Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

2

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

3

Reduced power consumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a potential energy savings of over $30 Billion/year. This new approach is demanded by the exponentiallyBenefits Reduced power consumption in IC devices; hence potential energy savings of 300 Billion KWh://www.sia- online.org) CuRIE Interconnect Technology for Improved Energy Efficiency in IC Chips ARPA-E Technology

4

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

5

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of the assessment recommendations is estimated to be $843,000 with a total implementation cost. Manufacturing at the facility includes both casting and extrusion processes. Process equipment, air compressors productivity. As a result, facility production costs can be reduced and profits can be increased. August 2001

6

Railroad fuel-oil consumption in 1928  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented, by districts, covering the consumption of fuel oil for various uses by railroads.

Redfield, A.H.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reduces a processor's energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Clearly, this is energy inefficient and wasteful of energy. 2 More precisely, the faster that a processor decide that energy is being wasted and will decrease the frequency/voltage level. Translation: LowerReduces a processor's energy consumption by up to 70% Diminishes greenhouse gas emissions Improves

8

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5 million per site Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Rebate Program Provider Agence de l'efficacité énergétique This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out various analyses as well as implement energy efficient measures relating to heavy fuel oil or to switch to other forms of energy containing fewer pollutants, such as natural gas,

9

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W....

10

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Networked Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Networked Devices Speaker(s): Ken Christensen Date: July 19, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 When Personal Computers are networked, energy...

11

Air toxics from heavy oil production and consumption  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential impact of recent Federal and state regulations for airborne toxic substances on the production and consumption of heavy fuel oils. Emissions of nickel from heavy oil production in California are considered in some detail, in conjunction with California state regulations for toxic emissions. Although the use of thermal energy from heavy crude oils could in theory be impacted by toxic air pollution regulations, recent trends towards the use of natural gas for the required extraction energy appear to provide substantial relief, in addition to reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants. However, the consumption of residual fuel oils containing toxic metals could result in higher population exposures to these substances and their attendant risks may be worthy of more detailed analysis.

Lipfert, F.W.; DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Potential for Reducing Consumption Through Distribution Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, EPRI released a Prism analysis, providing a technically and economically feasible roadmap for the electricity sector to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. This approach has been extended to evaluate the utility distribution sector and opportunities to improve efficiency and reduce consumption. Possible improvements in efficiency are estimated by improvement category, including use of more efficient transformers and better reactive power management. Voltage optimization is a significant option ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Oil consumption, pollutant emission, oil proce volatility and economic activities in selected Asian Developing Economies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is now well established in the literature that oil consumption, oil price shocks, and oil price volatility may impact the economic activities negatively. Studies (more)

Rafiq, Shuddhasattwa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Plan to Reduce State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption

17

Experimental study of lube oil characteristics in the PCV system and effects on engine oil consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine oil consumption is an important source of hydrocarbon and particulate emissions in modem automobile engines. Great efforts have been made by automotive manufacturers to minimize the impact of oil consumption on ...

Lopez, Oscar, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Exploiting Domain Knowledge to Forecast Heating Oil Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GasDay laboratory at Marquette University provides forecasts of energy consumption. One such service is the Heating Oil Forecaster

George F. Corliss; Tsuginosuke Sakauchi; Steven R. Vitullo; Ronald H. Brown

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other...

20

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bene?ts and costs of oil and to deeper global, economic,distribution of bene?ts and costs from oil. It is virtuallyboth the bene?ts and costs of oil production and consumption

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Compiler Support for Reducing Leakage Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy. Our strategy is built upon a data-flow analysis that ...

W. Zhang; M. Kandemir; N. Vijaykrishnan; M. J. Irwin; V. De

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Reducing Network Energy Consumption via Sleeping and Rate-Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to save power when routers are idle. The performance states we assume dynamically change the rate of links where ps states reduce power consumption by lowering the rate at which work consumption. We also assume a penalty for transitioning between power states. For simplicity, we measure

Ratnasamy, Sylvia

23

Psychological strategies to reduce energy consumption: first annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary program composed of a mix of physical and social scientists is studying the behavior of occupants as well as the engineering aspects of household energy consumption. A study of the Twin Rivers, New Jersey area examined and tested psychological strategies for helping people achieve significant reductions in their residential energy consumption. The results show that homeowners are motivated by cost and other pressures provided by daily feedback on their actual energy consumption. Four feedback experiments suggest that feedback helps homeowners to reduce their energy consumption, but the optimal nature of the feedback system has yet to be identified. The project also included research on thermostat control and on attitudes.

Seligman, C.; Darley, J.M.; Becker, L.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Challenge of Reducing Energy Consumption in China's Industrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Challenge of Reducing Energy Consumption in China's Industrial Sector Speaker(s): Lynn Price Date: September 16, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

25

Reducing 3G energy consumption on mobile devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 3G wireless interface is a significant contributor to battery drain on mobile devices. This paper describes the design, implementation, and experimental evaluation of methods to reduce the energy consumption of the 3G ...

Deng, Shuo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

27

Reducing US vulnerability to oil supply shocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 crisis in the Middle East has raised concern about the United States`s vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. In addition, a number of trends point to increased US dependence on imported oil. Oil imports have increased and production has declined in the United States for the last eight years. Imports now comprise 42 percent of total oil consumption and US dependence on oil imports is projected to increase over the next 20 years. The Energy Modeling Forum forecasts imports to be more than twice domestic production by the year 2010. There are many studies examining the effects of various policies to protect US energy security. Not many consider the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), which can be a powerful tool in combating energy supply shocks. The SPR can dramatically increase the domestic short run supply elasticity, which has been found to be a key element in the welfare cost of protectionist policies. Upon examining 5 policies the author finds that the SPR together with a protectionist policy works best against a supply disruption. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

Yuecel, M.K. [Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Today, the United States spends about $400 billion each year on imported oil. To realize a secure energy future, America must break its dependence on imported oil and its volatile costs. The transportation sector accounts for about 70% of U.S. oil demand and holds tremendous opportunity to increase America's energy security by reducing oil consumption. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R and D) on vehicle technologies which can stem America's dependence on oil, strengthen the economy, and protect the environment. Hybrid-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles can significantly improve fuel economy, displacing petroleum. Researchers are making batteries more affordable and recyclable, while enhancing battery range, performance, and life. This research supports President Obama's goal of putting 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The program is also working with businesses to develop domestic battery and electric-drive component plants to improve America's economic competitiveness globally. The program facilitates deployment of alternative fuels (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, propane, and natural gas) and fuel infrastructures by partnering with state and local governments, universities, and industry. Reducing vehicle weight directly improves vehicle efficiency and fuel economy, and can potentially reduce vehicle operating costs. Cost-effective, lightweight, high-strength materials can significantly reduce vehicle weight without compromising safety. Improved combustion technologies and optimized fuel systems can improve near-and mid-term fuel economy by 25% for passenger vehicles and 20% for commercial vehicles by 2015, compared to 2009 vehicles. Reducing the use of oil-based fuels and lubricants in vehicles has more potential to improve the nation's energy security than any other action; even a 1% improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency would save consumers more than $4 billion annually.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reducing system level power consumption for mobile and embedded platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The power consumption of peripheral devices is a significant portion of the overall energy usage of a mobile platform. To take advantage of idle times, most devices offer the ability to transition into low power states. However, the amount of energy saved by utilizing these sleep states depends on the lengths and number of idle periods experienced by the device. This paper describes a new process scheduling algorithm which accumulates device usage information in the form of device windows to make power a first class resource: it attempts to increase the burstiness of both device accesses and idle periods, and it provides enhanced behavior for timeout-based sleep mechanisms. An initial implementation based on the default Linux scheduler demonstrates the algorithms and approachs ability to reduce the average power consumption of devices by increasing device sleep times and reducing transition overheads. 1

Ripal Nathuji; Karsten Schwan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Application of Grey Correlation Method in Energy Consumption Analysis of Crude Oil Gathering System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to take quantitative analysis on impact factors of energy consumption in crude oil gathering system, gray system theory analysis was adopted to evaluate energy consumption impact factors sequence of crude oil gathering system through the establishment ... Keywords: Gathering and Transporting of Crude Oil, Influence factor, Grey Correlation

Zhou Yingming; Wang Shuwei; Li Dong; Wu Guozhong

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Altman, Susan Jeanne; Ciferno, Jared

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viii Figure 4.1: Electrical power usage breakdown for a3:30PM. The total HVAC electrical power consumption for thepower consumption, over Electrical Power Consumption (in kW)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 4.4: Power consumption of a desktop PC + 3 LCDChapter 2 Trends in Building Consumption 2.1 UCSD as abreakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- use

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- useFigure 3.7: The energy consumption of HVAC during ourSpring 2011 tests - Energy consumption for electricity and

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: June 13, 2005 6: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Digg

37

Sources and characteristics of oil consumption in a spark-ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) At low load, oil flowing past by the piston was found to be the major consumption source, while the contributions of oil evaporation and of blowby entrainment became more significant with increasing engine load. ...

Yilmaz, Ertan, 1970-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CCLEP Reduces Energy Consumption by More than 50% for a Luxury...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCLEP Reduces Energy Consumption by More than 50% for a Luxury Shopping Mall Title CCLEP Reduces Energy Consumption by More than 50% for a Luxury Shopping Mall Publication Type...

39

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

40

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

real-time power consumption. More modern devices come withpower consumption of laptop with time, and the difference in startup power draw of both devices.devices are turned on at different times, their characteristic waveforms can be distinguished from the overall power consumption

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring of Direct Energy Consumption in Long-Term2007. Constraining Energy Consumption of Chinas LargestProgram: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Towards new widgets to reduce PC power consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a study which describes the power consumption characteristics of a number of different interaction techniques on a desktop and laptop computer. In total, 8 interactions that can be used to carry out a single task (navigating a PDF document) ... Keywords: power consumption, widgets

Ross McLachlan; Stephen Brewster

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes that include: executing, by each compute node, an application, the application including power consumption directives corresponding to one or more portions of the application; identifying, by each compute node, the power consumption directives included within the application during execution of the portions of the application corresponding to those identified power consumption directives; and reducing power, by each compute node, to one or more components of that compute node according to the identified power consumption directives during execution of the portions of the application corresponding to those identified power consumption directives.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Peters, Amanda E. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measuring the efficacy of an energy and environmental awareness campaign to effectively reduce water consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased energy costs and a move toward environmental stewardship are driving many organizations, including universities, to engage in awareness efforts to reduce both energy consumption (more)

Miller, Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

FEMP Energy Savings Expert Teams (ESET) to Help Federal Facilities Immediately Reduce Demand and Consumption  

SciTech Connect

FEMP offers energy savings expert teams (ESET) assessments for federal facilities as part of a broad strategy to reduce natural gas consumption.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Piston ring pack design effects on production spark ignition engine oil consumption : a simulation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most significant contributors to an engine's total oil consumption is the piston ring-pack. As a result, optimization of the ring pack is becoming more important for engine manufacturers and lubricant suppliers. ...

Senzer, Eric B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to help reduce the wasted energy. Chapter 3 Occupancyestimate the amount of energy being wasted in each room. Theon reducing the energy being wasted in daily usage. A

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

52

Increment in World Oil Consumption by Region, 1997-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil production is projected to increase by a total of 39.8 million barrels per day ... Substantial growth is also expected in Central and South America, ...

53

Strategies to Reduce Water Consumption in SO2 Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants and require significant process water. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have potential to reduce multiple pollutants simultaneou...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the greatest quantity of oil from marine transport isunderrepresents the quantity of oil products that escapes

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfaces to Reduce PC Energy Usage. In Proceedings of46.2% of this primary energy usage[9]. Since buildings havecontributors to the total energy usage. Then, we can study

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reduced Nitrogen and Natural Gas Consumption at Deepwell Flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facing both an economic downturn and the liklihood of steep natural gas price increases, company plants were challenged to identify and quickly implement energy saving projects that would reduce natural gas usage. Unit operating personnel and engineers w

Williams, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/21/2011 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is essential for achieving a sustainable clean energy future and will be an enormous challenge. Buildings account for 40% of the nation's carbon emissions and the consumption of 40% of our

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

58

Persuading consumers to reduce their consumption of electricity in the home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous work has identified that providing real time feedback or interventions to consumers can persuade consumers to change behaviour and reduce domestic electricity consumption. However, little work has investigated what exactly those feedback mechanisms ...

