National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reduce contaminated gw

  1. Capacity Demand Power (GW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Capacity Demand Power (GW) Hour of the Day The "Dip" Electricity Demand in Electricity Demand Every weekday, Japan's electricity use dips about 6 GW at 12 but it also shows that: · Behavior affects naHonal electricity use in unexpected ways

  2. Simple Methods To Reduce Charge-Transfer Contamination in Time-Dependent Density-Functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, John

    Simple Methods To Reduce Charge-Transfer Contamination in Time-Dependent Density) contamination in condensed-phase, time- dependent density-functional theory. These calculations are plagued spectra can still be obtained, upon configurational averaging, despite pervasive CT contamination

  3. BerkeleyGW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeleyBerkeleyGW BerkeleyGW

  4. BerkeleyGW2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeleyBerkeleyGW3

  5. BerkeleyGW2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeleyBerkeleyGW34

  6. BerkeleyGW2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeleyBerkeleyGW345

  7. Motivation GW Hedin G0W0 Beyond GW Conclusions The one-particle Green's function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Motivation GW Hedin G0W0 Beyond GW Conclusions The one-particle Green's function and the GW - Benasque 2012 #12;bg=whiteMotivation GW Hedin G0W0 Beyond GW Conclusions Outline 1 Motivation 2 The GW approximation 3 Hedin's equations 4 In practice: G0W0 and beyond 5 Beyond GW 6 Conclusions #12;bg=whiteMotivation

  8. Cleaning up the masses: Exclusion lists to reduce contamination with HPLC-MS/MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamond, Angus I.

    Cleaning up the masses: Exclusion lists to reduce contamination with HPLC-MS/MS Kelly Hodgea,, Sara also increased. Most undesirable contaminants originate in the laboratory and come from either the user peptides from abundant contaminant proteins. While completely eliminating non-specific protein

  9. BerkeleyGW Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeleyBerkeleyGW

  10. GW Health Sciences Programs Student Services Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 _________________________ GW Health Sciences Programs Student Services Office hsp@gwu.edu (202) 994-4241 Health Sciences Programs 2012-13 The School of Medicine and Health Sciences offers a broad range of undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare health sciences professionals for roles

  11. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  12. Outlook for detection of GW inspirals by GRB-triggered searches in the Advanced detector era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz; Nickolas Fotopoulos; Leo Singer; Curt Cutler

    2013-04-25

    Short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to originate from the coalescence of two neutron stars (NSs) or a NS and a black hole (BH). If this scenario is correct, then short GRBs will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves (GWs), detectable by GW observatories such as LIGO, Virgo, KAGRA, and LIGO-India. As compared with blind, all-sky, all-time GW searches, externally triggered searches for GW counterparts to short GRBs have the advantages of both significantly reduced detection threshold due to known time and sky location and enhanced GW amplitude because of face-on orientation. Based on the distribution of signal-to-noise ratios in candidate compact binary coalescence events in the most recent joint LIGO-Virgo data, our analytic estimates, and our Monte Carlo simulations, we find an effective sensitive volume for GRB-triggered searches that is about 2 times greater than for an all-sky, all-time search. For NS-NS systems, a jet angle of 20 degrees, a gamma-ray satellite field of view of 10% of the sky, and priors with generally precessing spin, this doubles the number of NS-NS short-GRB and NS-BH short-GRB associations, to ~3-4% of all detections of NS-NSs and NS-BHs. We also investigate the power of tests for statistical excesses in lists of subthreshold events, and show that these are unlikely to reveal a subthreshold population until finding GW associations to short GRBs is already routine. Finally, we provide useful formulas for calculating the prior distribution of GW amplitudes from a compact binary coalescence, for a given GW detector network and given sky location.

  13. Evaluation of selected diagnostic and intervention strategies for reducing Salmonella contamination of poultry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarlin, Laura Lilinoe

    1997-01-01

    for detection of Salmonella. These experiments also provided evidence that the site of chill immersion could be a major source for cross-contamination between negative and positive flocks. In order to evaluate the benefit of non-selective pre-enrichment, a...

  14. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - GW OU Northwest Plume January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Paducah Gaseous...

  15. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northeast Plume | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - GW OU Northeast Plume January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Paducah Gaseous...

  16. Method for producing chemically bonded phosphate ceramics and for stabilizing contaminants encapsulated therein utilizing reducing agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Jeong, Seung-Young (Westmont, IL)

    2000-01-01

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions are stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  17. Threshold Values for Identification of Contamination Predicted by Reduced-Order Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Last, George V.; Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project is developing reduced-order models to evaluate potential impacts on underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) if CO2 or brine leaks from deep CO2 storage reservoirs. Threshold values, below which there would be no predicted impacts, were determined for portions of two aquifer systems. These threshold values were calculated using an interwell approach for determining background groundwater concentrations that is an adaptation of methods described in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Unified Guidance for Statistical Analysis of Groundwater Monitoring Data at RCRA Facilities.

  18. Parametric adaptive ltering and data validation in bar gw detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Parametric adaptive #12;ltering 2 1. Introduction Cryogenic and ultracryogenic gravitational waves (gw. For the AURIGA detector, it turns out convenient to freeze completely the parameters values during transients

  19. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  20. Savannah River Site - Central Shops GW OU | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site - Central Shops GW OU January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC...

  1. High Performance Builder Spotlight: G.W. Robinson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    G.W. Robinson of Gainesville, Florida, worked with Building America partners Florida Solar Energy Center and Florida HERO to achieve a true net zero energy home in 2010.

  2. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according...

  3. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Open lots or holding pens for feeding or holding livestock can be sources of ground water contamination. The safety of such operations depends on their separation from water wells, characteristics of the site, and proper management. This publication...

  4. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Improperly managed manure can contaminate both ground and surface water. Storing manure allows producers to spread it when crops can best use the nutrients. This publication explains safe methods of manure storage, as well as specifics about safe...

  5. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    The condition of a water well and its proximity to contamination sources determine the risk it poses to ground water. Topics covered include well location, well construction, well age and type, well depth, well maintenance, water testing...

  6. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Storing wastewater from the milking center and applying it to crops is the best method of preventing ground water contamination. This publication discusses proper methods of storing and applying such waste, with illustrations of a detention pond...

  7. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Parks, Derek J.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  8. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; et al

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing ?-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  9. Motivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Introduction to Green's functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Motivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Introduction to Green's functions Matteo Gatti ETSF Users' Meeting and Training Day Ecole Polytechnique - 22 October 2010 #12;bg=whiteMotivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Outline 1 Motivation 2 Green

  10. Bacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine Environments in California, with Ecologically Sustainable Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwill, Edward R.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Title: Reducing microbial contamination in runoff fromBacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine

  11. Bacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwill, Rob; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Tate. Reducing microbial contamination in storm runoff fromManagement of microbial contamination in storm runoff fromBacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine

  12. A mathematical analysis of the GW0 method for computing electronic excited energies of molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Cancès; David Gontier; Gabriel Stoltz

    2015-06-16

    This paper analyses the GW method for finite electronic systems. In a first step, we provide a mathematical framework for the usual one-body operators that appear naturally in many-body perturbation theory. We then discuss the GW equations which construct an approximation of the one-body Green's function, and give a rigorous mathematical formulation of these equations. Finally, we study the well-posedness of the GW0 equations, proving the existence of a unique solution to these equations in a perturbative regime.

  13. A mathematical analysis of the GW0 method for computing electronic excited energies of molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Cancès; David Gontier; Gabriel Stoltz

    2015-07-15

    This paper analyses the GW method for finite electronic systems. In a first step, we provide a mathematical framework for the usual one-body operators that appear naturally in many-body perturbation theory. We then discuss the GW equations which construct an approximation of the one-body Green's function, and give a rigorous mathematical formulation of these equations. Finally, we study the well-posedness of the GW0 equations, proving the existence of a unique solution to these equations in a perturbative regime.

  14. Enhancement of Sensitivity-Bandwidth Product of Interferometric GW Detectors using White Light Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Salit; M. S. Shahriar

    2009-06-11

    The effect of gravitational waves (GWs) has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequency of neutron stars in a binary system as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have not yet been observed directly. The initial LIGO apparatus has not yet observed GWs. The Advanced LIGO (AdLIGO) will use a combination of improved techniques in order to increase the sensitivity. Along with power recycling and a higher power laser source, the AdLIGO will employ signal recycling (SR). While SR would increase sensitivity, it would also reduce the bandwidth significantly. Previously, we and others have investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the feasibility of using a White Light Cavity (WLC) to circumvent this constraint. However, in the previous work, it was not clear how one would incorporate the white light cavity effect. Here, we first develop a general model for Michelson-Interferometer based GW detectors that can be easily adapted to include the effects of incorporating a WLC into the design. We then describe a concrete design of a WLC constructed as a compound mirror, to replace the signal recycling mirror. This design is simple, robust, completely non-invasive, and can be added to the AdLIGO system without changing any other optical elements. We show a choice of parameters for which the signal sensitivity as well as the bandwidth are enhanced significantly over what is planned for the AdLIGO, covering the entire spectrum of interest for gravitational waves.

  15. Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

  16. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an anaerobic, metal-reducing bacterium isolated from a contaminated subsurface environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, S.; Lapidus, A.; Barry, K.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Pitluck, S.; Sims, D.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  18. A Bayesian analysis pipeline for continuous GW sources in the PTA band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The direct detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) by Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) is very likely within the next decade. While the stochastic GW background is a promising candidate for detection it is also possible that single resolvable sources may be detectable as well. In this work we will focus on the detection and characterization of single GW sources from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). We introduce a fully Bayesian data analysis pipeline that is meant to carry out a search, characterization, and evaluation phase. This will allow us to rapidly locate the global maxima in parameter space, map out the posterior, and finally weigh the evidence of a GW detection through a Bayes Factor. Here we will make use of an adaptive metropolis (AM) algorithm and parallel tempering. We test this algorithm on realistic simulated data that are representative of modern PTAs.

  19. A Bayesian analysis pipeline for continuous GW sources in the PTA band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Ellis

    2013-05-03

    The direct detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) by Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) is very likely within the next decade. While the stochastic GW background is a promising candidate for detection it is also possible that single resolvable sources may be detectable as well. In this work we will focus on the detection and characterization of single GW sources from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). We introduce a fully Bayesian data analysis pipeline that is meant to carry out a search, characterization, and evaluation phase. This will allow us to rapidly locate the global maxima in parameter space, map out the posterior, and finally weigh the evidence of a GW detection through a Bayes Factor. Here we will make use of an adaptive metropolis (AM) algorithm and parallel tempering. We test this algorithm on realistic simulated data that are representative of modern PTAs.

  20. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  1. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  2. 1 Psychology Psychology is one of the most popular majors at GW and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Psychology PSYCHOLOGY Psychology is one of the most popular majors at GW and the second largest sciences division within the school, the program exposes students to basic psychological theory, helps them develop research skills, and teaches them how to approach psychological and social issues within

  3. the future of gw's mount vernon campus implementing the 2010 mount vernon campus plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    the future of gw's mount vernon campus implementing the 2010 mount vernon campus plan FALL 2012--Proposed Future Development SitesEXHIBIT L Proposed Perimeter Enhancements ­ W Street EXHIBIT L Proposed Perimeter determined early in the planning process based on input from members of the community, including: Future

  4. Introduction to the Many-Body problem (II): Vertex corrections beyond the GW and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Andrea

    Real materials #12;Vertex(I): diagrammatic approach Vertex part: any diagram without external that can approximation divergencies occur when the potential goes to infinity. These are cured by partial summations. #12 order Born, T-Matrix, GW #12;Conserving approximations (III): linear response regime By contracting

  5. A comparison between synthetic jets and continuous jets B.L. Smith, G.W. Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    A comparison between synthetic jets and continuous jets B.L. Smith, G.W. Swift Abstract Experimental measurements and flow visualiza- tion of synthetic jets and continuous jets with matched Reynolds numbers are described. Although they have the same profile shape, synthetic jets are wider and slower than

  6. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 125205 (2013) Role of the plasmon-pole model in the GW approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    ­14 could significantly improve electronic-structure calculations, their accuracy depends on parametrization to evaluate the dynamic screening matrix. Although the Hybertsen-Louie PPM is often adopted in GW calculations on electronic band structures. Thus, the true performance of the GW approx- imation is obscured

  7. AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION OF COMMERCIALLY GROWN TRANSGENIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    108 AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION OF COMMERCIALLY GROWN TRANSGENIC BT COTTONSEED P.J. Cotty and C. Bock cotton may have reduced susceptibility to aflatoxin contamination as a result of pink bollworm resistance) from one highly contaminated (>6,000 ppb aflatoxin B1) Bt seed lot indicated that most contamination

  8. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Toxic Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Toxic Contamination *Preliminary draft, please refer in the program implementation section a requirement to implement actions to reduce toxic contaminants and types of known contaminants in the Columbia Basin be mapped, and a means of identifying contaminants

  9. Department of Defense 3 GW Solar Target | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,Department of Defense 3 GW Solar Target Home

  10. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  11. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  12. Contaminant Sources are Known

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources are Known Historical contaminant sources from liquid discharges and solid waste management units are known. August 1, 2013 Contaminant source map LANL contaminant...

  13. Students gain a thorough understanding of history and its lessons through GW's Department of History. The program's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    , emphasizing primary sources and their interpretation. From 1715 to the present. HIST 1120W. Eur Shakespeare Library, the National Security Archives and the Smithsonian museums make GW an ideal place to take Civilization in Its World Context. 3 Credits. Introduction to the history of Europe, emphasizing primary

  14. Excited electron dynamics in bulk ytterbium: Time-resolved two-photon photoemission and GW+T ab initio calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschlimann, Martin

    relaxation dynamics is played by the electronic structure of the system close to the Fermi level. For exampleExcited electron dynamics in bulk ytterbium: Time-resolved two-photon photoemission and GW+T ab November 2007 The excited electron dynamics in ytterbium is investigated by means of the time-resolved two

  15. Contaminant treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Andrew Philip (Schenectady, NY); Thornton, Roy Fred (Schenectady, NY); Salvo, Joseph James (Schenectady, NY)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for treating contaminated media. The method comprises introducing remediating ions consisting essentially of ferrous ions, and being peroxide-free, in the contaminated media; applying a potential difference across the contaminated media to cause the remediating ions to migrate into contact with contaminants in the contaminated media; chemically degrading contaminants in the contaminated media by contact with the remediating ions; monitoring the contaminated media for degradation products of the contaminants; and controlling the step of applying the potential difference across the contaminated media in response to the step of monitoring.

  16. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-15

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  17. Process for treating waste water having low concentrations of metallic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B; Millings, Margaret R; Nichols, Ralph L; Payne, William L

    2014-12-16

    A process for treating waste water having a low level of metallic contaminants by reducing the toxicity level of metallic contaminants to an acceptable level and subsequently discharging the treated waste water into the environment without removing the treated contaminants.

  18. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  19. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    1996-01-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants.

  20. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants. 2 figs.

  1. Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-07-21

    The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

  2. Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

  3. Addressing Water Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewith, Robbie

    Addressing Water Contamination without Using Chemicals For more information contact WIPO at: World challenge Farmers and gardeners apply pesticides to their crops. Contaminated waters are released when-off contaminates local water supplies and pollutes the environment. As a consequence a range of pesticides may

  4. Treatment of radionuclide contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettis, S.A.; Kallas, A.J.; Kochen, R.L.; McGlochlin, S.C.

    1988-06-01

    Rockwell, International, Rocky Flats Plants, is committed to remediating within the scope of RCRA/CERCLA, Solid Waste Managements Units (SWMUs) at Rocky Flats found to be contaminated with hazardous substances. SWMUs fund to have radionuclide (uranium, plutonium, and/or americium) concentrations in the soils and/or groundwater that exceed background levels or regulatory limits will also be included in this remediation effort. This paper briefly summarizes past and present efforts by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, to identify treatment technologies appropriate for remediating actinide contaminated soils. Many of the promising soil treatments evaluated in Rocky Flats' laboratories during the late 1970's and early 1980's are currently being revisited. These technologies are generally directed toward substantially reducing the volume of contaminated soils, with the subsequent intention of disposing of a small remaining concentrated fraction of contaminated soil in a facility approved to receive radioactive wastes. Treatment processes currently will be treated to remove actinides, and recycled back to the process. Past investigations have included evaluations of dry screening, wet screening, scrubbing, ultrasonics, chemical oxidation, calcination, desliming, flotation, and heavy-liquid density separation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  6. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  7. Simulation of Contamination Through the Post-Harvest Environment Using Surrogate Organisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarreal Silva, Mariana

    2011-10-21

    The beef industry has made tremendous strides in reducing pathogen contamination on carcasses. Multiple antimicrobial interventions have been validated for their use during harvesting. Information in regards to cross-contamination with pathogens...

  8. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  9. Contaminants in Naturally Ventilated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    % of anthropogenic CO2 EIA Report #12;Conclusive Proof of Global Warming #12;Contaminants and Low Energy - Who cares? Passive (Gaseous) Particulate Radon Paint Fumes Gas Odours CO2 This is a very short, very incomplete list low energy buildings provide adequate indoor air quality? #12;Contaminants - What do I mean by that

  10. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  11. HST AND OPTICAL DATA REVEAL WHITE DWARF COOLING, SPIN, AND PERIODICITIES IN GW LIBRAE 3-4 YEARS AFTER OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Gaensicke, Boris T., E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: mukadam@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: boris.gaensicke@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-07-10

    Since the large amplitude 2007 outburst which heated its accreting, pulsating white dwarf, the dwarf nova system GW Librae has been cooling to its quiescent temperature. Our Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra combined with ground-based optical coverage during the third and fourth year after outburst show that the fluxes and temperatures are still higher than quiescence (T = 19,700 K and 17,300 K versus 16,000 K pre-outburst for a log g = 8.7 and d = 100 pc). The K{sub wd} of 7.6 {+-} 0.8 km s{sup -1} determined from the C I {lambda}1463 absorption line, as well as the gravitational redshift implies a white dwarf mass of 0.79 {+-} 0.08 M{sub Sun }. The widths of the UV lines imply a white dwarf rotation velocity v sin i of 40 km s{sup -1} and a spin period of 209 s (for an inclination of 11 deg and a white dwarf radius of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm). Light curves produced from the UV spectra in both years show a prominent multiplet near 290 s, with higher amplitude in the UV compared to the optical, and increased amplitude in 2011 versus 2010. As the presence of this set of periods is intermittent in the optical on weekly timescales, it is unclear how this relates to the non-radial pulsations evident during quiescence.

  12. Bioremediation of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.B.; Jee, V.; Ward, C.H. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Contaminants in bottom sediments have historically been considered to have minimal environmental impact because they are buried, sorbed or electrostatically bound to clay particles, or incorporated into humus. Physical and chemical conditions such as alkalinity, pH, and redox of the sediments also play a part in sequestering contaminants. As long as the sediments are undisturbed, the contaminants are considered stabilized and not an immediate environmental problem. Resuspension of bottom sediments makes contaminants more available for dispersal into the marine environment. Events that can cause resuspension include storm surges, construction activity, and dredging. During resuspension, sediment particles move from an anaerobic to aerobic environment, changing their redox characteristics, and allowing the indigenous aerobic bacteria to grow and utilize certain classes of contaminants as energy sources. The contaminants are also more available for use because the mixing energy imparted to the particles during resuspension enhances mass transfer, allowing contaminants to enter the aqueous phase more rapidly. The contaminants targeted in this research are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of contaminant commonly found in bottom sediments near highly industrialized areas. PAH sources include fossil fuel combustion and petroleum spills. Previous research has shown that PAHs can be biodegraded. Size and structure, i.e., number and configuration of condensed rings, can affect compound disappearance. The focus of this research was to examine the relationship between resuspension and biodegradation of PAHs in lab scale slurry reactors. The rate and extent of contaminant release from the sediments into an uncontaminated water column was determined. Oxygen demand of initially anaerobic sediments were investigated. Then rate and extent of phenanthrene biodegradation was examined.

