubricant from the power turbine. The power loop includes a float operable by liquid working fluid in the condenser for controlling a recirculation valve so as to maintain a minimum liquid level in the condenser, while causing a feed pump to pump most of the working fluid into the vapor generator. The heat pump compressor loop includes a float in the condenser for operating and expansion valve to maintain a minimum liquid working fluid level in the condenser while causing most of the working fluid to be expanded into the evaporator.

Landerman, A.M.; Biancardi, F.R.; Melikian, G.; Meader, M.D.; Kepler, C.E.; Anderson, T.J.; Sitler, J.W.

1982-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Solar assisted heat pump system with volume solar collector. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system uses the attic of the house with a large south facing window as the solar collector. An air-to-water heat pump uses the attic air as a heat source to heat a volume of storage water during the heating season. During the cooling season the attic is ventilated and the heat pump uses the attic air as a heat sink while cooling the storage water. The computer program was developed to include a heat exchanger in the attic which could by-pass the heat pump condenser cooling water, thus permitting direct heat exchange between the attic air and the storage water whenever a favorable temperature existed. The program also accounts for the effect of the incidence angle of insolation and the effect of the number of glass plates on the transmittance and absorptance of the collector and windows. Other refinements include: the use of a sophisticated nighttime setback thermostat, account of internal heat generation and infiltration loss. Among all of the parameter variations, the use of an attic heat exchanger resulted in the maximum savings in the heating/cooling energy consumption of the house. The use of double-glazed windows too, resulted in substantial energy savings. The total energy consumption was found to depend strongly on the infiltration rate. The program was also used to simulate the same system under weather conditions existing at several different geographic areas.

Sabnis, J.S.; Hickox, W.J.; Drucker, E.E.; Ucar, M.; LaGraff, J.E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Burgulence and Alfven waves heating mechanism of solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating of magnetized turbulent plasma is calculated in the framework of Burgers turbulence [A.M. Polyakov, Phys. Rev. E. 52, 6183 (1995)]. Explicit formula for the energy flux of Alfven waves along the magnetic field is presented. The Alfven waves are considered as intermediary between the turbulent energy and the heat. The derived results are related to a wave channel of heating of the solar corona. If we incorporate amplification of Alfven waves by shear flow the suggested model of heating can be applied to analysis of the missing viscosity of accretion discs and to reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. We suppose that the Langevin-Burgers approach to turbulence we have applied in the current work can be also helpful for other systems where we have intensive interaction between a stochastic turbulent system and waves and can be used in many multidisciplinary researches in hydrodynamics and MHD.

T. M. Mishonov; Y. G. Maneva

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Roof shading and wall glazing techniques for reducing peak building heating and cooling loads. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The roof shading device proved to be effective in reducing peak building cooling loads under both actual testing conditions and in selected computer simulations. The magnitude of cooling load reductions varied from case to case depending on individual circumstances. Key variables that had significant impacts on its thermal performance were the number of months of use annually, the thermal characteristics of the roof construction, hours of building use, and internal gains. Key variables that had significant impacts upon economic performance were the costs of fuel energy for heating and cooling, and heating and cooling equipment efficiency. In general, the more sensitive the building is to climate, the more effective the shading device will be. In the example case, the annual fuel savings ($.05 psf) were 6 to 10% of the estimated installation costs ($.50 to .75 psf). The Trombe wall installation at Roxborough High School proved to be effective in collecting and delivering significant amounts of solar heat energy. It was also effective in conserving heat energy by replacing obsolete windows which leaked large amounts of heat from the building. Cost values were computed for both solar energy contributions and for heat loss reductions by window replacement. Together they amount to an estimated three hundred and ninety dollars ($390.00) per year in equivalent electric fuel costs. When these savings are compared with installation cost figures it is apparent that the Trombe wall installation as designed and installed presents a potentially cost-effective method of saving fuel costs. The study results indicate that improved Trombe wall efficiency can be achieved by making design and construction changes to reduce or eliminate outside air leakage into the system and provide automatic fan control.

Ueland, M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Process for reducing series resistance of solar cell metal contact systems with a soldering flux etchant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a process for substantially reducing the series resistance of a solar cell having a thick film metal contact assembly thereon while simultaneously removing oxide coatings from the surface of the assembly prior to applying solder therewith. The process includes applying a flux to the contact assembly and heating the cell for a period of time sufficient to substantially remove the series resistance associated with the assembly by etching the assembly with the flux while simultaneously removing metal oxides from said surface of said assembly.

Coyle, R. T. (Lakewood, CO); Barrett, Joy M. (Eldorado Springs, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Testing and analysis of load-side immersed heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to determine the performance of load-side heat exchangers for use in residential solar domestic hot water systems. We measured the performance of four heat exchangers: a smooth coil and a finned coil having heat transfer areas of 2.5 m/sup 2/ (26 ft/sup 2/) and those having areas of 1.7 m/sup 2/ (19 ft/sup 2/). A numerical model using the thermal network program MITAS was constructed, and results were compared to the experimental results. Research showed a smooth coil with only 70% of the surface area of a finned coil performed better than the finned coil. Also, load-side heat exchangers can maintain and enhance stratification in storage tanks, permitting the use of control strategies that take advantage of stratified storage tanks to increase system performance. The analytical model, which agreed reasonably well with the experimental results, was used to vary heat exchanger flow rate and area and initial tank temperature for both a smooth- and a finned-coil heat exchanger. Increasing the heat exchanger flow rate and area results in higher heat transfer rates but not necessarily optimal performance. Lower initial tank temperatures resulted in reduced tank stratification. The smooth heat exchanger outperformed the finned heat exchanger with the same outside surface area. 15 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management. 6 figs., 2 tabs. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Solar water-heating system for the Ingham County geriatric medical care facility, Okemos, Michigan. Operational and maintenance instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Ingham County Solar Project include: the demonstration of a major operational supplement to fossil fuels, thereby reducing the demand for non-renewable energy sources, demonstration of the economic and technical feasibility of solar systems as an important energy supplement over the expected life of the building, and to encourage Michigan industry to produce and incorporate solar systems in their own facility. The Ingham County solar system consists of approximately 10,000 square feet of solar collectors connected in a closed configuration loop. The primary loop solution is a mixture of water and propylene glycol which flows through the tube side of a heat exchanger connected to the primary storage tank. The heat energy which is supplied to the primary storage tank is subsequently utilized to increase the temperature of the laundry water, kitchen water, and domestic potable water.

Not Available

1983-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Approximations for radiative cooling and heating in the solar chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. The radiative energy balance in the solar chromosphere is dominated by strong spectral lines that are formed out of LTE. It is computationally prohibitive to solve the full equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium in 3D time dependent MHD simulations. Aims. To find simple recipes to compute the radiative energy balance in the dominant lines under solar chromospheric conditions. Methods. We use detailed calculations in time-dependent and 2D MHD snapshots to derive empirical formulae for the radiative cooling and heating. Results. The radiative cooling in neutral hydrogen lines and the Lyman continuum, the H and K and intrared triplet lines of singly ionized calcium and the h and k lines of singly ionized magnesium can be written as a product of an optically thin emission (dependent on temperature), an escape probability (dependent on column mass) and an ionization fraction (dependent on temperature). In the cool pockets of the chromosphere the same transitions contribute to the heat...