Alan F. Smeaton, Aiden R. Doherty

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

60

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term threat from new oil and gas exploration (42). In theyear comes from oil and gas exploration and production.within oil and gas concessions that are under exploration or

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fact, emissions of TABLE 6 Sources of oil spills from marineoil spills are a major source of oil emissions and thaternments. Taxes from oil are a major source of income for

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77% of the worlds proven oil reserves and 40% of world oilbarrels of proven oil reserves, which represents approxi-66% of the total world oil reserves (21). The Persian Gulf

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reducing Energy Consumption on Process Ovens & Oxidation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the uncertain cost of energy, optimizing the use of air in process dryers, ovens and air pollution control systems is critical to your bottom line. The revived emphasis on air management through the entire process, from plant make-up air heating systems to pollution control system exhaust, provides many opportunities to save energy and cut operating costs. This presentation includes an overview of good air management practices used to optimize energy use in your process and plant. One of the most important benefits of the more stringent air pollution control regulations throughout the world is the focus on better use and conservation of our natural resources. Through the efforts of many of the world's finest engineers and scientists the world is now realizing the benefits of an environmentally friendly approach to manufacturing. These benefits, which include more efficient process operation, less waste generation and reduced emissions, have produced the unforeseen benefit of reduced production costs and higher quality products. Process dryers and ovens are used in the manufacture of a wide variety of products produced by the companies represented at the Industrial Energy Technology Conference. This equipment is installed and operating in facilities that produce printed materials, packaging materials, adhesive tapes, pharmaceutical diagnostic materials, coated papers & films, foil laminations, electronic media, and photographic & x-ray films. They are also used extensively in the food industry. The products manufactured include baked goods, cereals, pet food, tobacco, and many other products. Ovens are used to bake and cure surface coated materials. Such as building siding, window frames, window blinds, automotive parts, wood products, and miscellaneous metal parts. More stringent environmental regulations are also impacting the design and operation of coating and food processes. Today air pollution control devices are used on many of the above applications to control the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and odors. As emission limits have decreased, the use of permanent total enclosures PTE's are becoming a standard part of the process line design. These enclosures are used to obtain 100% capture of the solvents used in the process. In addition, concerns over solvent concentrations in ovens along with concerns over exposure limits to employees have combined to drive process exhaust flows ever higher. Increasing process exhaust flows has been the common approach to addressing process and environmental issues. This increase in exhaust flows has resulted in significant increases in energy use and operating costs.

Worachek, C.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - 12:34pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In step with the Bush Administration's call to increase the supply of alternative and renewable fuels nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today established the nation's first comprehensive Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. At a press conference today, EPA Administrator Johnson, joined by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Nicole Nason, discussed the RFS program, increasing the use of alternative fuels and modernizing CAFÉ standards for cars. "The Renewable Fuel Standard offers the American people a hat trick - it

67

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - 12:34pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In step with the Bush Administration's call to increase the supply of alternative and renewable fuels nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today established the nation's first comprehensive Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. At a press conference today, EPA Administrator Johnson, joined by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Nicole Nason, discussed the RFS program, increasing the use of alternative fuels and modernizing CAFÉ standards for cars. "The Renewable Fuel Standard offers the American people a hat trick - it

68

Reducing power consumption while performing collective operations on a plurality of compute nodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while performing collective operations on a plurality of compute nodes that include: receiving, by each compute node, instructions to perform a type of collective operation; selecting, by each compute node from a plurality of collective operations for the collective operation type, a particular collective operation in dependence upon power consumption characteristics for each of the plurality of collective operations; and executing, by each compute node, the selected collective operation.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Peters, Amanda E. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

69

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

70

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

71

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

72

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

74

Definition: Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usage (Not Monetized) Usage (Not Monetized) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) The functions that provide this benefit eliminate the need to send a line worker or crew to the switch or capacitor locations to operate them eliminate the need for truck rolls to perform diagnosis of equipment condition, and reduce truck rolls for meter reading and measurement purposes. This reduces the fuel consumed by a service vehicle or line truck. The use of plug-in electric vehicles can also lead to this benefit since the electrical energy used by plug-in electric vehicles displaces the equivalent amount of oil.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition

75

Oil transport inside the oil control ring grove and its interaction with surrounding areas in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In piston ring pack design, there is a tradeoff between reducing friction and increasing oil consumption. While friction reduces engine efficiency, oil consumption can poison exhaust aftertreatment systems. The primary ...

Senzer, Eric B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Deletion of N-type calcium channels alters ethanol reward and reduces ethanol consumption in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regulate ethanol consumption. Cell 109:733743.Mice blockers on alcohol consumption in alcohol-drinkingRD (1998) Etha- nol consumption and resistance are inversely

Newton, P M; Orr, C J; Wallace, M J; Kim, C; Shin, H S; Messing, R O

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger

D. Magnetto; G. Vidiella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

MRMAC: medium reservation MAC protocol for reducing end-to-end delay and energy consumption in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter proposes a novel medium reservation MAC protocol that reduces both end-to-end delay and energy consumption for wireless sensor networks. MRMAC reduces endto-end delay by informing the intended receiver of NPAT (next packet arrival time) and ... Keywords: asynchronous, end-to-end delay, energy consumption, medium access control, wireless sensor networks

Jaeyoung Hong; Ingook Jang; Hanjin Lee; Suho Yang; Hyunsoo Yoon

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application that include: beginning, by each compute node, performance of a blocking operation specified by the parallel application, each compute node beginning the blocking operation asynchronously with respect to the other compute nodes; reducing, for each compute node, power to one or more hardware components of that compute node in response to that compute node beginning the performance of the blocking operation; and restoring, for each compute node, the power to the hardware components having power reduced in response to all of the compute nodes beginning the performance of the blocking operation.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Peters, Amanda A. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

A wlan scheduling algorithm to reduce the energy consumption of a distributed speech recognition system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In distributed speech recognition, speech features are computed on a mobile device, compressed, and sent to a server that performs the computationally intensive search for the most likely word sequence. Much of the current research in distributed speech recognition has been in the area of feature compression and communication robustness over wireless links, including error correction and concealment techniques. However, another challenge in designing a distributed speech recognition system is minimizing the energy consumption on the mobile device. We consider quality-of-service tradeoffs including compression ratio and overall system latency. Our measurements verify that for high speed wireless interfaces such as 802.11b, small changes in compression rates have little effect on system level energy consumption. However, for wireless networks with lower power/bit-rate ratios such as Bluetooth, the choice of bit-rate and compression ratio becomes more important. We present a wireless LAN scheduling algorithm to minimize the energy consumption of a distributed speech recognition front-end on a mobile device. By powering down the 802.11b interface when not in use, we are able to reduce the energy consumption by up to a factor of 5 in heavy traffic conditions. Increasing the total amount of time spent in the off state to almost one second will allow the system to save power regardless of traffic conditions. We compare the results of this power saving algorithm to the low-power mechanisms of Bluetooth. The lower overhead of Bluetooth allows for greater energy savings with a much lower delay of approximately 300ms. 1.

Brian Delaney; Nikil Jayant

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Eco-Driving: An Everyday Way to Reduce Our Oil Dependence | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eco-Driving: An Everyday Way to Reduce Our Oil Dependence Eco-Driving: An Everyday Way to Reduce Our Oil Dependence Eco-Driving: An Everyday Way to Reduce Our Oil Dependence July 20, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Francis X. Vogel Executive Director and Coordinator of the Wisconsin Clean Cities coalition Global warming and oil dependence are on the front burner for good, and for good reason. The Gulf of Mexico oil spill that began on April 20 is now the worst oil disaster in American history. Meanwhile, U.S. transportation is still almost totally dependent on oil and responsible for about 30% of the nation's greenhouse gas emissions. About 60% of that oil comes from foreign sources. Is there anything we can do? Thankfully, there is something we can all do today, whether we drive the latest advanced-technology vehicle or a junkyard special. It's called

82

Microsoft Word - Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release June 11, 2008 202-586-4940 Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. The letter is available at http://www.energy.gov Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. * The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol 1 , a first-generation biofuel. * For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. * For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to $49 billion based on annual

83

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes that include: powering up, during compute node initialization, only a portion of computer memory of the compute node, including configuring an operating system for the compute node in the powered up portion of computer memory; receiving, by the operating system, an instruction to load an application for execution; allocating, by the operating system, additional portions of computer memory to the application for use during execution; powering up the additional portions of computer memory allocated for use by the application during execution; and loading, by the operating system, the application into the powered up additional portions of computer memory.

Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Peters, Amanda E.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Sanctions reduced Iran's oil exports and revenues in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A smaller decline in 2011 resulted mainly from declining production in aging fields. Iran remained the second-largest OPEC crude oil producer on ...

86

Sanctions reduced Iran's oil exports and revenues in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind Geothermal ... operators that process crude oil of Iranian origin. This provision will mostly affect refiners in South Korea and India, ...

87

Rapid Metal Heating: Reducing Energy Consumption and Increasing Productivity in the Thermal Processing of Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy intensive manufacturing operations, such as iron and steel production, forging, and heat treating, are attempting to increase productivity while decreasing energy consumption.

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

88

Measuring and Reducing Energy Consumption of Network Interfaces in Hand-Held Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next generation hand-held devices must provide seamless connectivity while obeying stringent power and size constrains. In this paper we examine this issue from the point of view of the Network Interface (NI). We measure the power usage of two PDAs, the Apple Newton Messagepad and Sony Magic Link, and four NIs, the Metricom Ricochet Wireless Modem, the AT&T Wavelan operating at 915 MHz and 2.4 GHz, and the IBM Infrared Wireless LAN Adapter. These measurements clearly indicate that the power drained by the network interface constitutes a large fraction of the total power used by the PDA. We then examine two classes of optimizations that can be used to reduce network interface energy consumption on these devices: transport-level strategies and application-level strategies. Simulation experiments of transportlevel strategies show that the dominant cost comes not from the number of packets sent or received by a particular transport protocol but the amount of time that the NI is in an activ...

Mark Stemm; Randy H. Katz; Y H. Katz

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 A small amount of fuel oil used for appliances is included in "Fuel Oil" under "All Uses." NF = No applicable RSE row factor.

90

Scenario analysis of retrofit strategies for reducing energy consumption in Norwegian office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model buildings were created for simulation to describe typical office buildings from different construction periods. A simulation program was written to predict the annual energy consumption of the buildings in their ...

Engblom, Lisa A. (Lisa Allison)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reducing data center energy consumption via coordinated cooling and load management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a unified approach to data center energy management based on a modeling framework that characterizes the influence of key decision variables on computational performance, thermal generation, and power consumption. Temperature dynamics ...

Luca Parolini; Bruno Sinopoli; Bruce H. Krogh

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd EditionChapter 11 Long-Term Clinical Studies of Ad Libitum Diacylglycerol Consumption in Subjects in a Free-Living Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 11 Long-Term Clinical Studies of Ad Libitum Diacylglycerol Consumption in Subjects in a Free-Living Environment Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Heal

93

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 besity Effect and Prevention of Insulin Resistance by a Long-Term Consumption of Dietary Diacylglycerol in Experimental Animal Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 besity Effect and Prevention of Insulin Resistance by a Long-Term Consumption of Dietary Diacylglycerol in Experimental Animal Models Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food S

94

REACH: Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware: A Low-Cost, Retrofit Approach to Reducing Stack Emissions and Enhancing t he Performance of Oil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved oil combustion technology, based upon optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer design, has been developed for retrofit to oil-fired utility boilers. This technology is referred to as Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware, or REACH. REACH is commercially available for retrofit to oil-fired boilers to simultaneously reduce NOx, PM, and opacity, as well as provide operational and performance benefits.

1995-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Reducing energy consumption of multiprocessor SoC architectures by exploiting memory bank locality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation embedded architectures are expected to accommodate multiple processors on the same chip. While this makes interprocessor communication less costly as compared to traditional high-end parallel machines, it also makes off-chip requests ... Keywords: Banked memory systems, bank locality, compiler optimization, energy consumption, multiprocessor SoC

Mahmut Taylan Kandemir

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Banked scratch-pad memory management for reducing leakage energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy for on-chip scratch-pad memories (SPMs). The idea is to divide SPM into banks and use compiler-guided data layout optimization and data migration to maximize SPM bank idleness, thereby increasing the chances of placing banks into low-power (low-leakage) state.

M. J. Irwin; G. Chen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Use of Computer Simulation to Reduce the Energy Consumption in a Tall Office Building in Dubai-UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are a major consumer of energy and thus have a significant impact on the environment. The use of artificial lights is a major contributor to the energy usage in a typical office building using electricity to run the lights and also increasing the cooling load due to its heat dissipation. Proper design for the maximization of natural light helps reduce the use of artificial lights and results in reduction in the buildings energy consumption. Computer simulation of the lighting and energy consumption in a typical tall office building in Dubai-UAE is used to optimize the effectiveness of natural lighting penetration and calculate the associated energy savings. Two alternative building designs are proposed and tested. The overall energy savings for the whole building reached 31.4 % for the proposed oval shaped design. This represents a significant reduction in the buildings electricity load and thus its impact on the environment.

Abu-Hijleh, B.; Abu-Dakka, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Impacts on U.S. Markets and the Economy of Reducing Oil Imports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Report Report The Impacts on U.S. Energy Markets and the Economy of Reducing Oil Imports Prepared by Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy For The General Accounting Office September 1996 Service Reports are prepared by EIA upon special request and may be based on assumptions specified by the requestor. Information regarding the request for this report is included in the Preface. The Impacts on U.S. Energy Markets and the Economy of Reducing Oil Imports Energy Information Administration, September 1996 For Further Information... The Impacts on U.S. Energy Markets and the Economy of Reducing Oil Imports was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler

100

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

102

CoolSpots: Reducing the Power Consumption of Wireless Mobile Devices with Multiple Radio Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CoolSpots enable a wireless mobile device to automatically switch between multiple radio interfaces, such as WiFi and Bluetooth, in order to increase battery lifetime. The main contribution of this work is an exploration of the policies that enable a system to switch among these interfaces, each with diverse radio characteristics and different ranges, in order to save power supported by detailed quantitative measurements. The system and policies do not require any changes to the mobile applications themselves, and changes required to existing infrastructure are minimal. Results are reported for a suite of commonly used applications, such as file transfer, web browsing, and streaming media, across a range of operating conditions. Experimental validation of the CoolSpot system on a mobile research platform shows substantial energy savings: more than a 50 % reduction in energy consumption of the wireless subsystem is possible, with an associated increase in the effective battery lifetime.