  13. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2010-01-01

    Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Studyoccupants. To investigate contamination levels, particlemethod of collecting contamination readings. The system,

  14. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2006-12-12

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  15. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

    2007-11-06

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  16. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  17. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

  18. Antimicrobial Interventions to Reduce Listeria spp. Contamination on Shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Tsui-Yin

    2010-01-14

    The effects of selected antimicrobials, applied singularly or in combination, and frozen or refrigerated storage conditions on the survival of Listeria spp. on inoculated shrimp was evaluated in this study. A combination ...

  19. Organic contaminant separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  20. An atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system for measuring ultra-low contamination by krypton in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelevinsky, Tanya

    An atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system for measuring ultra-low contamination by krypton in xenon ultra-low contamination by krypton in xenon dark matter detectors Tae Hyun Yoon The XENON dark matter of the experiment. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the contamination by krypton is reduced to the part

  1. Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

  2. Mercury contamination extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  3. Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Demmer

    2013-03-01

    A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

  4. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-11-16

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  5. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  6. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Y.-J.

    2010-01-01

    induced carbon contamination of extreme ultraviolet optics,"and A. Izumi. "Carbon contamination of EL'V mask: filmEffect of Carbon Contamination on the Printing Performance

  7. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Y.-J.

    2010-01-01

    mask surface. but also the topography of the contaminatedCarbon Contamination Topography Analysis of EUV Masks Yu-Jenpossible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations

  8. Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

  9. Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-09-30

    To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

  10. Time Dependence of ACIS Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    Time Dependence of ACIS Contamination Chandra Calibration Workshop 27 October 2003 Catherine Grant Source · Measuring the decay · Monitoring contamination with the ECS · Models of ECS time dependence · Monitoring contamination with the LETG · Agreement between models #12;ACIS External Calibration Source

  11. Measurement of Neutral Particle Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Roy Fletcher; Linda Coney; Gail Hanson

    2011-05-03

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the ISIS proton synchrotron at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to measure ionization cooling of a muon beam. During recent data-taking, it was determined that there is a significant background contamination of neutral particles populating the MICE muon beam. This contamination creates unwanted triggers in MICE, thus reducing the percentage of useful data taken during running. This paper describes the analysis done with time-of-flight detectors, used to measure and identify the source of the contamination in both positive and negative muon beams.

  12. Innovative technology for contamination control in plasma processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1994-10-01

    The causes and contributing factors to wafer contamination during plasma processing are discussed in the context of future technologies for controlling particle contamination by tool and process design and by the development of wafer dry cleaning technology. The importance of these developments is linked with the history of technological innovation and with the continuing evolution of the cleanroom from a highly developed facility for reducing ambient particle levels to an integrated, synergistic approach involving facilities and tooling for impeding the formation and transport of particles while also actively removing particles from sensitive surfaces. The methods, strategy and requirements for innovation in contamination control for plasma processing is discussed from a diachronic viewpoint.

  13. Purifying contaminated water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

  14. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

  15. Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veatch, B.D.

    1994-06-01

    In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

  16. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater: A turnkey approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shivjiani, D.M.; Rudy, R.J.; Burns, B.; Heuler, G.

    1994-12-31

    The Silvex Corporation Site is a Florida state funded remedial action site in St. Augustine, Florida, that, prior to 1980, was a silver smelting facility that accepted waste materials from the Naval Air Station-Jacksonville. Fuels, reportedly consisting of waste paint, cold carbon removers, and solvent degreasers that were stored in a 25,000-gallon tank, spilled onto the property. The assessment concluded that the surficial aquifer in the spill area and the area hydrologically down-gradient of the spill were contaminated by elevated levels of ketones (acetone, methyl-ethyl ketone, and methyl-isobutyl ketone), phenols, and toluene. Subsequently, a risk assessment/feasibility study and groundwater bench-scale and pilot-scale studies were performed to determine the technical feasibility/cost-effectiveness of the recommended alternative, submerged fixed-film bioremediation. The on-site pilot study, which was conducted at three flow rates (0.5, 1, and 2 gallons per minute [gpm]), demonstrated a greater than 99% contaminant removal efficiency from the three-stage bioreactor. Due to the impact of site contamination on a nearby creek that flows into the St. Johns River, an interim remedial deign was developed and implemented to reduce the potential for migration of contaminated groundwater into the creek.

  17. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  18. Sulfide catalysts for reducing SO2 to elemental sulfur

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Yun (Peking, CN); Yu, Qiquan (Peking, CN); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A highly efficient sulfide catalyst for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur, which maximizes the selectivity of elemental sulfur over byproducts and has a high conversion efficiency. Various feed stream contaminants, such as water vapor are well tolerated. Additionally, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen sulfides can be employed as the reducing gases while maintaining high conversion efficiency. This allows a much wider range of uses and higher level of feed stream contaminants than prior art catalysts.

  19. Field efficacy of a mixture of atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus Link: Fr vegetative compatibility groups in preventing aflatoxin contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    groups in preventing aflatoxin contamination in maize (Zea mays L.) J. Atehnkeng a , P.S. Ojiambo b , P- harvest increases in contamination. The results suggest that the evaluated multi-strain formulated prod- uct has potential to contribute to reduced aflatoxin contamination in Nigeria. This is the first

  20. Integrating Individual-Based Indices of Contaminant Effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rowe, Christopher L.; Hopkins, William A.; Congdon, Justin D.

    2001-01-01

    Habitat contamination can alter numerous biological processes in individual organisms. Examining multiple individual-level responses in an integrative fashion is necessary to understand how individual health or fitness reflects environmental contamination. Here we provide an example of such an integrated perspective based upon recent studies of an amphibian (the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana) that experiences several, disparate changes when larval development occurs in a trace element?contaminated habitat. First, we present an overview of studies focused on specific responses of individuals collected from, or transplanted into, a habitat contaminated by coal combustion residues (CCR). These studies have reported morphological, behavioral, and physiological modificationsmore »to individuals chronically interacting with sediments in the CCR-contaminated site. Morphological abnormalities in the oral and tail regions in contaminant-exposed individuals influenced other properties such as grazing, growth, and swimming performance. Behavioral changes in swimming activities and responses to stimuli appear to influence predation risk in the contaminant-exposed population. Significant changes in bioenergetics in the contaminated habitat, evident as abnormally high energetic expenditures for survival (maintenance) costs, may ultimately influence production pathways (growth, energy storage) in individuals. We then present a conceptual model to examine how interactions among the affected systems (morphological, behavioral, physiological) may ultimately bring about more severe effects than would be predicted if the responses were considered in isolation. A complex interplay among simultaneously occurring biological changes emerges in which multiple, sublethal effects ultimately can translate into reductions in larval or juvenile survival, and thus reduced recruitment of juveniles into the population. In systems where individuals are exposed to low concentrations of contaminants for long periods of time, research focused on one or few sublethal responses could substantially underestimate overall effects on individuals. We suggest that investigators adopt a more integrated perspective on contaminant-induced biological changes so that studies of individual-based effects can be better integrated into analyses of mechanisms of population change.« less

  1. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  2. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-01-27

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; CONTAMINATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; CONTAMINATION; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  4. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  5. Radioactive Contamination Control Work Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2002-10-01

    At Hanford, loose radioactive material can be found in plant systems, rooms, ventilation ducts, fuel pools, and outside radiological work facilities. Work practices used to accomplish radiological work in nuclear facilities often concern keeping radioactive contamination from spreading. This is not an easy task as the contamination activity levels can be very high and the material can be very unstable. Most of the time, the contamination is not visible, so we have to rely on surveys taken by Radiological Controls personnel to tell workers where the contamination is located and the activity levels present. The work practices used by workers are critical in controlling contamination spread, but it is impossible to document all of the work practices a worker should use. Many times, something will happen during the job that could result in a contamination spread. We rely on the workers knowledge and experience to realize when a potential spread of contamination is occurring, and take the actions necessary to prevent it from happening. It is important that a worker understand the concepts of contamination control in order to make the right decisions when work is accomplished. In facilities that work with ''fissile'' materials there is increased concern that nothing be done that increases the chance that a ''criticality accident'' might occur during work. Criticality safety personnel need to be consulted and approve contamination control practices that could increase the potential for a criticality accident. This Workshop includes a discussion of fundamental contamination control practices and new techniques used for radiological work. This is intended to be very informative and include hands-on exercises to provide the attendees with an appreciation of the methods being used to confine contamination spread.

  6. Composition and process for organic and metal contaminant fixation in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwitzgebel, Klaus (7507 Chimney Corners, Austin, TX 78731)

    1994-02-08

    A method and compositions using a first ferrous iron containing solution with the iron concentration in excess of theoretical requirements to treat a contaminated site to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium and coprecipitate trivalent chromium with other heavy metals and using a second solution of silicate containing a destabilizing salt to form a relatively impermeable gel in the contaminated site thereby fixing metals and organics to the extent that there should be no detectable ground water contamination.

  7. Reduces electric energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

  8. Contamination and solid state welds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Proceedings from the Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. T. Brown; G. Matthern; A. Glenn (INEEL); J. Kauffman (EnviroIssues); S. Rock (USEPA); M. Kuperberg (Florida State U); C. Ainsworth (PNNL); J. Waugh (Roy F. Weston Assoc.)

    2000-02-01

    The Metals and Radionuclides Product Line of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) is responsible for the development of technologies and systems that reduce the risk and cost of remediation of radionuclide and hazardous metal contamination in soils and groundwater. The rapid and efficient remediation of these sites and the areas surrounding them represents a technological challenge. Phytoremediation, the use of living plants to cleanup contaminated soils, sediments, surface water and groundwater, is an emerging technology that may be applicable to the problem. The use of phytoremediation to cleanup organic contamination is widely accepted and is being implemented at numerous sites. This workshop was held to initiate a discussion in the scientific community about whether phytoremediation is applicable to inorganic contaminants, such as metals and radionuclides, across the DOE complex. The Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants was held at Argonne National Laboratory from November 30 through December 2, 1999. The purpose of the workshop was to provide SCFA and the DOE Environmental Restoration Program with an understanding of the status of phytoremediation as a potential remediation technology for DOE sites. The workshop was expected to identify data gaps, technologies ready for demonstration and deployment, and to provide a set of recommendations for the further development of these technologies.

  10. Distribution and speciation of arsenic around roots in a contaminated riparian floodplain soil: Micro-XRF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ecosystem health through their up- take by soil organisms and plants and their transfer along the food chain in soils, un- less they were contaminated with organic arsenical pesti- cides. In oxic to mildly reducing

  11. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is...

  12. Probabilistic risk analysis of building contamination Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    Probabilistic risk analysis of building contamination Introduction Accurate and verifiable, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Key words: Ventilation contaminant; Risk analysis; Probabilistic

  13. Adhesion Impact of Silicone Contamination during Encapsulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Adhesion Impact of Silicone Contamination during Encapsulation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adhesion Impact of Silicone Contamination during Encapsulation. Abstract...

  14. Use of Air Modeling to Reduce Facility Demolition Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Dennis; Sanford, Peter; Parsons, Duane A.

    2003-02-26

    DOE faces the problem of decommissioning facilities contaminated with plutonium, uranium, and beryllium. The standard process has been to remove the contaminated process equipment from a facility, and then decontaminate the residual radiological and hazardous contamination from the facility structure to an ''unconditional release'' level. The facility would then be taken down as a clean demolition. Several beryllium-contaminated facilities were identified that will be particularly difficult to decontaminate to these release levels. A number of alternative decommissioning approaches were investigated that would require less decontamination, and thus reduced cost and schedule. Initial alternative approaches proposed erection of barriers (i.e. building-size tent structures with ventilation controls) to minimize the release of contamination to the environment. More recently we have investigated methods to control contamination at the structure surfaces before and during demolition, and model the risk posed to the workers, public, and the environment by the small residual material actually dispersed. This approach promises to minimize decontamination by removing only the highest contamination levels, and eliminates the need for erecting large contamination control structures along with the attendant ventilation equipment and administrative controls. The modeling has demonstrated the regulatory acceptability of this approach, and the approach is ready to be discussed with the regulators and the public.

  15. Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater Infiltration Robert Pitt, University (CSOs). Introduction (cont.) · Scattered information is available addressing groundwater impacts cities · EPA 1983 NURP work on groundwater beneath Fresno and Long Island infiltration basins · NRC 1994

  16. SOIL DESICCATION TECHNIQUES STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE MW; CHRONISTER GB; TRUEX MJ

    2012-01-30

    Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site where processes and technologies are being developed and tested for use in the on-going effort to remediate mobile contamination in the deep vadose zone, the area deep beneath the surface. Historically, contaminants were discharged to the soil along with significant amounts of water, which continues to drive contaminants deeper in the vadose zone toward groundwater. Soil desiccation is a potential in situ remedial technology well suited for the arid conditions and the thick vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Desiccation techniques could reduce the advance of contaminants by removing the pore water to slow the rate of contaminants movement toward groundwater. Desiccation technologies have the potential to halt or slow the advance of contaminants in unsaturated systems, as well as aid in reduction of contaminants from these same areas. Besides reducing the water flux, desiccation also establishes capillary breaks that would require extensive rewetting to resume pore water transport. More importantly, these techniques have widespread application, whether the need is to isolate radio nuclides or address chemical contaminant issues. Three different desiccation techniques are currently being studied at Hanford.

  17. Method of treating contaminated HEPA filter media in pulp process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian S.; Argyle, Mark D.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Mondok, Emilio P.

    2003-07-29

    A method for reducing contamination of HEPA filters with radioactive and/or hazardous materials is described. The method includes pre-processing of the filter for removing loose particles. Next, the filter medium is removed from the housing, and the housing is decontaminated. Finally, the filter medium is processed as pulp for removing contaminated particles by physical and/or chemical methods, including gravity, flotation, and dissolution of the particles. The decontaminated filter medium is then disposed of as non-RCRA waste; the particles are collected, stabilized, and disposed of according to well known methods of handling such materials; and the liquid medium in which the pulp was processed is recycled.

  18. FRoM BIRD-BANDING, VoL. 48, No.4, PP J70-J7I Autumn 1977 Incidence of Oil Contamination on Breeding Common Terns-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    FRoM BIRD-BANDING, VoL. 48, No.4, PP J70-J7I Autumn 1977 Incidence of Oil Contamination on Breeding oil contamination. Since even very small amounts of oil on the plumage of incubating birds may contaminate eggs and reduce their hatchability (Hnrtung, 1965; Albers, 1977; Szaro and Albers, 1977) knowledge

  19. Asymptotic distribution theory for contamination Francisco Vera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jim

    Asymptotic distribution theory for contamination models Francisco Vera , David Dickey and James and the second to the other sources (the contamination component). Here the goal is two-fold: (i) detect the overall presence of Contamination and (ii) identify observations that may be contaminated. A locally most

  20. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2014-02-26

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  1. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2013-11-21

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  2. Rehabilitating and developing contaminated land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proudfit, R.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation focuses on the problems involved when banks in California lend money using as collateral real estate that has been contaminated. Single action laws essentially limit the lenders remedies to the real estate purchased and taken as collateral. If a lender seeks a judicial foreclosure the court likely will take the position that a bank is a sophisticated lender and should know better than to step into a loss situation. According the EPA, if the property the bank has foreclosed on is environmentally impaired and as a responsible party, the bank, is liable for the remediation of this contaminated property.

  3. GW Energi | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTL Solar JumpNetworkingGAOHGW Energi Jump to:

  4. Extraction of contaminants from a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babko-Malyi, Sergei (Butte, MT)

    2000-01-01

    A method of treating industrial gases to remove contaminants is disclosed. Ions are generated in stream of injectable gas. These ions are propelled through the contaminated gas as it flows through a collection unit. An electric field is applied to the contaminated gas. The field causes the ions to move through the contaminated gases, producing electrical charges on the contaminants. The electrically charged contaminants are then collected at one side of the electric field. The injectable gas is selected to produce ions which will produce reactions with particular contaminants. The process is thus capable of removing particular contaminants. The process does not depend on diffusion as a transport mechanism and is therefore suitable for removing contaminants which exist in very low concentrations.

  5. Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates Interpreting Your Heavy Metals Test Results Olivia quantities. Soils have often been the landing spot for heavy metals, chemicals, and wastes as byproducts of industrial and agricultural pollutants. Many of these metals are present in soils natu- rally, usually

  6. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of supply, upon written request as follows: Address: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission OfficeTransfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees Office of Nuclear Regulatory; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series

  7. UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

  8. Cultivation, Capital, and Contamination: Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    urban gardens. Land Contamination & Reclamation 12 Schiff,Potentially toxic metal contamination of urban soils andAlloway, B. J. 2004. Contamination of soils in domestic

  9. Preventing Food Contamination: A Need for Innovation in Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mark

    2013-01-01

    174 Preventing Food Contamination A Need for Innovation infurther prevent microbial contamination. Due largely becausequick migration of the contamination in the example given

  10. Maternal Contributions to the Development of Contamination Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    The development of contamination sensitivity to "disgusting"of conservation and contamination: Invisible particles as areference to disgust and contamination sensitivity. Child

  11. Control of Viral Contamination of Food and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cliver, Dean O.

    2009-01-01

    M. , & Sattar, S. A. (2000a). Contamination of foods by food2004). Norovirus cross-contamination during food handlingcoli in mussels after contamination and depu- ration.

  12. Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination in CUORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandria, F.

    2014-01-01

    copper surface contamination in CUORE F. Alessandria a , R.experiment posed by surface contamination of inert detectorthat copper surface contamination levels better than 10 ?7 -

  13. Distribution of Chromium Contamination and Microbial Activity in Soil Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2010-01-01

    Distribution of Chromium Contamination and Microbialand predict the fate of Cr contamination. Typical methods ofOur previous work on Cr contamination was done using such

  14. Indigenous Resource Management and Environmental Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holder, Stanley Richard

    2008-07-28

    Heavy metals are potential contaminants which can produce negative impacts on human health which vary from metal to metal, and are also dependent upon concentration and duration of exposure to the contaminant. This study lists the human health...

  15. Hometown News Scientists prepare for oil contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Hometown News Scientists prepare for oil contamination Posted: 2010 Jun 25 - 00:54 By Jay Meisel organisms. If the oil contaminates reefs in the area, it will probably not totally destroy the reefs

  16. Revolutionary ultrasonic nozzle can reduce water and energy used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Revolutionary ultrasonic nozzle can reduce water and energy used for cleaning by ten times by N O R into the air to then settle and contaminate other surfaces). As it is able to use cold water, energy is saved ultrasonic cleaning baths can easily be scaled up and neither can be used To search, type and hit enter " F i

  17. Proceedings from the Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jay Thatcher; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Glenn, Anne Williams; Kauffman, J.; Rock, S.; Kuperberg, M.; Ainsworkth, C.; Waugh, J.

    2000-02-01

    The Metals and Radionuclides Product Line of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) is responsible for the development of technologies and systems that reduce the risk and cost of remediation of radionuclide and hazardous metal contamination in soils and groundwater. The rapid and efficient remediation of these sites and the areas surrounding them represents a technological challenge. Phytoremediation, the use of living plants to cleanup contaminated soils, sediments, surface water and groundwater, is an emerging technology that may be applicable to the problem. The use of phytoremediation to cleanup organic contamination is widely accepted and is being implemented at numerous sites. This workshop was held to initiate a discussion in the scientific community about whether phytoremediation is applicable to inorganic contaminants, such as metals and radionuclides, across the DOE complex. The Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants was held at Argonne National Laboratory from November 30 through December 2, 1999. The purpose of the workshop was to provide SCFA and the DOE Environmental Restoration Program with an understanding of the status of phytoremediation as a potential remediation technology for DOE sites. The workshop was expected to identify data gaps, technologies ready for demonstration and deployment, and to provide a set of recommendations for the further development of these technologies. More specifically, the objectives of the workshop were to: · Determine the status of the existing baseline, including technological maturation, · Identify areas for future potential research, · Identify the key issues and recommendations for issue resolution, · Recommend a strategy for maturing key aspects of phytoremediation, · Improve communication and collaboration among organizations currently involved in phytoremediation research, and · Identify technical barriers to making phytoremediation commercially successful in more areas.

