National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reduce blackout risk

  1. Blackout 2003: The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions Taken in the United States and Canada To Reduce Blackout Risk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A report to the US-Canada Power System Outage Task Force on steps taken in the United States and Canada to reduce blackout risk one year after the August 14, 2003 blackout.

  2. Exploring Complex Systems Aspects of Blackout Risk and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, David E; Carreras, Benjamin A; Lynch, Vickie E; Dobson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Electric power transmission systems are a key infrastructure, and blackouts of these systems have major consequences for the economy and national security. Analyses of blackout data suggest that blackout size distributions have a power law form over much of their range. This result is an indication that blackouts behave as a complex dynamical system. We use a simulation of an upgrading power transmission system to investigate how these complex system dynamics impact the assessment and mitigation of blackout risk. The mitigation of failures in complex systems needs to be approached with care. The mitigation efforts can move the system to a new dynamic equilibrium while remaining near criticality and preserving the power law region. Thus, while the absolute frequency of blackouts of all sizes may be reduced, the underlying forces can still cause the relative frequency of large blackouts to small blackouts to remain the same. Moreover, in some cases, efforts to mitigate small blackouts can even increase the frequency of large blackouts. This result occurs because the large and small blackouts are not mutually independent, but are strongly coupled by the complex dynamics.

  3. D:\0myfiles\Blackout Progress\Blackout-Progress.vp | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D:\0myfiles\Blackout Progress\Blackout-Progress.vp D:\0myfiles\Blackout Progress\Blackout-Progress.vp D:\0myfiles\Blackout Progress\Blackout-Progress.vp (236.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Blackout 2003: The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions Taken in the United States and Canada To Reduce Blackout Risk U.S. - Canada Power System Outage Task Force: Final Report on the Implementation of Task Force Recommendations Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report

  4. Blackout 2003: The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Blackout 2003: The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions Taken in the United States and Canada To Reduce Blackout Risk A report to the US-Canada Power System Outage Task ...

  5. Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Blackout Risk D:0myfilesBlackout ProgressBlackout-Progress.vp U.S. - Canada Power System Outage Task Force: Final Report on the Implementation of Task Force Recommendations

  6. Blackout Final Implementation Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... and Northeast and in Ontario, and why the blackout was not contained; and ii) to recommend measures to reduce the risk of future power outages and the scope of any that do occur. ...

  7. D:\0myfiles\Blackout Progress\Blackout-Progress.vp

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions Taken in the United States and Canada To Reduce Blackout Risk Report to the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy August 13, 2004 The August 14, 2003 Blackout One Year Later: Actions Taken in the United States and Canada To Reduce Blackout Risk Report to the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force August 13, 2004 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments As

  8. Complex systems analysis of series of blackouts: cascading failure, critical points, and self-organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska

    2007-01-01

    We give an overview of a complex systems approach to large blackouts of electric power transmission systems caused by cascading failure. Instead of looking at the details of particular blackouts, we study the statistics and dynamics of series of blackouts with approximate global models. Blackout data from several countries suggest that the frequency of large blackouts is governed by a power law. The power law makes the risk of large blackouts consequential and is consistent with the power system being a complex system designed and operated near a critical point. Power system overall loading or stress relative to operating limits is a key factor affecting the risk of cascading failure. Power system blackout models and abstract models of cascading failure show critical points with power law behavior as load is increased. To explain why the power system is operated near these critical points and inspired by concepts from self-organized criticality, we suggest that power system operating margins evolve slowly to near a critical point and confirm this idea using a power system model. The slow evolution of the power system is driven by a steady increase in electric loading, economic pressures to maximize the use of the grid, and the engineering responses to blackouts that upgrade the system. Mitigation of blackout risk should account for dynamical effects in complex self-organized critical systems. For example, some methods of suppressing small blackouts could ultimately increase the risk of large blackouts.

  9. Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and ...

  10. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock ... More Documents & Publications track 4: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 ...

  11. The Northeast Blackout of 1965

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vassell, G.S.

    1990-10-11

    Twenty-five years ago, on November 9, 1965, the electric utility industry - and the nation - experienced the biggest power failure in history. While major power outages did happen before and after this unique event, none of them came even close to the Great Northeast Blackout of 1965 - not in terms of the size of the area or the number of people affected, not in terms of the trauma inflicted on the society at large, and not in terms of its impact on the electric utility industry. With our institution memory - as a society - being as short as it is, many of the lessons that were learned by the industry, by the regulators, and by the nation at large in the wake of the Northeast Blackout have been, by now, mostly forgotten. The 25th anniversary of this event offers a unique opportunity, therefore, to refresh our institutional memory in this regard and, by doing so, bring to bear our past experience to the problems of today. This article has been written with this objective in mind and from the perspective of an individual who experienced firsthand - as an active electric utility industry participant - the Northeast Blackout itself, its aftermath, and the subsequent evolution of the industry to the present day.

  12. August 2003 Blackout | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation ¬Ľ August 2003 Blackout August 2003 Blackout General Information Final Report on Implementation of Task Force Recommendations (Issued Oct. 3, 2006) and the press release information Report on Competition v. Reliability per Rec. 12 of Aug. 2004 Blackout Investigation Final Report Draft Report on Implementation of the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Recommendations Notice of June 22 Conference For Public Review of Draft Report on Implementation of the U.S. - Canada Power

  13. Are You Prepared for a Blackout? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepared for a Blackout? Are You Prepared for a Blackout? August 24, 2012 - 2:23pm Addthis Earlier this week, Lynn talked about how you could prepare for a blackout. It's always...

  14. Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report, October 3, 2006 Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary ...

  15. New time-line technique for station blackout core-melt analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutzke, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Florida Power Corporation (FPC) has developed a new method for analyzing station blackout (SBO) core-melt accidents. This method, created during the recent probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of Crystal River Unit 3 (CR-3), originated from the need to analyze the interactions among the two-train emergency feedwater (EFW) system, station batteries, and diesel generators (DGs) following a loss of off-site power (LOSP) event. SBO core-melt sequences for CR-3 are unique since the time core-melt commences depends on which DG fails last. The purpose of this paper is to outline the new method of analysis of SBO core-melt accidents at CR-3. The significance of SBO core-melt accidents to total plant risk, along with the efficacy of various methods to reduce SBO risk, are also discussed.

  16. August 2003 Blackout | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reliability per Rec. 12 of Aug. 2004 Blackout Investigation Final Report Draft Report on Implementation of the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Recommendations Notice of ...

  17. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P

    1990-02-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC).

  18. Station blackout transients in the semiscale facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    The test results of station blackout transients conducted in the Semiscale MOD-2B facility are discussed in this report. The Semiscale MOD-2B facility simulates a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant. The experiments were initiated from conditions typical of PWR plant operating conditions (primary pressure of 15.2 MPa (2205 psi) and cold leg fluid temperature of 550 K (530F)). Five station blackout experiments were conducted, Three tests in the Power Loss (PL) Test Series and the two Primary Boil-off (PBO) Tests. The responses of these tests were analyzed and compared. However, only one test response (S-PL-2) is presented and discussed in detail. The S-PL-2 experiment is characterized by examining the responses of the primary and secondary pressures and fluid temperatures, the pressurizer liquid level, the primary fluid distribution, and the core thermal behavior. The mechanisms driving the S-PL-2 responses, the main elements of the station blackout transient, the influences of initial and boundary conditions and other transient that may appear similar to a station blackout are also discussed. Information pertinent to station blackout nuclear safety issues is presented in the report. 13 refs., 44 figs.

  19. Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments and Recommendations | Department of Energy Electric System Working Group Technical Conference - Comments and Recommendations Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference - Comments and Recommendations December 16, 2003 Electric System Working Group Technical Conference, Philadelphia PA - Summary of comments and recommendations relating to the aftermath of the August 2003 blackout. Recommendations (120.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Blackout 2003:

  20. Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old Finance Tools to Scale Up a New Industry Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using ...

  1. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys | Department of Energy Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys

  2. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading May 6, 2015 - 11:29am Addthis ...

  3. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) works with stakeholders to develop a voluntary Framework for reducing cyber risks to critical infrastructure. The Framework aims to be flexible and repeatable, while helping asset owner and operators manage cybersecurity risk.

  4. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a bio-oil intermediate into biofuel, making the conversion process expensive. Battelle's new process substantially reduces the cost and risk of biofuel production and helps make ...

  5. Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference - Comments and Recommendations December 16, 2003 Electric System Working Group Technical Conference, Philadelphia ...

  6. Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcript of the technical conference sponsored by the U.S. Canada task force investigating the August 14, 2003 blackout across Canada and the Northeastern United States. The ...

  7. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  8. Blackout 2003: Summary of Comments from Forum and Email | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Summary of Comments from Forum and Email Blackout 2003: Summary of Comments from Forum and Email This Excel file is a summary of all comments and recommendations received by DOE on the Blackout Report via email and the Blackout Forum as of 1-12-04. Summary of Comments from Forum and Email (170.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes

  9. 10 Years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ten years ago today, large portions of the Midwest and Northeast United States and into Canada went dark. The cascading event, which started shortly after 4:00 PM on August 14, 2003, ended up affecting an estimated 50 million people. For some customers, power was not restored for nearly four days. The Department of Energy and Natural Resources Canada jointly commissioned a task force that examined the underlying causes of the blackout and recommended forty-six actions to enhance the reliability of the North American power system. A number of the recommendations were incorporated into law passed by Congress and enacted in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Infrastructure Security Act of 2007.

  10. A surety engineering framework to reduce cognitive systems risks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P.; Peercy, David Eugene; Caldera, Eva O.; Shaneyfelt, Wendy L.

    2008-12-01

    Cognitive science research investigates the advancement of human cognition and neuroscience capabilities. Addressing risks associated with these advancements can counter potential program failures, legal and ethical issues, constraints to scientific research, and product vulnerabilities. Survey results, focus group discussions, cognitive science experts, and surety researchers concur technical risks exist that could impact cognitive science research in areas such as medicine, privacy, human enhancement, law and policy, military applications, and national security (SAND2006-6895). This SAND report documents a surety engineering framework and a process for identifying cognitive system technical, ethical, legal and societal risks and applying appropriate surety methods to reduce such risks. The framework consists of several models: Specification, Design, Evaluation, Risk, and Maturity. Two detailed case studies are included to illustrate the use of the process and framework. Several Appendices provide detailed information on existing cognitive system architectures; ethical, legal, and societal risk research; surety methods and technologies; and educing information research with a case study vignette. The process and framework provide a model for how cognitive systems research and full-scale product development can apply surety engineering to reduce perceived and actual risks.

  11. Determination of station blackout frequency-duration relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.; Balakrishna, S.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. This generally involves the loss of redundant off-site power sources and the failure of two or more emergency diesel generators (EDGs). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed requiring all commercial reactors to have the capability of coping with a station blackout of a specified duration. The NRC has also proposed 4 or 8 h as acceptable durations, depending on plant susceptibility to the occurrence of station blackout events. Analyses were performed to determine expected station blackout frequencies representative of a majority of domestic nuclear power plants. A methodology based on that developed by the NRC was used. Representative industry data for loss of off-site power (LOOP) events and EDG reliability were used in the analyses.

  12. Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigation Team | Department of Energy Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System Investigation Team Blackout 2003: Transcript of Technical Conference with the Electric System Investigation Team Electric System Investigation Team: 8 Reliability Recommendation consultation Transcript of the technical conference sponsored by the U.S. Canada task force investigating the August 14, 2003 blackout across Canada and the Northeastern United States. The transcript includes reports

  13. Loss of pressurizer water level during station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to both the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed a requirement that all plants be capable of maintaining adequate core cooling during station blackout events lasting a specified duration. The NRC has also suggested acceptable specified durations of four or eight hours, depending on individual plant susceptibility to blackout events. In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the occurrence of a station blackout event results in the functional loss of many plant components, including main feedwater, reactor coolant pumps, the emergency core cooling system, and pressurizer heaters and spray. Nevertheless, PWRs have the capability of removing decay heat for some period of time using steam-driven auxiliary feedwater pumps and the natural-circulation capability of the primary system. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the early response of a PWR to station blackout conditions. In particular, the effect of primary coolant shrinkage and inventory loss on pressurizer level is examined to gain insight into the operational and analytical issues associated with the proposed station blackout coping requirement.

  14. Blackout 2003: U.S.- Canada Task Force Presents Final Report onBlackout of August 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    August 14, 2003, saw the worst blackout in North American history. Today, Spencer Abraham, U.S. Secretary of Energy, and the Honorable R. John Efford, Minister of Natural Resources Canada, released...

  15. Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Task Force has completed a thorough investigation of the causes of the August 14, 2003 blackout and has recommended actions to minimize the likelihood and scope of similar events in the future.