Trevor Pering; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh Gupta; Comm Power

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Measures to reduce industrial consumption of petroleum under a short-term energy emergency  

SciTech Connect

Significant opportunities for petroleum conservation in the industrial sector in the event of an energy emergency are discussed. The most feasible government options identified are presented. These and the probable savings are: removing institutional barriers to fuel switching in industrial boilers and burners (384 to 407 Mbbl/day); rescinding certain air pollution regulations (19 to 100 Mbbl/day); restricting export of energy-intensive goods (20 to 60 Mbbl/day); rescinding thermal pollution regulations for power plants (16 to 27 Mbbl/day); removing trade barriers on certain imports; restricting electricity production by industry; and restricting export of recyclable materials. The bases for many of the recommended options are presented. Specifically, characteristics of industrial petroleum consumption for the chemical, steel, cement, and paper industries are presented.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr; D' Acierno, J.; Pilati, D.A.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A knee brace design to reduce the energy consumption of walking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent research into the mechanics of walking indicates that a quasi passive wearable device could be created which dramatically reduces the metabolic energy used in walking especially when the wearer is carrying additional ...

Carvey, Matthew R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program:Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005, the Chinese government announced an ambitious goal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% between 2005 and 2010. One of the key initiatives for realizing this goal is the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises program. The energy consumption of these 1000 enterprises accounted for 33% of national and 47% of industrial energy usage in 2004. Under the Top-1000 program, 2010 energy consumption targets were determined for each enterprise. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the program design and initial results, given limited information and data, in order to understand the possible implications of its success in terms of energy and carbon dioxide emissions reductions and to recommend future program modifications based on international experience with similar target-setting agreement programs. Even though the Top-1000 Program was designed and implemented rapidly, it appears that--depending upon the GDP growth rate--it could contribute to somewhere between approximately 10% and 25% of the savings required to support China's efforts to meet a 20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010.

Price, Lynn; Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun; Yun, Jiang

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accounting for 33% of national energy consumption and 47% ofenergy consumption of these 1000 enterprises accounted for 33% of national andEnergy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China Lynn Price, Lawrence Berkeley National

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear Power: A Leading Strategy to Reduce Oil Imports Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term threats to energy sustainability, energy security, and global environmental quality represented by the growing demand for oil are well documented. Of the more than 20 million barrels/day of oil used by the United States, about 45 % is devoted to the production of motor gasoline. This has resulted in the growing energy security problem for our country due to an increasing dependence on imported oil from unstable regions. The large consumption of oil also is a major contributor to the nations greenhouse gas emission levels. The partial substitution of electricity for gasoline as a transportation fuel could have a major impact on both our energy security and environmental quality while improving our energy sustainability posture. It is possible to use nuclear power to provide this contribution economically without large external or opportunity costs. Increasing the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) appears to be a feasible means of beginning this transition. The purpose of this position paper is not to argue that PHEVs should be adopted as the only solution to our energy supply challenge. Indeed, the American Nuclear Society favors a broad and intensive approach to the problem including study of all the attractive alternatives that might eventually contribute to the solutionfeasibility will eventually determine those options that are

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A nightly conditioning method to reduce parasitic power consumption in molten-salt central-receiver solar-power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to reduce nightly parasitic power consumption in a molten salt central receiver is discussed where salt is drained from the piping and heat tracing is turned off to allow the piping to cool to ambient overnight, then in the morning the pipes are filled while they are cold. Since the piping and areas of the receiver in a molten-nitrate salt central-receiver solar power plant must be electrically heated to maintain their temperatures above the nitrate salt freezing point (430{degrees}F, 221{degrees}C), considerable energy could be used to maintain such temperatures during nightly shut down and bad weather. Experiments and analyses have been conducted to investigate cold filling receiver panels and piping as a way of reducing parasitic electrical power consumption and increasing the availability of the plant. The two major concerns with cold filling are: (1) how far can the molten salt penetrate cold piping before freezing closed and (2) what thermal stresses develop during the associated thermal shock. Experiments and analysis are discussed.

Pacheco, J.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Table 4a. U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Commercial Inventory ..... 1,082 1,112 1,123 1,111 1,097 1,122 1,126 1,085 1,092 1,127 1,138 1,097 1,111 1,085 1,097 Crude Oil in SPR ...

110

Use of X-Ray Computed Microtomography to Understand Why Gels Reduce Permeability to Water More Than That to Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

That to Oil R. S. Seright * , New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center J. Liang, Idaho National was used to investigate why gels reduce permeability to water more than that to oil in strongly water 80 to 90 times more than that to oil. In Berea, the gel caused disproportionate permeability

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

111

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Steel Plate Processing for Line Pipes in Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This has further helped in reducing the specific steel consumption in oil and gas transportation. The current focus on less wall thickness at increased strength...

114

Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce consumption of imported oil, developing renewable diesel plays a vital role industry is the availablilty of affordable vegetable oil feedstocks and the competition of current feedstocks (primarily soybean) with food and feed markets. The price of October 2009 Chicago soybean oil

116

A WLAN SCHEDULING ALGORITHM TO REDUCE THE ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF A DISTRIBUTED SPEECH RECOGNITION FRONT-END  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and planned consumption needs, agreed electric power deliveries and agreed electric power import, in order) as well as the other power plants, telecommunication system, information system and other infrastructure 3590108 Source: EPS Supply and consumption of electric power of 2004 and 2005 is given in Table 5

Simunic, Tajana

117

The impacts on U.S. energy markets and the economy of reducing oil imports. Service report  

SciTech Connect

The General Accounting Office (GAO) has responded to a request from Representative John Kasich by requesting that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) use the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to estimate the cost to the U.S. economy of reducing oil imports. The analysis summarized by this paper focuses on two approaches toward a target reduction in oil imports: (1) a set of cases with alternative world crude oil price trajectories, and (2) two cases which investigates the use of an oil import fee.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Oil Prices and Long-Run Risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide anexcellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low (more)

READY, ROBERT

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will be concentrated in two areas: (1) HCEI Working Groups will be formed and made up of private, state, and U.S. government experts in the areas of Transportation and Fuels, Electricity Generation, Energy Delivery and Transmission, and End-Use Efficiency; and (2) Partnership Projects will be undertaken with local and mainland partners that demonstrate and commercialize new technologies and relieve technical barriers.

Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks

McGaughey, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sulfur content of heating oil to be reduced in northeastern states ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Also, the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve has switched to ULSD. The Northeast is the largest regional consumer of heating oil in the United States.

122

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

123

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to deliver these oils at low energy consumption. However, the possible accumulation of oil on the pipe walls alternative for the transportation of heavy crude oils. The lubricating effect of the aqueous film leads to reduced equivalent viscosities and, hence, low energy consumption. One of the possible problems associated

Loh, Watson

124

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

125

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

126

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Low natural gas prices in 2012 reduced returns for some oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on Evaluate Energy database and company financial statements. Note: Results based on data from 60 oil and natural ...

128

Low natural gas prices in 2012 reduced returns for some oil and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Producers with lower proportions of liquids in their total oil and gas production generally had ... wholesale natural gas prices in the United States and Canada fell ...

129

The Investigation of Newly Designed Transformer Windings with Reduced Thickness of Oil-Impregnated Paper Insulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For determining the insulation dimensions, Smit Transformers uses a so called design curve. As the oil-impregnated paper insulation of the windings has been improved, a (more)

Singuran, A.I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Our top priority: expanded electrification will substantially reduce oil use while propelling economic recovery  

SciTech Connect

Benefits resulting from increased use of electricity are discussed. Unique qualifications and benefits of increased use of electricity are documented in the areas of: conservation of energy, as a whole, and reduction of oil use; low energy costs in contrast to 7 to 15 times higher energy costs for imported oil; pacing of economic growth and job creation; greater national security, through lessened dependence on overseas oil; protection of the environment and better quality of life - working as well as residential; decreasing inflation, higher productivity, and a stronger dollar. It is suggested that electricity has been denied the recognition it deserves, the implementation of which would be the most constructive step possible toward approaching the goals of sustained economic and human progress, not only for Canada, the United States, and the other industrialized nations, but also for the entire world. (MCW)

Felix, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ADS genes for reducing saturated fatty acid levels in seed oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. In particular, the present invention provides coding sequences for Arabidopsis Desaturases (ADS), the encoded ADS polypeptides, and methods for using the sequences and encoded polypeptides, where such methods include decreasing and increasing saturated fatty acid content in plant seed oils.

Heilmann, Ingo H. (Bay Shore, NY); Shanklin, John (Shoreham, NY)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

Kraft, E.H.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, ...

134

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, and electricity ...

135

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Consumption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL. National Clean Fleets partners are investing in hybrid vehicles to reduce their oil use, vehicle emissions and fuel costs. Detecting Air Leaks For a thorough and accurate...

137

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The major energy sources in the United States are petroleum (oil), natural ... To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, ...

138

Application of Chemically Accelerated Biotreatment to Reduce Risk in Oil-Impacted Soils  

SciTech Connect

Conducted research in the following major focus areas: (1) Development of mild extraction approaches to estimate bioavailable fraction of crude oil residues in contaminated soils; (2) Application of these methods to understand decreases in toxicity and increases in sequestration of hydrocarbons over time, as well as the influence of soil properties on these processes; (3) Measurements of the abilities of various bacteria (PAH-degraders and others more representative of typical soil bacteria) to withstand oxidative treatments (i.e. Fenton's reaction) which would occur in CBT; and (4) Experiments into the biochemical/genetic inducibility of PAH degradation by compounds formed by the chemical oxidation of PAH.

Paterek, J.R.; Bogan, W.W.; Lahner, L.M.; Trbovic, V.

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Reducing Petroleum Consumption from Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States consumed more petroleum-based liquid fuel per capita than any other OECD- high-income country- 30 percent more than the second-highest country (Canada) and 40 percent more than the third-highest (Luxemburg). ...

Knittel, Christopher R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Reducing Petroleum Consumption from Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States consumes more petroleum-based liquid fuel per capita than any other OECD high-income country30 percent more than the second-highest country (Canada) and 40 percent more than the third-highest (Luxembourg). ...

Knittel, Christopher Roland

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS ... transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the ...

142

APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS  

SciTech Connect

The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

145

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

146

Margins up; consumption down  

SciTech Connect

The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

Mantho, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

148

Oil price shocks: Testing a macroeconomic model  

SciTech Connect

The main research objective was to answer the following question: Will Consumer Price Index forecast models utilizing computer oil-consumption ratios have better predictive capability as indicated by lower numerical differences from actual results than a model utilizing oil prices as the energy-related variable Multiple linear regressions were run on the components of the United States CPI to reduce them to a kernel set with meaningful predictive capability. New linear regressions were run with this kernel set and crude oil prices during the 1973 to 1984 time period. Crude oil prices were rationalized with a 1972 = 100 based index of GNP base petroleum consumption, the index of net energy imports, and the index of petroleum imports to create new oil substitute constructs to be used in multiple regressions with the CPI. Predictions obtained from the model were compared with actual results in the 1985-1987 time period to determine which model version showed the greatest predictive power. Results of the model tests show that oil prices are strongly related to the CPI, but neither the use of oil prices or the index of GNP-based petroleum consumption produced results that closely predict future prices.

Williams, D.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

150

Oil market in international and Norwegian perspectives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Crude oil is the most important energy source in global perspective. About 35 percent of the worlds primary energy consumption is supplied by oil, followed (more)

Singsaas, Julia Nazyrova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, June 2010 1 Natural gas prices may have also contributed to the decrease...

154

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews the various options available: WET-DRY towers, or DRY-WET, or combination WET and DRY towers!

Adler, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Consumption Characterization and Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cutting Condition on Power Consumption of Machine Tools, in:Energy Consumption Characterization and Reduction Strategiesand reducing the energy consumption of milling machine tools

Diaz, Nancy; E. Redelsheimer; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Consumption Characterization and Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption Characterization and Reduction Strategiesand reducing the energy consumption of milling machine toolsGreen Machine Tools; Energy Consumption Reduction; Specific

Diaz, Nancy; E. Redelsheimer; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Compare All CBECS Activities: Fuel Oil Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Oil Use Compare Activities by ... Fuel Oil Use Total Fuel Oil Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 1.3 billion gallons...

158

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

159

Energy consumption of building 39  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrated Petroleum Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy Murphy Larry Zirker Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program * Performed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Fleet Operations * Goal - Support DOE's efforts to reduce petroleum consumption & ensure the energy security of the United States Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Objectives - Test the concept of using oil bypass filters to minimize engine oil changes & the generation of waste oils - Demonstration the economics of oil bypass filter systems - Estimate potential engine oil saving from bypass filter technologies that can be achieved by INEEL,

162

A biological/chemical process for reduced waste and energy consumption, Caprolactam production: Phase 1, Select microorganisms and demonstrate feasibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel biological/chemical process for converting cyclohexane into caprolactam was investigated. Microorganisms in a bioreactor would be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone followed by chemical synthesis of caprolactam using ammonia. The proposed bioprocess would be more energy efficient and reduce byproducts and wastes that are generated by the current chemical process. We have been successful in isolating from natural soil and water samples two microorganisms that can utilize cyclohexane as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. These microorganisms were shown to have the correct metabolic intermediates and enzymes to convert cyclohexane into cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone and caprolactone. Genetic techniques to create and select for caprolactone hydrolase negative-mutants are being developed. These blocked-mutants will be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone but, because of the block, be unable to metabolize the caprolactone further and excrete it as a final end product.

St.Martin, E.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Prod. of Oil, Gas & Coal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production of oil, gas, and coal. Projected supply and disposition of crude oil. The model now uses the EIAs projections of production, imports, and consumption of ...