  18. Webinar: NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database," originally presented on May 27, 2014.

  19. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    regenerative braking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissionsconditions, the expected savings in fuel costs are notis whether the fuel cost savings over the lifetime of the

  20. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  1. Etiology and Management of Aflatoxin Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    25 Etiology and Management of Aflatoxin Contamination Peter J. Cotty*, Claudia Probst and Ramon Jaime-Garcia Abstract Aflatoxins are potent poisons that contaminate crops in warm regions worldwide and re- duce health and economic welfare in several portions of Africa. Crops are contaminated in two

  2. Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    R EVISED PAG E PR O O FS ia617 Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations Jason L . In such cases, 0 is said to be spin contaminated owing to incorporation of higher spin state character of Iron­Sulfur ia618 Clusters). It is important to note that while spin-contaminated and broken

  3. Hydrogen Contamination Detector Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Hydrogen Contamination

  4. Controlling surface contamination at SNO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokstad, R.; Garcia, A.; Zlimen, I. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The ability of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector to measure the energy spectrum of the {sup 8}B solar neutrinos will depend on the background radiation arising from uranium and thorium contamination in the bulk material and on the surfaces of the detector. A principle surface contaminant is the ubiquitous dust found in the working nickel mine where the detector will be assembled. The thorium content of mine dust is about 6 ppm, which is a factor of 6 x 10{sup 6} greater than is present in the acrylic material that holds the heavy water. The result of this is that the detector cavity, 6800 feet underground and having a volume of about 9000 cubic meters, must become a dust-free cleanroom. (It will be one of the larger cleanrooms in the world, and certainly the lowest lying.) After an 18 month construction period, the amount of dust present on the surfaces of the detector must be less than 0.4 micrograms/cm{sup 2}. A variety of techniques has been developed to measure these small amounts of surface contamination. These will be described along with the measures planned to achieve the surface cleanliness requirements of the SNO detector.

  5. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  6. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

  7. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1997-10-14

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

  8. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

  9. Contamination and purification of alkaline gas treating solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, J.G. [Proton Technology Ltd., Hawthorne, NY (United States); Nielsen, R.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Alkanolamine and potassium carbonate solutions in gas treating units removing carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, or both are contaminated by impurities in the feed gases and makeup water and by the products of the degradation and oxidation of amines occurring in the units themselves. Feed gas impurities include oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, brine, solid particles, heavy hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, organic acids, and pipeline corrosion inhibitors. Impure makeup water contains sulfate, chloride, alkali metal, and alkaline earth ions (hardness). Reactions causing contamination in the units include oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate and thiosulfate, oxidation of amines to formic acid and other products, and degradation of amines by carbon dioxide. The resulting heat-stable salts and polymers reduce the gas absorbing capacity of alkanolamine solutions and increase their corrosiveness. Similar problems occur in potassium carbonate solutions, except that degradation products of amine activators are too dilute to be harmful. Contaminants are removed by inlet gas separation, charcoal and mechanical filtration, neutralization of heat-stable salts, reclaiming at both atmospheric and reduced pressure, upstream washing of the feed gas, electrodialysis, use of antioxidants, ion exchange, and blowdown and dumping of the solution.

  10. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  11. Overview of Contaminant Removal From Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne, A.W.; Alvin, M.A.; Granite, E.; Pennline, H.W.; Siriwardane, R.V.; Keairns, D.; Newby, R.A.

    2007-11-01

    Gasification is an important strategy for increasing the utilization of abundant domestic coal reserves. DOE envisions increased use of gasification in the United States during the next 20 years. As such, the DOE Gasification Technologies Program, including the FutureGen initiative, will strive to approach a near-zero emissions goal, with respect to multiple pollutants, such as sulfur, mercury, and nitrogen oxides. Since nearly one-third of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are produced by coal-powered generation facilities, conventional coal-burning power plants, and advanced power generation plants, such as IGCC, present opportunities in which carbon can be removed and then permanently stored.
    Gas cleaning systems for IGCC power generation facilities have been effectively demonstrated and used in commercial operations for many years. These systems can reduce sulfur, mercury, and other contaminants in synthesis gas produced by gasifiers to the lowest level achievable in coal-based energy systems. Currently, DOE Fossil Energy's goals set for 2010 direct completion of R&D for advanced gasification combined cycle technology to produce electricity from coal at 45–50% plant efficiency. By 2012, completion of R&D to integrate this technology with carbon dioxide separation, capture, and sequestration into a zero-emissions configuration is targeted with a goal to provide electricity with less than a 10% increase in cost of electricity. By 2020, goals are set to develop zero-emissions plants that are fuel-flexible and capable of multi-product output and thermal efficiencies of over 60% with coal. These objectives dictate that it is essential to not only reduce contaminant emissions into the generated synthesis gas, but also to increase the process or system operating temperature to that of humid gas cleaning criteria conditions (150 to 370 °C), thus reducing the energy penalties that currently exist as a result of lowering process temperatures (?40 to 38 °C) with subsequent reheat to the required higher temperatures.
    From a historical perspective, the evolution of advanced syngas cleaning systems applied in IGCC and chemical and fuel synthesis plants has followed a path of configuring a series of individual cleaning steps, one for each syngas contaminant, each step controlled to its individual temperature and sorbent and catalyst needs. As the number of syngas contaminants of interest has increased (particulates, hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, halides such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, alkali metals, metal carbonyls, mercury, arsenic, selenium, and cadmium) and the degree of syngas cleaning has become more severe, the potential feasibility of advanced humid gas cleaning has diminished. A focus on multi-contaminant syngas cleaning is needed to enhance the potential cost savings, and performance of humid gas cleaning will focus on multi-contaminant syngas cleaning. Groups of several syngas contaminants to be removed simultaneously need to be considered, resulting in significant gas cleaning system intensification. Intensified, multi-contaminant cleaning processes need to be devised and their potential performance characteristics understood through small-scale testing, conceptual design evaluation, and scale-up assessment with integration into the power generation system. Results of a 1-year study undertaken by DOE/NETL are presented to define improved power plant configurations and technology for advanced multi-contaminant cleanup options.

  12. Hydrogen Contamination Detector Workshop Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Hydrogen Contamination9/2015

  13. Hydrogen Contamination Detector Workshop Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Hydrogen Contamination9/2015

  14. Probe for contamination detection in recyclable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi

    2003-08-05

    A neutron detection system for detection of contaminants contained within a bulk material during recycling includes at least one neutron generator for neutron bombardment of the bulk material, and at least one gamma ray detector for detection of gamma rays emitted by contaminants within the bulk material. A structure for analyzing gamma ray data is communicably connected to the gamma ray detector, the structure for analyzing gamma ray data adapted. The identity and concentration of contaminants in a bulk material can also be determined. By scanning the neutron beam, discrete locations within the bulk material having contaminants can be identified. A method for recycling bulk material having unknown levels of contaminants includes the steps of providing at least one neutron generator, at least one gamma ray detector, and structure for analyzing gamma ray data, irradiating the bulk material with neutrons, and then determining the presence of at least one contaminant in the bulk material from gamma rays emitted from the bulk material.

  15. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  16. Evaluating Transport and Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in the Vadose Zone for Aqueous Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2015-09-01

    An approach was developed for evaluating vadose zone transport and attenuation of aqueous wastes containing inorganic (non-volatile) contaminants that were disposed of at the land surface (i.e., directly to the ground in cribs, trenches, tile fields, etc.) and their effect on the underlying groundwater. The approach provides a structured method for estimating transport of contaminants through the vadose zone and the resulting temporal profile of groundwater contaminant concentrations. The intent of the approach is also to provide a means for presenting and explaining the results of the transport analysis in the context of the site-specific waste disposal conditions and site properties, including heterogeneities and other complexities. The document includes considerations related to identifying appropriate monitoring to verify the estimated contaminant transport and associated predictions of groundwater contaminant concentrations. While primarily intended for evaluating contaminant transport under natural attenuation conditions, the approach can also be applied to identify types of, and targets for, mitigation approaches in the vadose zone that would reduce the temporal profile of contaminant concentrations in groundwater, if needed.

  17. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  18. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2010-01-01

    Technologies Program Data Center Economizer ContaminationREFERENCES Executive Summary Data centers require continuousreluctance from many data center owners to use this common

  19. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2010-01-01

    Program Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humiditylevels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring insites to determine how economizers affect humidity control.

  20. IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    G.W. , "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBLfocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on human

  1. Response of PCB contamination in stream fish to abatement actions at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, G.R.; Peterson, M.J.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Milne, G. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, used large quantities of PCBs in equipment associated with the great electric power requirements of isotopic enrichment of uranium. Historic losses of PCBs in the 1950s and 1960s have left a legacy of contamination at the site. A biological monitoring program implemented in 1987 found PCBs in PGDP effluents and in fish downstream from facility discharges. As a consequence, a fish consumption advisory was posted on Little Bayou Creek by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1987, and regulatory discharge limits for PCBs at PGDP were reduced. Monitoring at multiple locations in receiving streams indicated that PGDP discharges were more important than in stream sediment contamination as sources of PCBs to fish. Environmental management and compliance staff at PGDP led an effort to reduce PCB discharges and monitor the effects of those actions. The active discharge of uncontaminated process water to historically PCB-contaminated drainage systems was found to mobilize PCBs into KPDES (Clean Water Act) regulated effluents. Efforts to locate PCB sources within the plant, coupled with improvements in management practices and remedial actions, appear to have been successful in reducing PCB discharges from these sources. Actions included emplacing passive monitors in the plant drainage system to identify this as a chronic source, and consolidating and re-routing effluents to minimize flow through PCB-contaminated channels. As a consequence, PCB contamination in fish in small streams receiving plant discharges decreased 75% over from 1992--1995.

  2. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  3. Method and apparatus for controlling cross contamination of microfluid channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F. (Walnut Creek, CA); Rehm, Jason E. (Alameda, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Arnold, Don W. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-07

    A method for controlling fluid flow at junctions in microchannel systems. Control of fluid flow is accomplished generally by providing increased resistance to electric-field and pressure-driven flow in the form of regions of reduced effective cross-sectional area within the microchannels and proximate a channel junction. By controlling these flows in the region of a microchannel junction it is possible to eliminate sample dispersion and cross contamination and inject well-defined volumes of fluid from one channel to another.

  4. Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poa, Davis S. (Naperville, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL); Mulcahey, Thomas P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Gerald K. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An electrolytic process and apparatus for reducing calcium oxide in a molten electrolyte of CaCl.sub.2 -CaF.sub.2 with a graphite anode in which particles or other contamination from the anode is restricted by the use of a porous barrier in the form of a basket surrounding the anode which may be removed from the electrolyte to burn the graphite particles, and wherein the calcium oxide feed is introduced to the anode compartment to increase the oxygen ion concentration at the anode.

  5. Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickstrom, Gary H. (Yorba Linda, CA); Knell, Everett W. (Los Alamitos, CA); Shaw, Benjamin W. (Costa Mesa, CA); Wang, Yue G. (West Covina, CA)

    1981-04-21

    In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

  6. Investigation of the Contamination of the Gould (2003) Halo Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Gould

    2007-08-09

    A recent astroph posting argued that the Gould (2003a) halo sample is substantially contaminated with thick-disk stars, which would then ``wash out'' any signature of granularity in the halo velocity distribution due to streams. If correct, this would imply that the limits placed by Gould (2003b) on streams are not valid. Here I investigate such contamination using six different indicators: (1) morphology of the underlying reduced proper motion diagram used to select halo stars; (2) comparison of kinematic and parallax-based distance scales; (3) comparison of derived halo parameters for the Gould (2003a) sample with other determinations; (4) a precision color-color diagram for a random subsample; (5) the 3-dimensional velocity distribution of a random subsample; (6) metallicity distribution versus kinematic cuts on a random subsample. I estimate that the contamination is of order 2%. Thus, the upper limits on the density of nearby streams derived by Gould (2003b) remain valid. In particular, at 95% confidence, no more than 5% of local halo stars (within about 300 pc) are in any one coherent stream. Determining whether or not this local measurement is consistent with CDM remains an outstanding question.

  7. Reducing Configuration Complexity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Pastams AG 2015 Reducing

  8. Method of remediation of contaminants in porous media through minimization of bouyancy effects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shook, G. Michael (Rigby, ID); Pope, Gary A. (Austin, TX)

    1999-01-01

    A method for controlling vertical migration of contaminants in an aquifer includes introduction of a solubilizing solution having a surfactant and an alcohol or other light co-solvent. The surfactant is selected to solubilize the contaminant. The alcohol or other solvent is selected to provide the microemulsion with a substantially neutral buoyancy with respect to groundwater. The neutral buoyancy of the microemulsion prevents the normal downward movement which is typical of the solubilized dense non-aqueous phase liquid in surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation. Thus, the risk that any significant amount of the solubilized dense non-aqueous contaminants will migrate vertically can be controlled. The relative tendency for vertical migration may also be reduced by increasing the injection rate or injected fluid viscosity (by adding polymer), or by reducing the well spacing.

  9. Biogeochemical Mechanisms Controlling Reduced Radionuclide Particle Properties and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim K. Fredrickson; John M. Zachara; Matthew J. Marshall; Alex S. Beliaev

    2006-06-01

    Uranium and Technetium are the major risk-driving contaminants at Hanford and other DOE sites. These radionuclides have been shown to be reduced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) under anoxic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that reduction results in the formation of poorly soluble hydrous oxides, UO2(s) and TcO2n?H2O(s), that are believed to limit mobility in the environment. The mechanisms of microbial reduction of U and Tc have been the focus of considerable research in the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP). In spite of equal or greater importance in terms of controlling the environmental fate of the contaminants relatively little is known regarding the precipitation mechanism(s), reactivity, persistence, and transport of biogenic UO2(s) and TcO2(s).

  10. Minimizing electrode contamination in an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Zelenay, Piotr; Johnston, Christina

    2014-12-09

    An electrochemical cell assembly that is expected to prevent or at least minimize electrode contamination includes one or more getters that trap a component or components leached from a first electrode and prevents or at least minimizes them from contaminating a second electrode.

  11. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  12. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  13. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  14. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2424E Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study A. Shehabi, W. Tschudi, A Emerging Technologies Program Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study Lawrence Berkeley 42 #12;Executive Summary Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal

  15. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Howard L. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  16. Evaluation of peracids for ante mortem disinfection of the chicken upper gastrointestinal tract to reduce food-borne pathogen transmission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herron, Kellie Lucretia

    2000-01-01

    studies have indicated that disinfectants added to the drinking water during the preharvest feed withdrawal can lower the incidence of human food-borne pathogens and reduce carcass contamination during processing. Presently, we evaluated the effect...

  17. Update of XIS contamination model (1) chemical composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    Update of XIS contamination model (1) chemical composition The XIS0-3 contamination models (ae of the chemical composition at the XIS center was revised by (i) adding N to the XIS1 contaminant, (ii) adding PKS of XIS contamination model (2) spatial distribution The XIS0-3 contamination models (ae

  18. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

    2007-03-06

    Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

  19. Assessment Of Potential Indicator Species For Monitoring Environmental Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Assessment Of Potential Indicator Species For Monitoring Environmental Contamination contamination in the aquatic component of the Fraser River Basin, British Columbia. A list of criterion were species for laboratory study; and 5) knowledge availability pertaining to contaminant research

  20. Influences of climate on aflatoxin producing fungi and aflatoxin contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Influences of climate on aflatoxin producing fungi and aflatoxin contamination Peter J. Cotty a human exposure, crop contamination with aflatoxins causes significant economic loss for producers, marketers, and processors of diverse susceptible crops. Aflatoxin contamination occurs when specific fungi

  1. Particle Contamination on a Thermal Flying-Height Control Slider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Nan; Bogy, David B.

    2010-01-01

    the investigation of particle contamination on a TFC slider.on particle ?ows and contamination of air bearing sliders.and Conclusion The particle contamination on a TFC slider is

  2. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  3. Evaluation of Methods to Assess and Reduce Bacterial Contamination of Surface Water from Grazing Lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin

    2012-10-19

    or unstable streambanks, increasing water supply reliability during droughts, and increasing weight gains in beef cattle by 0.1 to 0.2 kg/day (0.2 to 0.4 lb/day) (Willms et al. 1994; Buchanan 1996; Porath 2002; Willms et al. 2002; Veira 2003; Dickard 1998... and Grazing Management ......... 78 4.4.2 Comparison of BoBac to SR and Grazing Management .......... 80 4.4.3 Comparison of AllBac and BoBac Gene Copy Concentrations to E. coli Levels...

  4. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Petroleum Product Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29

    and cathodically protected. Monitoring Tanks Regulations for new underground tanks require that they have a method of detecting leaks. Select the tank location carefully to ensure that installation is easy and leak detec- tion methods reliable. Test the tank.../corrosion with cathodic corro- 15 years old, coated or more years old. or more years old. protection sion protection. with paint or asphalt. Bare steel tank less than 15 years old. Spill and tank over- Impermeable catch Impermeable catch Impermeable catch No protection...

  5. THE USE OF PONDS TO REDUCE POLLUTION FROM POTENTIALLY CONTAMINATED STEADING RUNOFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and SEPA's Diffuse Pollution and Habitat Enhancement Initiatives. INTRODUCTION The EC Water Framework ecological status in surface waters. The control of diffuse, land-based sources of pollution to these waters in water treatment in farm ponds vary between pollutants. P removal occurs mainly by sedimentation

  6. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29

    possible. Hazardous wastes are defined as materials that are ignitable, toxic, corrosive or explosive (TWC, 1990). Lists of hazardous wastes are contained in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 261.31 through 261.34. Some hazardous materials..., such as antifreeze, oil and grease H Used oil filters H Solvents for oil and grease removal and disposal H Engine, parts and equipment cleaners H Lubricants H Rust removers H Paints and paint preparation products H Brush or spray gun cleaners H Lead acid batteries...

  7. Use of in-stream reservoirs to reduce bacterial contamination of rural watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    of Prince Edward Island, Department of Health Management, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada

  8. Assessing beef hide interventions as a means to reduce carcass contamination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Bridget Elaine

    2007-04-25

    following a water wash. Treatments (distilled water, isopropyl alcohol, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% L-lactic acid, 1% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and 10% Povidone-iodine) then were applied to each section and sampled for aerobic plate counts (APCs...

  9. Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 21, 2012, Contamination Incident at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...

  10. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and Market Survey H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and Market Survey This H2FIRST...

  11. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

  12. Different Strategies for Biological Remediation of Perchlorate Contaminated Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Perchlorate Contamination in Groundwater: Legal, Chemical,of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater. Federal Facilitiesof perchlorate from groundwater by activated carbon tailored

  13. Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability Presented at the Department of...

  14. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant...

  15. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  16. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  17. Reducing Penguin Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya; Alakabha Datta; David London

    2013-04-29

    The most common decay used for measuring 2beta_s, the phase of Bs-Bsbar mixing, is Bs -> J/psi phi. This decay is dominated by the colour-suppressed tree diagram, but there are other contributions due to gluonic and electroweak penguin diagrams. These are often referred to as "penguin pollution" (PP) because their inclusion in the amplitude leads to a theoretical error in the extraction of 2beta_s from the data. In the standard model (SM), it is estimated that the PP is negligible, but there is some uncertainty as to its exact size. Now, phi_s^{c\\bar{c}s} (the measured value of 2beta_s) is small, in agreement with the SM, but still has significant experimental errors. When these are reduced, if one hopes to be able to see clear evidence of new physics (NP), it is crucial to have the theoretical error under control. In this paper, we show that, using a modification of the angular analysis currently used to measure phi_s^{c\\bar{c}s} in Bs -> J/psi phi, one can reduce the theoretical error due to PP. Theoretical input is still required, but it is much more modest than entirely neglecting the PP. If phi_s^{c\\bar{c}s} differs from the SM prediction, this points to NP in the mixing. There is also enough information to test for NP in the decay. This method can be applied to all Bs/Bsbar -> V1 V2 decays.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  19. Residual foreground contamination in the WMAP data and bias in non-Gaussianity estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2013-02-01

    We analyze whether there is any residual foreground contamination in the cleaned WMAP 7 years data for the differential assemblies, Q, V and W. We calculate the correlation between the foreground map, from which long wavelength correlations have been subtracted, and the foreground reduced map for each differential assembly after applying the Galaxy and point sources masks. We find positive correlations for all the differential assemblies, with high statistical significance. For Q and V, we find that a large fraction of the contamination comes from pixels where the foreground maps have positive values larger than three times the rms values. These findings imply the presence of residual contamination from Galactic emissions and unresolved point sources. We redo the analysis after masking the extended point sources cataloque of Scodeller et al. [7] and find a drop in the correlation and corresponding significance values. To quantify the effect of the residual contamination on the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in the CMB we add estimated contaminant fraction to simulated Gaussian CMB maps and calculate the characteristic non-Gaussian deviation shapes of Minkowski Functionals that arise due to the contamination. We find remarkable agreement of these deviation shapes with those measured from WMAP data, which imply that a major fraction of the observed non-Gaussian deviation comes from residual foreground contamination. We also compute non-Gaussian deviations of Minkowski Functionals after applying the point sources mask of Scodeller et al. and find a decrease in the overall amplitudes of the deviations which is consistent with a decrease in the level of contamination.