Carlsson, Mats

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Is the solar corona nonmodally self-heated?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently it was pointed out that nonmodally (transiently and/or adiabatically) pre-amplified waves in shear flows, undergoing subsequent viscous damping, can ultimately heat the ambient flow. The key ingredient of this process is the ability of waves to grow, by extracting energy from the spatially inhomogeneous mean flow. In this paper we examine this mechanism in the context of the solar coronal plasma flows. "Self-heating" (SH) processes are examined when both viscous damping and magnetic resistivity are at work. We show that if the plasma viscosity is in the favorable range of values the asymptotic SH rate in these flows can be quite substantial.

B. M. Shergelashvili; A. D. Rogava; S. Poedts

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

352

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pant Rfict Fan coil heat exchanger effectiveness. c min Fanis modeled as a fan-coil heat exchanger. The fan coil outputsystem with a fan-coil heat exchanger sized for a solar

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Revised fact sheet describes the transpired solar collector that was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

354

Solar technologies diversify the energy supply, reduce the country...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on imported fuels, improve air quality, and offset greenhouse gas emissions. A growing solar industry also stimulates our economy by creating jobs in solar manufacturing and...

355

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a combination of monthly progress reports submitted by AiResearch Manufacturing Company. It contains a summary of activities and progress made from November 1, 1978, to February 28, 1979. AiResearch Manufacturing Company is developing prototype solar heating/cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Solar heating system for recreation building at Scattergood School  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in May 1976 and was completed in June 1977. A six-month acceptance-testing period followed during which time a number of minor modifications and corrections were made to improve system performance and versatility. This Final Report describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility and the project involved in its construction. As such, it has both detailed drawings of the completed system and a section that discusses the bottlenecks that were encountered along the way.

Heins, C.F.

1978-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Performance studies of a solar energy storing heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction, and performance of a solar energy storing heat exchanger is presented as a step toward a solar cooking concept. The solid-solid transition of pentaerythritol is the principal mechanism for energy storage. The methods for describing the system performance are explained and applied to a test system containing a controllable replacement for the solar input power. This first stage of the project will be followed by another in which the heat exchanger is connected to a concentrating array of CPC cylindrical troughs. Although a size appropriate to commercial cooking may prove easier to design from the point of view of economics in the US, the system discussed herein is sized for domestic use and addresses the question of what solar collector area and PCM mass are needed in order to provide adequate energy for several family-size meals with sufficient storage to cook at night and one or two days later. The performance is described from efficiency measurements and the determination of a figure of merit.

Bushnell, D.L. (Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of a Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Heating- and Cooling-Dominated Buildings Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Heating- and Cooling-Dominated Buildings Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description In heating-dominated buildings, the proposed design approach takes advantage of glazed solar collectors to effectively balance the annual thermal loads on the ground with renewable solar energy. In cooling-dominated climates, the design approach takes advantage of relatively low-cost, unglazed solar collectors as the heat rejecting component.

359

Economic performance of passive solar heating: a preliminary analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the interest in solar energy applications for residential space heating grows, it becomes imperative to evaluate the economic performance of alternative designs. For the thermal storage wall two types of storage medium--masonry (Trombe) and water are examined. In addition a night insulation option is included in the thermal storage wall concept, thus giving rise to four alternative passive designs. The economic performance of these alternative designs are evaluated on a state-by-state basis. Discussion of the methodology briefly reviews the architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each solar design. Also included is a discussion of conventional energy costs, as well as the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. Nationwide feasibility results are reviewed for each alternative design. In addition to contracting the solar systems themselves, the effects of two incentive proposals--the National Energy Act (NEA) income tax credits and low interest loads--upon each design are examined. Finally, major conclusions are summarized for each design.

Roach, F.; Noll, S.; Ben-David, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Catastrophic cooling and cessation of heating in the solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensations in the more than 10^6 K hot corona of the Sun are commonly observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). While their contribution to the total solar EUV radiation is still a matter of debate, these condensations certainly provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamic response of the corona to the heating processes. We investigate different distributions of energy input in time and space to investigate which process is most relevant for understanding these coronal condensations. For a comparison to observations we synthesize EUV emission from a time-dependent, one-dimensional model for coronal loops, where we employ two heating scenarios: simply shutting down the heating and a model where the heating is very concentrated at the loop footpoints, while keeping the total heat input constant. The heating off/on model does not lead to significant EUV count rates that one observes with SDO/AIA. In contrast, the concentration of the heating near the footpoints leads to thermal non-equilibrium near the l...

Peter, H; Kamio, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES that with a drastic simplifying assumption these methods can be used to calculate system solar-optical properties and solar heat gain coefficients for arbitrary glazing systems, while requiring limited data about

363

SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR HEAT GAIN THROUGH FENESTRATION SYSTEMS CONTAINING SHADING: PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING that with a drastic simplifying assumption these methods can be used to calculate system solar-optical properties and solar heat gain coefficients for arbitrary glazing systems, while requiring limited data about

364

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System Callaway Spring 2011 #12;Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar of analysis of Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power (DCS-CHP) systems is a design

California at Berkeley, University of

365

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Solar water heating technical support. Technical report for November 1997--April 1998 and final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report covers the time period November 1, 1997 through April 30, 1998, and also summarizes the project as the final report. The topics of the report include certification of solar collectors for water heating systems, modeling and testing of solar collectors and gas water heater backup systems, ratings of collectors for specific climates, and solar pool heating systems.

Huggins, J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Joule Heating and Anomalous Resistivity in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as $2.5 \\times 10^9$ Amperes (Spangler 2007). These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al (2007). This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of $3 \\times 10^5$. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007) are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivi...

Spangler, Steven R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

City of Sunset Valley - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Sunset Valley - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program City of Sunset Valley - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program City of Sunset Valley - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $2,000 Program Info Funding Source General Funds State Texas Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount 30% of installed cost Provider City of Sunset Valley The City of Sunset Valley offers rebates to local homeowners who install solar water heating systems on their properties. The local rebate acts as an add-on to the solar water heating rebates that are offered by Austin Energy to its electric customers. The Sunset Valley rebate is set at 30% of the installed system cost, up to a maximum rebate of $2,000 per homeowner, supplementing the

369

Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, and a solar heating system with seasonal storage was designed and simulated based on various conditions. The results indicate that 1) for many places of China, solar systems with seasonal storage can save conventional energy and can be competitive with gas-fired boiler heating; 2) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 3~5, the system performance is optimal for many places in China; 3) the obtained solar heat is mainly dependent on the solar irradiance, length of heating period and ambient temperature. Solar heating with seasonal storage in chilly places may also get good performance.

Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Felt-metal-wick heat-pipe solar receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reflux heat-pipe receivers have been identified as a desirable interface to couple a Stirling-cycle engine with a parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflux receiver provides power nearly isothermally to the engine heater heads while decoupling the heater head design from the solar absorber surface design. The independent design of the receiver and engine heater head leads to higher system efficiency. Heat pipe reflux receivers have been demonstrated at approximately 65 kW{sub t} power throughput. Several 25 to 30-kW{sub e} Stirling-cycle engines are under development, and will soon be incorporated in commercial dish-Stirling systems. These engines will require reflux receivers with power throughput limits reaching 90-kW{sub t}. The extension of heat pipe technology from 60 kW{sub t} to 100 kW{sub t} is not trivial. Current heat pipe wick technology is pushed to its limits. It is necessary to develop and test advanced wick structure technologies to perform this task. Sandia has developed and begun testing a Bekaert Corporation felt metal wick structure fabricated by Porous Metal Products Inc. This wick is about 95% porous, and has liquid permeability a factor of 2 to 8 times higher than conventional technologies for a given maximum pore radius. The wick has been successfully demonstrated in a bench-scale heat pipe, and a full-scale on-sun receiver has been fabricated. This report details the wick design, characterization and installation into a heat pipe receiver, and the results of the bench-scale tests are presented. The wick performance is modeled, and the model results are compared to test results.

Andraka, C.E.; Adkins, D.R.; Moss, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, H.M. [Porous Metal Products, Jacksboro, TX (United States); Andreas, N.H. [Bekaert Corp., Marietta, GA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

A performance data network for solar process heat systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar process heat (SPH) data network has been developed to access remote-site performance data from operational solar heat systems. Each SPH system in the data network is outfitted with monitoring equipment and a datalogger. The datalogger is accessed via modem from the data network computer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The dataloggers collect both ten-minute and hourly data and download it to the data network every 24-hours for archiving, processing, and plotting. The system data collected includes energy delivered (fluid temperatures and flow rates) and site meteorological conditions, such as solar insolation and ambient temperature. The SPH performance data network was created for collecting performance data from SPH systems that are serving in industrial applications or from systems using technologies that show promise for industrial applications. The network will be used to identify areas of SPH technology needing further development, to correlate computer models with actual performance, and to improve the credibility of SPH technology. The SPH data network also provides a centralized bank of user-friendly performance data that will give prospective SPH users an indication of how actual systems perform. There are currently three systems being monitored and archived under the SPH data network: two are parabolic trough systems and the third is a flat-plate system. The two trough systems both heat water for prisons; the hot water is used for personal hygiene, kitchen operations, and laundry. The flat plate system heats water for meat processing at a slaughter house. We plan to connect another parabolic trough system to the network during the first months of 1996. We continue to look for good examples of systems using other types of collector technologies and systems serving new applications (such as absorption chilling) to include in the SPH performance data network.

Barker, G.; Hale, M.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Impact of the national energy plan on solar economics. [Economic analysis of solar space heating and solar water heating by state  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) which account for combustion and heat generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

... .,-9 .-F ' : .C,.-DIMENSIONING OF THE HEAT BALANCE AND THE SOLAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources not only for heating of buildings, but also for cooling. Solar fractions therefore need. INTRODUCTION The number of buildings simultaneously equipped with air heat pumps and photovoltaic collectors as an air source for the heat pump. Other authors, as for instance [2], studied photovoltaic solar assisted

Mosegaard, Klaus

374

Georgia Power- Residential Solar and Heat Pump Water Heater Rebate (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Georgia Power customers may be eligible for rebates up to $250 each toward the installation costs of a 50 gallon or greater solar water heater or heat pump water heater. The solar water heater or...

375

New waste-heat refrigeration unit cuts flaring, reduces pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planetec Utility Services Co. Inc. and Energy Concepts Co. (ECC), with the help of the US Department of Energy (DOE), developed and commissioned a unique waste-heat powered LPG recovery plant in August 1997 at the 30,000 b/d Denver refinery, operated by Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS). This new environmentally friendly technology reduces flare emissions and the loss of salable liquid-petroleum products to the fuel-gas system. The waste heat ammonia absorption refrigeration plant (Whaarp) is the first technology of its kind to use low-temperature waste heat (295 F) to achieve sub-zero refrigeration temperatures ({minus}40 F) with the capability of dual temperature loads in a refinery setting. The ammonia absorption refrigeration is applied to the refinery`s fuel-gas makeup streams to condense over 180 b/d of salable liquid hydrocarbon products. The recovered liquid, about 64,000 bbl/year of LPG and gasoline, increases annual refinery profits by nearly $1 million, while substantially reducing air pollution emissions from the refinery`s flare.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S. [Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Erickson, D.; Papar, R. [Energy Concepts Co., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water August 16, 2010 - 12:30pm Addthis An array of solar collectors | Photo courtesy of Trane An array of solar collectors | Photo courtesy of Trane Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Recovery Act grant funds solar farm to heat 14,000 gallons of water a day Estimated to save $60,000 a year 174 tons of CO2 emissions avoided annually Hot water demand soars at the six-building Knox County Detention Facility in Tennessee. It's open 24/7 with 1,036 inmate beds and 4,500 meals served daily-and don't forget the laundry. Naturally, county officials sought an alternative to costly water heating. Their solution: a $1.88 million solar thermal system, among

377

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 3, October 1978-June 1979  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe collector system design was re-evaluated as a new system, as compared to previous evaluation where the heat pipe was an interchangeable component in the standard TC-101 system. Collector hardware components were finalized, including production costs. Heat pipe fluid-vessel testing continued indoors and outdoors in the solar panel. A prototpe production processing station has been designed which shows that the labor content of processing individual heat pipes can be reduced to 15 seconds with a total cost of $1.50.

Ernst, D.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Feasibility evaluation for solar industrial process heat applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical method for assessing the feasibility of Solar Industrial Process Heat applications has been developed and implemented in a flexible, fast-calculating computer code - PROSYS/ECONMAT. The performance model PROSYS predicts long-term annual energy output for several collector types, including flat-plate, nontracking concentrator, one-axis tracking concentrator, and two-axis tracking concentrator. Solar equipment cost estimates, annual energy capacity cost, and optional net present worth analysis are provided by ECONMAT. User input consists of detailed industrial process information and optional economic parameters. Internal program data includes meteorological information for 248 US sites, characteristics of more than 20 commercially available collectors representing several generic collector types, and defaults for economic parameters. Because a fullscale conventional back-up fuel system is assumed, storage is not essential and is not included in the model.

Stadjuhar, S. A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy conservation and solar heating for mobile homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activities consisted of retro-fitting six (6) mobile homes with extensive energy-conservation improvements and installing solar-space-heating systems on four (4) of these homes. The intent of the project was to evaluate the potential of mobile homes as a low-cost energy-efficient housing option for low- to moderate income families. Using both hard and soft data, it is estimated that an average fuel reduction in excess of 35% was achieved by the conservation improvements alone. The project lacked the expertise and monitoring instruments to properly evaluate the effectiveness of the four solar installations and had to rely on the personal observations of the four families that received the units.