164

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

165

Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions of an analysis which identifies and quantifies Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity are summarized. Data on estimated cost of incentives used to stimulate energy consumption by incentive type and energy source are tabulated for coal, oil, gas, and electricity. It is suggested that the examination of past incentives can be useful in developing guidelines and limits for the use of incentives to stimulate consumption of solar energy. (MCW)

Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

167

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles offer similar emissionsimilar GHG emission levels as CNG vehicles and diesel vehiBRT buses . The 40-foot CNG buses used in a BRT system

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reducing Transient and Steady State Electricity Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning-Based Model-Predictive Control Energy efficiency improvement in HVAC systems is investigated in this paper; a model-predictive control strategy is proposed to maintain comfortable temperature. By Anil a control strategy that uses learning-based model-predictive control (MPC) to learn and compensate

California at Berkeley, University of

169

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol, methanol, compressed natural gas, liquefied propaneelectric vehicle CNGV: compressed natural gas vehicle Dl CIgasoline vehicles. Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant investigated for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development and the development of the electric launch system design.

Mark Machina

2002-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

171

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles : How does one determine their potential for reducing U.S. oil dependence?  

SciTech Connect

Estimation of the potential of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV's) ability to reduce U.S. gasoline use is difficult and complex. Although techniques have been proposed to estimate the vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) that can be electrified, these methods may be inadequate and/or inappropriate for early market introduction circumstances. Factors that must be considered with respect to the PHEV itself include (1) kWh battery storage capability; (2) kWh/km depletion rate of the vehicle (3) liters/km use of gasoline (4) average daily kilometers driven (5) annual share of trips exceeding the battery depletion distance (6) driving cycle(s) (7) charger location [i.e. on-board or off-board] (8) charging rate. Each of these factors is actually a variable, and many interact. Off the vehicle, considerations include (a) primary overnight charging spot [garage, carport, parking garage or lot, on street], (b) availability of primary and secondary charging locations [i.e. dwellings, workplaces, stores, etc] (c) time of day electric rates (d) seasonal electric rates (e) types of streets and highways typically traversed during most probable trips depleting battery charge [i.e. city, suburban, rural and high vs. low density]; (f) cumulative trips per day from charger origin (g) top speeds and peak acceleration rates required to make usual trips. Taking into account PHEV design trade-off possibilities (kW vs. kWh of battery, in particular), this paper attempts to extract useful information relating to these topics from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), and the 2005 American Housing Survey (AHS). Costs per kWh of PHEVs capable of charge depleting (CD) all-electric range (CDE, or AER) vs. those CD in 'blended' mode (CDB) are examined. Lifetime fuel savings of alternative PHEV operating/utilization strategies are compared to battery cost estimates.

Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Duoba, M.; Alexander, M.; Energy Systems; EPRI

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy consumption of building 39; Energy consumption of building thirty-nine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further (more)

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Daz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

176

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

177

Vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concern over air quality has prompted the development of strategies to reduce vehicle emissions in these areas. Concern has also been expressed regarding the current dependency of the U,S, on foreign oil. An option for addressing these concerns is to reduce vehicle-miles travelled (VMT), High- occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes have been cited as one alternative for achieving this goal. However, latent travel demand frequently negates some or all of the VMT savings brought about by HOV lanes, The net effects of modal shifts to HOV lanes and the subsequent latent travel demand were studied in the thesis, A methodology was developed for estimating vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts from private vehicles in the freeway mainlanes to buses in an HOV lane when latent travel demand is considered. The methodology was evaluated and determined to yield reasonable results, Finally, the methodology was applied to a freeway corridor in Houston, Texas. The results of the application indicate that reductions in VMT do not necessarily cause reductions in vehicle emissions of interest even when considered, all three of the pollutants of latent travel demand is not consumption was decreased at considered. Energy consumption was decreased a virtually all levels of latent travel demand except where latent travel demand was equivalent to the mode shift.

Mallett, Vickie Lynn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

179

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

182

Consumption Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

183

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

184

Table SH7. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil (gallons) Main Space Heating Fuel Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Table SH7.

185

Table SH8. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Main Space Heating Fuel Used (million Btu of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Any Major Fuel 4 Table SH8.

186

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

188

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

189

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

190

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. 0. Number of Establishments that Actually Switched Fuels from Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual Fuel Oil Total Code Industry Group and Industry (billion cu ft) Factors (counts) (counts) (percents) (counts) (percents) a Natural Gas Switchable to Establishments RSE Row Able to Switch Actually Switched RSE Column Factors: 1.3 0.1 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.8 20 Food and Kindred Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 14,698 702 4.8 262 1.8 5.6 2011 Meat Packing Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 759 23 3.0 10 1.3 9.0 2033 Canned Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 531 112 21.2 33 6.2 11.6 2037 Frozen Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 232 Q 5.3

191

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

192

World energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

194

Oil Price Shocks and Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices have risen sharply over the last year, leading to concerns that we could see a repeat of the 1970s, when rising oil prices were accompanied by severe recessions and surging inflation. This Economic Letter examines the historical relationship between oil price shocks and inflation in light of some recent research and goes on to discuss what the recent jump in oil prices might mean for inflation in the future. Figure 1 Inflation and the relative price of oil The historical record Figure 1 plots the price of oil relative to the core personal consumption expenditures price index (PCEPI) together with the core PCEPI inflation

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: August 23, 4: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on AddThis.com... Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption

196

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

197

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for Environmentally Adapted Metalworking to significantly influence the environmental burdens of all fluids, energy consumption was relatively constant and consumed without long-distance transportation. MWF Production Each MWF is composed of lubricant oil

Clarens, Andres

198

PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: * Less dependency on foreign oil * Less oil disposed as waste products * Lower oil disposal costs * Less downtime of equipment * Reduced vehicle maintenance costs *...

199

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Solar --Wind --Geothermal --Bioenergy -Fossil --Oil --Natural Gas -Nuclear Energy Usage -Storage --Hydrogen & Fuel Cells -Transmission -Consumption -Smart Grid Science...

200

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Top Hat Procedure at 4850'...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Solar --Wind --Geothermal --Bioenergy -Fossil --Oil --Natural Gas -Nuclear Energy Usage -Storage --Hydrogen & Fuel Cells -Transmission -Consumption -Smart Grid Science...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Consumptive water use in the production of ethanonl and petroleum gasoline.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of energy feedstocks and fuels requires substantial water input. Not only do biofuel feedstocks like corn, switchgrass, and agricultural residues need water for growth and conversion to ethanol, but petroleum feedstocks like crude oil and oil sands also require large volumes of water for drilling, extraction, and conversion into petroleum products. Moreover, in many cases, crude oil production is increasingly water dependent. Competing uses strain available water resources and raise the specter of resource depletion and environmental degradation. Water management has become a key feature of existing projects and a potential issue in new ones. This report examines the growing issue of water use in energy production by characterizing current consumptive water use in liquid fuel production. As used throughout this report, 'consumptive water use' is the sum total of water input less water output that is recycled and reused for the process. The estimate applies to surface and groundwater sources for irrigation but does not include precipitation. Water requirements are evaluated for five fuel pathways: bioethanol from corn, ethanol from cellulosic feedstocks, gasoline from Canadian oil sands, Saudi Arabian crude, and U.S. conventional crude from onshore wells. Regional variations and historic trends are noted, as are opportunities to reduce water use.

Wu, M.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M.; Arora, S.; Energy Systems

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Consumptive water use in the production of ethanonl and petroleum gasoline.  

SciTech Connect

The production of energy feedstocks and fuels requires substantial water input. Not only do biofuel feedstocks like corn, switchgrass, and agricultural residues need water for growth and conversion to ethanol, but petroleum feedstocks like crude oil and oil sands also require large volumes of water for drilling, extraction, and conversion into petroleum products. Moreover, in many cases, crude oil production is increasingly water dependent. Competing uses strain available water resources and raise the specter of resource depletion and environmental degradation. Water management has become a key feature of existing projects and a potential issue in new ones. This report examines the growing issue of water use in energy production by characterizing current consumptive water use in liquid fuel production. As used throughout this report, 'consumptive water use' is the sum total of water input less water output that is recycled and reused for the process. The estimate applies to surface and groundwater sources for irrigation but does not include precipitation. Water requirements are evaluated for five fuel pathways: bioethanol from corn, ethanol from cellulosic feedstocks, gasoline from Canadian oil sands, Saudi Arabian crude, and U.S. conventional crude from onshore wells. Regional variations and historic trends are noted, as are opportunities to reduce water use.

Wu, M.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M.; Arora, S.; Energy Systems

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

204

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets:"overall data tables"plusenergy consumption data for each of the following...

205

Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

Reed, David P.

206

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

207

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

Tancred Lidderdale

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

209

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

210

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: September 6, 6: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336:

211

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: September 17, 7: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487:

212

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth of standby energy consumption due to these products ?and reduce standby energy consumption (US EPA, 2004, IEA,However, standby energy consumption is still a new concept

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) XLS Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Estimates in Barrels per Day) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS

214

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

215

Power consumption optimization in multi-mode mobile relay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the energy generation system (some studies have raised the power consumption of telecommunication significantly reduce power consumption when either the traffic load is below 0.4 or when short reach of power consumption- of an eventual migration from static to dynamic architecture rather than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

The Long-run Macroeconomic Impacts of Fuel Subsidies in an Oil-importing Developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developing and emerging market countries have subsidies on fuel products. Using a small open economy model with a non-traded sector I show how these subsidies impact the steady state levels of macroeconomic aggregates such as consumption, labor supply, and aggregate welfare. These subsidies can lead to crowding out of non-oil consumption, inefficient inter-sectoral allocations of labor, and other distortions in macroeconomic variables. Across steady states aggregate welfare is reduced by these subsidies. This result holds for a country with no oil production and for a net exporter of oil. The distortions in relative prices introduced by the subsidy create most of the welfare losses. How the subsidy is financed is of secondary importance. Aggregate welfare is significantly higher if the subsidies are replaced by lump-sum transfers of equal value.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Strategies for Decreasing Petroleum Consumption in the Federal Fleet (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation offers strategies federal agency fleets can use to reduce petroleum consumption and build or gain access to alternative fuel infrastructure.

Putsche, V.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

219

Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to couple microbial permeability profile modification (MPPM), with carbon dioxide flooding to improve oil recovery from the Upper Cretaceous Little Creek Oil Field situated in Lincoln and Pike counties, MS. This study determined that MPPM technology, which improves production by utilizing environmentally friendly nutrient solutions to simulate the growth of the indigenous microflora in the most permeable zones of the reservoir thus diverting production to less permeable, previously unswept zones, increased oil production without interfering with the carbon dioxide flooding operation. Laboratory tests determined that no microorganisms were produced in formation waters, but were present in cores. Perhaps the single most significant contribution of this study is the demonstration that microorganisms are active at a formation temperature of 115?C (239?F) by using a specially designed culturing device. Laboratory tests were employed to simulate the MPPM process by demonstrating that microorganisms could be activated with the resulting production of oil in coreflood tests performed in the presence of carbon dioxide at 66?C (the highest temperature that could be employed in the coreflood facility). Geological assessment determined significant heterogeneity in the Eutaw Formation, and documented relatively thin, variably-lithified, well-laminated sandstone interbedded with heavily-bioturbated, clay-rich sandstone and shale. Live core samples of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation from the Heidelberg Field, MS were quantitatively assessed using SEM, and showed that during MPPM permeability modification occurs ubiquitously within pore and throat spaces of 10-20 ?m diameter. Testing of the MPPM procedure in the Little Creek Field showed a significant increase in production occurred in two of the five production test wells; furthermore, the decline curve in each of the production wells became noticeably less steep. This project greatly extends the number of oil fields in which MPPM can be implemented.

Darrel Schmitz; Lewis Brown F. Leo Lynch; Brenda Kirkland; Krystal Collins; William Funderburk

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Foreign Oil Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public transportation provides greater freedom, access, opportunity and choice for Americans from all walks of life and from all across the country. Ridership is up 25.1 percent since 1995, and the millions of Americans who use public transportation each weekday know it saves money and gasoline. This independent analysis looks for the first time at what public transportation saves both for individual households and for the nation as a whole. In addition, it explores a possible future where many more Americans would have the choice to take public transportation. It was commissioned from ICF International by the American Public Transportation Association. Public Transportation Reduces U.S. Foreign Oil Dependence Using conservative assumptions, the study found that current public transportation usage reduces U.S. gasoline consumption by 1.4 billion gallons each year. In concrete terms, that means: 108 million fewer cars filling up almost 300,000 every day. 34 fewer supertankers leaving the Middle East one every 11 days.

Linda Bailey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

222

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

223

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions Significant Energy Consumption - and Opportunities for Reduction Transportation is essential to our economy and quality of life, and currently accounts for 71% of the nation's total petroleum use and 33% of our total carbon emissions. Energy-efficient transportation strategies could reduce both oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective is to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an

224

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The...

225

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #432: July 10, 2006 World Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 25% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2005. The...

226

MECS Fuel Oil Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel : Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel Figure 1. Percent of Total Purchased Fuel Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS): Consumption of Energy; U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM): Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries: Statistical Abstract of the United States. Note: The years below the line on the "X" Axis are interpolated data--not directly from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey or the Annual Survey of Manufactures. Figure 2: Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Figure 2. Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of

227

Energy consumption in the pipeline industry  

SciTech Connect

Estimates are developed of the energy consumption and energy intensity (EI) of five categories of U.S. pipeline industries: natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, coal slurry, and water. For comparability with other transportation modes, it is desirable to calculate EI in Btu/Ton-Mile, and this is done, although the necessary unit conversions introduce additional uncertainties. Since water and sewer lines operate by lift and gravity, a comparable EI is not definable.