  20. Fate of Contaminants in Contact with West Valley Grouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhrmann,M.; Gillow, J.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the work described here is to determine to what extent a variety of contaminants, including fission products, actinides, and RCRA elements are sequestered by the two grout formulations. The conceptual model for this study is as follows: a large mass of grout having been poured into a high-level waste tank is in the process of aging and weathering for thousands of years. The waste remaining in the tank will contain radionuclides and other contaminants, much of which will adhere to tank walls and internal structures. The grout will encapsulate the contaminants. Initially the grout will be well sequestered, but over time rainwater and groundwater will gain access to it. Ultimately, the grout/waste environment will be an open system. In this condition water will move through the grout, exposing it to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} from the air and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} from the groundwater. Thus we are considering an oxic environment containing HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Initially the solubility of many contaminants, but not all, will be constrained by chemistry dominated by the grout, primarily by the high pH, around 11.8. This is controlled and buffered by the portland cement and blast furnace slag components of the grout, which by themselves maintain a solution pH of about 12.5. Slowly the pH will diminish as Ca(OH){sub 2} and KOH dissolve, are carried away by water, and CaCO{sub 3} forms. As these conditions develop, the behavior of these elements comes into question. In our conceptual model, although the grout is formulated to provide some reducing capacity, in order to be conservative this mechanism is not considered. In addition to solubility constraints imposed by pH, the various contaminants may be incorporated into a variety of solid phases. Some may be incorporated into newly forming compounds as the grout sets and cures. Others (like soddyite, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}) are the result of slower reactions but may become important over time as contaminants are exposed to evolving chemistry in the grout. Still other solid phases may form from reactions between the waste and grout components, not only the cementitious materials, but also the additives used in the grout. Another process that may exert some control on contaminant concentrations is adsorption onto solids within the grout. These may be additives such as the fluorapatite or zeolite that are substantial percentages of the grouts or they may be minerals, typically Ca-Al-Si materials, that form in the grout system as cement sets. In addition, as the grout weathers over time, CaCO{sub 3} minerals, such as calcite and aragonite, will form as a rind on the grout and as a fracture filling mineral. Some contaminants are likely to be incorporated into these minerals, to a greater or lesser extent, as they precipitate. For some elements, such as U, there is a significant literature exploring the incorporation into CaCO{sub 3}, but for others there is essentially no information. This is also the case for much of the chemical regime of the grouts. Initial conditions are at pH values around 12 and information is often sparse.

  1. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  2. Modelling Bioremediation of Uranium Contaminated Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Ben E G

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide extraction, processing and storage have resulted in a legacy of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater aquifers worldwide. An emerging remediation technology for such sites is the in situ immobilisation of ...

  3. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  4. Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

    1997-01-01

    Attempts have been made in recent years to find acceptable alternatives to classical soxhlet extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments. One such method that is very promising is accelerated solvent extraction also ...

  5. Predicting Groundwater Contamination beneath Stormwater Infiltration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Predicting Groundwater Contamination beneath Stormwater Infiltration Activities Shirley E. Clark, Penn State Harrisburg Robert Pitt, University of Alabama Pollutants of Concern · Classes of stormwaterHighest Observed Concentration Metal Are these waters infiltration quality? Benefits of Urban Stormwater

  6. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  7. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  8. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF IONIC CONTAMINATION REMOVAL FROM SILICON DIOXIDE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suni, Ian Ivar

    INVESTIGATION OF IONIC CONTAMINATION REMOVAL FROM SILICON DIOXIDE SURFACES H. Lin, A. A. Busnaina, and I. I. Suni T he removal of ionic contaminants from silicon surfaces surface contamination level canM Communications L td. INTRODUCTION with increasing frequency and power, and decreases Contamination removal is one

  10. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  11. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  12. ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY - NEW APPROACHES FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Roberts, J.

    2012-02-13

    This study evaluated pilot-scale active caps composed of apatite, organoclay, biopolymers, and sand for the remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. The active caps were constructed in Steel Creek, at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Monitoring was conducted for 12 months. Effectiveness of the caps was based on an evaluation of contaminant bioavailability, resistance to erosion, and impacts on benthic organisms. Active caps lowered metal bioavailability in the sediment during the one-year test period. Biopolymers reduced sediment suspension during cap construction, increased the pool of carbon, and lowered the release of metals. This field validation showed that active caps can effectively treat contaminants by changing their speciation, and that caps can be constructed to include more than one type of amendment to achieve multiple goals.

  13. Foreground contamination of the WMAP CMB maps from the perspective of the matched circle test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Then

    2006-10-16

    WMAP has provided CMB maps of the full sky. The raw data is subject to foreground contamination, in particular near to the Galactic plane. Foreground cleaned maps have been derived, e.g., the internal linear combination (ILC) map of Bennett et al. and the reduced foreground TOH map of Tegmark et al. Using S statistics we examine whether residual foreground contamination is left over in the foreground cleaned maps. In particular, we specify which parts of the foreground cleaned maps are sufficiently accurate for the circle-in-the-sky signature. We generalise the S statistic, called D statistic, such that the circle test can deal with CMB maps in which the contaminated regions of the sky are excluded with masks.

  14. Reducing Contingency through Sampling at the Luckey FUSRAP Site - 13186

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frothingham, David; Barker, Michelle; Buechi, Steve; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    Typically, the greatest risk in developing accurate cost estimates for the remediation of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste sites is the uncertainty in the estimated volume of contaminated media requiring remediation. Efforts to address this risk in the remediation cost estimate can result in large cost contingencies that are often considered unacceptable when budgeting for site cleanups. Such was the case for the Luckey Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site near Luckey, Ohio, which had significant uncertainty surrounding the estimated volume of site soils contaminated with radium, uranium, thorium, beryllium, and lead. Funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) allowed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to conduct additional environmental sampling and analysis at the Luckey Site between November 2009 and April 2010, with the objective to further delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of contaminated soils in order to reduce the uncertainty in the soil volume estimate. Investigative work included radiological, geophysical, and topographic field surveys, subsurface borings, and soil sampling. Results from the investigative sampling were used in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory's Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling (BAASS) software to update the contaminated soil volume estimate for the site. This updated volume estimate was then used to update the project cost-to-complete estimate using the USACE Cost and Schedule Risk Analysis process, which develops cost contingencies based on project risks. An investment of $1.1 M of ARRA funds for additional investigative work resulted in a reduction of 135,000 in-situ cubic meters (177,000 in-situ cubic yards) in the estimated base volume estimate. This refinement of the estimated soil volume resulted in a $64.3 M reduction in the estimated project cost-to-complete, through a reduction in the uncertainty in the contaminated soil volume estimate and the associated contingency costs. (authors)

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  16. Interfacial Reduction-Oxidation Mechanisms Governing Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Principal Investigator: Baolin Deng, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Co-Principal Investigator: Silvia Sabine Jurisson, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Co-Principal Investigator: Edward C. Thornton, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA; Co-Principal Investigator: Jeff Terry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL

    2008-05-12

    There are many soil contamination sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) installations that contain radionuclides and toxic metals such as uranium (U), technetium (Tc), and chromium (Cr). Since these contaminants are the main 'risk drivers' at the Hanford site (WA) and some of them also pose significant risk at other DOE facilities (e.g., Oak Ridge Reservation - TN; Rocky Flats - CO), development of technologies for cost effective site remediation is needed. Current assessment indicates that complete removal of these contaminants for ex-situ disposal is infeasible, thus in-situ stabilization through reduction to insoluble species is considered one of the most important approaches for site remediation. In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for vadose zone soil remediation. The ISGR approach uses hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) for reductive immobilization of contaminants that show substantially lower mobility in their reduced forms (e.g., Tc, U, and Cr). The technology can be applied in two ways: (i) to immobilize or stabilize pre-existing contaminants in the vadose zone soils by direct H{sub 2}S treatment, or (ii) to create a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that prevents the migration of contaminants. Direct treatment involves reduction of the contaminants by H{sub 2}S to less mobile species. Formation of a PRB is accomplished through reduction of ferric iron species in the vadose zone soils by H{sub 2}S to iron sulfides (e.g., FeS), which provides a means for capturing the contaminants entering the treated zone. Potential future releases may occur during tank closure activities. Thus, the placement of a permeable reactive barrier by ISGR treatment can be part of the leak mitigation program. Deployment of these ISGR approaches, however, requires a better understanding of the immobilization kinetics and mechanisms, and a better assessment of the long-term effectiveness of treatment. The primary objective of this project was to understand the complex interactions among the contaminants (i.e., Cr, Tc, and U), H{sub 2}S, and various soil constituents. The reaction with iron sulfide is also the focus of the research, which could be formed from iron oxide reduction by hydrogen sulfide. Factors controlling the reductive immobilization of these contaminants were identified and quantified. The results and fundamental knowledge obtained from this project shall help better evaluate the potential of in situ gaseous treatment to immobilize toxic and radioactive metals examined.

  17. Foreground contamination in Ly? intensity mapping during the epoch of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Silva, Marta; Santos, Mario G.

    2014-04-10

    The intensity mapping of Ly? emission during the epoch of reionization will be contaminated by foreground emission lines from lower redshifts. We calculate the mean intensity and the power spectrum of Ly? emission at z ? 7 and estimate the uncertainties according to the relevant astrophysical processes. We find that the low-redshift emission lines from 6563 Å H?, 5007 Å [O III], and 3727 Å [O II] will be strong contaminants on the observed Ly? power spectrum. We make use of both the star formation rate and luminosity functions to estimate the mean intensity and power spectra of the three foreground lines at z ? 0.5 for H?, z ? 0.9 for [O III], and z ? 1.6 for [O II], as they will contaminate the Ly? emission at z ? 7. The [O II] line is found to be the strongest. We analyze the masking of the bright survey pixels with a foreground line above some line intensity threshold as a way to reduce the contamination in an intensity mapping survey. We find that the foreground contamination can be neglected if we remove pixels with fluxes above 1.4 × 10{sup –20} W m{sup –2}.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  19. Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

  20. Apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodmansee, Donald E. (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination includes a tool for collecting a contamination sample from a target surface, a mask having an opening of known area formed therein for defining the target surface, and a flexible connector connecting the tool to the mask. The tool includes a body portion having a large diameter section defining a surface and a small diameter section extending from the large diameter section. A particulate collector is removably mounted on the surface of the large diameter section for collecting the contaminants. The tool further includes a spindle extending from the small diameter section and a spool slidingly mounted on the spindle. A spring is disposed between the small diameter section and the spool for biasing the spool away from the small diameter section. An indicator is provided on the spindle so as to be revealed when the spool is pressed downward to compress the spring.

  1. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adams; A. Alekou; M. Apollonio; R. Asfandiyarov; G. Barber; P. Barclay; A. de Bari; R. Bayes; V. Bayliss; R. Bertoni; V. J. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. Blot; M. Bogomilov; M. Bonesini; C. N. Booth; D. Bowring; S. Boyd; T. W. Bradshaw; U. Bravar; A. D. Bross; M. Capponi; T. Carlisle; G. Cecchet; C. Charnley; F. Chignoli; D. Cline; J. H. Cobb; G. Colling; N. Collomb; L. Coney; P. Cooke; M. Courthold; L. M. Cremaldi; A. DeMello; A. Dick; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; M. Drews; F. Drielsma; F. Filthaut; T. Fitzpatrick; P. Franchini; V. Francis; L. Fry; A. Gallagher; R. Gamet; R. Gardener; S. Gourlay; A. Grant; J. R. Greis; S. Griffiths; P. Hanlet; O. M. Hansen; G. G. Hanson; T. L. Hart; T. Hartnett; T. Hayler; C. Heidt; M. Hills; P. Hodgson; C. Hunt; A. Iaciofano; S. Ishimoto; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Karadzhov; Y. K. Kim; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J-B Lagrange; J. Langlands; W. Lau; M. Leonova; D. Li; A. Lintern; M. Littlefield; K. Long; T. Luo; C. Macwaters; B. Martlew; J. Martyniak; R. Mazza; S. Middleton; A. Moretti; A. Moss; A. Muir; I. Mullacrane; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Neuffer; A. Nichols; R. Nicholson; J. C. Nugent; A. Oates; Y. Onel; D. Orestano; E. Overton; P. Owens; V. Palladino; J. Pasternak; F. Pastore; C. Pidcott; M. Popovic; R. Preece; S. Prestemon; D. Rajaram; S. Ramberger; M. A. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; T. J. Roberts; M. Robinson; C. Rogers; K. Ronald; P. Rubinov; P. Rucinski; H. Sakamato; D. A. Sanders; E. Santos; T. Savidge; P. J. Smith; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; D. Speirs; T. Stanley; G. Stokes; D. J. Summers; J. Tarrant; I. Taylor; L. Tortora; Y. Torun; R. Tsenov; C. D. Tunnell; M. A. Uchida; G. Vankova-Kirilova; S. Virostek; M. Vretenar; P. Warburton; S. Watson; C. White; C. G. Whyte; A. Wilson; M. Winter; X. Yang; A. Young; M. Zisman

    2015-11-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  2. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, D; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R; Barber, G; Barclay, P; de Bari, A; Bayes, R; Bayliss, V; Bertoni, R; Blackmore, V J; Blondel, A; Blot, S; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C N; Bowring, D; Boyd, S; Bradshaw, T W; Bravar, U; Bross, A D; Capponi, M; Carlisle, T; Cecchet, G; Charnley, C; Chignoli, F; Cline, D; Cobb, J H; Colling, G; Collomb, N; Coney, L; Cooke, P; Courthold, M; Cremaldi, L M; DeMello, A; Dick, A; Dobbs, A; Dornan, P; Drews, M; Drielsma, F; Filthaut, F; Fitzpatrick, T; Franchini, P; Francis, V; Fry, L; Gallagher, A; Gamet, R; Gardener, R; Gourlay, S; Grant, A; Greis, J R; Griffiths, S; Hanlet, P; Hansen, O M; Hanson, G G; Hart, T L; Hartnett, T; Hayler, T; Heidt, C; Hills, M; Hodgson, P; Hunt, C; Iaciofano, A; Ishimoto, S; Kafka, G; Kaplan, D M; Karadzhov, Y; Kim, Y K; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J-B; Langlands, J; Lau, W; Leonova, M; Li, D; Lintern, A; Littlefield, M; Long, K; Luo, T; Macwaters, C; Martlew, B; Martyniak, J; Mazza, R; Middleton, S; Moretti, A; Moss, A; Muir, A; Mullacrane, I; Nebrensky, J J; Neuffer, D; Nichols, A; Nicholson, R; Nugent, J C; Oates, A; Onel, Y; Orestano, D; Overton, E; Owens, P; Palladino, V; Pasternak, J; Pastore, F; Pidcott, C; Popovic, M; Preece, R; Prestemon, S; Rajaram, D; Ramberger, S; Rayner, M A; Ricciardi, S; Roberts, T J; Robinson, M; Rogers, C; Ronald, K; Rubinov, P; Rucinski, P; Sakamato, H; Sanders, D A; Santos, E; Savidge, T; Smith, P J; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Speirs, D; Stanley, T; Stokes, G; Summers, D J; Tarrant, J; Taylor, I; Tortora, L; Torun, Y; Tsenov, R; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, M A; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Virostek, S; Vretenar, M; Warburton, P; Watson, S; White, C; Whyte, C G; Wilson, A; Winter, M; Yang, X; Young, A; Zisman, M

    2015-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  3. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  4. Evaluation of the effects of coal fly ash amendments on the toxicity of a contaminated marine sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, R.M.; Perron, M.M.; Friedman, C.L.; Suuberg, E.M.; Pennell, K.G.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Ryba, S.A.

    2009-01-15

    Approaches for cleaning up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In this study, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7-d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of postoxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash before use, and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. No evidence was seen of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel, or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28-d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high-carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, no evidence was seen of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content or of accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon content could represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments.

  5. Biotreatment of produced waters for volume reduction and contaminant removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negri, M.C.; Hinchman, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mollock, J. [Devon Energy Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Produced water is wastewater that is brought to the surface from natural gas wells during natural gas production. Its constituents, mostly salt, with traces of hydrocarbons and heavy metals, are a significant disposal problem. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in partnership with the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has developed a low-cost, low-tech method, in which green plants are used to reduce the volume of produced water. The authors have designed an engineered bioreactor system, which is modeled after natural saline wetland ecosystems. The plant bioreactor system maximizes plant evapotranspiration to reduce wastewater volume and, concurrently, may function as a biological filter to enhance contaminant degradation and immobilization in the root/rhizosphere zone. Halophyte plant species having high salt tolerance and high transpiration rates were selected after they tested them in greenhouse experiments. Models obtained by using their greenhouse findings reduced the volume of the wastewater (up to 6% salt) by 75% in about 8 days. A field demonstration of the bioreactor, designed on the basis of the results from the greenhouse study, is successfully under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma. The process could offer the petroleum industry a low-cost biological alternative to existing expensive options.

  6. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  7. Apparatus for extraction of contaminants from a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babko-Malyi, Sergei (Butte, MT)

    2001-01-01

    A method of treating industrial gases to remove contaminants is disclosed. Ions are generated in stream of injectable gas. These ions are propelled through the contaminated gas as it flows through a collection unit. An electric field is applied to the contaminated gas. The field causes the ions to move through the contaminated gases, producing electrical charges on the contaminants. The electrically charged contaminants are then collected at one side of the electric field. The injectable gas is selected to produce ions which will produce reactions with particular contaminants. The process is thus capable of removing particular contaminants. The process does not depend on diffusion as a transport mechanism and is therefore suitable for removing contaminants which exist in very low concentrations.

  8. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O'Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  9. WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate recovery and long-term recovery management plans that can address contaminated waste through the entire life cycle of the waste. Through Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety

  10. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Acciarri; M. Antonello; B. Baibussinov; M. Baldo-Ceolin; P. Benetti; F. Calaprice; E. Calligarich; M. Cambiaghi; N. Canci; F. Carbonara; F. Cavanna; S. Centro; A. G. Cocco; F. Di Pompeo; G. Fiorillo; C. Galbiati; V. Gallo; L. Grandi; G. Meng; I. Modena; C. Montanari; O. Palamara; L. Pandola; F. Pietropaolo; G. L. Raselli; M. Roncadelli; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; E. Segreto; A. M. Szelc; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli

    2008-04-08

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. Purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from about 10^-1 ppm up to about 10^3 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (gamma-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. The rate constant of the light quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be k(N2)=0.11 micros^-1 ppm^-1. Direct PMT signals acquisition at high time resolution by fast Waveform recording allowed to extract with high precision the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in pure and contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable from O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations.

  11. Contaminants of Emerging Concern Strategy Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ng/gwetweight new contaminants natural products selected legacy POPs #12;CECs in San Francisco Bay of Emerging Concern (CECs) New York Times, September 30, 2014: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office September 29, 2014 #12;RMP CEC Strategy: Three Elements CEC monitoring, evaluating risk Sharing expertise

  12. Reduced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impactsand engineersAcquisition andRedox ShuttleRedox

  13. Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.; Buckley, L.P.

    1994-11-22

    In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved. 1 fig.