  16. How to Prepare Your Home for a Blackout | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Your Home for a Blackout How to Prepare Your Home for a Blackout August 20, 2012 - 7:19pm Addthis Lynn Meyer Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  17. Study of a Station Blackout Event in the PWR Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching-Hui Wu; Tsu-Jen Lin; Tsu-Mu Kao [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    On March 18, 2001, a PWR nuclear power plant located in the Southern Taiwan occurred a Station Blackout (SBO) event. Monsoon seawater mist caused the instability of offsite power grids. High salt-contained mist caused offsite power supply to the nuclear power plant very unstable, and forced the plant to be shutdown. Around 24 hours later, when both units in the plant were shutdown, several inadequate high cycles of bus transfer between 345 kV and 161 kV startup transformers degraded the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears. Then, in the Train-A switchgear room of Unit 1 occurred a fire explosion, when the degraded switchgear was hot shorted at the in-coming 345 kV breaker. Inadequate configuration arrangement of the offsite power supply to the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears led to loss of offsite power (LOOP) events to both units in the plant. Both emergency diesel generators (EDG) of Unit 1 could not be in service in time, but those of Unit 2 were running well. The SBO event of Unit 1 lasted for about two hours till the fifth EDG (DG-5) was lined-up to the Train-B switchgear. This study investigated the scenario of the SBO event and evaluated a risk profile for the SBO period. Guidelines in the SBO event, suggested by probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) procedures were also reviewed. Many related topics such as the re-configuration of offsite power supply, the addition of isolation breakers of the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears, the betterment of DG-5 lineup design, and enhancement of the reliability of offsite power supply to the PWR plant, etc., will be in further studies. (authors)

  18. Proposed SPAR Modeling Method for Quantifying Time Dependent Station Blackout Cut Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Schroeder

    2010-06-01

    Abstract: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissionís (USNRCís) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and industry risk models take similar approaches to analyzing the risk associated with loss of offsite power and station blackout (LOOP/SBO) events at nuclear reactor plants. In both SPAR models and industry models, core damage risk resulting from a LOOP/SBO event is analyzed using a combination of event trees and fault trees that produce cut sets that are, in turn, quantified to obtain a numerical estimate of the resulting core damage risk. A proposed SPAR method for quantifying the time-dependent cut sets is sometimes referred to as a convolution method. The SPAR method reflects assumptions about the timing of emergency diesel failures, the timing of subsequent attempts at emergency diesel repair, and the timing of core damage that may be different than those often used in industry models. This paper describes the proposed SPAR method.

  19. Use of comprehensive NEPA documents to reduce program risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1994-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates DOE`s Kauai Test Facility (KTF) on the western coast of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. In July 1992, DOE approved a comprehensive Environmental Assessment (EA) covering ongoing and future rocket launches of experimental payloads. The KTF EA fulfilled two basic objectives: Consideration of environmental values early in the planning and decision making process; and public disclosure. These objectives can also be considered to be benefits of preparing comprehensive NEPA documents. However, proponents of an action are not as dedicated to these twin NEPA objectives as they are motivated by NEPA`s ability to reduce program risks. Once the KTF environmental assessment was underway, it was apparent that reducing risks to the program, budget, and schedule was the main incentive for successful completion of the EA. The comprehensive or ``omnibus`` environmental assessment prepared for the KTF is a de facto ``detailed statement,`` and it is also a good example of a ``mitigated FONSI,`` i.e., mitigation measures are essential to render some potential impacts not significant. Because the KTF EA is a broad scope, umbrella-like, site-wide assessment, it ``bounds`` the impacts of continuing and proposed future actions. The successful completion of this document eliminated the need to review, document, and gain approval individually for numerous related actions. Also, because it supported a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) after identifying appropriate mitigation, it also eliminated the need for an environmental impact statement (EIS). This paper discusses seven specific ways in which the KTF EA reduced program risks and supported budget and schedule objectives.

  20. Initial Evidence for Self-Organized Criticality in Electric Power System Blackouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, B.A.; Dobson, I.; Newman, D.E.; Poole, A.B.

    2000-01-04

    We examine correlations in a time series of electric power system blackout sizes using scaled window variance analysis and R/S statistics. The data shows some evidence of long time correlations and has Hurst exponent near 0.7. Large blackouts tend to correlate with further large blackouts after a long time interval. Similar effects are also observed in many other complex systems exhibiting self-organized criticality. We discuss this initial evidence and possible explanations for self-organized criticality in power systems blackouts. Self-organized criticality, if fully confirmed in power systems, would suggest new approaches to understanding and possibly controlling blackouts.

  1. Estimating Failure Propagation in Models of Cascading Blackouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Nkei, Bertrand [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska

    2005-09-01

    We compare and test statistical estimates of failure propagation in data from versions of a probabilistic model of loading-dependent cascading failure and a power systems blackout model of cascading transmission line overloads. The comparisons suggest mechanisms affecting failure propagation and are an initial step towards monitoring failure propagation from practical system data. Approximations to the probabilistic model describe the forms of probability distributions of cascade sizes.

  2. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyber Community C Voluntary Program Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management ... November 3, 2015 National Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month: Improving ...

  3. Comparative Study of Station Blackout Counterpart Tests in APEX and ROSA/AP600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafi, Abd Y.; Reyes, Jose N. Jr.

    2000-05-15

    A comparison is presented between station blackout tests conducted in both the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) facility and in the modified Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA/AP600) Large-Scale Test Facility. The comparison includes the depressurization and liquid-level behavior during secondary-side blowdown, natural circulation, automatic depressurization system operation, and in-containment refueling water storage tank injection. Reasonable agreement between the test results from APEX NRC-2 and ROSA/AP600 AP-BO-01 has been observed with respect to the timing of depressurization and liquid draining rates. This indicates that the reduced height and pressure scaling of APEX preserves the sequence of events relative to the full-height and pressure ROSA/AP600.

  4. Reproducing continuous radio blackout using glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Kai; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Shao, Mingxu [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071 (China)] [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071 (China); Zhang, Hanlu [School of Communication and Information Engineering, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an 710121 (China)] [School of Communication and Information Engineering, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an 710121 (China)

    2013-10-15

    A novel plasma generator is described that offers large-scale, continuous, non-magnetized plasma with a 30-cm-diameter hollow structure, which provides a path for an electromagnetic wave. The plasma is excited by a low-pressure glow discharge, with varying electron densities ranging from 10{sup 9} to 2.5 ◊ 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?3}. An electromagnetic wave propagation experiment reproduced a continuous radio blackout in UHF-, L-, and S-bands. The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The proposed method is suitable in simulating a plasma sheath, and in researching communications, navigation, electromagnetic mitigations, and antenna compensation in plasma sheaths.

  5. Thermohydraulic and Safety Analysis for CARR Under Station Blackout Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenxi Tian; Suizheng Qiu; Guanghui Su; Dounan Jia [Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road, Xi'an 710049 (China); Xingmin Liu - China Institute of Atomic Energy

    2006-07-01

    A thermohydraulic and safety analysis code (TSACC) has been developed using Fortran 90 language to evaluate the transient thermohydraulic behaviors and safety characteristics of the China Advanced Research Reactor(CARR) under Station Blackout Accident(SBA). For the development of TSACC, a series of corresponding mathematical and physical models were considered. Point reactor neutron kinetics model was adopted for solving reactor power. All possible flow and heat transfer conditions under station blackout accident were considered and the optional models were supplied. The usual Finite Difference Method (FDM) was abandoned and a new model was adopted to evaluate the temperature field of core plate type fuel element. A new simple and convenient equation was proposed for the resolution of the transient behaviors of the main pump instead of the complicated four-quadrant model. Gear method and Adams method were adopted alternately for a better solution to the stiff differential equations describing the dynamic behaviors of the CARR. The computational result of TSACC showed the enough safety margin of CARR under SBA. For the purpose of Verification and Validation (V and V), the simulated results of TSACC were compared with those of Relap5/Mdo3. The V and V result indicated a good agreement between the results by the two codes. Because of the adoption of modular programming techniques, this analysis code is expected to be applied to other reactors by easily modifying the corresponding function modules. (authors)

  6. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science - 9279

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Vienna, John D.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Hobbs, David; Wilmarth, B.; Mcilwain, Michael; Subramanian, K.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.

    2009-03-01

    In this document, we propose that scientific investments for the disposal of nuclear and hazardous wastes should not be focused solely on what may be viewed as current Department of Energy needs, but also upon longer-term investments in specific areas of science that underpin technologies presently in use. In the latter regard, we propose four science theme areas: 1) the structure and dynamics of materials and interfaces, 2) coupled chemical and physical processes, 3) complex solution phase phenomena, and 4) chemical recognition phenomena. The proposed scientific focus for each of these theme areas and the scientific opportunities are identified, along with links to major risks within the initiative areas identified in EMís Engineering and Technology Roadmap.

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout caused by external flooding using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

  8. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Vienna, John D.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Hobbs, David; Wilmarth, B.; Mcilwain, Michael; Subramanian, K.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.

    2009-08-28

    intent of this paper is to foster a dialogue on how basic scientific research can assist DOE in executing its cleanup and environmental management mission. In this paper, we propose that such scientific investments not be focused solely on what may be viewed as current DOE needs, but also be based upon longer-term investments in specific areas of science that underpin technologies presently in use. In the latter regard, we propose four science theme areas: 1) the structure and dynamics of materials and interfaces, 2) coupled chemical and physical processes, 3) complex solution phase phenomena, and 4) chemical recognition phenomena. The proposed scientific focus for each of these theme areas and the scientific opportunities are identified, along with links to major risks within the initiative areas identified in EMís Engineering and Technology Roadmap.

  9. Station Blackout: A case study in the interaction of mechanistic and probabilistic safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli; Cristian Rabiti

    2013-11-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margins is important to improved decision making about nuclear power plant design, operation, and plant life extension. As research and development (R&D) in the light-water reactor (LWR) Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a ‚Äústation blackout‚ÄĚ wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario.

  10. Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wister, CA | Department of Energy Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. The primary objective of this project is to conduct a 3C 3D (converted shear wave) seismic survey to reduce exploration risk by characterizing fault and fracture geometrics at Wister, CA.The intent of the proposed program is to

  11. Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finance Tools to Scale Up a New Industry | Department of Energy Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old Finance Tools to Scale Up a New Industry Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old Finance Tools to Scale Up a New Industry Provides a overview of finance tools available to scale-up to clean energy. Author: Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative (CE+BFI) Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy (3.97 MB) More Documents &

  12. Potential failure of steam generator tubes following a station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, L.W.; Palmrose, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is considering changes to pressurized water reactor (PWR) requirements relating to steam generator tube plugging and repair criteria, including leakage monitoring. The proposed changes are known as the alternate tube plugging criteria (APC) and are intended to permit PWRs to operate with through-wall cracks in steam generator tubes subject to meeting a specified limit on predicted primary to secondary leakage under accident conditions. To assess the consequences of the alternate plugging criteria, analyses were performed for a station blackout sequence in which the reactor core melts while the reactor coolant system (RCS) remains at high pressure. Evaluations were conducted to investigate the potential for tube failure with and without secondary system depressurization. The excessive heat coupled with the high-pressure differentials across the steam generator tubes could result in creep rupture failure of the tubes during a severe accident, which could lead to a radiological release directly to the environment. In order to assess the safety significance of the APC, it is important to identify the level of steam generator tube leakage that can occur without challenging the previous study conclusions that steam generator creep failure will not occur prior to a surge line or hot-leg failure. To assess the effect of leakage on steam generator tube integrity during a core melt sequence with the RCS at high pressure and the secondary side of the steam generators pressurized and depressurized, an analysis was performed for a core melt event resulting from an unmitigated station blackout to identify the total steamenerator and tube leakage flow rates that could induce tube ruptures prior to other RCS boudary faliures that could depressurize the RCS.

  13. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. The primary objective of this project is to combine a suite of high resolution geophysical and geochemical techniques to reduce exploration risk by characterizing hydrothermal alteration, fault geometries and relationships.

  14. OSTIblog Articles in the blackout Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Approximately 50 million people in 8 U.S. states and Canada experienced the worst blackout in North American history. Research has been ongoing at the Department of Energy to ...

  15. BWR station blackout: A RISMC analysis using RAVEN and RELAP5-3D

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelli, D.; Smith, C.; Riley, T.; Nielsen, J.; Alfonsi, A.; Cogliati, J.; Rabiti, C.; Schroeder, J.