Banks, W. F.

1977-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

229

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

230

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

231

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

232

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Forms Form EIA-846A (4-6-95) U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census Acting as Collecting and Compiling Agent For 1994 MANUFACTURING ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 9 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Energy Information Administration, Office of Statistical Standards, EI-73, 1707 H-Street, NW, Washington, DC 20585; and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of

233

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biofuels reduces global fossil fuel consumption andthe reduction of fossil fuel consumption, and therefore theto one. 7 Dynamic facets of fossil fuel can be introduced to

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Summary World Oil Data (from World on the Edge) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Data (from World on the Edge) Oil Data (from World on the Edge) Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world oil. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Brown, available from the Earth Policy Institute. This world oil dataset includes the following data: World oil production (1950 - 2009): Top 20 producing countries (2009); Oil production in U.S. (1900 - 2009); Oil consumption in U.S. (950 - 2010); Oil consumption in China (1965 - 2009); Oil consumption in E.U. (1965 - 2009); Top 20 oil importing countries (2009); World's 20 largest oil discoveries; Real price of gasoline (2007); Retail gas prices by country (2008); and fossil fuel consumption subsidies (2009).

235

Modelling Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in China has attracted considerable research interest since the middle 1990s. This is largely prompted by the environmental ramifications of the extensive use of fossil fuels in the country to propel two decades of high economic growth. Since the late 1980s, there has been an increasing awareness on the part of the Chinese government of the imperative for the balance of economic growth and environmental protection. The government has since taken various measures ranging from encouraging energy-saving practice, controlling waste discharges to financing R & D programs on improving energy efficiency. Against this backdrop has seen a constant decline of the energy intensity of the economy, measured as the ratio of total energy consumed in standard coal equivalent to the real GDP since 1989. Using the 1987 and 1997 input-output tables for China, the present study examines the impact of technical and structural changes in the economy on industry fuel consumption over the 10-year period. Technical changes are reflected in changes in direct input-output coefficients, which capture the technical evolvement of intermediate production processes. Structural changes refer to shifts in the pattern of final demand for energy, including the import and export composition of various fuels. Six fuels are included in the study, namely, coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, petroleum and coke and gas, which cover all of the energy types available in the input-output tables. It is found that the predominant force of falling energy intensity was changes in direct energy input requirements in various industries. Such changes were responsible for a reduction in the consumption of four of the six fuels per unit of total output. Structural changes were not conducive for improv...

Baiding Hu Department; Baiding Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Oil Crop Potential for Biodiesel Production: Summary of Three Years of Spring Mustard Research -- Methodologies, Results, and Recommendations; 2000-2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a project whose goal was to support R&D to develop an oil-seed crop that has the potential to reduce the feedstock cost of biodiesel to between 7 and 8 cents per pound of oil and expand supplies of biodiesel as demand for biodiesel grows. The key to this goal is that the non-oil fraction of the oil crop (the seed meal) must have a high value outside of the animal feed markets and produce oil that is not suitable for human consumption. To that end, a spring breeding program was developed to increase diversity of glucosinolate and the concentration of glucosinolates in the meal and to optimize the oil composition for biodiesel fuels. This report presents the research on the spring planted hybrids.

Brown, J.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Optimization of Auxiliaries Consumption in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators of nuclear power plants face significant challenges to produce power more cost-effectively. One approach to producing power more cost-effectively is to reduce power consumption by auxiliary systems in the plant, leading to more power available for the grid. This report provides guidance for assessing auxiliary system performance and recommends approaches to reduce their power consumption. The report also presents results from questionnaires on auxiliary system consumption and, in some cases, ac...

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Division, Census Region, and Climate Zone maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

240

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

242

Broad Initiatives/Sharp Focus- Cuts Electricity Consumption 15%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of electrical consumption can payout in reduced energy costs. Continuous monitoring of electrical usage coupled with improvements and optimization in system(s) operations can have a favorable impact on annual operating expenditures. Further, participation in local utility rebate programs to reduce electrical consumption will enhance funding of energy efficient programs.

Gialanella, V.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

244

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

245

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

246

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

247

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

248

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

249

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

250

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

251

Energy-consumption modelling  

SciTech Connect

A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

Reiter, E.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of Chinas Largestto-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP given Chinasgoal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of Chinas Largestone-to-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP given Chinagoal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Low World Oil Price Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low World Oil Price Case Projections (1990-2030) Low World Oil Price Case Projections (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Low World Oil Price Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low World Oil Price Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low World Oil Price Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low World Oil Price Case Table E1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel, Low World Oil Price Case Table E2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

256

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Optimization of Steam Network in Tehran Oil Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dominated energy crisis in the world dictates to reduce energy consumption and identify energy saving opportunities in large and complex industries especially in oil refining industry. In this paper, Tehran oil refinery is considered as a proper case study and its steam network is analyzed. At the first step, using STAR software, the steam network is simulated and then optimized, which determines the optimum conditions. In this regard, energy saving potential was identified and total operating costs (TOC) in two states of fixed fuel fraction and changeable fuel fraction was calculated. In addition, different scenarios were proposed like using HRSG instead of two boilers. The results showed that amount of total operating cost has been reduced, as the result the best scenario regarding TOC is selected.

Khodaie, H.; Nasr, M. R. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

260

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

262

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

J Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 526 Appendix J Related EIA Publications on Energy...

263

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Consumption in the Manufacturing Sector, 1991 In 1991, the amount of energy consumed in the manufacturing sector was as follows: * Primary Consumption of Energy for All...

264

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5HVLGHQWLDO (QHUJ\\ &RQVXPSWLRQ 6XUYH\\V 1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables Appliances Consumption Tables (17 pages, 60 kb) Contents Pages CE5-1c.

265

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Elements of consumption: an abstract visualization of household consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To promote sustainability consumers must be informed about their consumption behaviours. Ambient displays can be used as an eco-feedback technology to convey household consumption information. Elements of Consumption (EoC) demonstrates this by visualizing ... Keywords: a-life, eco-feedback, household consumption, sustainability

Stephen Makonin; Philippe Pasquier; Lyn Bartram

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Will lecture on: OIL AND WAR: A GRIM EARTH SCIENCES POINT OF VIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fluids in crustal processes and in energy resources. Worldwide, per-capita oil consumption is closely therefore requires increased per-capita oil consumption. However, oil is a finite resource whose production correlated with standard of living. In developing nations like China and India, increasing prosperity

Schuster, Assaf

268

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

269

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

270

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

272

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

273

Recent world fossil-fuel and primary energy production and consumption trends  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide fossil fuel and primary electric power production figures since 1973 show a recent drop in oil production similar to the 1975 decline after recession. Crude oil consumption has declined since 1978, while production has increased. Natural gas production and consumption continue to increase as does power generation from all energy sources. Differences are noted between data sources and comparisons made of the validity of the data. 13 references, 7 figures, 12 tables. (DCK)

Parent, J.D.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

275

Crisis and Consumption Smoothing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic impact of the current crisis on performance of businesses across sectors and economies has been headlining the business press for the past several months. Extant reconciliations of these patterns in the popular press rely on ad hoc reasoning. ... Keywords: consumer behavior, consumption smoothing, crisis, econometrics, marketing strategy

Pushan Dutt; V. Padmanabhan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

277

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

278

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

279

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

280

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

282

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

283

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80: July 11, 2005 80: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380:

284

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: November 19, 1: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Digg

285

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: May 5, 2003 6: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266:

286

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: June 10, 2002 0: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220:

287

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: May 11, 1999 8: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May

288

NETL: News Release - Leveling the Playing (Oil) Field For Small...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considerably more expensive than conventional methods, but is expected to reduce drilling costs, increase oil discovery rates, and improve the recovery of bypassed oil. Vecta...

289

Maximum of oil output of a treadle-powered peanut oil press  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manual processing of food products has become a substantial part of the daily routine of a typical household in the developing world. Consumption of oil is an essential part of an individual's diet and thus, the ...

Patel, Ravi M. (Ravi Mahendra)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of the Trade-Off between Power Consumption and Performance in Bluetooth Based Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To further increase the applicability of Bluetooth in real appli- cations, reducing the energy consumption and hardware cost are important research topics. In this paper we examine the trade-off between power consumption and performance for our experimen- ...

Juan-Carlos Cano; Jose-Manuel Cano; Carlos Calafate; Eva Gonzalez; Pietro Manzoni

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

292

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

294

Don't Supersize Me! Toward a Policy of Consumption-Based Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Don't Supersize Me! Toward a Policy of Consumption-Based Energy Efficiency Jeffrey Harris, Rick ultimately reverse) the growth in total energy consumption and carbon emissions. Instead, policy makers need for effective policy in a carbon- and oil-constrained world with increasingly brittle energy markets. To start

Diamond, Richard

295

America's Oil Imports: A Self-Inflicted Burden Vaclav Smil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America's Oil Imports: A Self-Inflicted Burden Vaclav Smil Faculty of Environment, University of Manitoba Burdensome dependence on crude oil imports is a key challenge for America's energy policy; its principal cause is excessive consumption of refined oil products, which is mainly the result

Smil, Vaclav

296

Oil, Climate Change & Sustainable Energy PASEF-20 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil, Climate Change & Sustainable Energy PASEF- 20 October 2011 1) How much longer can we rely should it contain? Ken Lande ­ Physics Department #12;Remaining Crude Oil Supplies Present World consumption = 30 billion barrels/year 1) Conventional Oil- Originally ~ 2 trillion barrels ­ ½ used ~ 1

Zywina, David

297

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barrel of crude oil in the Middle East was 14.85 US$ between5,000 US$ mark). Although consumption of crude oil in theUS$ for o?shore drilling; in other words, the marginal cost of a barrel of crude oil

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fuel consumption: Industrial, residential, and general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption in industrial and residential sectors. General studies of fuel supply, demand, policy, forecasts, and consumption models are presented. Citations examine fuel information and forecasting systems, fuel production, international economic and energy activities, heating oils, and pollution control. Fuel consumption in the transportation sector is covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dwindling resources of fossil fuels coupled with the steady increase in energy consumption have spurred research interest in alternative and renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives for fossil fuels. It can be made from various renewable sources, including recycled oil, and can be utilized in lieu of petroleum-based diesel. To foster market competitiveness for biodiesel, it is necessary to develop cost-effective and technically sound processing schemes, to identify related key design criteria, and optimize performance. The overall goal of this work was to design and optimize biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester FAME) production from vegetable oil. To achieve this goal, several interconnected research activities were undertaken. First, a base-case flow sheet was developed for the process. The performance of this flow sheet along with the key design and operating criteria were identified by conducting computer-aided simulation using ASPEN Plus. Various scenarios were simulated to provide sufficient understanding and insights. Also, different thermodynamic databases were used for different sections of the process to account for the various characteristics of the streams throughout the process. Next, mass and energy integration studies were performed to reduce the consumption of material and energy utilities, improve environmental impact, and enhance profitability. Finally, capital cost estimation was carried out using the ICARUS Process Evaluator computer-aided tools linked to the results of the ASPEN simulation. The operating cost of the process was estimated using the key information on process operation such as raw materials, utilities, and labor. A profitability analysis was carried out by examining the ROI (Return of Investment) and PP (Payback Period). It was determined that the single most important economic factor is the cost of soybean oil, which accounted for more than 90% of the total annualized cost. Consequently, a sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the effect of soybean oil cost on profitability. It was determined that both ROI and PP quickly deteriorate as the cost of soybean oil increases.

Myint, Lay L.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Glossary Anthracite: A hard, black, lustrous coal containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Often referred to as hard coal. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Bituminous Coal: A dense, black coal, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, with a moisture content usually less than 20 percent. Often referred to as soft coal. It is the most common coal. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

302

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last year’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

303

Why Sequence Bacteria That Reduce Sulfur Compounds?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria That Reduce Sulfur Compounds? Combustion of sulfur-containing fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, contributes significantly to global environmental problems, such...

304

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

305

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

306

Supply and demand of lube oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube oil consumption in the world has reached about 40 million tonnes per year, of which 24 million tonnes is used outside the communist areas. There are large regional differences in annual consumption per head from one kilogramme (kg) in India to 35 kg in North America. A statistical analysis of historical data over twenty years in about ninety countries has lead to the conclusion that national income, measured as GDP per head, is the key determinant of total lube oil consumption per head. The functional relationship, however, is different in different countries. Starting from GDP projections until the year 2000, regional forecasts of lube oil demand have been made which show that the share of developing nations outside the communist area in world demand will grow. This will increase the regional imbalance between base oil capacity and demand.

Vlemmings, J.M.L.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

308

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

309

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields: Oilfields Energy Consumption Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High electrical cost has always constituted a major expense item in the operation of oilfields. Such high costs are particularly critical to small oil and gas operators. There are opportunities that can substantially reduce electric cost and improve energy usage efficiency. For small operators, this could mean a difference between premature abandonment and continued recovery. Energy reduction in oil production supports the need for energy reduction across all industries brought on by recent electrical en...

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy consumption forecasting in process industry using support vector machines and particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are applied in predicting energy consumption in the first phase of oil refining at a particular oil refinery. During cross-validation process of the SVM training Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm ... Keywords: energy prediction, particle swarm optimization (PSO), support vector machines (SVM)

Milena R. Petkovi?; Milan R. Rapai?; Boris B. Jakovljevi?