  14. Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vijayan, Sivaraman (Deep River, CA); Wong, Chi F. (Pembroke, CA); Buckley, Leo P. (Deep River, CA)

    1994-01-01

    In processes of this invention aqueous waste solutions containing a variety of mixed waste contaminants are treated to remove the contaminants by a sequential addition of chemicals and adsorption/ion exchange powdered materials to remove the contaminants including lead, cadmium, uranium, cesium-137, strontium-85/90, trichloroethylene and benzene, and impurities including iron and calcium. Staged conditioning of the waste solution produces a polydisperse system of size enlarged complexes of the contaminants in three distinct configurations: water-soluble metal complexes, insoluble metal precipitation complexes, and contaminant-bearing particles of ion exchange and adsorbent materials. The volume of the waste is reduced by separation of the polydisperse system by cross-flow microfiltration, followed by low-temperature evaporation and/or filter pressing. The water produced as filtrate is discharged if it meets a specified target water quality, or else the filtrate is recycled until the target is achieved.

  15. NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

    2001-09-30

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that <0.5 ppm sulfur can be achieved. Removal of HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

  16. Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECH EUV Micro-Exposure Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuest, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECH EUV MioroTools IEUVI Optics Contamination/Lifetime TWG Sapporo,of spot inside visible contamination. sputter time (min) c

  17. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  18. Carbon contamination of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask and its effect on imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yu-Jen

    2009-01-01

    induced carbon contamination of extreme ultraviolet optics."potential LWR due to the contamination topography may be anet aI. , "Accelerated contamination testing of EUV masks."

  19. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbrick, Cheryl Marie

    2014-01-01

    BY CURRENT AND PAST SOURCES OF CONTAMINATION ………. 85S. A. (1996) Metal contamination in San Francisco Bay2012) GEOTRACES IC1 (BATS) contamination-prone trace element

  20. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR. FINAL REPORT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, David

    2012-01-01

    CONSERVATION: CHH1ICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR na 1CONSERVATION CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR DavidCONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR FINAL

  1. New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership Role of IEST in Shaping Future Research and Practices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Eudy, Jane; Berndt, Charles

    2007-01-01

    New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership RoleS&P) portion of the Contamination Control (CC) program,engineers, and contamination control professionals from all

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchange Membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchangethe impact of cation contamination on cell potential. It ismembrane, Nafion, contamination, mathematical model, Stefan-

  3. CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amy, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    of California. LBL-10526 CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BYABSTRACT for contamination ter shale was studied in a seriesassessment of the ial contamination of ground~ water by c

  4. Drinking Water Quality and Child Health in South Asia: The Role of Secondary Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ercumen, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    DPHE.  2001.  Arsenic  contamination  of  groundwater  in  for  microbial  contamination  of  well  water.   J.  al.  2011.  Fecal   contamination  of  shallow  tubewells  

  5. Narratives of Contamination: Representations of Race, Gender, and Disease in Nineteenth Century Cuban Fiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zander, Jessica Selene

    2012-01-01

    Narratives of Contamination: Representations of Race,Fall 2012 Narratives of Contamination: Representations ofAbstract Narratives of Contamination: Representations of

  6. Capture zone design for a contaminated shallow unconfined aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cann, Eric Roy

    1997-01-01

    Petroleum contamination has impacted a shallow unconfined Pleistocene terrace aquifer, in Travis County, East Austin, Texas (Figure 1). The aquifer was contaminated from accidental spills released from a bulk petroleum storage facility that operated...

  7. Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

    2004-07-27

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  8. Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

    2004-07-27

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  9. Evaluation of technologies for volume reduction of plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papelis, C.; Jacobson, R.L.; Miller, F.L.; Shaulis, L.K.

    1996-06-01

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in plutonium (Pu) contamination of the soil over an area of several thousands of acres. The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential of five different processes to reduce the volume of Pu-contaminated soil from three different areas, namely Areas 11, 13, and 52. Volume reduction was to be accomplished by concentrating the Pu into a small but highly contaminated soil fraction, thereby greatly reducing the volume of soil requiring disposal. The processes tested were proposed by Paramag Corp. (PARAMAG), Advanced Processing Technologies Inc. (APT), Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT), Nuclear Remediation Technologies (NRT), and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG). Because of time and budgetary restraints, the NRT and SEG processes were tested with soil from Area 11 only. These processes typically included a preliminary soil conditioning step (e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), followed by a more advanced process designed to separate Pu from the soil, based on physiochemical properties of Pu compounds (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, specific gravity). Analysis of the soil indicates that a substantial fraction of the total Pu contamination is typically confined in a relatively narrow and small particle size range. Processes which were able to separate this highly contaminated soil fraction (using physical methods, e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), from the rest of the soil achieved volume (mass) reductions on the order of 70%. The advanced, more complex processes tested did not enhance volume reduction. The primary reason why processes that rely on the dependence of settling velocity on density differences failed was the very fine grain size of the Pu-rich particles.

  10. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  11. Quantifying Contaminant Mass for the Feasibility Study of the DuPont Chambers Works FUSRAP Site - 13510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Carl; Rahman, Mahmudur; Johnson, Ann; Owe, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) - Philadelphia District is conducting an environmental restoration at the DuPont Chambers Works in Deepwater, New Jersey under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Discrete locations are contaminated with natural uranium, thorium-230 and radium-226. The USACE is proposing a preferred remedial alternative consisting of excavation and offsite disposal to address soil contamination followed by monitored natural attenuation to address residual groundwater contamination. Methods were developed to quantify the error associated with contaminant volume estimates and use mass balance calculations of the uranium plume to estimate the removal efficiency of the proposed alternative. During the remedial investigation, the USACE collected approximately 500 soil samples at various depths. As the first step of contaminant mass estimation, soil analytical data was segmented into several depth intervals. Second, using contouring software, analytical data for each depth interval was contoured to determine lateral extent of contamination. Six different contouring algorithms were used to generate alternative interpretations of the lateral extent of the soil contamination. Finally, geographical information system software was used to produce a three dimensional model in order to present both lateral and vertical extent of the soil contamination and to estimate the volume of impacted soil for each depth interval. The average soil volume from all six contouring methods was used to determine the estimated volume of impacted soil. This method also allowed an estimate of a standard deviation of the waste volume estimate. It was determined that the margin of error for the method was plus or minus 17% of the waste volume, which is within the acceptable construction contingency for cost estimation. USACE collected approximately 190 groundwater samples from 40 monitor wells. It is expected that excavation and disposal of contaminated soil will remove the contaminant source zone and significantly reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater. To test this assumption, a mass balance evaluation was performed to estimate the amount of dissolved uranium that would remain in the groundwater after completion of soil excavation. As part of this evaluation, average groundwater concentrations for the pre-excavation and post-excavation aquifer plume area were calculated to determine the percentage of plume removed during excavation activities. In addition, the volume of the plume removed during excavation dewatering was estimated. The results of the evaluation show that approximately 98% of the aqueous uranium would be removed during the excavation phase. The USACE expects that residual levels of contamination will remain in groundwater after excavation of soil but at levels well suited for the selection of excavation combined with monitored natural attenuation as a preferred alternative. (authors)

  12. Prebarvest Aflatoxin Contamination Molecular Strategies for Its Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Chapter 22 Prebarvest Aflatoxin Contamination Molecular Strategies for Its Control D. Bhatnllgar, P, thereby contaminating food and feed and threatening both human and animal heallh. Traditional control aflaloxin on a number of substrates, but aflatoxin contamination is a serious concern on diverse substrales

  13. Mitigation of Sounding Pilot Contamination in Massive MIMO Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Mitigation of Sounding Pilot Contamination in Massive MIMO Systems Taeseop Lee, Hyung-Sin Kim contamination of cell edge users or a lowered number of serviced users in a multi-cell scenario. In this paper the quality of service (QoS) of mobile users by mitigating the pilot contamination as well as minimize

  14. Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas Environmental Health Buford Highway NE (F-60) Atlanta, GA 30341 March 2011 #12;2 Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas Problem Statement Microbial contamination--both bacterial and viral

  15. Simulation and measurement of air generated electron contamination in radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Simulation and measurement of air generated electron contamination in radiotherapy Martin J and (ii) electrons produced outside the patient but inci- dent on the patient (electron contamination). To evaluate electron contamination produced by the air column located between the x-ray source and the patient

  16. 50TH ANNIVERSARY Quantitative correlation of interfacial contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    50TH ANNIVERSARY Quantitative correlation of interfacial contamination and antiphase domain Science+Business Media New York 2015 Abstract The role of interfacial contamination on anti- phase domain surface contamination across the wafer. APB density in the as-grown GaAs film was examined with the aid

  17. INCIDENT CONTAMINATION LEPTON DOSES MEASURED USING RADIOCHROMIC FILM IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    INCIDENT CONTAMINATION LEPTON DOSES MEASURED USING RADIOCHROMIC FILM IN RADIOTHERAPY MARTIN J) AbstractÐMeasurement of lepton contamination is achieved across a radiotherapy photon beam and peripheral in air to measure incident contamination without the eects of phantom scatter. Surface dose was measured

  18. The Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    The Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Anna M and dispersion of nuclear contamination through a granitic medium having densely spaced fractures, Rochester, MI 48309-4485 1 #12; Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media 2 2 The Single Porosity

  19. Low energy electron bombardment induced surface contamination of Ru mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Low energy electron bombardment induced surface contamination of Ru mirrors A. Al-Ajlonya , A., Albany, NY 12203, USA ABSTRACT The impact of secondary electrons induced contamination of the Ru surface, carbon contamination, Ruthenium capping 1. INTRODUCTION Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation induced

  20. Mirror contamination and secondary electron effects during EUV reflectivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Mirror contamination and secondary electron effects during EUV reflectivity analysis M. Catalfanoa, USA; b SEMATECH Inc., Albany, NY 12203, USA ABSTRACT We investigated Ru mirror contamination film at different angles. During the contamination process, the EUV reflectivity of the Ru film

  1. Evaluation of a radiotherapy electron contamination deecting system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Evaluation of a radiotherapy electron contamination de¯ecting system Martin J. Butsona, b, *, Tsang contamination from the entry beam while not aecting dose at depth or beam symmetry. Results have shown that up. All rights reserved. Keywords: Electron contamination; Surface dose; Skin sparing; NeFeB magnets

  2. In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapin, Sergey

    Chapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei Lapin and Rex Westbrook 1.1 Background Recently, a method for removing contaminants from soil (several as follows. Over a period of several weeks, electrical energy is introduced to the contaminated soil using

  3. Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

  4. Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    i Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis Submitted May 2011 #12;ii Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis peroxygens for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater" along with 5 papers describing part

  5. Annual Hanford Site GW Monitoring Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319 125 U.S.812 Annual FOIA

  6. Microsoft Word - S05935_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird Five-YearFinalGasbuggyHydrologic

  7. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task OrderAnnualRadiological Annual

  8. Microsoft Word - S07883_GW_2011

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task U.S.SurfaceGroundwater10100

  9. Microsoft Word - S07896_GW_MR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010 Task11 Groundwater Monitoring

  10. Microsoft Word - S10184_GW.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbinsMonumentThird6010Office ofListingsSitewide

  11. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R271NFSSNaturita,University

  12. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R271NFSSNaturita,University10

  13. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R271NFSSNaturita,University1010

  14. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P

  15. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels a

  16. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels aDate Surface

  17. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels aDate Surface

  18. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels aDate Surface

  19. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels aDate

  20. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels aDateOU III

  1. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels aDateOU IIIOU

  2. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  3. Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daughton, C.G.

    1981-10-27

    Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

  4. Reduced shedding regenerator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qiu, Songgang (Richland, WA); Augenblick, John E. (Richland, WA); Erbeznik, Raymond M. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-05-22

    A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the regenerator thereby alleviating a source of potential damage and malfunction of a thermal regenerative machine using the regenerator.

  5. The combinatorics of reduced decompositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenner, Bridget Eileen

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines several aspects of reduced decompositions in finite Coxeter groups. Effort is primarily concentrated on the symmetric group, although some discussions are subsequently expanded to finite Coxeter groups ...

  6. Copper contamination effects on hydrogen-air combustion under SCRAMJET (supersonic combustion ramjet) testing conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of copper catalytic reactions (homogeneous and heterogeneous) in hydrogen flames were found in a literature survey. Hydrogen atoms in flames recombine into hydrogen molecules through catalytic reactions, and these reactions which affect the timing of the combustion process. Simulations of hydrogen flames with copper contamination were conducted by using a modified general chemical kinetics program (GCKP). Results show that reaction times of hydrogen flames are shortened by copper catalytic reactions, but ignition times are relatively insensitive to the reactions. The reduction of reaction time depends on the copper concentration, copper phase, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and initial temperature and pressure. The higher the copper concentration of the smaller the particle, the larger the reduction in reaction time. For a supersonic hydrogen flame (Mach number = 4.4) contaminated with 200 ppm of gaseous copper species, the calculated reaction times are reduced by about 9%. Similar reductions in reaction time are also computed for heterogeneous copper contamination. Under scramjet testing conditions, the change of combustion timing appears to be tolerable (less than 5%) if the Mach number is lower than 3 or the copper contamination is less than 100 ppm. The higher rate the Mach number, the longer the reaction time and the larger the copper catalytic effects. 7 tabs., 8 figs., 34 refs.

  7. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  8. Suspect Mycoplasma contamination in your cell culture? Quick and reliable testing service.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    Suspect Mycoplasma contamination in your cell culture? Quick and reliable testing service. Surveys are contaminated with Mycoplasma. Unlike other bacterial contaminations, the presence of Mycoplasma often goes, Mycoplasma contamination will at best compromise, and at worst invalidate experimental results, wasting

  9. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

  10. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  11. Electrosorption on carbon aerogel electrodes as a means of treating low-level radioactive wastes and remediating contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Tri Duc; Farmer, Joseph C.; DePruneda, Jean H.; Richardson, Jeffery H.

    1997-07-01

    A novel separation process based upon carbon aerogel electrodes has been recently developed for the efficient removal of ionic impurities from aqueous streams. This process can be used as an electrical y- regenerated alternative to ion exchange, thereby reducing-the need for large quantities of chemical regenerants. Once spent (contaminated), these regenerants contribute to the waste that must be disposed of in landfills. The elimination of such wastes is especially beneficial in situations involving radioactive contaminants, and pump and treat processing of massive volumes of ground water. A review and analysis of potential applications will be presented.

  12. Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECH EUV Micro-Exposure Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuest, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECHMioro^Exposure Tools IEUVI Optics Contamination/Lifetime TWG

  13. The effects of a stannous chloride-based remediation system in a mercury contaminated stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Smith, John G [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations in the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.

  14. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  15. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  16. INTERACTIONS AMONG PHOSPHATE AMENDMENTS, MICROBES AND URANIUM MOBILITY IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A

    2007-08-30

    The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for long-term environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of four phosphate amendments and two microbial amendments on U availability. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of the untreated U-contaminated sediment showed that U was closely associated with Mn. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentration more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31% respectively. Uranium sorption in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of microbes. However, increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to reduction of phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract from U amended sediment was 437 {micro}g/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved sediment), the extractable U concentration was only 103 {micro}g/kg. When the autoclaved amended sediment was treated with autoclaved biological apatite, U concentration in the 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract was {approx}0 {micro}g/kg. Together these tests suggest that microbes may enhance U leaching and reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

  17. Microbial methods of reducing technetium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wildung, Raymond E. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Garland, Thomas R. (Greybull, WY) [Greybull, WY; Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hess, Nancy J. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Li, Shu-Mei W. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Plymale, Andrew E. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  18. Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

  19. Three dimensional electrode for the electrolytic removal of contaminants from aqueous waste streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spiegel, Ella F. (Louisville, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2001-01-01

    Efficient and cost-effective electrochemical devices and processes for the remediation of aqueous waste streams. The invention provides electrolytic cells having a high surface area spouted electrode for removal of heavy metals and oxidation of organics from aqueous environments. Heavy metal ions are reduced, deposited on cathode particles of a spouted bed cathode and removed from solution. Organics are efficiently oxidized at anode particles of a spouted bed anode and removed from solution. The method of this inventions employs an electrochemical cell having an anolyte compartment and a catholyte compartment, separated by a microporous membrane, in and through which compartments anolyte and catholyte, respectively, are circulated. A spouted-bed electrode is employed as the cathode for metal deposition from contaminated aqueous media introduced as catholyte and as the anode for oxidation of organics from contaminated aqueous media introduced as anolyte.

  20. Method and apparatus for in-cell vacuuming of radiologically contaminated materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spadaro, Peter R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Smith, Jay E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Speer, Elmer L. (Ruffsdale, PA); Cecconi, Arnold L. (Clairton, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum air flow operated cyclone separator arrangement for collecting, handling and packaging loose contaminated material in accordance with acceptable radiological and criticality control requirements. The vacuum air flow system includes a specially designed fail-safe prefilter installed upstream of the vacuum air flow power supply. The fail-safe prefilter provides in-cell vacuum system flow visualization and automatically reduces or shuts off the vacuum air flow in the event of an upstream prefilter failure. The system is effective for collecting and handling highly contaminated radiological waste in the form of dust, dirt, fuel element fines, metal chips and similar loose material in accordance with radiological and criticality control requirements for disposal by means of shipment and burial.

  1. Excited state contamination in nucleon structure calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Green; Stefan Krieg; John Negele; Andrew Pochinsky; Sergey Syritsyn

    2011-11-28

    Among the sources of systematic error in nucleon structure calculations is contamination from unwanted excited states. In order to measure this systematic error, we vary the operator insertion time and source-sink separation independently. We compute observables for three source-sink separations between 0.93 fm and 1.39 fm using clover-improved Wilson fermions and pion masses as low as 150 MeV. We explore the use of a two-state model fit to subtract off the contribution from excited states.

  2. Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuresko, Daniel D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01

    A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

  3. Reduced Harmonic Representation of Partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Psimopoulos

    2011-03-08

    In the present article the reduced integral representation of partitions in terms of harmonic products has been derived first by using hypergeometry and the new concept of fractional sum and secondly by studying the Fourier series of the kernel function appearing in the integral representation. Using the method of induction, a generalization of the theory has also been obtained.

  4. CORRESPONDENCE Reduced major axis regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORRESPONDENCE Reduced major axis regression and the island rule The Ôisland ruleÕ describes). The slope of the least-squares regression of Y on X, b, measures the extent to which large body sizes tend- ferent way, as the regression of Y ) X on X, and here the slope (b¢) is generally negative (b¢ = b ) 1

  5. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  6. Biotreatment of groundwater contaminated with MTBE: interaction of common environmental co-contaminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biotreatment of groundwater contaminated with MTBE: interaction of common environmental co of groundwater with the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is often accompanied by many aromatic, a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter for groundwater treatment inoculated with a microbial consortium

  7. Need for a contamination control textbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stowers, I.F.; Patton, H.G.; Guntrum, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Since the authors have become associated with contamination control technology they have repeatedly found themselves searching for technical information that was either never documented and therefore never reached a technical journal or was too specific to appear in a technical article. On countless occasions they have found other workers frustrated over the same lack of concise and up to date information in the relatively broad and interdisciplinary field of surface science, surface cleaning, and clean room operation and design. It is for these reasons that the authors wish to suggest formally that those engineers, chemists, technicians, and surface scientists working in this field collectively create a textbook that they may use as their first reference and teaching book. The text of this paper suggests a topical outline for a book and gives examples of the kinds of information that it should contain and the types of questions it should address. Included is an extensive bibliography recently collected showing the diversity of disciplines that those working in contamination control must be knowledgeable of and the variety of publications and journals in which these reports and articles are generally found.