None

380

Solar heat collectors. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains selected patents concerning solar heat collector apparatus and systems. Building panels, air conditioning systems, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, and controls are discussed. Applications include residential and commercial building space and water heating, greenhouse heating, and swimming pool heating. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

System design package for solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This package contains information used to evaluate the design of Solaron's solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling and back-up heating (when solar energy is not available). Included in the package are such items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A Solaron solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Solar-heated municipal swimming pools, a case study: Dade County, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The experience of installing a solar energy system to heat the water in the swimming pool in one of Dade County, Florida's major parks is described and the mechanics of solar heated swimming pools are explained. The solar heating system consists of 216 unglazed polypropylene tube collectors, a differential thermostat, and the distribution system. The performance and economics of the system are discussed as well as future plants. (LEW)

Levin, M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Extended Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Over the Solar Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews our growing understanding of the physics behind coronal heating (in open-field regions) and the acceleration of the solar wind. Many new insights have come from the last solar cycle's worth of observations and theoretical work. Measurements of the plasma properties in the extended corona, where the primary solar wind acceleration occurs, have been key to discriminating between competing theories. We describe how UVCS/SOHO measurements of coronal holes and streamers over the last 14 years have provided clues about the detailed kinetic processes that energize both fast and slow wind regions. We also present a brief survey of current ideas involving the coronal source regions of fast and slow wind streams, and how these change over the solar cycle. These source regions are discussed in the context of recent theoretical models (based on Alfven waves and MHD turbulence) that have begun to successfully predict both the heating and acceleration in fast and slow wind regions with essentially no fre...

Cranmer, Steven R; Miralles, Mari Paz; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

OBSERVATION OF ULTRAFINE CHANNELS OF SOLAR CORONA HEATING  

SciTech Connect

We report the first direct observations of dynamical events originating in the Sun's photosphere and subsequently lighting up the corona. Continuous small-scale, impulsive events have been tracked from their origin in the photosphere on through to their brightening of the local corona. We achieve this by combining high-resolution ground-based data from the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), and satellite data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The NST imaging observations in helium I 10830 A reveal unexpected complexes of ultrafine, hot magnetic loops seen to be reaching from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Most of these ultrafine loops are characterized by an apparently constant, but surprisingly narrow diameter of about 100 km all along each loop, and the loops originate on the solar surface from intense, compact magnetic field elements. The NST observations detect the signature of upward injections of hot plasma that excite the ultrafine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. The ejecta have their individual footpoints in the intergranular lanes between the Sun's ubiquitous, convectively driven granules. In many cases, AIA/SDO detects cospatial and cotemporal brightenings in the overlying, million degree coronal loops in conjunction with the upward injections along the ultrafine loops. Segments of some of the more intense upward injections are seen as rapid blueshifted events in simultaneous H{alpha} blue wing images observed at BBSO. In sum, the observations unambiguously show impulsive coronal heating events from upward energy flows originating from intergranular lanes on the solar surface accompanied by cospatial mass flows.

Ji, Haisheng [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NREL: Learning - Student Resources on Passive Solar Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

teams to design the most attractive, energy-efficient, and effective solar-powered house. American Solar Energy Society Has publications on passive solar design and...

386

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power (CSP) troughs in the central valley of California (Pricesolar combined heat and power with desalination Figure 2.7: Comparison of desalination plants; price

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Viability Of Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System With Solar Thermal Collectors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a study for examining the viability of hybrid ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems that use solar thermal collectors as the supplemental… (more)

Rad, Farzin M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on a comprehensive evaluation of the market for active solar heating and cooling products focusing on the attributes and behavior of HVAC decision makers. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Standards applicable to performance measurement of solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advantage of the utilization of existing standards in the performance monitoring of solar heating and cooling systems is discussed. Existing applicable measurement standards and practices are listed.

Lior, N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Focus on Energy - Commercial Solar Space-Heating Grant (WPS Customers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Focus on Energy (FOE) and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are partnering to offer solar space-heating grants for feasibility studies and installations. Commercial projects...

391

Progress Energy Florida - SunSense Solar Water Heating with EnergyWise...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In 2011, Progress Energy expanded its SunSense program to Florida and increased the Solar Water Heating Program rebate amount. Program incentives are as follows: * A 550...

392

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of heat loss tests for the Integral Collector Storage unit are shown. Work on unique solar system components is summarized briefly. (MHR)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

O&M First! Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs Heating accounts for a significant energy load and usually presents a number of opportunities to improve performance and...

394

Solar heat gain through a skylight in a light well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed heat flow measurements on a skylight mounted on a light well of significant depth are presented. It is shown that during the day much of the solar energy that strikes the walls of the well does not reach the space below. Instead, this energy is trapped in the stratified air of the light well and eventually either conducted through the walls of the well or back out through the skylight. The standard model for predicting fenestration heat transfer does not agree with the measurements when it is applied to the skylight/well combination as a whole (the usual practice), but does agree reasonably well when it is applied to the skylight alone, using the well air temperature near the skylight. A more detailed model gives good agreement. Design implications and future research directions are discussed.

Klems, J.H.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer Projects For Up to $67.6 Million DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer Projects For Up to $67.6 Million September 19, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced selections for negotiations of award under the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids and Novel Thermal Storage Concepts for Concentrating Solar Power Generation. These 15 new projects, for up to approximately $67.6 million, will facilitate the development of lower-cost energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. These projects support President Bush's Solar America Initiative, which aims to make solar energy cost-competitive with conventional forms of electricity

396

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.] [Terrafore Inc.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, October 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

Davidson, J.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--May 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

Davidson, J.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, November 15, 1996--January 14, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

Davidson, J.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas adopted in its residential building energy code a maximum 0.40 solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for fenestration (e.g., windows, glazed doors and skylights)-a critical driver of cooling energy use, comfort and peak demand. An analysis of the expected costs and benefits of low solar heat gain glazing, and specifically the SHGC requirement in the new Texas Residential Building Energy Code,1 shows that the 0.40 SHGC requirement is ideal for Texas and that the benefits far outweigh the expected costs. For consumers, the requirement will increase comfort and reduce their cost of home ownership. The anticipated public benefits are also substantial - the result of full implementation can be expected to: 1) Reduce cumulative statewide cooling energy use over ten years by 15 billion kWh; 2) Reduce cumulative statewide electric peak demand over ten years by over 1200 MW; 3) Result in cooling cost savings of more than a billion dollars; and 4) Reduce cumulative statewide key air pollutants.

Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mexico-GTZ Support for the Programme to Promote Solar Water Heating | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for the Programme to Promote Solar Water Heating for the Programme to Promote Solar Water Heating Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-GTZ Support for the Programme to Promote Solar Water Heating Name Mexico-GTZ Support for the Programme to Promote Solar Water Heating Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Partner German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Centro Mexicano de Promoción del Cobre A.C. (PROCOBRE) Sector Energy Focus Area Solar Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/27 Program Start 2007 Program End 2009 Country Mexico Central America References Support for the Programme to Promote Solar Water Heating in Mexico (PPP)[1] GTZ is working with Mexico on this project with the following objective:

402

An Ab Initio Approach to the Solar Coronal Heating Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an ab initio approach to the solar coronal heating problem by modelling a small part of the solar corona in a computational box using a 3D MHD code including realistic physics. The observed solar granular velocity pattern and its amplitude and vorticity power spectra, as reproduced by a weighted Voronoi tessellation method, are used as a boundary condition that generates a Poynting flux in the presence of a magnetic field. The initial magnetic field is a potential extrapolation of a SOHO/MDI high resolution magnetogram, and a standard stratified atmosphere is used as a thermal initial condition. Except for the chromospheric temperature structure, which is kept fixed, the initial conditions are quickly forgotten because the included Spitzer conductivity and radiative cooling function have typical timescales much shorter than the time span of the simulation. After a short initial start up period, the magnetic field is able to dissipate 3-4 10^6 ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} in a highly intermittent corona, maintaining an average temperature of $\\sim 10^6$ K, at coronal density values for which emulated images of the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer(TRACE) 171 and 195 pass bands reproduce observed photon count rates.

B. V. Gudiksen; Å. Nordlund

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into advanced low-cost solar water heating. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Project Description This project seeks to identify and resolve technical, performance, and cost barriers to the development of easy-to-install and reliable solar water heating systems for all major U.S. climate regions. The project will also evaluate opportunities for breakthrough system innovations and innovations in advanced system performance ratings. Project Partners

404

Installation guidelines for Solar Heating System, single-family residence at New Castle, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating System installer guidelines are provided for each subsystem and includes testing and filling the system. This single-family residential heating system is a solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air system with solar-assisted domestic water heating. It is composed of the following major components: liquid cooled flat plate collectors; water storage tank; passive solar-fired domestic water preheater; electric hot water heater; heat pump with electric backup; solar hot water coil unit; tube-and-shell heat exchanger, three pumps, and associated pipes and valving in an energy transport module; control system; and air-cooled heat purge unit. Information is also provided on the operating procedures, controls, caution requirements, and routine and schedule maintenance. Information consists of written procedures, schematics, detail drawings, pictures and manufacturer's component data.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Boiler Blowdown Heat Recovery Project Reduces Steam System Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produced. Much of this heat can be recovered by routing the blown down liquid through a heat exchanger that preheats the boiler's makeup water. A boiler blowdown heat recovery...

406

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations June 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the availability of more than $27 million in new funding that will reduce the non-hardware costs of solar energy projects, a critical element in bringing down the overall costs of installed solar energy systems. The funding will support a $12.5 million challenge to encourage cities and counties to compete to streamline and digitize permitting processes, as

407

DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, 27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations DOE Announces $27 Million to Reduce Costs of Solar Energy Projects, Streamline Permitting and Installations June 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the Obama Administration's SunShot Initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with fossil fuels within the decade, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the availability of more than $27 million in new funding that will reduce the non-hardware costs of solar energy projects, a critical element in bringing down the overall costs of installed solar energy systems. The funding will support a $12.5 million challenge to encourage cities and counties to compete to streamline and digitize permitting processes, as

408

Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

Schneider, A.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermal storage studies for solar heating and cooling: applications using chemical heat pumps. Final report, September 15, 1979-April 15, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TRNSYS-compatible subroutines for the simulation of chemical heat pumps have been written, and simulations (including heating, cooling, and domestic hot water) have been performed for Washington, DC and Ft. Worth, Texas. Direct weekly comparisons of the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//H/sub 2/O and CaCl/sub 2//CH/sub 3/OH cycles have been carried out. Projected performance of the NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3//NH/sub 3/ cycle has also been investigated, and found to be essentially identical to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//H/sub 2/O. In all cases simulated, the solar collector is a fixed evacuated tube system, which is necessary because chemical heat pumps operate at higher solar collector temperatures (> 100/sup 0/C) than conventional solar systems. With standard residential loads, the chemical heat pumps performed surprisingly well. In the Ft. Worth climate, less than 45 m/sup 2/ of collectors were required to meet over 90% of the heating and cooling loads. In Washington, DC, the area required to meet the cooling load was smaller (as little as 20 m/sup 2/, depending on window shading), but was sufficient to meet only 50 to 60% of the heating load. However, gas-fired backup via the heat pump was quite effective in reducing fossil fuel consumption: the thermal COPs in the heating mode were in the range 1.6 to 1.7. Since chemical heat pumps are designed to reject heat at relatively high temperatures, they were also effective in providing domestic hot water, supplying ca. 70% of the DHW in summer, ca. 50% in winter, and nearly 100% in spring and fall.

Offenhartz, P O.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Measurement of the solar heat gain coefficient and U value of windows with insect screens  

SciTech Connect

Energy ratings are currently being used in a number of countries to assist in the selection of windows and doors based on energy performance. Developed for simple comparison purposes, these rating numbers do not take into account window removable attachments such as insect screens that are, nevertheless, widely used. Research was carried out to assess the effect of insect screens on the heat gains and losses of windows. The work reported in this paper deals with the effect of one screen type on the performance of a base-case, double-glazed window. Using an indoor solar simulator facility, measurements of the window solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and U value were made for different screen attachment configurations and climatic conditions. Results with the sample window tested indicate that insect screens placed on the outdoor side can reduce its SHGC by 46% with only a 7% reduction in its U value (0.19 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C), and that insect screens placed on the indoor side can reduce its SHGC by 15% while reducing its U value by 14% (0.38 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C).

Brunger, A.; Dubrous, F.M.; Harrison, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Guidelines for selecting a solar heating, cooling or hot water design  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines are presented for the professional who may have to choose between competing solar heating and cooling designs for buildings. The experience of the National Solar Data Network in monitoring over 100 solar installations are drawn upon. Three basic principles and a design selection checklist are developed which will aid in choosing the most cost effective design.

Kelly, C.J. Jr.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change Dr N.J. EkiNs-DaukEs Executive summary Why are we interested in using solar energy? Sunlight provides the energy source. In developing countries, solar technologies are already in use to enhance the standard of living

413

State-of-the-art of solar control systems in industrial process heat applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art of solar control systems is addressed pertinent to industrial process heat applications. Solar system configurations currently being used or proposed are presented; parameters and functions deemed essential in solar system controls are identified; operating deficiencies are described; and possible future improvements are discussed.