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

312

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

313

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

314

2009 Energy Consumption Per Person  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Per capita energy consumption across all sectors of the economy. Click on a state for more information.

315

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - High World Oil Price Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table D1. World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table D2. World total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

316

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

317

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

318

Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society's growing demands for energy results in rapid increase in oil consumption and motivates us to make unconventional resources conventional resources. There are enormous amounts of heavy oil reserves in the world but the lack of cost effective technologies either for extraction, transportation, or refinery upgrading hinders the development of heavy oil reserves. One of the critical problems with heavy oil and bitumen is that they require large amounts of thermal energy and expensive catalysts to upgrade. This thesis demonstrates that electron beam (E-Beam) heavy oil upgrading, which uses unique features of E-Beam irradiation, may be used to improve conventional heavy oil upgrading. E-Beam processing lowers the thermal energy requirements and could sharply reduce the investment in catalysts. The design of the facilities can be simpler and will contribute to lowering the costs of transporting and processing heavy oil and bitumen. E-Beam technology uses the high kinetic energy of fast electrons, which not only transfer their energy but also interact with hydrocarbons to break the heavy molecules with lower thermal energy. In this work, we conducted three major stages to evaluate the applicability of E-Beam for heavy oil upgrading. First, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of E-Beam on hydrocarbons. To do so, we used a Van de Graff accelerator, which generates the high kinetic energy of electrons, and a laboratory scale apparatus to investigate extensively how radiation effects hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional upgrading. The results of our study are very encouraging. From the experiments we found that E-Beam effect on hydrocarbon is significant. We used less thermal energy for distillation of n-hexadecane (n-C16) and naphtha with E-Beam. The results of experiments with asphaltene indicate that E-Beam enhances the decomposition of heavy hydrocarbon molecules and improves the quality of upgraded hydrocarbon. From the study of energy transfer mechanism, we estimated heat loss, fluid movement, and radiation energy distribution during the reaction. The results of our economic evaluation show that E-Beam upgrading appears to be economically feasible in petroleum industry applications. These results indicate significant potential for the application of E-Beam technology throughout the petroleum industry, particularly near production facilities, transportation pipelines, and refining industry.

Yang, Daegil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Residential energy-consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1978-March 1979  

SciTech Connect

Tables present data on energy consumption and expenditures for US households during a 12-month period. The total amount of energy consumed by the residential sector from April 1978 through March 1979 is estimated to have been 10,563 trillion Btu with an average household consumption of 138 million Btu. Table 1 summarizes residential energy consumption for all fuels (totals and averages) as wells as total amounts consumed and expenditures for each of the major fuel types (natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, and liquid petroleum gas). Tables 2 and 3 give the number of households and the average energy prices, respectively, for each of the major fuel types. In Tables 4 to 9, totals and averages for both consumption and expenditures are given for each of the major fuels. The consumption of each fuel is given first for all households using the fuel. Then, households are divided into those that use the fuel as their main source of heat and those using the fuel for other purposes. Electricity data (Tables 5 to 7) are further broken down into households that use electricity for air conditioning and those not using it for this purpose. Limited data are also presented on households that use each of the major fuels for heating water. Each of the consumption tables is given for a variety of general household features, including: geographical, structural and physical, and demographic characteristics. Tables 10 to 18 present the same information for the subgroup of households living in single-family owner-occupied detached houses. The third set of tables (19 to 27) is limited to households that paid directly for all of the energy they used. Tables 28 to 36 provide variance estimates for the data.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the consumption cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1.6 Optimal consumption, expenditures and1.3.2 Optimal nondurable consumption and durable

Issler, Paulo Floriano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls Clement Aassociation between milk consumption and occurrence of acneand 'don't drink milk'. Consumption of the specific types of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A Note on the Consumption Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeldes, S. (1989) Consumption and Liquidity Constraints:A Note on the Consumption Function Douglas G.Steigerwald Consumption Function The international

Steigerwald, Douglas G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Stock Market and Consumption: Evidence from China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 1992. Understanding Consumption. Cambridge, UK: CambridgeStock market wealth and consumption. The Journal of Economic139146. Stock Market and Consumption: Evidence from China

Hau, Leslie C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well, saving 12.41% in thermal cooling loads and 9.59% infor electricity and thermal cooling and heating (as12.85% savings in thermal cooling loads, with the savings

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inaccuracies. However, we do waste energy when a vacant roombuildings, thus indicating energy waste. In order to makein each room. The energy waste information gives feedback to

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The centralized Energy Management Systems(EMS), by Johnsonby a central Energy Management System(EMS) and are operateda centralized Energy Management System(EMS). The Computer

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

MECS Fuel Oil Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas : Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas Year Distillate Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 185 148 1224 3.4% 1994 152 125 1020 3.1% Residual Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 505 290 1577 16.7% 1994 441 241 1249 19.8% Natural Gas (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 4656 2702 5233 77.2% 1994 6141 4435 6758 73.4% Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985 and 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys. Table 2: Establishments That Actually Switched Between Natural Gas and Residual Fuel Oil Type of Switch Number of Establishments in Population Number That Use Original Fuel Percentage That Use Original Fuel Number That Can Switch to Another Fuel Percentage That Can Switch to Another Fuel Number That Actually Made a Switch Percentage That Actually Made a Switch

329

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

331

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Oil and Natural Gas Index (click to jump links) Natural Gas Consumption and Prices Natural Gas Production Natural Gas Imports and Wellhead Prices Natural Gas Alternative Cases Oil Prices and Reserve Additions Oil Production Alaskan Oil Production and Oil Imports Petroleum Refining Refined Petroleum Products Natural Gas Consumption and Prices Projected Increases in Natural Gas Use Are Led by Electricity Generators Figure 85. Natural gas consumption by end-use sector, 1990-2025 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total natural gas consumption is projected to increase from 2002 to 2025 in all the AEO2004 cases. The projections for domestic natural gas consumption in 2025 range from 29.1 trillion cubic feet per year in the low economic

332

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

335

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

336

Understanding goal setting behavior in the context of energy consumption reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home energy use represents a significant proportion of total consumption. A growing research area is considering how to help everyday users consume less. However, simply determining how to best reduce consumption remains a challenging task for many users. ... Keywords: energy consumption, goal-setting, motivation, sustainability

Michelle Scott; Mary Barreto; Filipe Quintal; Ian Oakley

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Increased tight oil production, vehicle efficiency reduce ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas overtakes coal as the largest fuel for U.S. electricity generation. ... Over the same period, pipeline imports from Canada fall by 30%, ...

338

Active improvement of air-conditioning system energy consumption with adaptive thermal comfort approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MSc research project aims to suggest improvements to building air-conditioning control systems, to reduce energy consumption while maintaining the comfort level of the occupants. (more)

Muhammad Saleh, Muhammad Fadzli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and ...  

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy ...

340

Map Data: State Consumption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Map Data: State Consumption stateconsumptionpc2009.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Spending...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency ...

342

Reducing Emissions in Plant Flaring Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2006, one of the largest integrated energy and chemical companies in the world has actively pushed toward optimization and upgrading of pipelines, refineries and petrochemical plants in China for the purpose of minimizing energy consumption, lowering emissions and maximizing production. Saving energy and reducing emissions are the internal requirements for every division of this major corporation. To achieve the public goals the company set, they issued a five year plan called Methods on Energy and Water Saving Management which was applied to all operating equipment in the 13 company owned oil and gas fields, the 22 refineries and 3 pipeline companies. The plan for the refineries focused on key areas such as improving energy efficiency, utilizing latest technologies and reducing green house gas emissions.1 The company also created a Green Team with the objective of achieving zero injury, zero pollution, and zero accidents for all production facilities. These Green Teams advocated the company's new HSE (Health Safety & Environment) culture by eliminating energy-consuming and highly polluting production equipment and facilities that fell behind in the use of technologically advanced equipment.

Duck, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1972, the U.S. refining industry has made much progress in reducing energy consumption. Lately, falling energy prices have de-emphasized the need to appropriate new capital for additional energy conservation projects. One area neglected in most refineries is the need to monitor and manage the daily use of energy. Setting up an energy auditing system will tell management how well each unit in the refinery is being operated and can be used as a valuable tool in reducing energy costs. An example of an energy monitorirg and management system is discussed and illustrated with examples.

Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An experimental study of the oil evolution in critical piston ring pack regions and the effects of piston and ring designs in an internal combustion engine utilizing two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence and the impact on maritime economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faced with increasing concern for lubricating, oil consumption and engine friction, it is critical to understand the oil transport mechanisms in the power cylinder system. Lubricating oil travels through distinct regions ...

Vokac, Adam, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

346

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

Not Available

1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

348

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

349

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

includes descriptions of the 30 groups that comprise the strata of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. These are the 20 major industrial groups (two-digit SIC) and...

350

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey ... Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Form EIA-457A (2001) Form Approval: OMB No. 1905-0092 ...

351

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOEEIA-0464(91) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

352

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas...

353

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

354

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) was designed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA)...

355

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates Introduction The 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) has been designed by the Energy Information Administration...

356

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

357

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

358

Chemically enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yet when conducted according to present state of the art, chemical flooding (i.e., micellar/polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, surfactant flooding) can mobilize more residual crude oil than any other method of enhanced oil recovery. It also is one of the most expensive methods of enhanced oil recovery. This contribution will describe some of the technology that comprises the state of the art technology that must be adhered to if a chemical flood is to be successful. Although some of the efforts to reduce cost and other points are discussed, the principle focus is on technical considerations in designing a good chemical flooding system. The term chemical flooding is restricted here to methods of enhanced oil recovery that employs a surfactant, either injected into the oil reservoir or generated in situ, primarily to reduce oil-water interfacial tension. Hence, polymer-water floods for mobility or profile control, steam foams, and carbon dioxide foams are excluded. Some polymer considerations are mentioned because they apply to providing mobility control for chemical flooding systems.

Nelson, R.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

fuel_oil.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Oil Usage Form Fuel Oil Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed report is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may c

360

World Oil Price, 1970-2020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Oil Price, 1970-2020 World Oil Price, 1970-2020 (1999 dollars per barrel) 17.09 50- 45 - 40 - I Nominal dollars 35- 1995 _2020 15 - J 9, AE02000 5- 10 - HHistory Projections 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 35AS0570 ^a .i^ Petroleum Supply, Consumption, and Imports, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 30- History Projections 25 - 20 - 20~ Consumption _ Net imports 15 - Domestic supply . _ 5- 0 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 '-'e^~~~ u,~~ ~35AS0570 ., te Petroleum Consumption by Sector, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 20- History Projections 15- XTransportation 10 Industrial Eect i city gener - 5- 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 .n 35AS0570 r-N Crude Oil Production by Source, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 8 History Projections 6- Lower 48 conventional 4- Lower 48 offshore 2- lasa k r 0 § ^.^^^r"_ "^^"' ^Lower 48 EOR

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reducing Leaking Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Reducing Leaking Electricity Figure 1. Full and standby power draws of some compact audio systems. A surprisingly large number of appliances-from computer peripherals to cable TV boxes to radios-consume electricity even after they have been switched off. Other appliances, such as cordless telephones, remote garage door openers, and battery chargers don't get switched off but draw power even when they are not performing their principal functions. The energy used while the appliance is switched off or not performing its primary purpose is called "standby consumption" or "leaking electricity." This consumption allows TVs, VCRs and garage-door openers to be ready for instant-on with a remote control, microwave ovens to display a digital

362

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTIONENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities | Fuel Switching Capacity Introduction The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals into thousands of various products. Chemicals are key materials for producing an extensive assortment of consumer goods. They are also crucial materials in creating many resources that are essential inputs to the numerous industries and sectors of the U.S. economy.1 The manufacturing sector is classified by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of which the chemicals sub-sector is NAICS

364

Characterization of oil transport in the power cylinder of internal combustion engines during steady state and transient operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine friction, wear, and oil consumption are some of the primary interests for the automotive industry. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of the fundamentals involving oil transport inside the power ...

Przesmitzki, Steve (Steve Victor)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION TO INFORM DATA-DRIVEN ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Effective demand-side energy efficiency policies are needed to reduce residential electricity consumption and its harmful effects on the environment. The first step to devise such polices is to quantify the potential for energy efficiency by analyzing the factors that impact consumption. This paper proposes a novel approach to analyze large data sets of residential electricity consumption to derive insights for policy making and energy efficiency programming. In this method, underlying behavioral determinants that impact residential electricity consumption are identified using Factor Analysis. A distinction is made between long-term and short-term determinants of consumption by developing separate models for daily maximum and daily minimum consumption and analyzing their differences. Finally, the set of determinants are ranked by their impact on electricity consumption, using a stepwise regression model. This approach is then applied on a large data set of smart meter data and household information as a case example. The results of the models show that weather, location, floor area, and number of refrigerators are the most significant determinants of daily minimum (or idle) electricity consumption in residential buildings,

Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer; Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil ...  

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing ...

367

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

369

Biofuels Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption Biofuels Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data is presented as thousand barrels per day. Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels Biofuels Consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_biofuels_production_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_biofuels_consumption_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

370

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

371

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

372

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Low Oil PriceTables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Price Tables (2007-2035) Oil Price Tables (2007-2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main Low Oil Price Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary Low Oil Price Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year Low Oil Price Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Excel Gif Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity

373

Proxying: Reducing PC Energy Use With Network Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vendors, component manufacturers, and PC companies. Proxying applies directly to other devices and will be an important strategy to reduce electricity consumption in the...