    2016-01-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates and improved operations. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions and accident scenarios. This paper presents a case study in order to show the capabilities of the RISMC methodology to assess impact of power uprate of a Boiling Watermore¬†¬Ľ Reactor system during a Station Black-Out accident scenario. We employ a system simulator code, RELAP5-3D, coupled with RAVEN which perform the stochastic analysis. Lastly, our analysis is performed by: 1) sampling values from a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest, 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values and 3) analyzing the outcomes from the set of simulation runs.¬ę¬†less

  16. Analysis of Kuosheng Station Blackout Accident Using MELCOR 1.8.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.-J.; Chien, C.-S.; Wang, T.-C.; Chiang, K.-S

    2000-11-15

    The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a fully integrated, relatively fast-running code that models the progression of severe accidents in commercial light water nuclear power plants (NPPs).A specific station blackout (SBO) accident for Kuosheng (BWR-6) NPP is simulated using the MELCOR 1.8.4 code. The MELCOR input deck for Kuosheng NPP is established based on Kuosheng NPP design data and the MELCOR users' guides. The initial steady-state conditions are generated with a developed self-initialization algorithm. The main severe accident phenomena and the fission product release fractions associated with the SBO accident were simulated. The predicted results are plausible and as expected in light of current understanding of severe accident phenomena. The uncertainty of this analysis is briefly discussed. The important features of the MELCOR 1.8.4 are described. The estimated results provide useful information for the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of Kuosheng NPP. This tool will be applied to the PRA, the severe accident analysis, and the severe accident management study of Kuosheng NPP in the near future.

  17. Analysis of core uncovery time in Kuosheng station blackout transient with MELCOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.J.; Chien, C.S. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lungtan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-02-01

    The MELCOR code, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, is capable of simulating severe accident phenomena of nuclear power plants. Core uncovery time is an important parameter in the probabilistic risk assessment. However, many MELCOR users do not generate the initial conditions in a station blackout (SBO) transient analysis. Thus, achieving reliable core uncovery time is difficult. The core uncovery time for the Kuosheng nuclear power plant during an SBO transient is analyzed. First, full-power steady-state conditions are generated with the application of a developed self-initialization algorithm. Then the response of the SBO transient up to core uncovery is simulated. The effects of key parameters including the initialization process and the reactor feed pump (RFP) coastdown time on the core uncovery time are analyzed. The initialization process is the most important parameter that affects the core uncovery time. Because SBO transient analysis, the correct initial conditions must be generated to achieve a reliable core uncovery time. The core uncovery time is also sensitive to the RFP coastdown time. A correct time constant is required.

  18. BWR station blackout: A RISMC analysis using RAVEN and RELAP5-3D

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelli, D.; Smith, C.; Riley, T.; Nielsen, J.; Alfonsi, A.; Cogliati, J.; Rabiti, C.; Schroeder, J.

    2016-01-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates and improved operations. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions and accident scenarios. This paper presents a case study in order to show the capabilities of the RISMC methodology to assess impact of power uprate of a Boiling Watermore¬†¬Ľ Reactor system during a Station Black-Out accident scenario. We employ a system simulator code, RELAP5-3D, coupled with RAVEN which perform the stochastic analysis. Furthermore, our analysis is performed by: 1) sampling values from a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest, 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values and 3) analyzing the outcomes from the set of simulation runs.¬ę¬†less

  19. BWR station blackout: A RISMC analysis using RAVEN and RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, D.; Smith, C.; Riley, T.; Nielsen, J.; Alfonsi, A.; Cogliati, J.; Rabiti, C.; Schroeder, J.

    2016-01-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates and improved operations. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions and accident scenarios. This paper presents a case study in order to show the capabilities of the RISMC methodology to assess impact of power uprate of a Boiling Water Reactor system during a Station Black-Out accident scenario. We employ a system simulator code, RELAP5-3D, coupled with RAVEN which perform the stochastic analysis. Lastly, our analysis is performed by: 1) sampling values from a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest, 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values and 3) analyzing the outcomes from the set of simulation runs.

  20. EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading | Department of Energy Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading May 12, 2015 - 4:53pm Addthis Battelle-a nonprofit research and development organization that operates many of the national laboratories-reached an Energy Department project milestone to demonstrate at least 1,000 hours of

  1. Planning for the Next Blackout: Optimizing the Use of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glickman, Joan A.; Herrera, Shawn; Kline, Keith F.; Warwick, William M.

    2004-12-01

    Given recent blackouts and concerns of terrorist attacks, some public and private organizations are taking steps to produce their own heating, cooling, and power in the event of future, potentially prolonged, outages. For example, military installations, such as Fort Bragg in North Carolina, and the Marine Task Force Training Command in Twentynine Palms, California, turned to combined heat and power and other distributed energy technologies to reduce costs and simultaneously manage their energy and reliability needs. While these individual efforts can help ensure reliability for these facilities, public policies continue to discourage most individual public and private entities from making such investments. As a result, communities across the country are not adequately prepared to protect human health and ensure safety in the event of a prolonged emergency. Significant cost savings and social benefits can accrue if parties interested in emergency preparedness, energy efficiency, and environmentally preferred technologies, come together to identify and implement win-win solutions. This paper offers recommendations to help federal, state, and local governments, along with utilities, jointly plan and invest in cleaner distributed energy technologies to address growing reliability needs as well as environmental and emergency preparedness concerns.

  2. Reduced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. | Photo courtesy of istockphoto/diane555 Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. | Photo courtesy of istockphoto/diane555 Paige Terlip Paige Terlip Former Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory What are the key facts? Reduce waste and save energy this holiday

  3. POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T. M.; Lipfert, F. W.; Morris, S. C.; Moskowitz, P. D.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no

  4. Data Management Issues Associated with the August 14, 2003 Blackout Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2004-06-10

    The largest blackout in the history of the North American electric power grid occurred on August 14, 2003. An extensive investigation into what happened (and why) began immediately. The joint U.S.-Canada task force led the effort, including support from the electric utility industry and several federal agencies, e.g. the U.S. Department of Energy. The North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) supported the task force, including particularly the electricity working group. The overall blackout investigation team drew expertise from a large number of organizations, assembled into teams to address specific attributes of the blackout. This paper describes the data management issues associated with supporting the blackout investigation, beginning with the immediate response in the days and weeks following the blackout, supporting the interim report [1], to the long-term plans for deriving lessons learned for implementing improvements in the overall process of outage disturbance reporting. The sole focus of this paper is the electricity working group activities at NERC; the security and nuclear working groups are outside the scope of this paper.

  5. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to

  6. Utility perspective on station blackout rule implementation with NUMARC 87-00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maracek, J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of the station blackout rule involved an unusually high level of cooperation between the industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The industry developed an approach to implementation of the rule in the form of the Nuclear Management and Resources Council's (NUMARC's) Guidelines and Technical Bases for NUMARC Initiatives Addressing Station Blackout at Light Water Reactors (NUMARC 87-00). This document was reviewed and accepted by the NRC staff as a means for meeting the requirements of the station blackout rule. Yet difficulties still arose when individual utilities used the NUMARC 87-00 approach to respond to the rule. This presentation examines the development process and subsequent difficulties and identifies potential improvements for development and implementation of new rules in the future.

  7. Applications of the RELAP5 code to the station blackout transients at the Browns Ferry Unit One Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.R.; Wagoner, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    As a part of the charter of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program, station blackout transients have been analyzed using a RELAP5 model of the Browns Ferry Unit 1 Plant. The task was conducted as a partial fulfillment of the needs of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in examining the Unresolved Safety Issue A-44: Station Blackout (1) the station blackout transients were examined (a) to define the equipment needed to maintain a well cooled core, (b) to determine when core uncovery would occur given equipment failure, and (c) to characterize the behavior of the vessel thermal-hydraulics during the station blackout transients (in part as the plant operator would see it). These items are discussed in the paper. Conclusions and observations specific to the station blackout are presented.

  8. OSTIblog Articles in the blackout Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information blackout Topic Keeping the lights on by Kathy Chambers 17 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content 7547 NY_8076404_nightfall.jpg Keeping the lights on Read more about 7547 On August 14, 2003, a software bug at a utility company brought New York City to its knees, and the resulting cascading effect ultimately forced the shutdown of more than 100 power plants (read more). Approximately 50 million people in 8 U.S. states and Canada experienced the worst blackout in

  9. The response of BWR Mark II containments to station blackout severe accident sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, S.R.; Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Tobias, M.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the results of a series of calculations conducted to investigate the response of BWR Mark 2 containments to short-term and long-term station blackout severe accident sequences. The BWR-LTAS, BWRSAR, and MELCOR codes were employed to conduct quantitative accident sequence progression and containment response analyses for several station blackout scenarios. The accident mitigation effectiveness of automatic depressurization system actuation, drywell flooding via containment spray operation, and debris quenching in Mark 2 suppression pools is assessed. 27 refs., 16 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Battelle‚ÄĒa nonprofit research and development organization that operates many of the national laboratories‚ÄĒreached an Energy Department project milestone to demonstrate at least 1,000 hours of bio-oil hydrotreatment on a single catalyst charge. Typically, it takes many catalysts to convert a bio-oil intermediate into biofuel, making the conversion process expensive. Battelle‚Äôs new process substantially reduces the cost and risk of biofuel production and helps make the process more commercially viable.

  11. Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old Finance Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old Finance Tools to Scale Up a New Industry August 2013 Report Prepared for the Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative (CE+BFI) A Joint Project of Clean Energy Group and the Council of Development Finance Agencies Robert G. Sanders Lewis Milford Toby Rittner Clean Energy Group (CEG) CEG is a leading national, nonprofit advocacy organization working on innovative technology, finance, and policy programs in the areas of clean

  12. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    out at the top of the late Miocene, early Mohnian: Bolivina aff hughesi, Rotalia becki, Suggrunda californica, Virgulina grandis, Virgulina ticensis, Bulimina ecuadorana, Denticula lauta and Nonion medio-costatum. Please see Appendix B, Fig. 1, Neogene Zones, p. 91 and Appendix C, chart 5, p. 99 By the use of Stratigraphy, employing both Paleontology and Lithology, we can increase hydrocarbon production, reduce operating costs and risks by the identification of the productive sections, and reduce environmental concerns by drilling less dry holes needlessly.

  13. Recovery sequences for a station blackout accident at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recovery sequences for a low-pressure, short term, station blackout severe accident at the Grand Gulf power plant have been investigated using the computer code MELCOR, version 1.8.3 PN. This paper investigates the effect of reflood timing and mass flow rate on accident recovery.

  14. RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the station blackout experiment conducted at the IIST facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Liu, T.J.; Lee, C.H. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-hydraulic responses in the station blackout experiment conducted at the IIST facility are simulated through the use of the advanced system code RELAP5/MOD3. Typical behaviors occurring in the IIST station blackout transient are characterized by secondary boiloff, primary saturation and pressurization, and subsequent core uncovery and heatup. As the coolant inventory within the steam generator secondary system boils dry, the primary system pressure increases as a result of degradation of the heat removal ability of the steam generator secondary side. This pressurization phenomenon causes the pressurizer safety valve to open and the primary coolant to deplete through the valve, causing the core to eventually become uncovered. The same response can be exactly simulated by the current model. The current calculated results show fairly good agreement with the experimental data, but the timing of the events occurring in the station blackout transient is calculated earlier than the measured value. The overall comparison of key parameters between the calculated results and IIST test data, however, reveals that the current RELAP5/MOD3 model can provide reasonable station blackout modeling for simulating long-term system behavior.

  15. SCDAP severe core-damage studies: BWR ATWS and PWR station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laats, E.T.; Chambers, R.; Driskell, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is addressing a number of accident scenarios that potentially pose a health hazard to the public. Two of the scenarios being analyzed in detail at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are the station blackout at the Bellefonte nuclear plant and the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) at the Browns Ferry-1 plant. The INEL analyses of the station blackout and ATWS have been divided into four parts, which represent the sequence being followed in this study. First, the evaluation of long term irradiation effects prior to the station blackout or ATWS was conducted using the FRAPCON-2 fuel rod behavior code; second, the reactor primary and secondary coolant system behavior is being analyzed with the RELAP5 code; third, the degradation of the core is being analyzed with the SCDAP code; and finally, the containment building response is being analyzed with the CONTEMPT code. This paper addresses only the SCDAP/MODO degraded core analyses for both the station blackout and ATWS scenarios.

  16. Simulating Pelletization Strategies to Reduce the Biomass Supply Risk at America’s Biorefineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Shane Carnohan; Andrew Ford; Allyson Beall

    2014-07-01

    Demand for cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels has been on the rise, due in part to federal targets enacted in 2005 and extended in 2007. The industry faces major challenges in meeting these worthwhile and ambitious targets. The challenges are especially severe in the logistics of timely feedstock delivery to biorefineries. Logistical difficulties arise from seasonal production that forces the biomass to be stored in uncontrolled field-side environments. In this storage format physical difficulties arise; transportation is hindered by the low bulk density of baled biomass and the unprotected material can decay leading to unpredictable losses. Additionally, uncertain yields and contractual difficulties can exacerbate these challenges making biorefineries a high-risk venture. Investors’ risk could limit business entry and prevent America from reaching the targets. This paper explores pelletizer strategies to convert the lignocellulosic biomass into a denser form more suitable for storage. The densification of biomass would reduce supply risks, and the new system would outperform conventional biorefinery supply systems. Pelletizer strategies exhibit somewhat higher costs, but the reduction in risk is well worth the extra cost if America is to grow the advanced biofuels industry in a sustainable manner.