  8. SUMMARY REPORT FOR ZINC 65 CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2011-07-14

    Radioactive zinc, {sup 65}Zn, was detected after extraction of 215 TPBARs in from TVA reactor fuel cycle 6. A team consisting of Tritium Engineering, Tritium Operations, Tritium Radiation Control, and Savannah River National Laboratory personnel evaluated the risk and response and developed short, medium and long term goals for contamination control. One of the goals was incorporated into site Performance Based Incentive CO 3.4, to optimize the filter geometry and operating conditions for the Tritium Extraction Facility. This goal included a scoping study to determine if the contamination could be contained within the high radiation environment of the furnace module as well. In order to optimize the filters studies were conducted to independently evaluate the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc trapping efficiency (1). A study was also conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature on the trapping efficiency and adhesion (2). In addition, the potential for chemically trapping zinc in the lithium trap was evaluated using a thermodynamic study (3) followed by preliminary experimental testing (4). Based on the work that was completed it is determined that a 20 {mu}m filter heated to between 120 and 200 C will act as an effective physical trap for zinc vapors. It may be possible to chemically react zinc with copper or cobalt to form zinc intermetallic compounds or alloys but additional work under more prototypic conditions are required.

  9. In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Kaback, Dawn S. (Aiken, SC)

    1989-01-01

    A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like.

  10. In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

    1989-05-23

    A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

  11. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  13. Detection of contamination of municipal water distribution systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-17

    A system for the detection of contaminates of a fluid in a conduit. The conduit is part of a fluid distribution system. A chemical or biological sensor array is connected to the conduit. The sensor array produces an acoustic signal burst in the fluid upon detection of contaminates in the fluid. A supervisory control system connected to the fluid and operatively connected to the fluid distribution system signals the fluid distribution system upon detection of contaminates in the fluid.

  14. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Downs, Wayne C. (Sugar City, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Ammon, ID); Hall, H. James (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  15. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  16. Tactical approach to maneuvering within the chemical contamination labyrinth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the need and accepts the responsibility for understanding the reality and mitigating the consequence of the complex chemical contamination legacy it inherited as well as controlling, reducing, and eliminating extant emissions and effluents. The key to maneuvering through this complicated and multifaceted labyrinth of concerns, from which a meaningful, high quality, and cost-effective restoration/mitigation machine is then set in motions, is the ability to perform accurate, factual, and explicit health and environmental/ecological risk assessments. Likewise, the common denominator for carrying out this essential task is to have access to comprehensive and reliable data of known quality with which to perform those analyses. DOE is committed to identifying the data universe; to technically scrutinize and ensure the quality of that data; to develop efficient and cost-effective means to maximize the handling, utilization, and sharing of that universe; and to undertake those assessments. DOE views this as an effort that can only be accomplished through a merging of the technical excellence that exists within federal and state agencies, academia, and industry. The task at hand is so large that only by integrating that intelligence base can we hope to accomplish the goals of establishing meaningful standards, developing functional and effective solutions, and providing quality guidance at a national scale.

  17. Extragalactic foreground contamination in temperature-based CMB lens reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, Stephen J.; Hanson, Duncan; Doré, Olivier E-mail: dhanson@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a ''source-hardened'' lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck. We find that for radio sources and SZ the bias is significantly reduced, but for CIB it is essentially unchanged. However, by using the high-frequency, all-sky CIB measurements from Planck and Herschel it may be possible to suppress this contribution.

  18. Bioventing approach to remediate a gasoline contaminated subsurface. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Griffin, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. Two pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. Process operations began in October 1990. The field site is located at an air station. A spill in 1969 of about 100,000 kilograms aviation gasoline was caused by a broken underground transfer line. A major portion of the spilled product still persists as an oily-phase residue in a 80x360 meter plume. The subsurface is a uniform beach sand with the ground water level near five meters. Prior to startup of the venting systems, a grass cover was established and a nutrient solution was dispersed throughout the unsaturated subsurface. Subsurface air flow patterns are being determined with a tracer gas of sulfur hexafloride. Soil gas, core material, and underground water are being monitored to determine the extent of remediation. Objectives of the study are to demonstrate that surface emissions of gasoline are minimal, oily residue will be reduced to <100 mg fuel carbon/Kg core material, and the process will be applicable to full-scale remediation. Flow rate is based on a calculated residence time of 24 hours. Surface emission of fuel hydrocarbons have not exceeded 1 micrograms/liter soil gas.

  19. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  20. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T. (13609 Verbena Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Warren, William L. (7716 Wm. Moyers Ave., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tuttle, Bruce A. (12808 Lillian Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Dimos, Duane B. (6105 Innsbrook Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Pike, Gordon E. (1609 Cedar Ridge, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  1. Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    limits and permitting and operational requirements for facilities that may contribute to air emissions. General air quality standards and standards for specific contaminants are...

  2. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Richard Paul (Allentown, PA); Makitka, III, Alexander (Hatfield, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  3. Metagenomic Insights into Evolution of a Heavy Metal-Contaminated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    could be a key mechanism in rapidly responding and adapting to environmental contamination. The results presented in this study have important implications in understanding,...

  4. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients.

  5. Global samples from nuclear contamination sites reveal unpredicted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reveal unpredicted uranium and plutonium behavior Global samples from nuclear contamination sites reveal unpredicted uranium and plutonium behavior Knowing how a chemical in...

  6. RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

  7. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 011999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999red...

  8. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ECOLOGY; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; CONTAMINATION Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View...

  9. Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination in CUORE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface...

  10. Scale dependence of sorption coefficients for contaminant transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (LANL) Sponsoring Org: DOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54; 97; CONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; FRACTURES; ROCKS; SIMULATION; SORPTION...

  11. Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE...

  12. Investigation of the November 8, 2011, Plutonium Contamination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    November 8, 2011, Plutonium Contamination in the Zero Power Physics Reactor Facility, at the Idaho National Laboratory Investigation of the November 8, 2011, Plutonium...

  13. DOE Issues Request for Information on Hydrogen Contamination...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    seeking feedback from interested stakeholders on existing and potential hydrogen contamination detectors (HCDs) and related factors such as performance characteristics, system...

  14. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    published in April 2015, describes the current commercial state of the art in contamination detection and identifies the technical requirements for implementing a hydrogen...

  15. The Simulation of Nuclear Contaminant Transport in Fractally ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The presentation will begin with a derivation of a model of nuclear contaminant transport in naturally-fractured porous media. Then, a Locally-Conservative ...

  16. Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Terrence L. (Lenior City, TN); Wilson, James H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing.

  17. Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donaldson, T.L.; Wilson, J.H.

    1993-09-21

    A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing. 2 figures.

  18. The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy Effects of Impurities of Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability...

  19. MapReduce SVM Game

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently andmore »recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.« less

  20. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT RIVERTON PROCESSING SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2014-05-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site – a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks – spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical – in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated). A few of the key findings include: ? Physical removal of the tailings and associated materials reduced contaminant discharges to groundwater and reduced contaminant concentrations in the near-field plume. ? In the mid-field and far-field areas, residual contaminants are present in the vadose zone as a result of a variety of factors (e.g., evaporation/evapotranspiration from the capillary fringe and water table, higher water levels during tailings disposal, and geochemical processes). ? Vadose zone contaminants are widely distributed above the plume and are expected to be present as solid phase minerals that can serve as “secondary sources” to the underlying groundwater. The mineral sample collected at the site is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. ? Water table fluctuations, irrigation, infiltration and flooding will episodically solubilize some of the vadose zone secondary source materials and release contaminants to the groundwater for continued down gradient migration – extending the overall timeframe for flushing. ? Vertical contaminant stratification in the vadose zone and surficial aquifer will vary from location to location. Soil and water sampling strategies and monitoring well construction details will influence characterization and monitoring data. ? Water flows from the Wind River, beneath the Riverton Processing Site and through the plume toward the Little Wind River. This base flow pattern is influenced by seasonal irrigation and other anthropogenic activities, and by natural perturbations (e.g., flooding). ? Erosion and reworking of the sediments adjacent to the Little Wind River results in high heterogeneity and complex flow and geochemistry. Water flowing into oxbow lakes (or through areas where oxbow lakes were present in the past) will be exposed to localized geochemical conditions that favor chemical reduction (i.e., “naturally reduced zones”) and other attenuation processes. This attenuation is not sufficient to fully stabilize the plume or to reduce contaminant concentrations in the groundwater to target levels. Consistent with these observations, the team recommended increased emphasis on collecting data in the zones where secondary source minerals are projected to accumulate (e.g., just above the water table) using low cost methods such as x-ray fluorescence. The team also suggested several low cost nontraditional sources of data that have the potential to provide supplemental data (e.g., multispectral satellite imagery) to inform and improve legacy management decisions. There are a range of strategies for management of the legacy contamination in the groundwater and vadose zone near the Riverton Processing Site. These range from the current strategy, natural flushing, to intrusive remedies such as plume scale excavation of the vadose zone and pump & treat. Each option relates to the site specific conditions, issues and opportunities in a unique way. Further, each option has advantages and disadvantages that need to be weighed. Scoping evaluation was performed for three major classes

  1. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save money and reduce energy...

  2. Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

    2010-06-01

    The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

  3. Method of removing arsenic and other anionic contaminants from contaminated water using enhanced coagulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teter, David M.; Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.; Khandaker, Nadim R.

    2006-11-21

    An improved water decontamination process comprising contacting water containing anionic contaminants with an enhanced coagulant to form an enhanced floc, which more efficiently binds anionic species (e.g., arsenate, arsenite, chromate, fluoride, selenate, and borate, and combinations thereof) predominantly through the formation of surface complexes. The enhanced coagulant comprises a trivalent metal cation coagulant (e.g., ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate) mixed with a divalent metal cation modifier (e.g., copper sulfate or zinc sulfate).

  4. Characterization and Potential Remediation Approaches for Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford 241-SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Sydnor, Harold A.; Parker, Danny L.; Glaser, Danney R.

    2013-01-10

    Unplanned releases of radioactive and hazardous wastes have occurred at the 241-SX Tank Farm on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Interim and long-term mitigation efforts are currently under evaluation for 241-SX Tank Farm. Two contiguous interim surface barriers have been designed for deployment at 241-SX Tank Farm to reduce future moisture infiltration; however, construction of the surface barriers has been deferred to allow testing of alternative technologies for soil moisture reduction and possibly contaminant source term reduction. Previous tests performed by other organizations at the Hanford Site have demonstrated that: vadose zone desiccation using large diameter (greater than 4 inch) boreholes is feasible; under certain circumstances, mobile contaminants may be removed in addition to water vapor; and small diameter (approximately 2 inch) boreholes (such as those placed by the direct push hydraulic hammer) can be used to perform vapor extractions. Evaluation of the previous work combined with laboratory test results have led to the design of a field proof-of-principle test to remove water and possibly mobile contaminants at greater depths, using small boreholes placed with the direct push unit.

  5. JV Task 59-Demonstration of Accelerated In Situ Contaminant Degradation by Vacuum-Enhanced Nutrient Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc

    2007-03-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater at a former Mohler Oil site in Bismarck, North Dakota. The remedial strategy was based on the application of two innovative concepts: (1) design and deployment of the mobile extraction, treatment, and injection units to overcome site limitations associated with urban settings in high-traffic areas and (2) vacuum-controlled nutrient injection within and on the periphery of an induced hydraulic and pneumatic depression. Combined contaminant recovery since the beginning of the project in June 2003 totals over 13,600 lb ({approx}6,170 kg) of hydrocarbons, equivalent to 2176 gallons (8236 l) of product. In situ delivery of 1504 Ib (682 kg) of ionic nitrate and 540 Ib (245 kg) of dissolved oxygen translates into further reduction of about 489 Ib (222 kg) of benzene for the same period and provides for long-term stimulation of the natural attenuation process. In addition to contaminant recovered by extraction and reduced by in situ biodegradation, a total of 4136 Ib (1876 kg) of oxygen was delivered to the saturated zone, resulting in further in situ reduction of an estimated 1324 lb (600 kg) of dissolved-phase hydrocarbons. Based on the results of the EERC demonstration, the North Dakota Department of Health approved site abandonment and termination of the corrective action.

  6. Chemical and toxicological characterization of slurry reactor biotreatment of explosives-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Vass, A.A.; Ho, C.H.

    1998-08-01

    Treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil in the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) soil slurry bioreactor (SSBR) eliminated detectable TNT but left trace levels of residual monoamino and diamino metabolites under some reactor operating conditions. The reduction of solvent-extractable bacterial mutagenicity in the TNT-contaminated soil was substantial and was similar to that achieved by static pile composts at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA) field demonstration. Aquatic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia from TNT in the leachates of TNT-contaminated soil was eliminated in the leachates of JAAP SSBR product soil. The toxicity of soil product leachates to Ceriodaphnia dubia was reasonably predicted using the specific toxicities of the components detected, weighted by their leachate concentrations. In samples where TNT metabolites were observed in the soil product and its leachates, this method determined that the contribution to predicted toxicity values was dominated by trace amounts of the diamino-metabolites, which are very toxic to ceriodaphnia dubia. When the SSBR operating conditions reduced the concentrations of TNT metabolites in the product soils and their leachates to undetectable concentrations, the main contributors to predicted aquatic toxicity values appeared to be molasses residues, potassium, and bicarbonate. Potassium and bicarbonate are beneficial or benign to the environment, and molasses residues are substantially degraded in the environment. Exotoxins, pathogenic bacteria, inorganic particles, ammonia, and dissolved metals did not appear to be important to soil product toxicity.

  7. Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

    2008-11-03

    Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

  8. CONSTRUCTION-GRADE CEMENT PRODUCTION FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1 CONSTRUCTION-GRADE CEMENT PRODUCTION FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING CEMENT-LOCKTM TECHNOLOGY A manufacturing technology for producing construction-grade cements from a wide variety of contaminated waste cementitious properties that allow it to be transformed into construction-grade cement. The Cement

  9. Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed, British Columbia in the Brunette 1994/95 Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed, British Westminster. Past and currently ongoing projects have studied the water, sediment, and biota within

  10. Contamination effects on fixed-bias Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steigies, C. T.; Barjatya, A.

    2012-11-15

    Langmuir probes are standard instruments for plasma density measurements on many sounding rockets. These probes can be operated in swept-bias as well as in fixed-bias modes. In swept-bias Langmuir probes, contamination effects are frequently visible as a hysteresis between consecutive up and down voltage ramps. This hysteresis, if not corrected, leads to poorly determined plasma densities and temperatures. With a properly chosen sweep function, the contamination parameters can be determined from the measurements and correct plasma parameters can then be determined. In this paper, we study the contamination effects on fixed-bias Langmuir probes, where no hysteresis type effect is seen in the data. Even though the contamination is not evident from the measurements, it does affect the plasma density fluctuation spectrum as measured by the fixed-bias Langmuir probe. We model the contamination as a simple resistor-capacitor circuit between the probe surface and the plasma. We find that measurements of small scale plasma fluctuations (meter to sub-meter scale) along a rocket trajectory are not affected, but the measured amplitude of large scale plasma density variation (tens of meters or larger) is attenuated. From the model calculations, we determine amplitude and cross-over frequency of the contamination effect on fixed-bias probes for different contamination parameters. The model results also show that a fixed bias probe operating in the ion-saturation region is affected less by contamination as compared to a fixed bias probe operating in the electron saturation region.

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil by stimulating indigenous microbes In situ bioremediation of oily sludge- contaminated soil by biostimulation of indigenous microbes through with only 15.6% in the control plot. Moreover, bioremediation significantly improved the physicochemical

  12. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  13. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peters, Robert W. (Naperville, IL); Frank, James R. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Feng, Xiandong (West Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    An in situ method for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal.

  14. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

    1998-06-23

    An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

  15. Modeling Contaminant Exposure in a Single-Family House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    occupational exposure to household contaminants in a single-family house under different ventilation, heating the performance of two heating systems, two cooling systems and three ventilation systems in summer and winter contaminant exposure in a generic, small single-family house with a floor area of 100 m2 and a height of 2.5 m

  16. Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Watson, David B [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

    2011-01-01

    Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [{sup 13}C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

  17. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration...

  18. Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable...

  19. New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The New York State Homes and...

  20. Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, K.J.; Barrie, S.L.; Buttner, W.J.

    1999-08-24

    A system is described for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein. 5 figs.

  1. In vitro gastrointestinal mimetic protocol for measuring bioavailable contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to measurements of contaminants in the soil and other organic or environmental materials, using a biologically relevant chemical analysis that will measure the amount of contaminants in a given sample that may be expected to be absorbed by a human being ingesting the contaminated soil. According to the present invention, environmental samples to be tested are added to a pre-prepared physiological composition of bile salts and lipids. They are thoroughly mixed and then the resulting mixture is separated e.g. by centrifugation. The supernatant is then analyzed for the presence of contaminants and these concentrations are compared to the level of contaminants in the untreated samples. It is important that the bile salts and lipids be thoroughly pre-mixed to form micelles.

  2. Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  3. Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kirk J. (Shelley, ID); Barrie, Scott L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Buttner, William J. (White Bear Lake, MN)

    1999-01-01

    A system for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein.

  4. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Yimin (Urbana, IL); Kahn, Zakia (Palatine, IL); Man, Malcolm (Vancouver, CA)

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  5. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  6. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, Charles J. (Rexford, NY); Rhudy, Ralph G. (Scotia, NY); Bushman, Ralph E. (Lathem, NY)

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  7. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Fertilizer Storage and Handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29

    . Locate the pad adjacent to the storage area. Make sure that water moves away from the well. At sites where runoff could reach the well, construct a diversion to direct runoff to another area. The size of the pad depends on the equip- ment you use. Provide... into the water. Other potential sources of nitrate are septic systems, livestock yards, livestock waste stor- age facilities, and silage storage. This bulletin covers the following topics: 1) Building a new storage facility 2) Modifying an existing facility 3...

  8. Monitoring and Modeling Non-Point Source Contributions of Host-Specific Fecal Contamination in San Pablo Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuertz, Stefan; Bombardelli, Fabian A; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Wang, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Host-Specific Fecal Contamination in San Pablo Bay Principlelivestock sources of fecal contamination in Kenya with host-Huang. Abstract Fecal contamination from non-point sources

  9. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    AT A SITE OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L.A T A SITE OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L.a site contaminated with gasoline. Although the high V O C

  10. Motivation Atmospheric Contamination Rejuvenation of a Cesium-Based Dispenser Photocathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Motivation Atmospheric Contamination Results Rejuvenation of a Cesium-Based Dispenser Photocathode in Response to Atmospheric Contamination Alexandra Day, Dr. Eric Montgomery, Dr. Kevin Jensen, Blake Riddick, Saara Khan, Scott Eustice Quantum Efficiency Key Conclusions Cs + contaminants higher work function

  11. Contamination of heavy metals in mangroves: A comparison between Cao Martn Pea and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Contamination of heavy metals in mangroves: A comparison between Caño that contamination of heavy metals in mangroves decrease their chlorophyll levels and how heavy metals contamination has affected them. The images utilized

  12. Enhanced detection of groundwater contamination from a leaking waste disposal site by microbial community profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Enhanced detection of groundwater contamination from a leaking waste disposal site by microbial into the subsurface from leaking landfills. Detecting leachate contamination using statistical techniques of groundwater contamination. We sampled profiles of the microbial community from monitoring wells surrounding

  13. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION Robert Pitt, Shirley Clark, and Richard Field1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION Robert Pitt, Shirley Clark and addresses potential ground water problems associated with stormwater infiltration. Several categories stormwater contaminants as to their potential to contaminant ground water and to provide guidance

  14. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS ­ EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD assessment of contaminated aquatic sediments has to consider both sediment hydraulics and ecology. Since layers of contaminated sediments are often buried under less polluted deposits, the risk of erosion

  15. Transuranic contaminated waste functional definition and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the problem(s) of TRU waste classification and to document the development of an easy-to-apply standard(s) to determine whether or not this waste package should be emplaced in a geologic repository for final disposition. Transuranic wastes are especially significant because they have long half-lives and some are rather radiotoxic. Transuranic radionuclides are primarily produced by single or multiple neutron capture by U-238 in fuel elements during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Reprocessing of spent fuel elements attempts to remove plutonium, but since the separation is not complete, the resulting high-activity liquids still contain some plutonium as well as other transuranics. Likewise, transuranic contamination of low-activity wastes also occurs when the transuranic materials are handled or processed, which is primarily at federal facilities involved in R and D and nuclear weapons production. Transuranics are persistent in the environment and, as a general rule, are strongly retained by soils. They are not easily transported through most food chains, although some reconcentration does take place in the aquatic food chain. They pose no special biological hazard to humans upon ingestion because they are weakly absorbed from the gastrointestional tract. A greater hazard results from inhalation since they behave like normal dust and fractionate accordingly.