Su, W. S.; Castle, J. N.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A nanoflare heating model for the quiet solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy input into the lower solar corona by flare evaporation events has been modeled according to the available observations for quiet regions. The question is addressed whether such heating events can provide the observed average level of the coronal emission measure and thus of the observed flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray emission without contradicting the observed average power spectrum of the emission measure, the typical emission measure variations observed for individual pixels and the observed flare energy distribution. As the assumed flare height influences the derived flare energy, the mathematical foundations of nanoflare distributions and their conversion to different height assumptions are studied first. This also allows a comparison with various published energy distributions differing in height assumptions and to relate the observations to the input parameters of the heating model. An analytic evaluation of the power spectrum yields the relationship between the average time profile of nanoflares (or microflares), assumed to be self-similar in energy, and the power spectrum. We find that the power spectrum is very sensitive to the chosen time profile of the flares. Models are found by numerical simulation that fit all available observations. They are not unique but severely constrained. We concentrate on a model with a flare height proportional to the square root of the flare area. The existence of a fitting model demonstrates that nanoflare heating of the corona is a viable and attractive mechanism.

U. Mitra-Kraev; A. O. Benz

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Design manual for solar heating of buildings and domestic hot water  

SciTech Connect

This manual presents design and cost analysis methods for sizing and payback estimating of solar heat collectors for augmentation of portable water heaters and space heaters. Sufficient information is presented to enable almost anyone to design solar space and water heating systems or conduct basic feasibility studies preparatory to design of large installations. Both retrofit and new installations are considered. (MOW)

Field, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling of solar heating and air conditioning. Progress report, October 31, 1974--December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of the research is to develop the means to identify and optimize practical systems for heating and cooling of buildings with solar energy in the United States. This will be done through simulation methods. Secondary objectives are to: extend and refine TRNSYS (a modular solar energy system simulation program); develop the means of supporting TRNSYS users in other laboratories; use TRNSYS (and other simulation programs) to develop design procedures for solar heating and cooling processes; design and evaluate an experimental solar heating system on a Wisconsin farm residence.

Duffie, J.A.; Beckman, W.A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Shallow solar ponds for industrial process heat: the ERDA--SOHIO project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy group at LLL has developed shallow solar ponds to supply cost-competitive solar heated water for industrial use. A prototype system has been built and put into operation at the site of the Sohio Petroleum Company's new uranium mine and milling complex near Grants, New Mexico. When operational, a projected full-size system is expected to furnish approximately half of the 10/sup 5/ GJ (approximately 10/sup 5/ MBtu) annual site process heat requirement. A description of the physical features of shallow solar ponds is presented along with a method for analyzing pond performance. An economic analysis of the projected Sohio solar system is provided.

Dickinson, W.C.; Clark, A.V.; Iantuono, A.

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Shallow solar ponds for industrial process heat: the ERDA--SOHIO project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy group at LLL has developed shallow solar ponds to supply cost-competitive solar heated water for industrial use. A prototype system has been built and put into operation at the site of the Sohio Petroleum Company's new uranium mine and milling complex near Grants, New Mexico. When operational, a projected full-size system is expected to furnish approximately half of the 10/sup 5/ GJ annual site process heat requirement. A description of the physical features of shallow solar ponds is presented along with a method for analyzing pond performance. An economic analysis of the projected Sohio solar system is provided.

Dickinson, W.C.; Clark, A.F.; Iantuono, A.

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solar site test module. [DOE/NASA solar heating and cooling demonstration installations  

SciTech Connect

A solar site test module using the Rockwell AIM 65 micro-computer is described. The module is designed to work at any site where an IBM site data acquisition system (SDAS) is installed and is intended primarily as a troubleshooting tool for DOE/NASA commercial solar heating and cooling system demonstration installations. It collects sensor information (temperatures, flow rates, etc.) and displays or prints it immediately in calibrated engineering units. It will read one sensor on demand, periodically read up to 10 sensors or periodically read all sensors. Performance calculations can also be included with sensor data. Unattended operation is possible to, e.g., monitor a group of sensors once per hour. Work is underway to add a data acquisition system to the test module so that it can be used at sites which have no SDAS.

Kissel, R.R.; Scott, D.R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs February 19, 2009 - 1:39pm Addthis Water heating can account for a significant portion of your energy costs. Purchasing a new ENERGY STAR® water heater is just one way to save on your water heating bills. The Energy Savers Tips site lists other strategies you can use to cut your water heating costs. How do you reduce your water heating costs? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Energy Savers Guide: Tips on Saving Money and Energy at Home How Do You Save on Lighting Costs? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs

423

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations for the Heat Exchanger Network Heat-Exchangepower-generation heat exchangers. and storage vessels.and Valves None Heat Exchangers. Distillation Column, Low

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Installation package for a domestic solar heating and hot water system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fern Engineering Company, Inc. has developed two prototype solar heating and hot water systems. The systems have been installed at Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania, and Lansing, Michigan. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, storage, control, transport, and auxiliary energy. General guidelines which may be utilized in development of detailed installation plans and specifications are presented. In addition, instruction on operation, maintenance, and repair of a solar heating and hot water system is provided.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Comparative performance of solar heating with air and liquid systems. Interim progress report, February 1, 1976--August 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

A performance comparison between an air solar system and a liquid solar system for space heating under nearly equal conditions has been obtained. The Colorado State University Solar House I is a liquid solar system which has been in operation since August 1974. Solar House II, which stands adjacent to and has a comparable heating load to Solar House I, is equipped with an air solar system. Solar House I has been continuously monitored since August 1974 and Solar House II has been monitored since February 1976. Performance of the solar systems is reported in terms of the collector efficiency, the amount of space heating and service water heating load provided by solar energy, and the use of electrical energy to operate the solar equipment. General characteristics of the two types of systems are also compared. Information concerning installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems have been documented and are discussed.

Karaki, S.; Lof, G.O.G.; Smith, C.C.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Analysis of heat-pipe absorbers in evacuated-tube solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer in evacuated-tube solar collectors with heat-pipe absorbers is compared with that for similar collectors with flow-through absorbers. In systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids, the heat-pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow-through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat-pipe condenser and system manifold. The heat transfer penalty decreases with decreasing collector heat loss coefficient, suggesting that evacuated tubes with optical concentration are more appropriate for use with heat pipes than evacuated or nonevacuated flat-plate collectors. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat-pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow-through absorbers.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.; Allen, J.W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of OngoingSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat andSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of a heat pump system suitable for incorporating in a space solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility are described. The performance of the system is evaluated. The refrigerating capacity, heating capacity and compressor horsepower for a heat pump system using a piston type compressor are first determined. The heat pump design is also matched with the existing University of Toledo solar house heating system. The refrigerant is Freon-12 working between a condensing temperature of up to 172/sup 0/F and evaporator temperature between 0/sup 0/F and 75/sup 0/F. The heat pump is then installed. Performance indices for the heat pump and the heating system in general are defined and generated by the on-line computer monitoring system for the 1979/80 heating season operation. Monthly and seasonal indices such as heat pump coefficient of performance, collector efficiency, percent of heating load supplied by solar energy and individual components efficiencies in general are recorded. The data collected is then analyzed and compared with previously collected data. The improvement in the performance resulting from the addition of a piston type compressor with an external motor belt drive is then evaluated. Data collected points to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. Data shows that the seasonal percent of space heating load supplied by solar is 60% and the seasonal percent cost of space heating load supplied by solar is 82% with a solar collection coefficient of performance of 4.6. Data also indicates that such a system would pay for itself in 14 years when used in Northwest Ohio.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Gross Thermal Efficiency of a Solar Power Plant • .and Maintenance* - Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar PowerMWe Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar Power Plant,MWe-hr/