  17. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Convergence of the Uncertainty Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, Nathan E.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Mattie, Patrick D.; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the convergence of MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) probabilistic results of offsite consequences for the uncertainty analysis of the State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The consequence metrics evaluated are individual latent-cancer fatality (LCF) risk and individual early fatality risk. Consequence results are presented as conditional risk (i.e., assuming the accident occurs, risk per event) to individuals of the public as a result of the accident. In order to verify convergence for this uncertainty analysis, as recommended by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission‚Äôs Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, a ‚Äėhigh‚Äô source term from the original population of Monte Carlo runs has been selected to be used for: (1) a study of the distribution of consequence results stemming solely from epistemic uncertainty in the MACCS2 parameters (i.e., separating the effect from the source term uncertainty), and (2) a comparison between Simple Random Sampling (SRS) and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) in order to validate the original results obtained with LHS. Three replicates (each using a different random seed) of size 1,000 each using LHS and another set of three replicates of size 1,000 using SRS are analyzed. The results show that the LCF risk results are well converged with either LHS or SRS sampling. The early fatality risk results are less well converged at radial distances beyond 2 miles, and this is expected due to the sparse data (predominance of ‚Äúzero‚ÄĚ results).

  18. Analyzing simulation-based PRA data through traditional and topological clustering: A BWR station blackout case study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maljovec, D.; Liu, S.; Wang, B.; Mandelli, D.; Bremer, P. -T.; Pascucci, V.; Smith, C.

    2015-07-14

    Here, dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP and MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN and ADAPT). Whereas system simulator codes model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic and operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures and parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by sampling values of a set of parameters and simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values. For complex systems, a major challenge in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large number of scenarios generated,more¬†¬Ľ where clustering techniques are typically employed to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of two nuclear simulation datasets that are part of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) boiling water reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We provide the domain experts a software tool that encodes traditional and topological clustering techniques within an interactive analysis and visualization environment, for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other for enhanced structural understanding of the data.¬ę¬†less

  19. Analyzing simulation-based PRA data through traditional and topological clustering: A BWR station blackout case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maljovec, D.; Liu, S.; Wang, B.; Mandelli, D.; Bremer, P. -T.; Pascucci, V.; Smith, C.

    2015-07-14

    Here, dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP and MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN and ADAPT). Whereas system simulator codes model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic and operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures and parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by sampling values of a set of parameters and simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values. For complex systems, a major challenge in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large number of scenarios generated, where clustering techniques are typically employed to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of two nuclear simulation datasets that are part of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) boiling water reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We provide the domain experts a software tool that encodes traditional and topological clustering techniques within an interactive analysis and visualization environment, for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other for enhanced structural understanding of the data.

  20. STEAM LINE BREAK AND STATION BLACKOUT TRANSIENTS FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANT HEXAGONAL TIGHT LATTICE BWR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHATGI,U.S.; JO,J.; CHUNG,B.D.; TAKAHASHI,H.

    2002-06-09

    Safety analyses of a proliferation resistant, economically competitive, high conversion, boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core which therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum, and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of Light Water Reactors. The tight lattice core has a very narrow flow channels with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular BWR core and, thus, presents a special challenge to core cooling, because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator to fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios. In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core has been placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected with Isolation Condenser System (ICs). The vessel is placed in containment with Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to SBWR; ICs and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump was placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney, since the buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel as the tight lattice configuration resulted in much larger friction in the core than the SBWR. The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 were assessed for narrow channels, and as a result the heat transfer package was modified. The modified RELAP5 was used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight

  1. Steam Line Break and Station Blackout Transients for Proliferation Resistant Hexagonal Tight Lattice BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upendra Rohatgi; Jae Jo; Bub Dong Chung; Hiroshi Takahashi [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Energy Sciences and Technology Department, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Downar, T.J. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47906-1290 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Safety analyses of a proliferation resistant, economically competitive, high conversion, boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core which therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum, and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of Light Water Reactors. A tight lattice BWR core has very narrow flow channels with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular BWR core. The tight lattice core presented a special challenge to core cooling, because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator to fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios. In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core has been placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected with an Isolation Cooling System (ICS). The vessel is placed in a containment with a Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and a Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to the SBWR; the ICS and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump was placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney. The buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel since the tight lattice configuration resulted in much larger friction in the core than the SBWR. A modified RELAP5 Code was used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight pitch lattice core: the Station Blackout and the Main Steam Line Break events. The constitutive

  2. Comparing Simulation Results with Traditional PRA Model on a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhegang Ma; Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    A previous study used RELAP and RAVEN to conduct a boiling water reactor station black-out (SBO) case study in a simulation based environment to show the capabilities of the risk-informed safety margin characterization methodology. This report compares the RELAP/RAVEN simulation results with traditional PRA model results. The RELAP/RAVEN simulation run results were reviewed for their input parameters and output results. The input parameters for each simulation run include various timing information such as diesel generator or offsite power recovery time, Safety Relief Valve stuck open time, High Pressure Core Injection or Reactor Core Isolation Cooling fail to run time, extended core cooling operation time, depressurization delay time, and firewater injection time. The output results include the maximum fuel clad temperature, the outcome, and the simulation end time. A traditional SBO PRA model in this report contains four event trees that are linked together with the transferring feature in SAPHIRE software. Unlike the usual Level 1 PRA quantification process in which only core damage sequences are quantified, this report quantifies all SBO sequences, whether they are core damage sequences or success (i.e., non core damage) sequences, in order to provide a full comparison with the simulation results. Three different approaches were used to solve event tree top events and quantify the SBO sequences: ďWĒ process flag, default process flag without proper adjustment, and default process flag with adjustment to account for the success branch probabilities. Without post-processing, the first two approaches yield incorrect results with a total conditional probability greater than 1.0. The last approach accounts for the success branch probabilities and provides correct conditional sequence probabilities that are to be used for comparison. To better compare the results from the PRA model and the simulation runs, a simplified SBO event tree was developed with only four top

  3. MELCOR calculations for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A postulated, low-pressure, short term station blackout severe accident has been analyzed using the MELCOR code for the Grand Gulf nuclear power plant. Different versions have been used with three different models of the plant. This paper presents results of the effects of different plant models and versions of MELCOR on the calculated results and to present the best-estimating timing of events for this transient.

  4. The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

  5. Reduced Order Model Implementation in the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis L.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J.; Talbot, Paul W.; Rinaldi, Ivan; Maljovec, Dan; Wang, Bei; Pascucci, Valerio; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-09-01

    The RISMC project aims to develop new advanced simulation-based tools to perform Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) for the existing fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These tools numerically model not only the thermo-hydraulic behavior of the reactor primary and secondary systems but also external events temporal evolution and components/system ageing. Thus, this is not only a multi-physics problem but also a multi-scale problem (both spatial, ¬Ķm-mm-m, and temporal, ms-s-minutes-years). As part of the RISMC PRA approach, a large amount of computationally expensive simulation runs are required. An important aspect is that even though computational power is regularly growing, the overall computational cost of a RISMC analysis may be not viable for certain cases. A solution that is being evaluated is the use of reduce order modeling techniques. During the FY2015, we investigated and applied reduced order modeling techniques to decrease the RICM analysis computational cost by decreasing the number of simulations runs to perform and employ surrogate models instead of the actual simulation codes. This report focuses on the use of reduced order modeling techniques that can be applied to any RISMC analysis to generate, analyze and visualize data. In particular, we focus on surrogate models that approximate the simulation results but in a much faster time (¬Ķs instead of hours/days). We apply reduced order and surrogate modeling techniques to several RISMC types of analyses using RAVEN and RELAP-7 and show the advantages that can be gained.

  6. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a publicly available database of energy retrofit measures containing performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 measures. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. The database provides a single, consistent source of current data for DOE and private-sector energy audit and simulation software tools and the retrofit industry. The database will reduce risk for residential retrofit industry stakeholders by providing a central, publicly vetted source of up-to-date information.

  7. Postmortem analysis of power grid blackouts - The role of measurement systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-09-01

    Promptly following any blackout, an investigation is conducted to determine the who, what, where, when, why, and how. For system operators, it is important to quickly grasp the scale and magnitude of the event and rapidly restore service. Then a broader set of stakeholders get involved to assess system performance, determine root causes, compile lessons learned, and develop recommendations. At the heart of the post-mortem investigation is the detailed sequence of events. As accurately as possible, investigators need to know what happened and when. Especially during a cascading failure where events occur rapidly, accurate timing is crucial to understanding how the event unfolded so that the root causes can be determined. The sequence of events is based on vast amounts of data collected from multiple points in the system from a myriad of data collection instruments, some devoted to the purpose of supporting system disturbance post mortem analysis, others providing useful additional context or filling in missing gaps. The more that the investigators know about their available sources of data, and the inherent limitations of each, the better (and quicker) will be the analysis. This is especially important when a large blackout has occurred; there is pressure to find answers quickly, but due to the size and complexity of the event, a deliberate and methodical investigation is necessary. This article discusses the role that system monitoring plays in supporting the investigation of large-scale system disruptions and blackouts.

  8. Regulatory/backfit analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1988-06-01

    Station blackout is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory/backfit analysis for USI A-44. It includes (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the recommended technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements, and (7) a backfit analysis demonstrating that the resolution of USI A-44 complies with the backfit rule (10 CFR 50.109).

  9. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    ''Station Blackout'' is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory analysis for USI A-44. It includes: (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the proposed technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, and (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements.

  10. Modeling Advanced Neutron Source reactor station blackout accident using RELAP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N.C.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fletcher, C.D. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) system model using RELAP5 has been developed to perform loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and non-LOCA transients as safety-related input for early design considerations. The transients studies include LOCA, station blackout, and reactivity insertion accidents. The small-, medium-, and large-break LOCA results were presented and documented. This paper will focus on the station blackout scenario. The station blackout analyses have concentrated on thermal-hydraulic system response with and without accumulators. Five transient calculations were performed to characterize system performance using various numbers and sizes of accumulators at several key sites. The main findings will be discussed with recommendations for conceptual design considerations. ANS is a state-of-the-art research reactor to be built and operated at high heat flux, high mass flux, and high coolant subcooling. To accommodate these features, three ANS-specific changes were made in the RELAP5 code by adding: the Petukhov heat transfer correlation for single-phase forced convection in the thin coolant channel; the Gambill additive method with the Weatherhead wall superheat for the critical heat flux; and the Griffith drift flux model for the interfacial drag in the slug flow regime. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Are You Saved? HIM, an Intranet-based Expert System Reduces Fatality Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crofts, Von David; Simpson, Wayne Winger; Hopkins, Deborah Jean; Hawke, Scott Allen

    2000-06-01

    proven review checklists and processes.The manual process is lengthyósometimes taking 12 to 18 hours to complete. As such, it is difficult, prone to errors, and very tempting to shortcut. Automation of this process through the HIM system reduced a monumental hazard identification task for each work order, into a streamlined, efficient, and accurate process that can be completed in less than one hour. The result is that the process gets done, the regulations are met, and risk to human life is reduced.

  12. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  13. Containment pressurization and burning of combustible gases in a large, dry PWR containment during a station blackout sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Fan, C.T. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hsinchu (TW))

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, responses of a large, dry pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment in a station blackout sequence are analyzed with the CONTAIN, MARCH3, and MAAP codes. Results show that the predicted containment responses in a station blackout sequence of these three codes are substantially different. Among these predictions, the MAAP code predicts the highest containment pressure because of the large amount of water made available to quench the debris upon vessel failure. The gradual water boiloff by debris pressurizes the containment. The combustible gas burning models in these codes are briefly described and compared.

  14. Blackout: coal, climate and the last energy crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinberg, R. [Post Carbon Institute in California, CA (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Coal fuels more than 30 per cent of UK electricity production, and about 50 per cent in the US, providing a significant portion of total energy output. China and India's recent ferocious economic growth has been based almost entirely on coal-generated electricity. Coal currently looks like a solution to many of our fast-growing energy problems. However, while coal advocates are urging us full steam ahead, the increasing reliance on this dirtiest of all fossil fuels has crucial implications for energy policy, pollution levels, the global climate, world economy and geopolitics. Drawbacks to a coal-based energy strategy include: Scarcity - new studies suggest that the peak of world coal production may actually be less than two decades away; Cost - the quality of produced coal is declining, while the expense of transportation is rising, leading to spiralling costs and increasing shortages; and, Climate impacts - our ability to deal with the historic challenge of climate change may hinge on reducing coal consumption in future years.