  16. Groundwater contaminant plume ranking. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    Containment plumes at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites were ranked to assist in Subpart B (i.e., restoration requirements of 40 CFR Part 192) compliance strategies for each site, to prioritize aquifer restoration, and to budget future requests and allocations. The rankings roughly estimate hazards to the environment and human health, and thus assist in determining for which sites cleanup, if appropriate, will provide the greatest benefits for funds available. The rankings are based on the scores that were obtained using the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Modified Hazard Ranking System (MHRS). The MHRS and HRS consider and score three hazard modes for a site: migration, fire and explosion, and direct contact. The migration hazard mode score reflects the potential for harm to humans or the environment from migration of a hazardous substance off a site by groundwater, surface water, and air; it is a composite of separate scores for each of these routes. For ranking the containment plumes at UMTRA Project sites, it was assumed that each site had been remediated in compliance with the EPA standards and that relict contaminant plumes were present. Therefore, only the groundwater route was scored, and the surface water and air routes were not considered. Section 2.0 of this document describes the assumptions and procedures used to score the groundwater route, and Section 3.0 provides the resulting scores for each site. 40 tabs.

  17. Reduced models for quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1999-10-04

    The preceding talks given at this conference have dealt mainly with general ideas for, main problems of and techniques for the task of quantizing gravity canonically. Since one of the major motivations to arrange for this meeting was that it should serve as a beginner's introduction to canonical quantum gravity, we regard it as important to demonstrate the usefulness of the formalism by means of applying it to simplified models of quantum gravity, here formulated in terms of Ashtekar's new variables. From the various, completely solvable, models that have been discussed in the literature we choose those that we consider as most suitable for our pedagogical reasons, namely 2+1 gravity and the spherically symmetric model. The former model arises from a dimensional, the latter from a Killing reduction of full 3+1 gravity. While 2+1 gravity is usually treated in terms of closed topologies without boundary of the initial data hypersurface, the toplogy for the spherically symmetric system is chosen to be asymptotically flat. Finally, 2+1 gravity is more suitably quantized using the loop representation while spherically symmetric gravity is easier to quantize via the self-dual representation. Accordingly, both types of reductions, both types of topologies and both types of representations that are mainly employed in the literature in the context of the new variables come into practice. What makes the discussion especially clear is the fact that for both models the reduced phase space turns out to be finitely dimensional.

  18. Evaluation of the Parameters of Radioactive Contamination of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panasyuk M.I.; Skorbun A.D.; Klyuchnikov O.O.

    2002-02-26

    After Chornobyl NPP (ChNPP) accident the territory near destroyed Unit 4 (that now with the special confinement has the name the ''Shelter'' object) is contaminated of fuel fallouts. During liquidation of the accident consequences this territory was covered with pure earth, concrete, etc. As a result a contaminated anthropogenic layer of the soil on the depth up to 10 m was formed. Now the problem of contamination estimation and the soils management arose. For this tasks a gamma logging method was modified conformably to ChNPP conditions. The methods for necessary coefficients receiving and log treatment have been suggested.

  19. Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECH EUV Micro-Exposure Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuest, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    min) c Si F N • Carbon contamination layer - 1 8 nm thick.large part of C contamination layer • S i l i c o n present

  20. Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam, Ohio 43606. 182 #12;Contaminant Stratigraphy of the

  1. Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischhauer, H.L.

    1985-10-01

    Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

  2. Transuranic Contamination in Sediment and Groundwater at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-08-20

    A review of transuranic radionuclide contamination in sediments and groundwater at the DOE’s Hanford Site was conducted. The review focused primarily on plutonium-239/240 and americium-241; however, other transuranic nuclides were discussed as well, including neptunium-237, plutonium-238, and plutonium-241. The scope of the review included liquid process wastes intentionally disposed to constructed waste disposal facilities such as trenches and cribs, burial grounds, and unplanned releases to the ground surface. The review did not include liquid wastes disposed to tanks or solid wastes disposed to burial grounds. It is estimated that over 11,800 Ci of plutonium-239, 28,700 Ci of americium-241, and 55 Ci of neptunium-237 have been disposed as liquid waste to the near surface environment at the Hanford Site. Despite the very large quantities of transuranic contaminants disposed to the vadose zone at Hanford, only minuscule amounts have entered the groundwater. Currently, no wells onsite exceed the DOE derived concentration guide for plutonium-239/240 (30 pCi/L) or any other transuranic contaminant in filtered samples. The DOE derived concentration guide was exceeded by a small fraction in unfiltered samples from one well (299-E28-23) in recent years (35.4 and 40.4 pCi/L in FY 2006). The primary reason that disposal of these large quantities of transuranic radionuclides directly to the vadose zone at the Hanford Site has not resulted in widespread groundwater contamination is that under the typical oxidizing and neutral to slightly alkaline pH conditions of the Hanford vadose zone, transuranic radionuclides (plutonium and americium in particular) have a very low solubility and high affinity for surface adsorption to mineral surfaces common within the Hanford vadose zone. Other important factors are the fact that the vadose zone is typically very thick (hundreds of feet) and the net infiltration rate is very low due to the desert climate. In some cases where transuranic radionuclides have been co-disposed with acidic liquid waste, transport through the vadose zone for considerable distances has occurred. For example, at the 216-Z-9 Crib, plutonium-239 and americium-241 have moved to depths in excess of 36 m (118 ft) bgs. Acidic conditions increase the solubility of these contaminants and reduce adsorption to mineral surfaces. Subsequent neutralization of the acidity by naturally occurring calcite in the vadose zone (particularly in the Cold Creek unit) appears to have effectively stopped further migration. The vast majority of transuranic contaminants disposed to the vadose zone on the Hanford Site (10,200 Ci [86%] of plutonium-239; 27,900 Ci [97%] of americium-241; and 41.8 Ci [78%] of neptunium-237) were disposed in sites within the PFP Closure Zone. This closure zone is located within the 200 West Area (see Figures 1.1 and 3.1). Other closure zones with notably high quantities of transuranic contaminant disposal include the T Farm Zone with 408 Ci (3.5%) plutonium-239, the PUREX Zone with 330 Ci (2.8%) plutonium-239, 200-W Ponds Zone with 324 Ci (2.8%) plutonium-239, B Farm Zone with 183 Ci (1.6%) plutonium-239, and the REDOX Zone with 164 Ci (1.4%) plutonium 239. Characterization studies for most of the sites reviewed in the document are generally limited. The most prevalent characterization methods used were geophysical logging methods. Characterization of a number of sites included laboratory analysis of borehole sediment samples specifically for radionuclides and other contaminants, and geologic and hydrologic properties. In some instances, more detailed research level studies were conducted. Results of these studies were summarized in the document.

  3. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

  4. Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malla, Deepak Babu

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of trichloroethylene (TCE), chromium (VI), and 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by zero valent iron and palladized iron under anaerobic conditions was investigated. Reduction experiments of the contaminants were carried out individually...

  5. Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Colin John

    2012-06-25

    Land contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread and global environmental pollution issue from recovery and refining of crude oil and the ubiquitous use of hydrocarbons in industrial processes and applications. ...

  6. Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yu

    2013-07-01

    The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

  7. X-ray Detector System Helps Evaluate Facility Contamination ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is pinpointing the exact location of contamination in facilities that DOE is dismantling," says Joe Gray, co-developer of the K-edge heavy metal detector. "But quickly...

  8. USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. William D. Bostick

    2003-05-01

    Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.

  9. Microbial controls on contaminant metal transport in porous media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapetas, Leon

    2011-11-24

    Metal contamination in groundwater aquifers poses risks to human health as well as other life forms. Previous laboratory experiments have demonstrated that bacteria found in geologic settings like aquifers are likely to ...

  10. Workers Successfully Excavate Mother Lode of Chromium Contamination...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hanford (WCH) have removed what is believed to be the primary source of chromium contamination to the Columbia River near Hanford's D Reactor after workers excavated 2.2 million...

  11. Mechanisms of metal release from contaminated coastal sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnejais, Linda H

    2005-01-01

    The fate of trace metals in contaminated coastal sediments is poorly understood, yet critical for effective coastal management. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and quantify the mechanisms leading to the release ...

  12. Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    73 Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants 8.1. Catchment the Water Column...............................................79 8.3 Water Column to Bottom Sediment Transfer......................................80 #12;Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records... 74 8

  13. Radon induced surface contaminations in low background experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattavina, L. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)] [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)

    2013-08-08

    In neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches, one of the main issues is to increase the experimental sensitivity through careful material selection and production, minimizing the background contributions. In order to achieve the required, extremely low, counting rates, very stringent requirements must be fulfilled in terms of bulk material radiopurity. As the experimental sensitivity increases, the bulk impurities in the detector components decrease, and surface contaminations start to play an increasingly significant role In fully active detectors, like cryogenic particle detectors, surface contaminations are a critical issue (as shown by the CUORICINO experiment). {sup 222}Rn is by far the most intense source of airborne radioactivity, and if a radio-pure material is exposed to environment where the Radon concentration is not minimized, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po contaminations can occur. The mechanisms and the dynamics of Radon-induced surface contaminations are reviewed, and specific solutions to prevent and to reject the induced background are presented.

  14. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

    1980-07-01

    This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies.

  15. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous and sediment environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Marc Allyn

    1994-01-01

    Six bioremediation methods were tested in laboratory microcosms using field soil and water samples from within the fire-wall area of a petroleum storage tank. This soil had been intermittently contaminated with Bunker C fuel oil and other petroleum...

  16. Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in SanCA 94025 Abstract The hydraulic gold-mining process usedsediment created by hydraulic gold mining in the Sierra

  17. Dose assessment for radioactive contamination of a child 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczik, Jeffrey Aaron

    2009-05-15

    Dose assessments produced using the computer code MCNP are important to simulate events that are difficult to recreate experimentally. An emergency scenario involving whole-body skin contamination is one example of such an event. For these scenarios...

  18. Evaluation of Automated Extraction of Organochlorine Contaminants from Freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    in a typical LLE extraction. A considerable body of information is available which evaluates disk and cartridge of organic contaminants dissolved in distilled water are comparable with either SPE disk or cartridge

  19. Hydrogeologic investigation of petrochemical contamination at a bulk storage facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryar, Dennis Gene

    1997-01-01

    of contaminants released in the vicinity of the Chevron property. Transient flow modeling tests, designed to investigate the effects of seasonal recharge from a nearby irrigation ditch, the San Jose Lateral, were conducted with various recharge rates for the ditch...

  20. Salmonella contamination during production of domestic and imported canaloupe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uribe, Imelda Mercado

    2002-01-01

    In this study, 8 cantaloupe farms and packing sheds from the United States (U.S.) and Mexico were sampled to evaluate cantaloupe contamination with Salmonella and Escherichia coli during production and processing. Samples collected from external...

  1. Use of modile enclosures for weather protection & contamination containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOHO, T.

    2001-07-18

    This document describes two metal-frame enclosures used during low-level waste retrieval in France for weather protection and contamination containment. Technical description and LL are provided to serve as the basis for decision to use similar enclosures

  2. Solidification/stabilization of simulated uranium and nickel contaminated sludges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramabhadran, Sanjay

    1996-01-01

    Research missions in nuclear energy conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy facilities have generated large volumes of mixed wastes with hazardous and radioactive components. Uranium and nickel are the primary contaminants of concern...

  3. Rapid and Robust Detection Methods for Poison and Microbial Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Peter J.

    Real-time on-site monitoring of analytes is currently in high demand for food contamination, water, medicines, and ingestible household products that were never tested appropriately. Here we introduce chemical methods for ...

  4. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  5. Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

    1991-01-01

    -CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic... contaminants from aqueous streams by pervaporation membrane systems is a viable and economical treatment for many waste streams. Specific opportunities for the technology are identified in this paper. La~oratory and pilot system data are used to develop...

  6. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Mullen, C.K.; Scott, D.W.; Feldman, E.M.; Meyer, L.C.

    1993-04-20

    A system is described to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  7. The recognition of toxic contaminants in sea water by bioassay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duke, Thomas Wade

    1960-01-01

    THE RECOGNITION OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN SEA WATER BY BIOASSAY A Thesis By THOMAS WADE DUKE Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1960 Major Subject: Biological Oceanography THE RECOGNITION OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN SEA li'ATER BY BIOASSAY A Thesis THOMAS O'ADE DUKE Approved as to style and content by: ( airman o emmy ee wi, ( ea of Depar me...

  8. A statistical analysis of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M.A.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1983-05-18

    This study determined the frequency statistics of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities. These statistics are utilized in probability calculations for contamination risks, and are part of an effort to provide reliable information for use in safety studies. Data for this analysis were obtained from the 200 Area and the Tritium Area Fault Tree Data Banks and were analyzed with the aid of the STATPAC computer code.

  9. Functional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the emerging water contaminants: 1,4-dioxane and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sales, Christopher Michael

    2012-01-01

    from affected water supplies is bioremediation. Althoughthan most water contaminants targeted for bioremediation.traditional water contaminants targeted for bioremediation.

  10. Screening-level approach for estimating contaminant export from tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velleux, M. [Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison, WI (United States); Gailani, J. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Endicott, D. [EPA Large Lakes Research Station, Grosse Ile, MI (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The in-place pollutant export model (IPX) is a screening-level model for estimating contaminant export from tributaries with contaminated sediments to receiving waterbodies. IPX is a modified version of the USEPA`s WASP4 modeling framework. IPX synthesizes sediment transport processes for sediment aging, decreased sediment resuspendability with increasing age, and resuspension of freshly deposited sediments as a function of water velocity, into an expanded WASP4 contaminant transport and fate chassis while retaining the computational flexibility of the original framework. These process descriptions are needed to accurately simulate contaminant transport and substantially improve the framework for application to tributary systems subject to significant deposition and resuspension events. The potential for applying IPX is broad; water quality impairments attributable to contaminated sediments are widespread due to discharges from industry, agriculture, and mining and ore processing. IPX has been successfully applied to the upper and lower Fox River in Wisconsin, and the Buffalo and Oswego Rivers in New York, all impaired by contaminated sediments.

  11. Mechanical properties and tribological behavior of contaminate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport) | SciTechelement method inBook:Connect

  12. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the manufacturer . Replaced with energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) signs. Project reduced risk of tritium

  13. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    world experience, mobility management strategies appear to have the po­ tential to reduce energy and CO2 emissions

  14. Uraniferous Phosphates: Resource, Security Risk, or Contaminant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMone, D.V.; Goodell, Ph.C.; Gibbs, S.G.; Winston, J.W.

    2008-07-01

    The escalation of the price of uranium (U) yellow cake (summer high = $130/0.454 kg (lb) has called into question the continuing availability of sufficient stockpiles and ores to process. As was developed during the years following World War II, the establishment and maintenance of a strategic inventory is a reasonable consideration for today. Therefore, it becomes critical to look at potential secondary resources beyond the classical ore suites now being utilized. The most economically viable future secondary source seems to be the byproducts of the beneficiation of phosphoric acids derived from phosphate ores. Phosphorous (P) is an essential nutrient for plants; its deficiency can result in highly restrictive limitations in crop productivity. Acidic soils in tropical and subtropical regions of the world are often P deficient with high P-sorption (fixation) capacities. To correct this deficiency, efficient water-soluble P fertilizers are required. The use of raw phosphate rocks not only adds phosphate but also its contained contaminants, including uranium to the treated land. Another immediate difficulty is phosphogypsum, the standard byproduct of simple extraction. It, for practical purposes, has been selectively classified as TENORM by regulators. The imposition of these standards presents major current and future disposal and re-utilization problems. Therefore, establishing an economically viable system that allows for uranium byproduct extraction from phosphoric acids is desirable. Such a system would be dependent on yellow cake base price stability, reserve estimates, political conditions, nation-state commitment, and dependence on nuclear energy. The accumulation of yellow cake from the additional extraction process provides a valuable commodity and allows the end acid to be a more environmentally acceptable product. The phosphogypsum already accumulated, as well as that which is in process, will not make a viable component for a radiation disposal devise (RDD). Concern for weapon proliferation by rogue nation states from the byproduct production of yellowcake is an unlikely scenario. To extract the fissile U-235 (0.07%) isotope from the yellowcake (99.3%) requires the erection of a costly major gaseous diffusion or a cascading centrifuge facility. Such a facility would be extremely difficult to mask. Therefore, from a diminished security risk and positive economic and environmental viewpoints, the utilization of a phosphoric acid beneficiation process extracting uranium is desirable. (authors)

  15. Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listedNuclear1 DOEUmatillaContamination

  16. Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery James-plume pixels are inadvertently included, then that background characterization will be contaminated. In broad in the scene are off- plume, so some contamination is inevitable. In general, the contaminated background

  17. Slow changes in performance consistent with expectations for increasing radiation damage and contamination deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    and contamination deposition · Performance changes do not substantially degrade instrument capabilities · Quiescent damage, molecular contamination and aging in general. Here we present highlights from the instrument team). " Molecular Contamination! · Hydrocarbon contaminant is accumulating on the ACIS filter · Strong absorption

  18. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerial Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination...

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination...

  1. Study of Pyrex and quartz insulators contamination effect on the X-ray intensity in a 4-kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M. Sharifi, R.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-12-15

    The variation of the X-ray intensity has been investigated with the Pyrex and quartz insulators surface contamination in a 4-kJ plasma focus device with argon gas at 11.5-kV charging voltage. Elemental analysis (EDAX) showed that the Cu evaporated from the electrode material and was deposited on the sleeve surface improves the breakdown conditions. A small level of sleeve contamination by copper is found to be essential for good focusing action and high HXR intensity. The SEM imaging showed the grain-type structure of Cu formed on the surface and it changed the surface property. Resistance measurements of original and coated Pyrex surface proved that the copper deposition on the sleeve surface will reduce its resistance as compared to the almost infinitely large resistance of the uncontaminated sleeve. As the contamination is surpassed to some critical level, the HXR intensity from the device is deteriorated.

  2. Live wires: direct extracellular electron exchange for bioenergy and the bioremediation of energy-related contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, DR

    2011-12-01

    Microorganisms that can form direct electrical connections with insoluble minerals, electrodes, or other microorganisms can play an important role in some traditional as well as novel bioenergy strategies and can be helpful in the remediation of environmental contamination resulting from the use of more traditional energy sources. The surprising discovery that microorganisms in the genus Geobacter are capable of forming highly conductive networks of filaments that transfer electrons along their length with organic metallic-like conductivity, rather than traditional molecule to molecule electron exchange, provides an explanation for the ability of Geobacter species to grow in subsurface environments with insoluble Fe(III) oxides as the electron acceptor, and effectively remediate groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbon fuels or uranium and similar contaminants associated with the mining and processing of nuclear fuel. A similar organic metallic-like conductivity may be an important mechanism for microorganisms to exchange electrons in syntrophic associations, such as those responsible for the conversion of organic wastes to methane in anaerobic digesters, a proven bioenergy technology. Biofilms with conductivities rivaling those of synthetic polymers help Geobacter species generate the high current densities in microbial fuel cells producing electric current from organic compounds. Electron transfer in the reverse direction, i.e. from electrodes to microbes, is the basis for microbial electrosynthesis, in which microorganisms reduce carbon dioxide to fuels and other useful organic compounds with solar energy in a form of artificial photosynthesis that is more efficient and avoids many of the environmental sustainability concerns associated with biomass-based bioenergy strategies. The ability of Geobacter species to produce highly conductive electronic networks that function in water opens new possibilities in the emerging field of bioelectronics.