374

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 2, Regional data. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

Included here are data at the Census region and division level on consumption of and expenditures for the major fuels used in residential households - electricity, natural gas, fuel oil/kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on wood consumption. Section 1 of this report contains data on the average amount of energy consumed per household for space heating in 1984 and the corresponding expenditures. Sections 2 through 7 summarize the energy consumption and expenditure patterns. Appendices A through D contain information on how the survey was conducted, estimates of the size of the housing unit in square feet and the quality of the data. Procedures for calculating relative standard errors (RSE) are located in Appendix C, Quality of the Data. Procedures for estimating the end-use statistics are located in Appendix D. Census and weather maps, and related publications are located in Appendices E through G.

Not Available

1987-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

376

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach Last Reviewed 2172012 DE-FC26-06NT42937 Goal The primary goal of...

377

Microbiology for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy has sponsored several projects to investigate the feasibility of using microorganisms to enhance oil recovery. Microbes from the Wilmington oilfield, California, were found to be stimulated in growth by polyacrylamide mobility-control polymers and the microbes also can reduce the viscosity of the polyacrylamide solutions. Microbes have been discovered that produce surface active molecules, and several mixed cultures have been developed that make low viscosity, non-wetting, emulsions of heavy oils (/sup 0/API oil deposits, in China for enhanced recovery of light oils and successful field tests have been conducted in Romania and Arkansas.

Donaldson, E.C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

379

Oil Consumption for Transportation and Other Uses in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... products for noncommercial fuels (such as wood burning for home heating and cooking) as incomes rise and the energy infrastructure matures. ...

380

Purification of Vegetable Oils Post-Consumption Residential and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viscosity residential treated with clay Tonsil was lower compared to the crude ... Designing a Collaborative System for Socio-Environmental Management of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Oil Consumption for Transportation and Other Uses in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the developing countries is caused in part by the substitution of petroleum products for noncommercial fuels (such as wood burning for home heating and cooking) ...

382

"Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,32,1688,378,0,58,0,15.7 3274," Lime","Q",657,"W","Q",657,"W",0,0,0,33.9 3296," Mineral Wool","W","W","W",113,34,"W","W","W",0,2 33,"Primary Metal Industries","W",5117,"W",2433,494...

383

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

384

2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Built-in room heater burning gas, oil, or kerosene? 7 Heating stove burning wood, coal, or coke (IF VOLUNTEERED) 8 Portable electric heaters (IF VOLUNTEERED)

385

THE COMPETITION BETWEEN METHYLMERCURY RISKS AND OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID BENEFITS: A REVIEW OF CONFLICTING EVIDENCE ON FISH CONSUMPTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The health concerns of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination of seafood have recently been extended to include cardiovascular effects, especially premature mortality. Although the fatty acids (fish oils) found in most species are thought to confer a wide range of health benefits, especially to the cardiovascular system, some epidemiological studies have suggested that such benefits may be offset by adverse effects of MeHg. This comprehensive review is based on searches of the NIH MEDLINE database and compares and contrasts 145 published studies involving cardiovascular effects and exposures to mercury and other fish contaminants, intake of fatty acids including dietary supplements of fish oils, and rates of seafood consumption. Since few of these studies include adequate simultaneous measurements of all of these potential predictor variables, we summarized their effects separately, across the available studies of each, and then drew conclusions based on the aggregated findings. It is important to realize that studies of seafood consumption encompass the net effects of all of these predictor variables, but that seafood intake studies are rarely supported by human biomarker measurements that reflect the actual uptake of harmful as well as beneficial fish ingredients. As a result, exposure measurement error is an issue when comparing studies and predictor variables. It is also possible that the observed benefits of eating fish may relate more to the characteristics of the consumers than to those of the fish. We found the evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of MeHg to be sparse and unconvincing. Studies of cardiovascular mortality show net benefits, and the findings of adverse effects are mainly limited to studies Finland at high mercury exposure levels. By contrast, a very consistent picture of beneficial effects is seen for fatty acids, after recognizing the effects of exposure uncertainties and the presence of threshold effects. Studies based on measured biomarker levels are seen to be the most reliable and present a convincing picture of strong beneficial effects, especially for those causes of death involving cardiac arrhythmia. This conclusion also extends to studies of fish-oil supplementation. Studies based on fish consumption show mainly benefits from increased consumption. This finding is supported by an ecological study at the national population level, for which the lifestyle effects that might be correlated with fish consumption within a given population would be expected to ''average out'' across nations. Finally, the net survival benefits resulting from eating fish are consistent with studies involving complete diets, although benefits are also seen to accrue from reduced consumption of red meat and saturated fats.

LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heating Oil Propane Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NYSERDAs mission- help New York meet its energy goals: reducing energy consumption, promoting the use of renewable energy sources, and protecting the environment. Energy R&DPurpose: Support policy-relevant research to enhance understanding of energyrelated environmental issuesAir Quality and Health Effects Chain of accountability. Each box represents a link between regulatory action and human health response to air pollution. Arrows connecting the linksNew York State Primary Consumption of Energy for Electric Generation,

Ellen Burkhard Ph. D; Cord Wood

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

388

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

389

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

390

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

391

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

392

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

393

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

394

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

395

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

396

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W as hi ng to n, DC DOEEIA-0464(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets...

397

Financing retirement consumption and bequests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays that evaluate possible vehicles for financing either retirement consumption or bequests. Chapter 1 compares the use of Roth and tax-deferred retirement accounts for retirement ...

Bishop, Tonja Bowen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Progressive consumption : strategic sustainable excess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in the marketplace show that urban dwellers are increasingly supporting locally produced foods. This thesis argues for an architecture that responds to our cultures consumptive behaviors. Addressing the effects of ...

Bonham, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph MacLeod)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S Y M n i 1 y 2 i (W i ) (W i 1) , Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Methodological Report 1985. Although this report describes 44...

400

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Idiosyncratic Consumption Risk and the Cross Section of Asset Returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the importance of idiosyncratic consumption risk for the cross-sectional variation in average returns on stocks and bonds. If idiosyncratic consumption risk is not priced, the only pricing factor in a multiperiod economy is the rate of aggregate consumption growth. We oer evidence that the cross-sectional variance of consumption growth is also a priced factor. This demonstrates that consumers are not fully insured against idiosyncratic consumption risk, and that asset returns reect their attempts to reduce their exposure to this risk. We nd that over the sample period the resulting two-factor pricing model has lower Hansen-Jagannathan distances than the CAPM and the Fama-French three-factor model. Moreover, in the presence of the market factor and the size and book-to-market factors, the two consumption based factors retain explanatory power. Together with the results of Lettau and Ludvigson (2000), these ndings indicate that consumption-based asset pricing is relevant for explaining the cross-section of asset returns.

Kris Jacobs; Kevin Q. Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

403

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot...

405

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of...

406

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

407

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household. RECS 2009 Release date: June 6, 2012. Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained ...

408

Greece poised for oil and gas development  

SciTech Connect

The first indigenous crude oil in Greece will be produced by late 1980, and commercial operations are expected to start in early 1981 from the offshore oil and gas field in the North Aegean Sea. The discovery of oil in Greek waters started a new era in the economic development of Greece and could be considered a milestone in the development of the country. The discovery also had international political implications. Many analysts consider it as the main cause of the dispute between Greece and Turkey over the delineation of the continental shelf of the Aegean Sea. The Greek Government, after the collapse of the dictatorial regime in 1974, has enacted new legislation regarding oil exploration and exploitation activities in Greece. Oil found so far amounts to 12% of present domestic consumption, and there is hope of more as the Public Petroleum Corporation turns its attention westward.

Vougaris, C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on US dependence on foreign oil when he testi?ed that US dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce militaryincrease in oil prices, at a minimum because foreign demand

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

SciTech Connect

Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

Not Available

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

412

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fail to meet this demand, the most likely alternatives will be heavy oil, oil sands, oil shale, and liquids from natural gas and coal. These are carbon-intensive fuels that would...

413

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

414

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

415

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

416

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

417

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

418

Today in Energy - Residential Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent residential consumption and efficiency issues and trends

419

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data. ... Commercial Buildings - CBECS. Manufacturing - MECS.

420

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

422

Reducing fuel usage through applications of conservation and solar energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal technology, coupled with aggressive conservation measures, offers the prospect of greatly reducing the dependence of industry on oil and natural gas. The near-term market for solar technology is largely in industrial processes operating at temperatures below 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F). Such process heat can be supplied by the relatively unsophisticated solar equipment available today. The number and diversity of industrial plants using process heat at this temperature allows favorable matches between solar technologies and industrial processes. The problems involved with the installation and maintenance of conservation and solar equipment are similar. Both compete for scarce investment capital, and each complicates industrial operations and increases maintenance requirements. Technological innovations requiring new types of equipment and reducing the temperature requirements of industrial processes favor the introduction of solar hardware. The industrial case studies program at the Solar Energy Research Institute has examined technical, economic, and other problems facing the near-term application of solar thermal technology to provide industrial process heat. The plant engineer is in the front line of any measure to reduce energy consumption or to supplement existing fuel supplies. The conditions most favorable to the integration of solar technology are presented and illustrated with examples from actual industrial plants.

May, E. K.; Hooker, D. W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

OpenEI - Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

424

Monitoring Energy Consumption of Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the rapid development of new and innovative applications for mobile devices like smartphones, advances in battery technology have not kept pace with rapidly growing energy demands. Thus energy consumption has become a more and more important issue of mobile devices. To meet the requirements of saving energy, it is critical to monitor and analyze the energy consumption of applications on smartphones. For this purpose, we develop a smart energy monitoring system called SEMO for smartphones using Android operating system. It can profile mobile applications with battery usage information, which is vital for both developers and users.

Ding, Fangwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xuhai; Ma, Chengchuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

426

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures By Joe Mellott, Joshua New to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back into the atmosphere. By use of commonly available calculators, one can analyze the potential energy savings based on environmental

Tennessee, University of

427

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2010 2006 2002 1998 1994 1991 Archive Analysis & Projections MECS Industry Analysis Briefs Steel Industry Analysis The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of construction, transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the backbone of bridges, skyscrapers, railroads, automobiles, and appliances. Most grades of steel used today - particularly high-strength steels that are lighter and more versatile - were not available a decade ago. Chemical Industry Analysis The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals

428

NETL: News Release - Submersible Oil Pump, More Revealing Seismic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seven days a week.Enerdyne projects that, if the submersible pump succeeds in reducing oil field costs, an additional 780 million barrels of oil from the Red Mountain Reservoir...

429

Oil Independent Oakland Action Plan: Recommendations by the OIO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Independent Oakland Action Plan: Recommendations by the OIO Task Force to the City of Oakland to Reduce its Dependence on Oil Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: March 21, 2008 -...

430

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

431

Conspicuous Consumption and Dynamic Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do firms develop marketing strategy when consumers seek to satisfy both quality and status-related considerations? We develop an analytical model to study this issue, examining both pricing and product management decisions in markets for conspicuous ... Keywords: conspicuous consumption, durable goods, dynamic pricing, game theory, status

Raghunath Singh Rao, Richard Schaefer

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

433

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total 3 17 16 13 Net Electricity 4 2 2 2 Natural Gas 5 5 4 Coal 7 6 4 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil or coal.

434

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports U.S. crude oil production topped 7 million barrels per day in November and December for the first time in 20 years, and production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast sees domestic crude oil output averaging 7.3 million barrels per day this year and climbing to 7.9 million barrels next year. Higher crude oil production means America will need less imported oil. U.S. net imports of crude oil and liquid fuels are forecast to drop to 6.0 million barrels per day in 2014, less than half the 12.5 million barrels per day level in 2005. That will push U.S. imports down to just 32 percent of domestic oil consumption, the lowest

435

U.S. crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year U.S. crude oil production is expected to surpass U.S. crude oil imports by the fourth quarter of this year. That would mark the first time since February 1995 that domestic crude oil output exceeds imports, according to the latest monthly energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The United States will still need to import crude oil to help meet domestic demand. However, total crude oil imports this year are on track to fall to their lowest level since 1997. U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise over the next two years as imports fall. As a result, the share of total U.S. petroleum consumption met by net imports is forecast to fall to 32 percent next year, the lowest level since 1985 and nearly half the peak level of 60 percent seen in

436

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

437

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

438

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

439

The 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Two Decades  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey presents two decades of changes in energy consumption related Household Characteristics

440

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

442

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The effects of driving style and vehicle performance on the real-world fuel consumption of U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with advances in vehicle technology, both conservation and methods for reducing the fuel consumption of existing vehicles are needed to decrease the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of the U.S. ...

Berry, Irene Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Design of an energy consumption scheduler based on genetic algorithms in the smart grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper designs an energy consumption scheduler capable of reducing peak power load in smart places based on genetic algorithms and measures its performance. The proposed scheme follows the task model consisting of actuation time, operation length, ... Keywords: combinatory index, genetic algorithm, peak load reduction, power consumption scheduler, smart grid

Junghoon Lee; Gyung-Leen Park; Ho-Young Kwak; Hongbeom Jeon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

PowerView monitoring system for instant power consumption in tritium separation technological installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper shows the development of some integrated systems for monitoring and control of instant power consumption in normal and abnormal operation mode of tritium separation technological installations, with the view of reducing energy losses, supports ... Keywords: monitoring systems, power consumption

Carmen Maria Moraru; Ciprian Ciprian Bucur; Iulia Stefan; Ovidiu Balteanu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Statistical Derivation of an Accurate Energy Consumption Model for Embedded Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy consumption of software is becoming an increasingly important issue in designing mobile embedded systems where batteries are used as the main power source. As a consequence, recently, a number of promising techniques have been proposed to optimize software for reduced energy consumption.