  15. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at glass buttes, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Patrick; Fercho, Steven; Perkin, Doug; Martini, Brigette; Boshmann, Darrick

    2015-06-01

    The engineering and studies phase of the Glass Buttes project was aimed at reducing risk during the early stages of geothermal project development. The project‚Äôs inclusion of high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys allowed Ormat to evaluate the value of these surveys both independently and in combination to quantify the most valuable course of action for exploration in an area where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The sizes of the thermal anomalies at Glass Buttes are unusually large. Over the course of Phase I Ormat acquired high resolution LIDAR data to accurately map fault manifestations at the surface and collected detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys to map subsurface structural features. In addition, Ormat collected airborne hyperspectral data to assist with mapping the rock petrology and mineral alteration assemblages along Glass Buttes faults and magnetotelluric (MT) survey to try to better constrain the structures at depth. Direct and indirect identification of alteration assemblages reveal not only the geochemical character and temperature of the causative hydrothermal fluids but can also constrain areas of upflow along specific fault segments. All five datasets were merged along with subsurface lithologies and temperatures to predict the most likely locations for high permeability and hot fluids. The Glass Buttes temperature anomalies include 2 areas, totaling 60 km2 (23 mi2) of measured temperature gradients over 165¬į C/km (10¬į F/100ft). The Midnight Point temperature anomaly includes the Strat-1 well with 90¬įC (194 ¬įF) at 603 m (1981 ft) with a 164 ¬įC/km (10¬įF/100ft) temperature gradient at bottom hole and the GB-18 well with 71¬įC (160 ¬įF) at 396 m (1300 ft) with a 182¬įC/km (11¬įF/100ft) gradient. The primary area of alteration and elevated temperature occurs near major fault intersections associated with Brothers Fault Zone and Basin and Range systems. Evidence for faulting is

  16. ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W.

    2012-07-01

    U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event

  17. Solution of resource allocation problem for identification of cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents a methodology of selection of cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks. The methodology relies on a graded security model used in practice in different applications. The method is based on the controlled finite Markov chain approach set in combination with discrete dynamic programming and MCDM (Multi Criteria Decision Making) techniques that enables the expert to select the cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks depending on availability of resources. The analysis performed with different number of possible measures confirms the conclusions that the implementation of extra-large costs may not produce the required effect, and the increase in resources above a certain level does not appear sensitive. Diversification in improving the effectiveness of other measures seems more rational and efficient for the whole system than the unlimited improvement of the effectiveness of only one measure.

  18. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Review Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water- Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Principal Investigator: Joseph Moore Organization: University of Utah Track Name: Research and Development April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. East - West Cross Section of Coso; Production Zones >-1000 ft ASL 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov

  19. Source term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-05-21

    For a severe PWR accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the steam generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating will cause a water boiloff. Without effective cooling of the core, steam will begin to oxidize the Zircaloy cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as Cs and I, that are major contributors to the radiological source term, will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  20. Demonstration of fully coupled simplified extended station black-out accident simulation with RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin; Zou, Ling; Anders, David; Martineau, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The RELAP-7 code develop-ment effort started in October of 2011 and by the end of the second development year, a number of physical components with simplified two phase flow capability have been de-veloped to support the simplified boiling water reactor (BWR) extended station blackout (SBO) analyses. The demonstration case includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety system components for the safety relief valve (SRV), the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system, and the wet well. Three scenar-ios for the SBO simulations have been considered. Since RELAP-7 is not a severe acci-dent analysis code, the simulation stops when fuel clad temperature reaches damage point. Scenario I represents an extreme station blackout accident without any external cooling and cooling water injection. The system pressure is controlled by automatically releasing steam through SRVs. Scenario II includes the RCIC system but without SRV. The RCIC system is fully coupled with the reactor primary system and all the major components are dynamically simulated. The third scenario includes both the RCIC system and the SRV to provide a more realistic simulation. This paper will describe the major models and dis-cuss the results for the three scenarios. The RELAP-7 simulations for the three simplified SBO scenarios show the importance of dynamically simulating the SRVs, the RCIC sys-tem, and the wet well system to the reactor safety during extended SBO accidents.

  1. APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISK IN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.R. Paterek; W.W. Bogan; L.M. Lahner; V. Trbovic; E. Korach

    2001-05-01

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate integrated biological/physical/chemical co-treatment strategies for the remediation of wastes associated with the exploration and production of fossil energy. The specific objectives of this project are: chemical accelerated biotreatment (CAB) technology development for enhanced site remediation, application of the risk based analyses to define and support the rationale for environmental acceptable endpoints (EAE) for exploration and production wastes, and evaluate both the technological technologies in conjugation for effective remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from E&P sites in the USA.

  2. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-05-21

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  3. Steam Line Break and Station Blackout Transients for Proliferation-Resistant Hexagonal Tight Lattice Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, Upendra S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Jo, Jae H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Chung, Bub Dong [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Takahashi, Hiroshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2004-01-15

    Safety analyses of a proliferation-resistant, economically competitive, high-conversion boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems, are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core that therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of light water reactors. The tight lattice core has a very narrow flow channel with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular boiling water reactor (BWR) core and, thus, presents a special challenge to core cooling because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator-to-fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios.In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core is placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected to the isolation condenser system (ICS). The vessel is placed in containment with the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) and passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's simplified BWR (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to those of the SBWR; the ICS and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump is placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney since the buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel as the tight lattice configuration results in much larger friction in the core than with the SBWR.The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 are assessed for narrow channels, and as a result the heat transfer package is modified. The modified RELAP5 is used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events

  4. A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J.

    1997-06-01

    Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

  5. ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hartwell

    2007-02-28

    . Finally, the CEMP provides training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs, which help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  6. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  7. MELCOR Analysis of Steam Generator Tube Creep Rupture in Station Blackout Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Y.; Vierow, K. [Purdue University (United States)

    2005-12-15

    A pressurized water reactor steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is of concern because it represents a bypass of the containment for radioactive materials to the environment. In a station blackout accident, tube integrity could be threatened by creep rupture, particularly if cracks are present in the tube walls. Methods are developed herein to improve assessment capabilities for SGTR by using the severe-accident code MELCOR. Best-estimate assumptions based on recent research and computational fluid dynamics calculations are applied in the MELCOR analysis to simulate two-dimensional natural circulation and to determine the relative creep-rupture timing in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components. A new method is developed to estimate the steam generator (SG) hottest tube wall temperature and the tube critical crack size for the SG tubes to fail first. The critical crack size for SG tubes to fail first is estimated to be 20% of the wall thickness larger than by a previous analysis. Sensitivity studies show that the failure sequence would change if some assumptions are modified. In particular, the uncertainty in the countercurrent flow limit model could reverse the failure sequence of the SG tubes and surge line.

  8. Analysis of fission product revaporization in a BWR reactor cooling system during a station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.W.; Schmidt, E.; Cazzoli, E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary analysis of fission product revaporization in the Reactor Cooling System (RCS) after the vessel failure. The station blackout transient for BWR Mark I Power Plant is considered. The TRAPMELT3 models of evaporization, chemisorption, and the decay heating of RCS structures and gases are adopted in the analysis. The RCS flow models based on the density-difference between the RCS and containment pedestal region are developed to estimate the RCS outflow which carries the revaporized fission product to the containment. A computer code called REVAP is developed for the analysis. The REVAP is incorporated with the MARCH, TRAPMELT3 and NAUA codes of the Source Term Code Pack Package (STCP). The NAUA code is used to estimate the impact of revaporization on environmental release. The results show that the thermal-hydraulic conditions between the RCS and the pedestal region are important factors determining the magnitude of revaporization and subsequent release of the volatile fission product. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Source-term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    For a severe pressurized water reactor accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the stream generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating causes a water boil-off. Without effective decay heat removal, the fuel elements will be uncovered. Eventually, steam will oxidize the overheated cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as cesium and iodine, that are major contributors to the radiological source term will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  10. Proliferation resistance assessments during the design phase of a recycling facility as a means of reducing proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindell, M.A.; Grape, S.; Haekansson, A.; Jacobsson Svaerd, S.

    2013-07-01

    The sustainability criterion for Gen IV nuclear energy systems inherently presumes the availability of efficient fuel recycling capabilities. One area for research on advanced fuel recycling concerns safeguards aspects of this type of facilities. Since a recycling facility may be considered as sensitive from a non-proliferation perspective, it is important to address these issues early in the design process, according to the principle of Safeguards By Design. Presented in this paper is a mode of procedure, where assessments of the proliferation resistance (PR) of a recycling facility for fast reactor fuel have been performed so as to identify the weakest barriers to proliferation of nuclear material. Two supplementing established methodologies have been applied; TOPS (Technological Opportunities to increase Proliferation resistance of nuclear power Systems) and PR-PP (Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection evaluation methodology). The chosen fuel recycling facility belongs to a small Gen IV lead-cooled fast reactor system that is under study in Sweden. A schematic design of the recycling facility, where actinides are separated using solvent extraction, has been examined. The PR assessment methodologies make it possible to pinpoint areas in which the facility can be improved in order to reduce the risk of diversion. The initial facility design may then be slightly modified and/or safeguards measures may be introduced to reduce the total identified proliferation risk. After each modification of design and/or safeguards implementation, a new PR assessment of the revised system can then be carried out. This way, each modification can be evaluated and new ways to further enhance the proliferation resistance can be identified. This type of iterative procedure may support Safeguards By Design in the planning of new recycling plants and other nuclear facilities. (authors)

  11. Analysis of Potential Hydrogen Risk in the PWR Containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Jian; Xuewu Cao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2006-07-01

    Various studies have shown that hydrogen combustion is one of major risk contributors to threaten the integrity of the containment in a nuclear power plant. That hydrogen risk should be considered in severe accident strategies in current and future NPPs has been emphasized in the latest policies issued by the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China (NNSA). According to a deterministic approach, three typical severe accident sequences for a PWR large dry containment, such as the large break loss-of-coolant (LLOCA), the station blackout (SBO), and the small break loss-of-coolant (SLOCA) are analyzed in this paper with MELCOR code. Hydrogen concentrations in different compartments are observed to evaluate the potential hydrogen risk. The results show that there is a great amount of hydrogen released into the containment, which causes the containment pressure to increase and some potential in-consecutive burning. Therefore, certain hydrogen management strategies should be considered to reduce the risk to threaten the containment integrity. (authors)

  12. Hydrogen Mitigation Strategy of the APR1400 Nuclear Power Plant for a Hypothetical Station Blackout Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hee-Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    In order to analyze the hydrogen distribution during a hypothetical station blackout accident in the Korean next-generation Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400) containment, the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW was used. The source of the hydrogen and steam for the GASFLOW analysis was obtained from a MAAP calculation. The discharged water, steam, and hydrogen from the pressurizer are released into the water of the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST). Most of the discharged steam is condensed in the IRWST water because of its subcooling, and dry hydrogen is released into the free volume of the IRWST; finally, it goes out to the annular compartment above the IRWST through the vent holes. From the GASFLOW analysis, it was found that the gas mixture in the IRWST becomes quickly nonflammable by oxygen starvation but the hydrogen is accumulated in the annular compartment because of the narrow ventilation gap between the operating deck and containment wall when the igniters installed in the IRWST are not operated. When the igniters installed in the APR1400 were turned on, a short period of burning occurred in the IRWST, and then the flame was extinguished by the oxygen starvation in the IRWST. The unburned hydrogen was released into the annular compartment and went up to the dome because no igniters are installed around the annular compartment in the base design of the APR1400. From this result, it could be concluded that the control of the hydrogen concentration is difficult for the base design. In this study design modifications are proposed and evaluated with GASFLOW in view of the hydrogen mitigation strategy.

  13. Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S.

    2012-07-01

    The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

  14. An uncertainty analysis of the hydrogen source term for a station blackout accident in Sequoyah using MELCOR 1.8.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Wagner, Kenneth Charles

    2014-03-01

    A methodology for using the MELCOR code with the Latin Hypercube Sampling method was developed to estimate uncertainty in various predicted quantities such as hydrogen generation or release of fission products under severe accident conditions. In this case, the emphasis was on estimating the range of hydrogen sources in station blackout conditions in the Sequoyah Ice Condenser plant, taking into account uncertainties in the modeled physics known to affect hydrogen generation. The method uses user-specified likelihood distributions for uncertain model parameters, which may include uncertainties of a stochastic nature, to produce a collection of code calculations, or realizations, characterizing the range of possible outcomes. Forty MELCOR code realizations of Sequoyah were conducted that included 10 uncertain parameters, producing a range of in-vessel hydrogen quantities. The range of total hydrogen produced was approximately 583kg 131kg. Sensitivity analyses revealed expected trends with respected to the parameters of greatest importance, however, considerable scatter in results when plotted against any of the uncertain parameters was observed, with no parameter manifesting dominant effects on hydrogen generation. It is concluded that, with respect to the physics parameters investigated, in order to further reduce predicted hydrogen uncertainty, it would be necessary to reduce all physics parameter uncertainties similarly, bearing in mind that some parameters are inherently uncertain within a range. It is suspected that some residual uncertainty associated with modeling complex, coupled and synergistic phenomena, is an inherent aspect of complex systems and cannot be reduced to point value estimates. The probabilistic analyses such as the one demonstrated in this work are important to properly characterize response of complex systems such as severe accident progression in nuclear power plants.