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.a central solar thermal power plant. A variety of heliostatSTORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Research on the Applicability of Solar Energy-Ground Source Heat Pump in Different Regions of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development potential of solar energy resource, cLimatic characteristics and soil temperature conditions are various in different areas of China, which brings some difficulties in the promotion and appLication of solar energy-ground source heat pump ... Keywords: Solar energy-ground source heat pump (GSHP), Solar radiation, Sharacteristics of soil thermal storage, Geographic features

Dongyi Zhou; Chu-ping Shi; Wen-hua Yuan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

InterTechnology Corporation proposed systems level plan for solar heating and cooling commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program for non-residential buildings are embodied in the following: (1) Demonstrate the ultimate economic and technical feasibility of solar heating and combined heating and cooling. (2) Stimulate industry to produce and market solar equipment. (3) Stimulate a commercial market for solar systems. The systems level plan is designed to address the above stated goals as they relate to the building community associated with the commercial sector of the economy. (WDM)

None

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Beaches Energy Services - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Programs Amount Solar Water Heater: 500 Equipment Requirements Must be Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) certified All system components must be new Systems must be...

438

Heat Transfer Interface for Thermo-Solar Energy - Energy ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Alex Zettl of Berkeley Lab has invented a high efficiency solar energy collector and converter. By addressing both solar absorption and ...

439

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

certified by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), and installed by a state-licensed solar or plumbing contractor. For installations arranged by homeowners, the contractor...

440

Near-term viability of solar heat applications for the federal sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal technologies are capable of providing heat across a wide range of temperatures, making them potentially attractive for meeting energy requirements for industrial process heat applications and institutional heating. The energy savings that could be realized by solar thermal heat are quite large, potentially several quads annually. Although technologies for delivering heat at temperatures above 100{degrees}C currently exit within industry, only a fairly small number of commercial systems have been installed to date. The objective of this paper is to investigate and discuss the prospects for near-term solar heat sales to federal facilities as a mechanism for providing an early market niche to the aid the widespread development and implementation of the technology. The specific technical focus is on mid-temperature (100{degrees}--350{degrees}C) heat demands that could be met with parabolic trough systems. Federal facilities have several relative to private industry that may make them attractive for solar heat applications relative to other sectors. Key features are specific policy mandates for conserving energy, a long-term planning horizon with well-defined decision criteria, and prescribed economic return criteria for conservation and solar investments that are generally less stringent than the investment criteria used by private industry. Federal facilities also have specific difficulties in the sale of solar heat technologies and strategies to mitigate these difficulties will be important. For the baseline scenario developed in this paper, the solar heat application was economically competitive with heat provided by natural gas. The system levelized energy cost was $5.9/MBtu for the solar heat case, compared to $6.8/MBtu for the life-cycle fuel cost of a natural gas case. A third-party ownership would also be attractive to federal users, since it would guarantee energy savings and would not need initial federal funds. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Williams, T.A.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of In press at Progress in Solar Energy April 28, 2010 R.2008. In press at Progress in Solar Energy April 28, 2010 R.ectance measurements. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells,

Levinson, Ronnen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, August 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

Davidson, J.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for solar water heating has been reduced to 0.40 per equivalent kilowatt-hour (kWh), and incentives for all non-solar renewable energy technologies have been suspended. ''''' Prev...

444

Solar heating and cooling system design and development. Status summary, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling equipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Annual Energy Consumption Analysis and Energy Optimization of a Solar-Assisted Heating Swimming Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the energy efficiency calculations and optimization for an indoor solar-assisted heating swimming pool in GuangZhou. The heating energy requirements for maintaining the pool constant temperature were investigated, which can be divided into three main parts: heat loss due to surface water evaporation, conduction and convective heat loss, and heat demand for heating fresh water. Then, an all-year solar radiation model for slope with varying orientation and incline angle is introduced, and relevant results are given based on typical year weather data in GuangZhou. Furthermore, annual energy consumption model and life cycle cost optimization model is established, and optimal results are analyzed based on an indoor solar-assisted heating swimming pool with 200m2 surface area in GuangZhou.

Zuo, Z.; Hu, W.; Meng, O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Compressor performance at high suction temperatures with application to solar heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the study of Solar Assisted Heat Pump (SAHP) Systems, the performance of the heat pump itself and its components under conditions attendant to series solar input to the evaporator is being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Particular emphasis has been placed on the details of the compressor performance, since in order to properly exploit the thermodynamic potential of high solar input temperatures (40 to 100/sup 0/F), the compressor must operate efficiently over a wide range of (saturated) suction temperatures most of which are well above those for which present compressors are designed. A systematic series of experiments is being conducted at evaporating temperatures in the range from 45 to 100/sup 0/F using a Solar Heat Pump Simulator and a specially designed Laboratory Model Heat Pump assembled from off-the-shelf components. Two reciprocating compressors have been tested thus far - an open type driven by a 2-speed motor and a hermetic 2-speed, the multi-speed feature providing capacity control, which is a virtual necessity for effective use of solar source. Thorough and highly accurate instrumentation is used in the simulator and in the heat pump refrigeration loop. The results to date of the compressor aspects of the solar heat pump experiments at BNL are described, and the general application of heat pumps and their compressors to use with solar input are discussed.

Kush, E A

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

City of Palo Alto Utilities - Solar Water Heating Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heating Program Solar Water Heating Program City of Palo Alto Utilities - Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family residential gas-displacing systems: $2,719 Single-family residential electricity or propane-displacing systems: $1,834 Commercial/Industrial/Multi-family: $100,000 One contractor can have no more than $150,000 in incentive reservations at any given time. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single-family residential gas-displacing systems: $18.59 per therm displaced Single-family residential electricity or propane-displacing systems: $$0.54 per kWh displaced Multi-family and commercial gas-displacing systems: $14.53 per therm

448

U.S. Virgin Islands - Solar Water Heating Requirement for New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » U.S. Virgin Islands - Solar Water Heating Requirement for New Construction U.S. Virgin Islands - Solar Water Heating Requirement for New Construction < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Program Type Building Energy Code In July 2009, U.S. Virgin Islands enacted legislation Act 7075. This legislation requires all new developments, and substantial building modifications, must be installed with energy efficient solar water heaters to provide at least 70% of the building's water heating needs. This is for all building types: residential, commercial, and governmental.