  3. Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Udell, Kent S. (Berkeley, CA); Bruton, Carol J. (Livermore, CA); Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

  4. Ecotoxicity literature review of selected Hanford Site contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    Available information on the toxicity, food chain transport, and bioconcentration of several Hanford Site contaminants were reviewed. The contaminants included cesium-137, cobalt-60, europium, nitrate, plutonium, strontium-90, technetium, tritium, uranium, and chromium (III and VI). Toxicity and mobility in both aquatic and terrestrial systems were considered. For aquatic systems, considerable information was available on the chemical and/or radiological toxicity of most of the contaminants in invertebrate animals and fish. Little information was available on aquatic macrophyte response to the contaminants. Terrestrial animals such as waterfowl and amphibians that have high exposure potential in aquatic systems were also largely unrepresented in the toxicity literature. The preponderance of toxicity data for terrestrial biota was for laboratory mammals. Bioconcentration factors and transfer coefficients were obtained for primary producers and consumers in representative aquatic and terrestrial systems; however, little data were available for upper trophic level transfer, particularly for terrestrial predators. Food chain transport and toxicity information for the contaminants were generally lacking for desert or sage brush-steppe organisms, particularly plants and reptiles

  5. Atmosphere contamination following repainting of a human hyperbaric chamber complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Morris, J.W.; Caldwell, J.M.; Balk, D.M.; Flynn, E.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The Naval Medical Research Institute currently conducts hyperbaric research in a Man-Rated Chamber Complex (MRCC) originally installed in 1977. Significant engineering alterations to the MRCC and rusting of some of its interior sections necessitated repainting, which was completed in 1988. Great care was taken in selecting an appropriate paint (polyamide epoxy) and in ensuring correct application and curing procedures. Only very low levels of hydrocarbons were found in the MRCC atmosphere before initial pressurization after painting and curing. After pressurization, however, significant chemical contamination was found. The primary contaminants were aromatic hydrocarbons: xylenes (which were a major component of both the primer and topcoat paint) and ethyl benzene. The role that pressure played in stimulating off-gassing from the paint is not clear; the off-gassing rate was observed to be similar over a large range in chamber pressures from 1.6 to 31.0 atm abs. Scrubbing the chamber atmosphere with the chemical absorbent Purafil was effective in removing the contaminants. Contamination has been observed to slowly decline with chamber use and is expected to continue to improve with time. However, this contamination experience emphasizes the need for a high precision gas analysis program at any diving facility to ensure the safety of the breathing gas and chamber atmosphere.

  6. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

  7. Use of Disinfectants and Cleaners to Reduce Bacteria on Poultry Transportation Coops with a Compressed Air Foam System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa-Garza, Carolee A.

    2013-05-24

    company?s Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) because a large amount of this bacteria be an indicator of improper sanitation. Cleaning and disinfection programs for this microorganism are being set by USDA and are being improved upon... Salmonella and aerobic bacteria, which could reduce contamination of carcasses. A recent literature search suggests that there are few procedures on how to clean and sanitize transport coops, this may be because it is currently not a requirement...

  8. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

  9. Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

  10. Ultrasonic processor reduces drill-cuttings size and eliminates subsea mounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaddy, D.E.

    1997-10-06

    Drill cuttings size reduction using ultrasonics eliminated a subsea clean-up and significantly reduced the environmental impact in a North Sea drilling project. Reduction in cuttings size allows for a wider areal dispersion when released into the ocean because they are held in suspension longer than larger sizes. Thus, ocean currents carry the smaller cuttings farther away from the well template, leaving a much wider footprint than larger cuttings sizes. This eliminates the pile-up of cuttings that otherwise would contaminate and harm the marine habitat.

  11. Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2005-01-01

    below the header pressure have the added advantage of reducing the air consumption of equipment, as well as reducing the leak rate. Turn Off the Air to Idle Equipment In most plants, when production equipment operators shut off their equipment... of the reason why plant personnel often find leak repair unproductive. The other reason relates to the compressor controls. If the plant had several lubricated rotary screw compressors operating in modulation, repairing 2,000 cfm in leaks may only reduce...

  12. An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

  13. Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 * January 2006 Industrial Technologies Program Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces Fuel-fired furnaces discharge combustion products through a stack or a chimney. Hot furnace...

  14. Generalized Reduced Order Modeling of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gariffo, James Michael

    2013-01-01

    Aeroelasticity, Dover, 1996. [7] Dowell, E. , Crawley, E. ,Engineering, 2010. [13] Dowell, E. , “Some Recent AdvancesFL, 2010. [14] Attar, P. and Dowell, E. , “A Reduced Order

  15. Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2005-12-27

    Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

  16. Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water Treatment Citation Details In-Document Search...

  17. Evaluation of Recent Trailer Contamination and Supersack Integrity Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, S.

    2012-09-17

    During the period from fiscal year (FY) 2009 to FY 2011, there were a total of 21 incidents involving radioactively contaminated shipment trailers and 9 contaminated waste packages received at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). During this time period, the EnergySolutions (ES) Clive, Utah, disposal facility had a total of 18 similar incidents involving trailer and package contamination issues. As a result of the increased occurrence of such incidents, DOE Environmental Management Headquarters (EM/HQ) Waste Management organization (EM-30) requested that the Energy Facility Contractors’ Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) conduct a detailed review of these incidents and report back to EM-30 regarding the results of this review, including providing any recommendations formulated as a result of the evaluation of current site practices involving handling and management of radioactive material and waste shipments.

  18. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1996-02-13

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  19. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  20. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  1. In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  2. In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  3. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-03

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  4. Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Oak Ridge, TN); Li, Rongfu (Zhejiang, CH)

    2002-01-01

    Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

  5. Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Morris, M.I.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D&D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and it daughters), and {sup 60}Co, followed closely by {sup 90}Sr and tritium, which account for {minus}30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope.

  6. Emergency department management of patients internally contaminated with radioactive material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazzi, Ziad; Buzzell, Jennifer; Bertelli, Luiz; Christensen, Doran

    2014-11-15

    After a radiation emergency that involves the dispersal of radioactive material, patients can become externally and internally contaminated with one or more radionuclides. Internal contamination can lead to the delivery of harmful ionizing radiation doses to various organs and tissues or the whole body. The clinical consequences can range from acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to the long term development of cancer. Estimating the amount of radioactive material absorbed into the body can guide the management of patients. Treatment includes, in addition to supportive care and long term monitoring, certain medical countermeasures like Prussian blue, Calcium DTPA and Zinc DTPA.

  7. Analysis of Zinc 65 Contamination after Vacuum Thermal Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, Paul S.; Tosten, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive contamination with a gamma energy emission consistent with {sup 65}Zn was detected in a glovebox following a vacuum thermal process. The contaminated components were removed from the glovebox and subjected to examination. Selected analytical techniques were used to determine the nature of the precursor material, i.e., oxide or metallic, the relative transferability of the deposit and its nature. The deposit was determined to be borne from natural zinc and was further determined to be deposited as a metallic material from vapor.

  8. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  9. Apparatus for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Columbus, OH)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil in a manner adapted to decompose the organic compounds; one embodiment of the apparatus comprises a means to supply ozone as a gas-ozone mixture, a stability means to treat ozone obtained from the supply and distribution means to apply the stabilized gas-ozone to soil. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  10. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  11. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  12. THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMMISSIONS FROM 21 INDUSTRIES BY JONATHAN FISHER CSERGE WORKING PAPER WM 97-03 #12;THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMISSIONS FROM 21 INDUSTRIES by Jonathan Fisher ERM Economics 8 and Industry to estimate the costs of various levels of controls on emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds

  13. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turick, C.E.; Apel, W.W.

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed. 10 figs.

  14. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turick, Charles E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Apel, William W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed.

  15. Mercury Contamination in Pelagic Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuklyte, Ligita

    2012-10-19

    accumulates from small benthic invertebrates to large pelagic fish, and therefore high end consumers and terminal predators have elevated Hg concentrations. The main pathway of MeHg exposure in humans is by consumption of contaminated fish. In this study total...

  16. REVIEW OF INFORMATION ON THE OCCURRENCE OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and loaded into the ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS). The study compiled available data from#12;REVIEW OF INFORMATION ON THE OCCURRENCE OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS AND CONDITIONS or are in the process of a complete restructuring of their respective data storage systems. As such, much

  17. Transport and Fate of Contaminants in Surface Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    has been prepared jointly by the University of California Agricultural Extension Service) solids. The amount of a contaminant of concern (COC) found at a given location in the aquatic environment originates from within the water body. It includes ungrazed plant components such as cells and tissues

  18. Identification of 300 Area Contaminants of Potential Concern for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.W. Ovink

    2010-04-05

    This report documents the process used to identify source area contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) in support of the 300 Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan. This report also establishes the exclusion criteria applicable for 300 Area use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the COPCs.

  19. Method for in-situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2006-12-12

    Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled. A method of removing carbon contaminants from a substrate surface that is housed within a vacuum chamber is also disclosed. The method employs activated gaseous species that react with the carbon contaminants to form carbon containing gaseous byproducts.

  20. Correcting second-order contamination in low-resolution spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Stanishev

    2007-05-23

    An empirical method for correcting low-resolution astronomical spectra for second-order contamination is presented. The method was developed for correcting spectra obtained with grism #4 of the ALFOSC spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope and the performance is demonstrated on spectra of two nearby bright Type Ia supernovae.

  1. Radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; A. M. Dubovik; S. d'Angelo; E. N. Galashov; B. V. Grinyov; A. Incicchitti; V. V. Kobychev; M. Laubenstein; L. L. Nagornaya; F. Nozzoli; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; O. G. Polischuk; D. Prosperi; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; I. A. Tupitsyna; Ya. V. Vasiliev; Yu. Ya. Vostretsov

    2010-09-05

    The radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators has been measured deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN in Italy with a total exposure 3197 kg x h. Monte Carlo simulation, time-amplitude and pulse-shape analyses of the data have been applied to estimate the radioactive contamination of the ZnWO4 samples. One of the ZnWO4 crystals has also been tested by ultra-low background gamma spectrometry. The radioactive contaminations of the ZnWO4 samples do not exceed 0.002 -- 0.8 mBq/kg (depending on the radionuclide), the total alpha activity is in the range: 0.2 - 2 mBq/kg. Particular radioactivity, beta active 65Zn and alpha active 180W, has been detected. The effect of the re-crystallization on the radiopurity of the ZnWO4 crystal has been studied. The radioactive contamination of samples of the ceramic details of the set-ups used in the crystals growth has been checked by low background gamma spectrometry. A project scheme on further improvement of the radiopurity level of the ZnWO4 crystal scintillators is briefly addressed.

  2. Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year’s goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state.

  3. Making Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water. However, this protection may break down during emergencies caused by natural disastersMaking Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations Monty C. Dozier, such as hurricanes. Water supplies to your home may be shut off or become dangerous to use. You must then know what

  4. Submitted to Risk Management of Contaminated Sediments -International Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Submitted to Risk Management of Contaminated Sediments - International Workshop October 18, 2000/Dredged Material Management for the Port of New York and New Jersey as a Component to Port Development of an overall dredged material management plan, must be environmentally balanced and economically feasible

  5. Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Current models and assessment methods of sediment-water distribution predominantly rely

  6. Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Jeffrey W.

    Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab Jeffrey W. Lynn,a* Ying Chen a neutron scattering measurement is a contribution to the background, especially in inelastic measurements of having N2 in the sample environment system during elastic neutron scattering measurements on a single

  7. Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Z I H that this material may be appropriate for treating a complex mixture of estrogenic pollutants. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water by the MIP was demonstrated using lake water spiked

  8. Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of BTEX-Contaminated Groundwater by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of BTEX-Contaminated Groundwater by Combined Injection of Nitrate. Introduction Remediation by natural attenuation (RNA) is the preferred method (1) for addressing groundwater, at siteswherethenaturalgroundwaterflowisveryslow,intrinsic biodegradation processes can be limited by the rate at which the groundwater supplies

  9. The Approximation of Nuclear Contaminant Transport in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    of a chain of radioactive waste products and to present the results of some typical simulationsThe Approximation of Nuclear Contaminant Transport in Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Chieh;ective and eÆcient numerical method for approximating the solution of equations that govern the transport

  10. LIBRARY PARTITIONING FOR TARGET DETECTION IN JOINT CONTAMINATED SURFACE DETECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    that is present from the given library. For a hypothesis testing problem, there are two types of statistical error in the given library present in the mixtures; Type II error, also known as a false negative, is the errorLIBRARY PARTITIONING FOR TARGET DETECTION IN JOINT CONTAMINATED SURFACE DETECTOR Wei Wang and T

  11. Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-03-12

    historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality ... constructed the hydraulic conductivity field, which was used run in a ..... F reundlich curve-f it in the study of Cu, Cd and P b ads or ption on taiwan s oils, J. Soil.

  12. Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

  13. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Using THELI pipeline in order to reduce Abell 226 multi-band optical images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joveini, R; Roozrokh, A; Taheri, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review THELI (Erben & Schrimer, 2005), an image processing pipeline developed to reduce multi-pointing optical images taken by mosaic CCD cameras. This pipeline works on raw images by removing several instrumental contaminations, implementing photometric calibration and astrometric alignment, and constructing a deep co-added mosaic image complemented by a weight map. We demonstrate the procedure of reducing NGC3923 images from raw data to the final results. We also demonstrate the quality of our data reduction strategy using mag-count and mag-error in mag plots. Emphasis is mainly placed on photometric calibration which is of great interest to us due to our scientific case. Based on the cross-association of the extracted catalogue against a reference catalogue of stellar magnitudes, zero-point calibration is performed. Our data reduction strategy and the method employed for cross-correlating large catalogues is also presented.

  15. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

  16. Dust resuspension as a contaminant source and transport pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loosmore, G.A,; Hunt, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Numerous environmental contaminants sorb to dust particles or exist as particles, including metals, hydrophobic organic compounds, asbestos, pollens, and microbial pathogens. Wind resuspension of dust and other particulate matter provides a dust source for the atmosphere and a contaminant transport pathway. Not only do these materials pose a risk to human health, but also, resuspended dust particles are believed to play a role in global climate change and chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The conditions under which contaminated sites are vulnerable to wind resuspension are not generally known, as the basic physics of the problem are poorly understood. Field data show tremendous variability. Conventional dust flux models assume that dust resuspension occurs only for high winds and then only temporarily, with a transient dust flux occurring only when the bed is first exposed to the high wind. The surface is then assumed to stabilize such that no further dust moves until the surface is disturbed or a higher wind occurs. Recent wind tunnel experiments demonstrate that surfaces yield continuous steady dust fluxes under steady wind conditions well beyond the initial high transient flux, even when no erosion is visible and the velocity is below the predicted threshold velocity for movement. This average steady-state dust flux increases with average wind speed. Ongoing work is investigating the influence of air relative humidity on these processes. Contaminant resuspension models capture trends only and fail to predict sporadic high flux events that may control doses. Successful modeling of contaminant resuspension will depend on development of better dust flux predictions. Risk analyses require better predictive modeling, necessitating a deeper understanding of the underlying phenomena.

  17. Hazen, T. C., A. J. Tien, A. Worsztynowicz, D. J. Altman, K. Ulfig, and T. Manko. 2003. Biopiles for Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Soils: A Polish Case Study. NATO Advanced Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    on The Utilization of Bioremediation to Reduce Soil Contamination: Problems and Solutions. V. Sasek, J. Glaser, and P Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas of Poland demonstrated bioremediation to destroy oil sludges [6]. By applying oil to the soil surface, adding fertilizer (P & N), water

  18. Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced process control application, using DMCplus® (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

  19. Working Together to Reduce Our Environmental Footprint

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ground Floor, & DOE Cafeteria MONDAY APRIL 20 11:00 A.M. - 2:30 P.M. * Environmental Film Series * Forrestal Small Auditorium GJ-015 See two excellent films related to reducing...

  20. Reducing Emissions in Plant Flaring Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, B.

    2011-01-01

    latest technologies and reducing green house gas emissions.1 The company also created a Green Team with the objective of achieving zero injury, zero pollution, and zero accidents for all production facilities. These Green Teams advocated the company's new...

  1. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, A.J.

    1993-11-30

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

  2. On reduced relatives with genitive subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Cornelia (Cornelia Ann), 1972-

    2001-01-01

    What is the place of relatives with genitive subjects in a typology of relative clauses? Are they full or reduced, headed or free relatives? Can they appear pre- and postnominally? Can they be head-internal relatives? Are ...

  3. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    If you are planning to install a small renewable energy system to make your own electricity, such as a solar electric system or small wind turbine, reducing your electricity...

  4. “Friday off”: Reducing Working Hours in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallis, Giorgos

    This article explores the pros and cons for reducing working hours in Europe. To arrive to an informed judgment we review critically the theoretical and empirical literature, mostly from economics, concerning the relation ...

  5. Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Projects Reduce Energy Consumption Eric Niemeyer, Operations Superintendent Drilling Specialties Company A division of Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... of the paper “Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption” by Bruce Murray and Allison Myers ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Conroe, TX Facility ESL...

  6. Reducing mode circulating fluid bed combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Yung-Yi (Katy, TX); Sadhukhan, Pasupati (Katy, TX); Fraley, Lowell D. (Sugarland, TX); Hsiao, Keh-Hsien (Houston, TX)

    1986-01-01

    A method for combustion of sulfur-containing fuel in a circulating fluid bed combustion system wherein the fuel is burned in a primary combustion zone under reducing conditions and sulfur captured as alkaline sulfide. The reducing gas formed is oxidized to combustion gas which is then separated from solids containing alkaline sulfide. The separated solids are then oxidized and recycled to the primary combustion zone.

  7. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  8. From Soil Aggregate to Watershed, from California's Central Valley to the Salton Sea - Agricultural Selenium Contamination across Ecosystems, Scales, and Disciplines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kausch, Matteo Francesco

    2013-01-01

    2003. Distribution of chromium contamination and microbialassessment of worldwide contamination of air, water andKrynitsky. 1987. Selenium contamination of the grasslands, a

  9. Assessment of Dioxin-Like Soil Contamination in Mexico by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Assessment of Dioxin-Like Soil Contamination in Mexico by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay E contaminants found in soil (Lor- ber et al. 1998; Nadal et al. 2002), sediment (Hilscherova et al. 2003), air

  10. Analyzing risk and uncertainty for improving water distribution system security from malevolent water supply contamination events 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jacob Manuel

    2009-05-15

    subject to an intentional water contamination event. A Monte Carlo simulation is conducted including uncertain stochastic diurnal demand patterns, seasonal demand, initial storage tank levels, time of day of contamination initiation, duration...

  11. EHS-RC-CONSURVY rev 9/93 RADIATION/CONTAMINATION SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EHS-RC-CONSURVY rev 9/93 RADIATION/CONTAMINATION SURVEY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: SURVEYOR: ROOM NO & Serial # Work Area mR/hr Waste Facilities mR/hr Storage Areas mR/hr CONTAMINATION SURVEY RESULTS Counting

  12. Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments by providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon

  13. Prediction of flashover voltage of non-ceramic insulators under contaminated conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediction of flashover voltage of non-ceramic insulators under contaminated conditions S Terms -- Polymeric insulators, ceramic insulators, surface resistance, arc constant, reignition constant ceramic insulators (porcelain and glass). There are various types of contaminants that settle

  14. Mercury-Contaminated Sediments Affect Amphipod Feeding Mirco Bundschuh Jochen P. Zubrod Frank Seitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Mercury-Contaminated Sediments Affect Amphipod Feeding Mirco Bundschuh · Jochen P. Zubrod · Frank and contaminated field sediment during the preliminary experi- ment and additionally to Sedimite (a commercial mercury- sequestering agent) amended sediments during the final experiment. The preliminary experiment

  15. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  16. Effects of organic carbon supply rates on mobility of previously bioreduced uranium in a contaminated sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2008-01-01

    contaminated subsurface sediments. Environ. Microbiol. 2002,in previously bioreduced sediment by dissolved oxygen andcontaminated aquifer sediments. Appl Environ Microbiol 2002,

  17. A Lesson Learned on Determination of Radionuclides on Metal Surface Fixed Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEZNARICH, H.K.

    2000-02-01

    A Measurement of fixed surface contamination required to determine classification as low-level or as transuranic waste.

  18. Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

    2009-07-01

    Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

  19. Revisiting Modes of energy generation in sulfate reducing bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachimiak, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    generation in sulfate reducing bacteria 1. Lawrence BerkeleyAbstract Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play an importantin the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio sp." FEMS

  20. Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing This tip sheet discusses how to reduce pumping system costs through optimum pipe...