  15. Source terms released into the environment for a station blackout severe accident at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This study calculates source terms released into the environment at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station after containment failure during a postulated low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR, version 1.8.1, was used in these calculations. Source terms were calculated for three different containment failure modes. The largest environmental releases occur for early containment failure at the drywell liner in contact with the cavity by liner melt-through. This containment failure mode is very likely to occur when the cavity is dry during this postulated severe accident sequence.

  16. Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Sitakanta; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-04-01

    In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

  17. Integrated Risk Assessment for the LaSalle Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant, Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP), MELCOR code calculations. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, C.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, L.A.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1992-10-01

    A Level III Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has been performed for LaSalle Unit 2 under the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP) and the Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP). This report documents the phenomenological calculations and sources of. uncertainty in the calculations performed with HELCOR in support of the Level II portion of the PRA. These calculations are an integral part of the Level II analysis since they provide quantitative input to the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) and Source Term Model (LASSOR). However, the uncertainty associated with the code results must be considered in the use of the results. The MELCOR calculations performed include four integrated calculations: (1) a high-pressure short-term station blackout, (2) a low-pressure short-term station blackout, (3) an intermediate-term station blackout, and (4) a long-term station blackout. Several sensitivity studies investigating the effect of variations in containment failure size and location, as well as hydrogen ignition concentration are also documented.

  18. Integrated Risk Assessment for the LaSalle Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant, Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP), MELCOR code calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, C.J. (Science and Engineering Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Miller, L.A.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1992-10-01

    A Level III Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has been performed for LaSalle Unit 2 under the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP) and the Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP). This report documents the phenomenological calculations and sources of. uncertainty in the calculations performed with HELCOR in support of the Level II portion of the PRA. These calculations are an integral part of the Level II analysis since they provide quantitative input to the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) and Source Term Model (LASSOR). However, the uncertainty associated with the code results must be considered in the use of the results. The MELCOR calculations performed include four integrated calculations: (1) a high-pressure short-term station blackout, (2) a low-pressure short-term station blackout, (3) an intermediate-term station blackout, and (4) a long-term station blackout. Several sensitivity studies investigating the effect of variations in containment failure size and location, as well as hydrogen ignition concentration are also documented.

  19. Performance of "WAMS East 1" in Providing Dynamic Information for the North East Blackout of August 14, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, John F.; Bhatt, Navin B.; Shah, Kirit; Kolluri, Sharma

    2004-12-31

    The blackout that impacted the U.S. and Canada on August 14, 2003, was notable for its extent, complexity, and impact. It triggered a massive review of operating records to determine what happened, why it happened, and how to avoid it in future operations. Much of this work was done at NERC level, through the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force. Additional background information concerning the event was gathered together by a group of utilities that, collectively, have been developing a wide area measurement system (WAMS) for the eastern interconnection. Like its counterpart in the western interconnection, "WAMS East" has a primary backbone of synchronized phasor measurements that are continuously recorded at central locations. Operational data have been critical for understanding and responding to the August 14 Blackout. Records collected on WAMS East demonstrate the contributions that well synchronized data offer in such efforts, and the value of strategically located continuous recording systems to facilitate their integration. This paper examines overall performance of the WAMS East backbone, with a brief assessment of the technology involved.

  20. Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... in order to reduce the risk of creating fuels for wildfire. ... or foster compaction-tolerant annual grass and forb ... occasional sudden storm, accident, or blackout ...

  1. Conceptual design station blackout and loss-of-flow accident analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Ghan, L.S.; Determan, J.C.; Nielsen, H.H. )

    1994-04-01

    A system model of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) has been developed and used to perform conceptual safety analyses. To better represent thermal-hydraulic behavior in the unique geometry and conditions of the ANSR core, three specific changes in the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code were implemented: a turbulent forced-convection heat transfer correlation, a critical heat flux correlation, and an interfacial drag correlation. The system model includes representations of the ANSR core, heat exchanger coolant loops, and the pressurizing and letdown systems. Analyses of ANSR station blackout and loss-of-flow accident scenarios are described. The results show that the core can survive without exceeding the flow excursion or critical heat flux thermal limits defined for the conceptual safety analysis, if the proper mitigation options are provided.

  2. Introduction of a methoxymethyl side chain into p-phenylenediamine attenuates its sensitizing potency and reduces the risk of allergy induction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goebel, Carsten; Troutman, John; Hennen, Jenny; Rothe, Helga; Schlatter, Harald; Gerberick, G. Frank; BlŲmeke, Brunhilde

    2014-02-01

    The strong sensitizing potencies of the most important primary intermediates of oxidative hair dyes, p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and p-toluylenediamine (PTD, i.e. 2-methyl-PPD) are well established. They are considered as the key sensitizers in hair dye allergic contact dermatitis. While modification of their molecular structure is expected to alter their sensitizing properties, it may also impair their color performance. With introduction of a methoxymethyl side chain we found the primary intermediate 2-methoxymethyl-p-phenylenediamine (ME-PPD) with excellent hair coloring performance but significantly reduced sensitizing properties compared to PPD and PTD: In vitro, ME-PPD showed an attenuated innate immune response when analyzed for its protein reactivity and dendritic cell activation potential. In vivo, the effective concentration of ME-PPD necessary to induce an immune response 3-fold above vehicle control (EC3 value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) was 4.3%, indicating a moderate skin sensitizing potency compared to values of 0.1 and 0.17% for PPD and PTD, respectively. Finally, assessing the skin sensitizing potency of ME-PPD under consumer hair dye usage conditions through a quantitative risk assessment (QRA) indicated an allergy induction risk negligible compared to PPD or PTD. - Highlights: ē Methoxymethyl side chain in p-phenylenediamine reduces its strong skin sensitizing properties. ē Reduced protein reactivity and dendritic cell activation. ē Reduced skin sensitizing potency in local lymph node assay (LLNA). ē Negligible allergy induction risk under hair dye usage conditions.

  3. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy

  4. Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program Rois Langner, Bob Hendron, and Eric Bonnema Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-60976 August 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National

  5. Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Hendron, B.; Bonnema, E.

    2014-08-01

    The small buildings and small portfolios (SBSP) sector face a number of barriers that inhibit SBSP owners from adopting energy efficiency solutions. This pilot project focused on overcoming two of the largest barriers to financing energy efficiency in small buildings: disproportionately high transaction costs and unknown or unacceptable risk. Solutions to these barriers can often be at odds, because inexpensive turnkey solutions are often not sufficiently tailored to the unique circumstances of each building, reducing confidence that the expected energy savings will be achieved. To address these barriers, NREL worked with two innovative, forward-thinking lead partners, Michigan Saves and Energi, to develop technical solutions that provide a quick and easy process to encourage energy efficiency investments while managing risk. The pilot project was broken into two stages: the first stage focused on reducing transaction costs, and the second stage focused on reducing performance risk. In the first stage, NREL worked with the non-profit organization, Michigan Saves, to analyze the effects of 8 energy efficiency measures (EEMs) on 81 different baseline small office building models in Holland, Michigan (climate zone 5A). The results of this analysis (totaling over 30,000 cases) are summarized in a simple spreadsheet tool that enables users to easily sort through the results and find appropriate small office EEM packages that meet a particular energy savings threshold and are likely to be cost-effective.

  6. Containment failure time and mode for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-4 with Mark-I containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.; Greene, S.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates containment failure time and mode for a low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident sequence in a boiling water reactor (BWR-4) with a Mark-I containment. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR, version 1.8.1, was used in these calculations. Other results using the MELCOR/CORBH package and the BWRSAR and CONTAIN codes are also presented and compared to the MELCOR results. The plant analyzed is the Peach Bottom atomic station, a BWR-4 with a Mark-I containment. The automatic depressurization system was used to depressurize the vessel in accordance with the Emergency Procedure Guidelines. Two different variations of the station blackout were studied: one with a dry cavity and the other with a flooded cavity. For the flooded cavity, it is assumed that a control rod drive (CRD) pump becomes operational after vessel failure, and it is used to pump water into the cavity.

  7. Evaluating the Effect of Upgrade, Control and Development Strategies on Robustness and Failure Risk of the Power Transmission Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, David E; Carreras, Benjamin A; Lynch, Vickie E; Dobson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    We use the OPA complex systems model of the power transmission system to investigate the effect of a series of different network upgrade scenarios on the long time dynamics and the probability of large cascading failures. The OPA model represents the power grid at the level of DC load flow and LP generation dispatch and represents blackouts caused by randomly triggered cascading line outages and overloads. We examine the effect of increased component reliability on the long-term risks, the effect of changing operational margins and the effect of redundancy on those same long-term risks. The general result is that while increased reliability of the components decreases the probability of small blackouts, depending on the implementation, it actually can increase the probability of large blackouts. When we instead increase some types of redundancy of the system there is an overall decrease in the large blackouts. As some of these results are counter intuitive these studies suggest that care must be taken when making what seem to be logical upgrade decisions.

  8. Developing Fully Coupled Dynamical Reactor Core Isolation System Models in RELAP-7 for Extended Station Black-Out Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-04-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup water to the reactor vessel for core cooling when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. It was one of the very few safety systems still available during the Fukushima Daiichi accidents after the tsunamis hit the plants and the system successfully delayed the core meltdown for a few days for unit 2 & 3. Therefore, detailed models for RCIC system components are indispensable to understand extended station black-out accidents (SBO) for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the new generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, major components to simulate the RCIC system have been developed. This paper describes the models for those components such as turbine, pump, and wet well. Selected individual component test simulations and a simplified SBO simulation up to but before core damage is presented. The successful implementation of the simplified RCIC and wet well models paves the way to further improve the models for safety analysis by including more detailed physical processes in the near future.

  9. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  10. Experimental and code simulation of a station blackout scenario for APR1400 with test facility ATLAS and MARS code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, X. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Choi, K. Y.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.; Kang, K. H.; Choi, N. H.

    2012-07-01

    A SBO (station blackout) experiment named SBO-01 was performed at full-pressure IET (Integral Effect Test) facility ATLAS (Advanced Test Loop for Accident Simulation) which is scaled down from the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). In this study, the transient of SBO-01 is discussed and is subdivided into three phases: the SG fluid loss phase, the RCS fluid loss phase, and the core coolant depletion and core heatup phase. In addition, the typical phenomena in SBO-01 test - SG dryout, natural circulation, core coolant boiling, the PRZ full, core heat-up - are identified. Furthermore, the SBO-01 test is reproduced by the MARS code calculation with the ATLAS model which represents the ATLAS test facility. The experimental and calculated transients are then compared and discussed. The comparison reveals there was malfunction of equipments: the SG leakage through SG MSSV and the measurement error of loop flow meter. As the ATLAS model is validated against the experimental results, it can be further employed to investigate the other possible SBO scenarios and to study the scaling distortions in the ATLAS. (authors)

  11. Modeling of a Flooding Induced Station Blackout for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis L; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J; Kinoshita, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    In the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach we want to understand not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or are not) to key safety-related events and how might we increase our safety margins. The RISMC Pathway uses the probabilistic margin approach to quantify impacts to reliability and safety by coupling both probabilistic (via stochastic simulation) and mechanistic (via physics models) approaches. This coupling takes place through the interchange of physical parameters and operational or accident scenarios. In this paper we apply the RISMC approach to evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., system activation) and to perform statistical analyses (e.g., run multiple RELAP-7 simulations where sequencing/timing of events have been changed according to a set of stochastic distributions). By using the RISMC toolkit, we can evaluate how power uprate affects the system recovery measures needed to avoid core damage after the PWR lost all available AC power by a tsunami induced flooding. The simulation of the actual flooding is performed by using a smooth particle hydrodynamics code: NEUTRINO.

  12. Comparison of MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5 results for a low-pressure, short-term station blackout at Browns Ferry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This study compares results obtained with two U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored codes, MELCOR version 1.8.3 (1.8PQ) and SCDAP/RELAP5 Mod3.1 release C, for the same transient - a low-pressure, short-term station blackout accident at the Browns Ferry nuclear plant. This work is part of MELCOR assessment activities to compare core damage progression calculations of MELCOR against SCDAP/RELAP5 since the two codes model core damage progression very differently.