449

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Israeli manufacturer introduces solar heating for home use in Greece and Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Miromit Ltd. of Tel Aviv, Israel's principal developer and producer of solar heating equipment, said to be the world's large manufacturer in the field, recently announced the completion of a marketing agreement with major heating companies in Greece and Turkey which are introducing solar energy for hot water heating in their countries. Both of these countries will benefit from continuous Miromit research and development in new Sun heating applications, including central hot water installations for apartment buildings and solar-heating systems for swimming pools, sport halls, and agricultural and industrial buildings. Israeli solar equipment has been installed in a research model apartment building at the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA in Green Belt, Md. (MCW)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Review of state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes. Task 1 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes is reviewed, and Task 1 of a current research program on use of aqueous heat transfer fluids for solar heating and cooling is summarized. The review of available published literature has indicated that lack of quantitative information exists relative to collector corrosion at the present time, particularly for the higher temperature applications of solar heating and cooling compared to domestic water heating. Solar collector systems are reviewed from the corrosion/service life viewpoint, with emphasis on various applications, collector design, heat transfer fluids, and freeze protection methods. Available information (mostly qualitative) on collector corrosion technology is reviewed to indicate potential corrosion problem areas and corrosion prevention practices. Sources of limited quantitative data that are reviewed are current solar applications, research programs on collector corrosion, and pertinent experience in related applications of automotive cooling and non-solar heating and cooling. A data bank was developed to catalog corrosion information. Appendix A of this report is a bibliography of the data bank, with abstracts reproduced from presently available literature accessions (about 220). This report is presented as a descriptive summary of information that is contained in the data bank.

Clifford, J E; Diegle, R B

1980-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Experimental evaluation of a simulation model for wrap-around heat exchanger, solar storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance of a commercially available 80 gallon, solar storage tank with an integral wrap-around heat exchanger is characterized experimentally an indoor test stand. The experimental results are used to evaluated the accuracy of a previously developed simulation model. Heat input on the collector side of the heat exchanger is held constant causing the heat transfer to reach a quasi-steady state. Temperatures in the heat exchanger and tank increase with time, however, the temperature differences across the heat exchanger remain nearly constant. Several combinations of heat input and collector loop flow are investigated. The development of the tank temperature profiles over time and the overall heat transfer performance predicted by the model are compared with experimental results. The influence of an electric auxiliary heater located in the top of the solar storage tank on the heat exchanger performance is investigated. Experimental normalization of the model is considered and modifications to the model and experiments are recommended.

Miller, J.A.; Hittle, D.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Experimental investigation on the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system on water-heating mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study on operation performance of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was conducted in this paper. The experimental system of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure, the condensation pressure and the coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pump air-conditioning system, the water temperature and receiving heat capacity in water heater, the photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and the photovoltaic efficiency were investigated. The experimental results show that the mean photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar heat pump air-conditioning system reaches 10.4%, and can improve 23.8% in comparison with that of the conventional photovoltaic module, the mean COP of heat pump air-conditioning system may attain 2.88 and the water temperature in water heater can increase to 42 C. These results indicate that the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system has better performances and can stably work. (author)

Fang, Guiyin; Hu, Hainan; Liu, Xu [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Solar heating and cooling in the Los Alamos National Security and Resources Study Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the solar energy system for the National Security and Resources Study Center, a conference center and library at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The solar heating and cooling system makes use of selectively coated collectors, hot storage, cold storage, night evaporative cold storage, heat recovery, a lithium bromide chiller, and a Rankine-cycle chiller. Data are given for the performance of the system for the years 1978 and 1979. The solar energy system has provided 76% of the energy required to heat the building and 97% of the thermal energy required to cool the building.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Murray, H.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Handbook of experiences in the design and installation of solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large array of problems encountered are detailed, including design errors, installation mistakes, cases of inadequate durability of materials and unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in the performance and operation of different solar systems. Durability, reliability, and design problems are reviewed for solar collector subsystems, heat transfer fluids, thermal storage, passive solar components, piping/ducting, and reliability/operational problems. The following performance topics are covered: criteria for design and performance analysis, domestic hot water systems, passive space heating systems, active space heating systems, space cooling systems, analysis of systems performance, and performance evaluations. (MHR)

Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effect of Cavity Wall Temperature and Opening Ratio on the Natural Convection Heat Loss Characteristics of a Solar Cavity Receiver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural convection heat loss characteristics of a solar cavity receiver have been investigated by numerical simulation method. The results show that, the natural convection heat loss, the convection heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number increase ... Keywords: solar cavity receiver, cavity wall temperature, opening ratio, natural convection heat loss

Lan Xiao; Shuang-Ying Wu; You-Rong Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Public release of optimization of metallization scheme for thin emitter wrap-through solar cells for higher efficiency, reduced precious metal costs, and reduced stress.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Back-contact crystalline-silicon photovoltaic solar cells and modules offer a number of advantages, including the elimination of grid shadowing losses, reduced cost through use of thinner silicon substrates, simpler module assembly, and improved aesthetics. While the existing edge tab method for interconnecting and stringing edge-connected back contact cells is acceptably straightforward and reliable, there are further gains to be exploited when you have both contact polarities on one side of the cell. In this work, we produce 'busbarless' emitter wrap-through solar cells that use 41% of the gridline silver (Ag) metallization mass compared to the edge tab design. Further, series resistance power losses are reduced by extraction of current from more places on the cell rear, leading to a fill factor improvement of about 6% (relative) on the module level. Series resistance and current-generation losses associated with large rear bondpads and busbars are eliminated. Use of thin silicon (Si) wafers is enabled because of the reduced Ag metallization mass and by interconnection with conductive adhesives leading to reduced bow. The busbarless cell design interconnected with conductive adhesives passes typical International Electrotechnical Commission damp heat and thermal cycling test.

Ruby, Douglas Scott; Murphy, Brian (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Meakin, David (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Jason (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Hacke, Peter (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Theory of heating of hot magnetized plasma by Alfven waves. Application for solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating of magnetized plasma by propagation of Alfven waves is calculated as a function of the magnetic field spectral density. The results can be applied to evaluate the heating power of the solar corona at known data from satellites' magnetometers. This heating rate can be incorporated in global models for heating of the solar corona and creation of the solar wind. The final formula for the heating power is illustrated with a model spectral density of the magnetic field obtained by analysis of the Voyager 1 mission results. The influence of high frequency dissipative modes is also taken into account and it is concluded that for evaluation of the total coronal heating it is necessary to know the spectral density of the fluctuating component of the magnetic field up to the frequency of electron-proton collisions.

T. M. Mishonov; M. V. Stoev; Y. G. Maneva

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Sunburst is a demonstration system for solar space heating and cooling and solar hot water heating for a 14,400 square foot office building in Richland, Washington. The project is part of the US Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid--liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building to reject surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program has been provided from the beginning of the program and has resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on June, 1978 prices, AN OVERVIEW OF THE SOLAR POWER PLANTstorage for a solar power plant at a reasonable price usingsolar power plant energy storage for a reasonable price

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce solar heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.