Sheayun Lee; Andreas Ermedahl; Sang Lyul Min; et a l.; Min Naehyuck Chang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Reduce Stress!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stress! Stress! x Take a break every hour. Do some relaxation or stretching exercises or talk with someone about topics unrelated to work. Give your body and mind a rest. x Massage your hands and forearms several times a day with a vitamin E lotion. The massage will improve circulation and break up adhesions. Since you can't touch a keyboard until the lotion is absorbed, it also enforces a good break. x Massage the muscles in your neck working your way down from the skull to the shoulders, applying more force to the larger muscles as you go down. x Periodically evaluate your environment for ways to reduce stress. Try to keep your desk uncluttered so you can always find things. Make sure programs are set up correctly on the computer, and see if you can use a macro program to reduce

448

Keeping oil out of the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

Although the load-on-top procedure is capable of recovering 99% of the oil in tank washings and dirty ballast, the industry has continued to look for ways to reduce the contact between oil and water on board ship. With crude oil washing, as the tanker discharges its cargo, part of the crude oil is redirected through the ship pipes into washing machines located in the cargo tanks. The crude oil is applied under pressure to the tank walls, structure and tank bottom to remove oil residues. The resulting tank washings (all crude oil) are pumped onshore along with the rest of the cargo. Currently, clean ballast tanks and some of the remaining cargo tanks are, on a rotational basis, crude-oil washed with each discharge. Exxon Corp. VLCC's will be equipped to crude-oil wash all tanks, every discharge, by 1978. Oil residues retained on board ship following water washing average about to 1200 tons. The actual range experienced by Exxon's vessels during 1975-76 was 980-1460 tons. Studies of similar vessels following a crude-oil wash, with water rinse, showed significantly less oil remaining on board ship, 300-450 tons.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Minimizing energy consumption for handheld computers in Moby Dick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report we propose a number of techniques to reduce energy consumption for mobile computers. We use extra dedicated low-power modules to cut on processor cycles of the main CPU, i.e. hardware and software decomposition. These modules are autonomous and can be powered down individually. Furthermore, as networking consumes a large part of a mobile system's battery resources much effort is put in reducing energy consumption in this part. We use intelligent network interfaces with a power aware network protocol, and a MAC protocol that minimizes the `on-time' of network interfaces to reduce energy. There is a direct link between QoS and energy consumption. Therefore we move power management into the QoS domain. 1 Introduction Portable and hand-held computers must be careful not to waste the scarce energy resources in their batteries. Even though battery technology is improving continuously and processors and displays are rapidly improving in terms of power consumption, battery lif...

Paul J.M. Havinga; Gerard J. M. Smit

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

451

Strategies of Asian oil-importing countries  

SciTech Connect

Various strategies are used by oil-importing countries to reduce their economic dependence on imported oil: national oil production, energy conservation, and the change of economic structures from high energy intensity sectors to low ones. In this article, the roles of these different strategies have been identified for 10 selected oil-importing countries in Asia: Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Thailand, Hong Kong, R.O Korea, and Taiwan. The results show that most of the selected countries (although Hong Kong and Taiwan are independent economic entities, for simplicity, the author refers to them as countries) have succeeded in reducing their national economy dependence on imported oil since 1973. Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India are among the most successful countries, with more than 40% reduction in their economic dependence on imported oil.

Yang, M. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes that include: assigning an execution priority to each of one or more applications; executing, on the plurality of compute nodes, the applications according to the execution priorities assigned to the applications at an initial power level provided to the compute nodes until a predetermined power consumption threshold is reached; and applying, upon reaching the predetermined power consumption threshold, one or more power conservation actions to reduce power consumption of the plurality of compute nodes during execution of the applications.

Archer, Charles J; Inglett, Todd A

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

453

Budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes that include: assigning an execution priority to each of one or more applications; executing, on the plurality of compute nodes, the applications according to the execution priorities assigned to the applications at an initial power level provided to the compute nodes until a predetermined power consumption threshold is reached; and applying, upon reaching the predetermined power consumption threshold, one or more power conservation actions to reduce power consumption of the plurality of compute nodes during execution of the applications.

Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Peters, Amanda E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

455

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

456

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

Greene, D.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

458

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

459

RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

462

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2(94) 2(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. ii Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Contacts This publication was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the general direction of W. Calvin

463

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline. More recently, the electricity markets have been undergoing change. When Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992, requirements were included not only to open access to the ownership of electricity generation, but also to open access to the transmission lines so that wholesale trade in electricity would be possible. Now several States, including California and

464

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

465

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

466

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E U.S. Census Regions and Divisions 489 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States,1996 (Washington, DC, October 1996), Figure 1. Appendix E U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Appendix F Descriptions of Major Industrial Groups and Selected Industries Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget, Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987, pp. 67-263. 54 493 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Appendix F Descriptions of Major Industrial Groups and Selected Industries This appendix contains descriptions of industrial groups and selected industries taken from the Standard Industrial

467

Modeling overall energy consumption in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing the energy consumption of a wireless sensor network application is crucial for effective realization of the intended application in terms of cost, lifetime, and functionality. However, the minimizing task is hardly possible as no overall energy cost function is available for optimization. Optimizing a specific component of the total energy cost does not help in reducing the total energy cost as this reduction may be negated by an increase in the energy consumption of other components of the application. Recently we proposed Hierarchy Energy Driven Architecture as a robust architecture that takes into account all principal energy constituents of wireless sensor network applications. Based on the proposed architecture, this paper presents a single overall model and proposes a feasible formulation to express the overall energy consumption of a generic wireless sensor network application in terms of its energy constituents. The formulation offers a concrete expression for evaluating the performance of ...

Kamyabpour, Najmeh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Effects of feedback on residential electricity consumption: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews 17 studies assessing the effect of information feedback on residential electricity consumption. Most of the studies were conducted in experimental or quasi-experimental conditions. The studies reviewed used (1) both feedback and incentives, (2) goal setting, (3) cost information feedback, and (4) displays. The study findings, taken together, provide some evidence that feedback is effective in reducing electricity consumption, although questions remain concerning the conditions under which feedback can best be provided. Reductions in consumption found in most of the studies ranged from 5% to 20%. Utility companies are the most likely source of feedback information for residential customers. Three of the studies investigated utility feedback projects. The report discusses the policy implications of these as well as the other studies. The report also lists questions remaining to be researched. 13 refs., 1 tab.

Farhar, B.C.; Fitzpatrick, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

470

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Total Consumption State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu 1 North Dakota 99.8 District of Columbia 193.1 Louisiana 585.8 Alaska 277.3 Wyoming 974.7 2 West Virginia 90.9 Wyoming 119.2 Wyoming 568.2 Wyoming 200.7 Louisiana 886.5 3 Missouri 89.4 North Dakota 106.9 Alaska 435.7 North Dakota 172.8 Alaska 881.3 4 Tennessee 87.8 Alaska 94.1 North Dakota 388.9 Louisiana 158.0 North Dakota 768.4 5 Kentucky 87.4 Montana 78.4 Iowa 243.4 Oklahoma 122.3 Iowa 493.6

471

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

472

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

473

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Effect of thin-film coating on wear in EGR-contaminated oil.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased use of higher-efficiency compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) diesel engines instead of today's gasoline engines will result in reduced fuel consumption and greenhouse gases emissions. However, NO{sub x} and particulate exhaust emissions from diesel engines must be significantly reduced due to their possible adverse health effects. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is an effective way to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from diesel engines, but the particulates and acidic exhaust products in the recirculated gas will contaminate engine lubricant oil by increasing the soot content and total acid number (TAN). These factors will increase the wear rate in many critical engine components and seriously compromise engine durability. We have investigated the use of commercially available thin and hard coatings (TiN, TiCN, TiAlN, and CrN) to mitigate the negative effects of EGR on wear. In tests with the four-ball machine according to ASTM D4172, we found that all the four coatings deposited on M-50 steel significantly reduced wear in EGR-contaminated oils when compared with uncoated M50 steel balls.

Ajayi, O. O.; Aldajah, S. H.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

475

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four super majorsExxonMobil, Royal Dutch/Shell, BP-2001, ?ve corporations (ExxonMobil, BP-Amoco- Arco, Chevron-involved BP Amoco ExxonMobil Chevron Phillips Petroleum

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YPF Westdeutsche Landesbank Exxon Shell Nigerian Nationalsome perspective, the Exxon-Valdez spill, which released 12to approximately ?ve Exxon-Valdez spills per year. For many

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C31A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

478

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C25A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

479

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C32A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

480

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reduce oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C30A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

482

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

483

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary ...

484

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

485

State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

487

Energy Consumption and Expenditures RECS 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating. Space Heating. Appliances. Air-Conditioning. About the Data. Tables: Total Energy Consumption in U.S ...

488

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... State Energy Data System: Noncombustible Renewable Energy for 2011 ...

489

Experimental Studies Focused on the Pore-Scale Aspects of Heavy Oil and Bitumen Recovery Using the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) and Solvent-Aided SAGD (SA-SAGD) Recovery Processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing energy consumption and continuous depletion of hydrocarbon reservoirs will result in a conventional oil production peak in the near future. Thus, the gap between (more)

Mohammadzadeh Shanehsaz, Omidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Method for enhanced oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

Comberiati, Joseph R. (Morgantown, WV); Locke, Charles D. (Morgantown, WV); Kamath, Krishna I. (Chicago, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Safe recycling of used oil  

SciTech Connect

It`s not just recovery of used oil, but how you recover it, that ultimately determines the impact on the environment. No matter what recycling technology is employed, there are environmental/economic factors that come into play. One is the distance to the end user. Sending the used oil to a nearby plant (e.g. a local asphalt manufacturer as opposed to a distant refiner) both reduces hauling costs and the potential for a spill occurring during transport. Management practices of the used oil recycler, pollution control, insurance coverage and environmental compliance record are other factors in evaluating recovery options. Generators need to be careful about who is collecting their used oil, because they can be held liable for mismanagement.

Arner, R. [Northern Virginia Planning District Commission, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per-customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Categories: Consumption (Released, 6/23/2010, pdf format)

493

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan Vazler , Marijana Zeki-Susac ksabo of natural gas consumption hourly fore- cast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas

Scitovski, Rudolf

494

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve now focuses on New England ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NHHOR) will be reduced to one million barrels, half its original size, as the stockpile's holdings are converted to ultra-low ...

495

Is there oil after OPEC : Ecuador's Pasaje  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1973 when Ecuador joined the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, crude oil production increased by nearly half and domestic petroleum consumption has more than tripled. Oil's percent of Gross Domestic Product was just 3% in 1972, peaked at 17.3% in 1974, and has since declined to 11.71% in 1991. In 1992 the national perspective changed and found that OPEC membership was working against, not in favor of, economic growth. This issue addresses Ecuador's status change and its plans for its petroleum and economic future.

Not Available

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

496

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

/HRIf /HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption and Expenditures, April 1981 Through March 1982 an Part I: National Data Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. (202) 20fr02 'O'Q 'uoifkjjUSBM ujiuud juaoiujeAog 'S'n siuawnooQ jo luapuaiuuadns - 0088-292 (202) 98S02 '0'Q 8f 0-d I 6ujp|ing uoiieflSjUjiup v UOIIBUJJOJU | ABjau 3 02-13 'jaiuao UOIJBUJJOJUI XBjaug IBUO!;BN noA pasopua s; uujoi japjo uy 'MO|aq jeadde sjaqoinu auoydajaj PUB sassajppv 'OI3N 9>4i oi papajip aq pinoqs X6jaue uo suotjsenQ '(OIBN) J9»ueo aqjeiMJO^ui ASjaug (BUOIJEN s,vi3 QMi JO OdO 941 UUGJJ peuiBiqo eq ABOI suoijBonqnd (vi3) UO!JBJ;S!UILUPV UOIIBUUJO|U| XBjeug jaiflo PUB SJMJ p ssBiiojnd PUB UOIIBLUJO^JI 6uuepjQ (Od9) 90IWO Bujjuud luetuujaAOQ -g'n 'sjuaiunooa p juapuaiuuedng aqt LUOJI aiqB||BAB si uoHBOjiqnd sjt|i

497

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

498

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

499

Gulf Shale Oil Upgrading Process technology  

SciTech Connect

A description of the Gulf Shale Oil Hydrotreating Process, which is designed for upgrading full range shale oil to premium quality synthetic crude, is presented. The process consists of two sections: a low severity pretreating section which stabilizes the raw oil, removes iron, arsenic, trace metals and particulates, and sulfur; and a twostage, high severity hydrotreating section which completes the upgrading. The second section hydrotreats the bulk oil to a specified nitrogen content, allowing for a quality FCC feedstock in the 650F+ (343C+) residue. The main reactor effluent is flashed with subsequent hydrotreating of the flash vapor oil to achieve a low nitrogen level in the naphtha and middle distillate. The benefit of this flash configuration is hydrogen addition selectivity which maximizes syncrude quality while minimizing overall hydrogen consumption; this selectivity relationship is detailed. Finally, the product quality of the syncrudes produced with the Gulf Shale Oil Hydrotreating Process using shale oils derived from three different retort technologies and for Western and Eastern shales are discussed.

Jones, W.; Antezana, F.J.; Cugini, A.V.; Lyzinski, D.; Miller, J.B.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Standby Power Consumption Report, March. http://of measurement for the power consumption of audio, video andand Low Power Mode Energy Consumption, Energy Efficiency in

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z