  13. Blackout Final Implementation Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy September 2006 Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force September 2006 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments This document was prepared by staff of Natural Resources Canada and the U.S. Department of Energy. The principal contributors

  14. Survey of Tools for Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Dobson, Ian; Fonte, Louis; Haq, Enamul; Hines, Paul; Kirschen, Daniel; Luo, Xiaochuan; Miller, Stephen; Samaan, Nader A.; Vaiman, Marianna; Varghese, Matthew; Zhang, Pei

    2011-10-17

    Cascading failure can cause large blackouts, and a variety of methods are emerging to study this challenging topic. In parts 1 and 2 of this paper, the IEEE task force on cascading failure seeks to consolidate and review the progress of the field towards methods and tools of assessing the risk of cascading failure. Part 2 summarizes and discusses the state of the art in the available cascading failure modeling tools. The discussion integrates industry and research perspectives from a variety of institutions. Strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in current approaches are indicated.

  15. Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

    2012-02-02

    We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

  16. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer After Definitive Radiation Therapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. of China (China); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O'Reilly, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gold, Kathryn A. [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for nonĖsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiation therapy for stages I to III NSCLC between 2004 and 2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results: Of 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of RP grade ?2 seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; P=.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from RP grade ?2 among patients who received a low (?20-Gy) MLD (P<.01) or were male (P=.04). Conclusions: A trend toward reduction in symptomatic RP among patients taking ACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, although certain subgroups may benefit from use (ie, male patients and those receiving low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP.

  17. Reducing the Risk of Arc-Faults

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arc-fault detection algorithms by: 1. Performing arcing tests at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) with AFCI prototypes to verify their functionality on...

  18. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a ‚Äústation blackout‚ÄĚ (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  19. Report: Technical Uncertainty and Risk Reduction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TECHNICAL UNCERTAINTY AND RISK REDUCTION Background In FY 2007 EMAB was tasked to assess EM's ability to reduce risk and technical uncertainty. Board members explored this topic ...

  20. Verbal risk in communicating risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, J.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1993-03-01

    When persons in the waste management industry have a conversation concerning matters of the industry, thoughts being communicated are understood among those in the industry. However, when persons in waste management communicate with those outside the industry, communication may suffer simply because of poor practices such as the use of jargon, euphemisms, acronyms, abbreviations, language usage, not knowing audience, and public perception. This paper deals with ways the waste management industry can communicate risk to the public without obfuscating issues. The waste management industry should feel obligated to communicate certain meanings within specific contexts and, then, if the context changes, should not put forth a new, more appropriate meaning to the language already used. Communication of the waste management industry does not have to be provisional. The authors suggest verbal risks in communicating risk can be reduced significantly or eliminated by following a few basic communication principles. The authors make suggestions and give examples of ways to improve communication with the general public by avoiding or reducing jargon, euphemisms, and acronyms; knowing the audience; avoiding presumptive knowledge held by the audience; and understanding public perception of waste management issues.

  1. Budget Risk & Prioritization Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    BRPAtool performs the following: ?Assists managers in making solid decisions on what scope/activities to reduce and/or eliminate, to meet constrained budgets, based on multiple risk factors ?Enables analysis of different budget scenarios ?Can analyze risks and cost for each activity based on technical, quantifiable risk criteria and management-determined risks ?Real-time analysis ?Enables managers to determine the multipliers and where funding is best applied ?Promotes solid budget defense

  2. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  3. Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA DOE ...

  4. Risk Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Almost any new technology involves some risk. Risks involved in working with hydrogen can be minimized through adherence to standard design parameters for equipment and procedures. The Fuel Cell...

  5. Reducing the Vulnerability of Electric Power Grids to Terrorist Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Baldick; Thekla Boutsika; Jin Hur; Manho Joung; Yin Wu; Minqi Zhong

    2009-01-31

    This report describes the development of a cascading outage analyzer that, given an initial disturbance on an electric power system, checks for thermal overloads, under-frequency and over-frequency conditions, and under-voltage conditions that would result in removal of elements from the system. The analyzer simulates the successive tripping of elements due to protective actions until a post-event steady state or a system blackout is reached.

  6. Adequacy of Power-to-Mass Scaling in Simulating PWR Incident Transient for Reduced-Height, Reduced-Pressure and Full-Height, Full-Pressure Integral System Test Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, T.-J.; Lee, C.-H

    2004-03-15

    A complete scheme of scaling methods to design the reduced-height, reduced-pressure (RHRP) Institute of Nuclear Energy Research Integral System Test (IIST) facility and to specify test conditions for incident simulation was developed. In order to preserve core decay power history and coolant mass inventory during a transient, a unique power-to-mass scaling method is proposed and utilized for RHRP and full-height, full-pressure (FHFP) systems. To validate the current scaling method, three counterpart tests done at the IIST facility are compared with the FHFP tests in small-break loss-of-coolant, station blackout, and loss-of-feedwater accidents performed at the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the BETHSY test facility. Although differences appeared in design, scaling, and operation conditions among the IIST, LSTF, and BETHSY test facilities, the important physical phenomena shown in the facilities are almost the same. The physics involved in incident transient phenomena are well measured and modeled by showing the common thermal-hydraulic behavior of key parameters and the general consistency of chronological events. The results also confirm the adequacy of power-to-mass scaling methodology.

  7. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  8. Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-08-25

    In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing ‚Äúfailure‚ÄĚ in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM‚Äôs applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five ‚Äúcrosscutting‚ÄĚ themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

  9. Smart Phone Technologies Reduce Risks to Eagles from Wind Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential Mitigating Wind-Radar ...

  10. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Hobbs, David T.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.; Mcilwain, Michael; Moyer, Bruce A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Subramanian, K.; Vienna, John D.; Wilmarth, B.

    2008-07-18

    Cleaning up the nation’s nuclear weapons complex remains as one of the most technologically challenging and financially costly problems facing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Safety, cost, and technological challenges have often delayed progress in retrieval, processing, and final disposition of high-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, and challenging materials. Some of the issues result from the difficulty and complexity of the technological issues; others have programmatic bases, such as contracting strategies that may provide undue focus on near-term, specific clean-up goals or difficulty in developing and maintaining stakeholder confidence in the proposed solutions. We propose that independent basic fundamental science research focused on the full cleanup life-cycle offers an opportunity to help address these challenges by providing 1) scientific insight into the fundamental mechanisms involved in currently selected processing and disposal options, 2) a rational path to the development of alternative technologies should the primary options fail, 3) confidence that models that predict long-term performance of different disposal options are based upon the best available science, 4) fundamental science discovery that enables transformational solutions to revolutionize the current baseline processes.

  11. Reducing the risk, complexity and cost of coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, L.

    1999-07-01

    Drilling vertical well extensions with coiled tubing, particularly in the underbalanced state, exploits the inherent strengths of coiled tubing including: The ability to enter slim holes against a live well head; The use of small equipment that is fast to rig up and down; and The ability to trip quickly and maintain a steady pressure downhole with continuous circulation. Coiled tubing has successfully been used to deepen hundreds of wells, yet this application has only received sporadic attention. There are some very important technical considerations when drilling non-directionally with coiled tubing that must be addressed to ensure a commercially successful job. A recent vertical drilling job carried out in Western Australia illustrates the critical engineering aspects of an underbalanced, non-directional, coiled tubing drilling job. This job was completed for Arc Energy in April 1999 and produced a well that stabilized at 1.1 MMcfd, where three other wells drilled conventionally into these zones had shown only trace amounts of hydrocarbon.

  12. Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... We can create a new asset class that would enable the sector to access low-cost ... the P3 is to realize public sector energy savings by installing solar panels on public buildings. ...

  13. NREL's Renewable Energy Development Expertise Reduces Project Risks (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) success story fact sheet highlights a June 2012 solar power purchase agreement between the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority and three corporations. The fact sheet describes how technical assistance from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory enabled the U.S. Virgin Islands to realistically assess its clean energy resources and identify the most viable and cost-effective solutions to its energy challenges--resulting in a $65 million investment in solar energy in the territory.

  14. DOE Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other research includes the development of 3-D laser imaging inspection and monitoring ... (Houston, Texas) -- Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Inspection Using a 3D Laser. ...

  15. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  16. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system’s distribution capacity by increasing current flow and causing voltage drops. This fact sheet describes power factor and explains how you can improve your power factor to reduce electric bills and enhance your electrical system’s capacity.

  17. Budget Risk & Prioritization Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    BRPAtool performs the following: ¬ēAssists managers in making solid decisions on what scope/activities to reduce and/or eliminate, to meet constrained budgets, based on multiple risk factors ¬ēEnables analysis of different budget scenarios ¬ēCan analyze risks and cost for each activity based on technical, quantifiable risk criteria and management-determined risks ¬ēReal-time analysis ¬ēEnables managers to determine the multipliers and where funding is best applied ¬ēPromotes solid budget defense

  18. Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

  19. Risk Code?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identify the Task Risk Code >2 Determine if a Work Control Document is needed What is the Unmitigated Risk Code? Rev.1 09/05/14 Read and Agree to Comply with appropriate mitigation and sign Work Control Documents Is there an approved Work Control Document (WCD)? WORK PLANNING, CONTROL AND AUTHORIZATION FLOW DIAGRAM 1. Define Scope of Work 2. Analyze Hazards 3. Develop and Implement Hazard Controls 4. Perform Work Within Controls 5. Feedback and Continuous Improvement Analyze Hazards and

  20. EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading May 12, 2015 - ...

  1. Reducing Configuration Complexity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ams AG 2015 Reducing Configuration Complexity The contribution of chipscale integrated solutions Tom Griffiths Sr. Marketing Manager ams AG November 2015 © ams AG 2015 Agenda Architecture of IoT smart lighting Importance of the sensors The puzzle pieces Focus on adoption (turn... key...) A quick case study Industry's to-do list (an opinion) © ams AG 2015 Page 3 The Opportunity of Smart Lighting "Sufficient" light 24x7 Worker Productivity Decorative Use Utilitarian Lights Following in

  2. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  3. Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Risk along the Columbia River | Department of Energy Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The

  4. D:\\0myfiles\\DOE Policy (LBL) Blackout Final\\final-blackout-body...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and for the operations planning horizon at the CONTROL ... modeled to capture any problems crossing such boundaries." ... What Constitutes an Operating Emergency? An operating ...

  5. Assessing Risk and Driving Risk Mitigation for First-of-a-Kind Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2011-09-01

    . Product - Risk Handling Strategy. STEP 4 - Residual Risk Work off The risk handling strategy is entered into the Project Risk Allocation Tool (PRAT) to analyze each task for its ability to reduce risk. The result is risk-informed task prioritization. The risk handling strategy is captured in the Risk Management System, a relational database that provides conventional database utility, including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. The tool's Hierarchy Tree allows visualization and analyses of complex relationships between risks, risk mitigation tasks, design needs, and PIRTs. Product - Project Risk Allocation Tool and Risk Management System which depict project plan to reduce risk and current progress in doing so.

  6. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  7. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  8. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  9. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  10. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  11. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  12. Risk Management Process Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary components: the risk management model and the the risk management cycle.

  13. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-12

    The purpose of this guide is to describe effective risk management processes. The continuous and iterative process includes updating project risk documents and the risk management plan and emphasizes implementation communication of the risks and actions taken.

  14. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Opportunities in Reliability Reduced losses from power outages and power quality issues * Reducing the probability of regional blackouts can prevent significant losses to society. ...

  15. Advanced Test Reactor outage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, T.A.; Atkinson, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    Beginning in 1997, risk assessment was performed for each Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) outage aiding the coordination of plant configuration and work activities (maintenance, construction projects, etc.) to minimize the risk of reactor fuel damage and to improve defense-in-depth. The risk assessment activities move beyond simply meeting Technical Safety Requirements to increase the awareness of risk sensitive configurations, to focus increased attention on the higher risk activities, and to seek cost-effective design or operational changes that reduce risk. A detailed probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) had been performed to assess the risk of fuel damage during shutdown operations including heavy load handling. This resulted in several design changes to improve safety; however, evaluation of individual outages had not been performed previously and many risk insights were not being utilized in outage planning. The shutdown PRA provided the necessary framework for assessing relative and absolute risk levels and assessing defense-in-depth. Guidelines were written identifying combinations of equipment outages to avoid. Screening criteria were developed for the selection of work activities to receive review. Tabulation of inherent and work-related initiating events and their relative risk level versus plant mode has aided identification of the risk level the scheduled work involves. Preoutage reviews are conducted and post-outage risk assessment is documented to summarize the positive and negative aspects of the outage with regard to risk. The risk for the outage is compared to the risk level that would result from optimal scheduling of the work to be performed and to baseline or average past performance.

  16. GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats May 29, 2014 Mission In 2004 NNSA established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition of high risk vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. GTRI's mission is to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological

  17. Battery Electric Vehicles can reduce greenhouse has emissions and make renewable energy cheaper in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopal, Anand R; Witt, Maggie; Sheppard, Colin; Harris, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    India's National Mission on Electric Mobility (NMEM) sets a countrywide goal of deploying 6 to 7 million hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) by 2020. There are widespread concerns, both within and outside the government, that the Indian grid is not equipped to accommodate additional power demand from battery electric vehicles (BEVs). Such concerns are justified on the grounds of India's notorious power sector problems pertaining to grid instability and chronic blackouts. Studies have claimed that deploying BEVs in India will only

  18. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  19. Risk Assessment & Management Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NRC - A Proposed Risk Management Regulatory Framework, April 2012 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) web page DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation Workshop on Risk Assessment and Safety Decision Making Under Uncertainty

  20. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (177.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden

  1. Fuzzy Risk Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-03-04

    FRA is a general purpose code for risk analysis using fuzzy, not numeric, attributes. It allows the user to evaluate the risk associated with a composite system on the basis of the risk estimates of the individual components.

  2. Enterprise Risk Management Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Model is a system used to analyze the cost and benefit of addressing risks inherent in the work performed by the Department of Energy. This system measures risk using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to set a standard method for analyzing risk across the many functions within the department. Risks generally fall within five categories regardless ofthe subject matter ofthe subsystem. These categories are (1) risks to people, (2)

  3. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  4. Chemical, mechanical treatment options reduce hydroprocessor fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groce, B.C.

    1996-01-29

    The processing of opportunity crudes and the need to meet stricter environmental regulations in the production of distillates and finished fuels have increased the benefit of the hydroprocessing unit to the refiner. With this potential for increased margins and more environmentally friendly fuel products comes increased risk of fouling in hydroprocessing units. Increased fouling can reduce unit reliability and increase maintenance and operating costs. The refiner has several options available to help minimize the fouling and maximize the unit`s profitability and flexibility. One of the two commonly selected options is to allocate capital for a mechanical solution to address a specific cause of fouling. The other option is the use of a chemical treatment program. This paper reviews the efficiency and implementation procedures for these two processes.

  5. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (289.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 SEVENTH RFI COMMENTS ON REDUCING REGULATORY BURDEN

  6. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  7. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

    2008-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

  8. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

    2009-01-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

  9. Secretary Chu to Participate in White House Grid Modernization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the grid; help accommodate the growing number of electric vehicles; help avoid blackouts and restore power quicker when outages occur; and reduce the need for new power plants. ...

  10. June 13, 2011: Building the 21st Century Grid | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the grid; help accommodate the growing number of electric vehicles; help avoid blackouts and restore power quicker when outages occur; and reduce the need for new power plants. ...

  11. Obama Administration Announces Job-Creating Grid Modernization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of electric vehicles on America's roads, help avoid blackouts, restore power more quickly when outages occur, and reduce the need for new power plants. "Transmission is a vital ...

  12. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are already in place that mitigate that risk, and propose additional controls if needed. Step 1: Identify Risks - What can go wrong? This step should identify the negative outcomes that could result from an action or decision . It is important to consider a wide range of risks, and so the Department's ERM framework includes

  13. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  14. Microbial methods of reducing technetium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wildung, Raymond E. [Richland, WA; Garland, Thomas R. [Greybull, WY; Gorby, Yuri A. [Richland, WA; Hess, Nancy J. [Benton City, WA; Li, Shu-Mei W. [Richland, WA; Plymale, Andrew E. [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  15. METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johns, I.B.

    1958-06-01

    A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

  16. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  17. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  18. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  19. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  20. MapReduce SVM Game

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently and recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.

  1. MapReduce SVM Game

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently andmore¬†¬Ľ recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.¬ę¬†less

  2. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State...

  3. Blackout 2003: Conference for public review draft report on implementa...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    On Thursday, June 22, in Washington, D.C., the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force will hold a conference for stakeholders and the public to comment on the draft of the ...

  4. Second Anniversary of Northeast Blackout Marked with Progress...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    On August 14, 2003, Americans throughout the Northeast lost electricity when problems at a utility in northern Ohio began a chain reaction of events that led to power outages ...

  5. Topographical Risk Assessment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-24

    TRA was developed as a computer tool for the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) that will provides the capability to visualize and rapidly understand information about the risks associated with the River protection Project (RPP). Previously, technical and programmatic risk management within ORP had relied heavily on risk lists and other techniques that presented risk information but did not place it in perspective of the overall project. This made it difficult for ORP seniormore¬†¬Ľ management to understand the risk information presented, prioritize their activities, and provide direction to ORP staff and contractors about how to manage specific risk events. The TRA visualization tool, provides the appropriate context and perspective that allows senior management to effectively manage risks. Basically, the TRA overlays information about risks associated with specific activities and their magnitudes on top of the project baseline schedule. this provides senior management with information about the magnitudes of specific risk events as well as their timing, and allows them to focus their attention and resources on the risks that merit attention and possible further action. The TRA tool can also be used to display other types of information associated with scheduled activities, such as cost to date, technical performance, schedule performance, etc. Additionally, the base of the 3-dimensional representation can be changed to other types of graphics, such as maps, process flow diagrams, etc., which allows the display of other types of informatio, such as hazards, health and safety risks, and system availability.¬ę¬†less

  6. Risk assessment as a framework for decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert Paul; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Borns, David James

    2010-12-01

    The risk assessment approach has been applied to support numerous radioactive waste management activities over the last 30 years. A risk assessment methodology provides a solid and readily adaptable framework for evaluating the risks of CO2 sequestration in geologic formations to prioritize research, data collection, and monitoring schemes. This paper reviews the tasks of a risk assessment, and provides a few examples related to each task. This paper then describes an application of sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters to reduce the uncertainty in the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive waste repository, which because of importance of the geologic barrier, is similar to CO2 sequestration. The paper ends with a simple stochastic analysis of idealized CO2 sequestration site with a leaking abandoned well and a set of monitoring wells in an aquifer above the CO2 sequestration unit in order to evaluate the efficacy of monitoring wells to detect adverse leakage.

  7. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  8. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, Charles J.; Rhudy, Ralph G.; Bushman, Ralph E.

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  9. Risk and Realities | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ¬Ľ Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary components: the risk management model and the the risk management cycle. The risk management model reflects the organization as a three-tiered structure and provides a comprehensive view for the electricity sector organization and

  10. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates aremore¬†¬Ľ based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.¬ę¬†less

  11. Sociocultural definitions of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-10-01

    Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  12. Risk Identification and Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk Identification and Assessment [Sections in brackets are for instructions; these should be deleted or replaced with specifics in the template.] Subsystem Title or Section within Subsystem [In the first column, using short bullets, fill in "what can go wrong," or a brief description of a potential benefit from a program or action. Add additional rows as necessary. Fill in the other columns using the rating guidelines in the attached reference pages.] |Risk|Probability|Impact|Risk

  13. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel Appliances & Electronics Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save...

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs While Increasing Durability PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs ...

  15. Enterprise Risk Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Risk and...

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snowberg, David; Weber, Jochem

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, the global marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry has suffered a number of serious technological and commercial setbacks. To help reduce the risks of industry failures and advance the development of new technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK Risk Management Framework. By addressing uncertainties, the MHK Risk Management Framework increases the likelihood of successful development of an MHK technology. It covers projects of any technical readiness level (TRL) or technical performance level (TPL) and all risk types (e.g. technological risk, regulatory risk, commercial risk) over the development cycle. This framework is intended for the development and deployment of a single MHK technology‚ÄĒnot for multiple device deployments within a plant. This risk framework is intended to meet DOE‚Äôs risk management expectations for the MHK technology research and development efforts of the Water Power Program (see Appendix A). It also provides an overview of other relevant risk management tools and documentation.1 This framework emphasizes design and risk reviews as formal gates to ensure risks are managed throughout the technology development cycle. Section 1 presents the recommended technology development cycle, Sections 2 and 3 present tools to assess the TRL and TPL of the project, respectively. Section 4 presents a risk management process with design and risk reviews for actively managing risk within the project, and Section 5 presents a detailed description of a risk registry to collect the risk management information into one living document. Section 6 presents recommendations for collecting and using lessons learned throughout the development process.

  17. Draugen HSE-case - occupational health risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glas, J.J.P.; Kjaer, E.

    1996-12-31

    The Draugen HSE-Case serves as a risk management tool. Originally, risk management included only major safety hazards to personnel, environment and assets. Work Environment risks such as ergonomics, psycho-social factors and exposure to chemicals and noise, was not given the same attention. The Draugen HSE-Case addresses this weakness and extends all work environment risks. In order to promote line responsibility and commitment, relevant personnel is involved in the Case development. {open_quotes}THESIS{degrees}, a software application, is used to systematize input and to generate reports. The Draugen HSE-case encompasses: HSE risk analyses related to specific activities; Control of risk related to work environment; Established tolerability criteria; Risk reducing measures; Emergency contingency measures; and Requirements for Competence and Follow-up. The development of Draugen HSE-Case is a continuous process. It will serve to minimize the potential of occupational illnesses, raise general awareness, and make occupational health management more cost-effective.

  18. Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Responsibility, and Performance Matrix | Department of Energy Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk, Responsibility, and Performance Matrix Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk, Responsibility, and Performance Matrix Document offers guidance on how to recognize and assign energy savings performance contract (ESPC) risks and responsibilities using the risk, responsibility, and performance matrix, also known as RRPM.

  19. Biogeochemical Mechanisms Controlling Reduced Radionuclide Particle Properties and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim K. Fredrickson; John M. Zachara; Matthew J. Marshall; Alex S. Beliaev

    2006-06-01

    Uranium and Technetium are the major risk-driving contaminants at Hanford and other DOE sites. These radionuclides have been shown to be reduced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) under anoxic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that reduction results in the formation of poorly soluble hydrous oxides, UO2(s) and TcO2n?H2O(s), that are believed to limit mobility in the environment. The mechanisms of microbial reduction of U and Tc have been the focus of considerable research in the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP). In spite of equal or greater importance in terms of controlling the environmental fate of the contaminants relatively little is known regarding the precipitation mechanism(s), reactivity, persistence, and transport of biogenic UO2(s) and TcO2(s).

  20. Bio Risk Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-07-22

    The Biosecurity Risk Assessment Tool (BRAT) is a new type of computer application for the screening-level assessment of risk to dairy operations. BRAT for Dairies is designed to be intuitive and easy to use. Users enter basic data-property address, feed management, employee population, and so on - into the interface. Using these data and rules found in an expert system. BRAT for Dairies consults appropriate sections of its database. The expert system determines the riskmore¬†¬Ľ implications of the basic data, e.g. diseases are closely tied to pen location with respect to the outside world, When the analysis is complete, BRAT for Dairies evaluates and allocates the risk for each hazard, ranks the risks, and displays the results graphically.¬ę¬†less

  1. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-7.

  2. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  3. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C

    2012-08-14

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  4. Risk assessment based on point source deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, G.F.

    1997-12-31

    The International Joint Commission (IJC) in a recently published report states that various clean-up techniques have resulted in significantly cleaner lakes than 20 years ago. Both the US EPA and Environment Canada have passed laws that require emissions controls on significant sources of contaminants. Improved emission controls have played a large part in the reduced pollution levels to the Great Lakes. Improved controls have significantly reduced the pollutants deposited to both land and water. This paper will discuss a Risk Analysis for the emissions from a Hospital in Rochester, New York. Current New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) regulations require emission controls on such incinerators. This hospital has added both a scrubber and a bag house to control emissions. Twenty years ago, such incinerators, like many other emission sources would not have had control devices. New York`s Department of Environmental Conservation requires, as part of the Permitting process, that an Impact Analysis and if required, a multipathway Health Risk Assessment (HRA) be performed for all Medical Waste Incinerators before a Permit can be issued. This insures that the emissions will not create a health hazard to humans. Such an analysis was performed for a new 1,000 lb/hr Medical Waste Incinerator (MWI) installed in the North-East part of Rochester, New York. An Air Quality Impact Assessment (AQIA) based on an actual stack test indicated that this facility`s dioxin emissions would exceed the NY DEC Guideline levels. The Carcinogenic Risk (of death) for our most exposed individual (MEI) was calculated to be 8.75 E{sup {minus}06} (<1:100,000). The Hazard Index calculated for this MEI was 0.43. Hazard Index`s less then 1 are considered a reasonable risk. Health risk assessments are by design, very conservative. EPA sources have concluded that calculated death risks between one (1) and one hundred (100) per million are not excessive.

  5. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security, and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. If you are planning ...

  6. Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels Print Wednesday, 04 May 2016 12:11 Lignin is a polymer that permeates plant cell walls. ...

  7. Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases the Market Potential of Biofuels (Fact Sheet), Innovation Impact, Bioenergy, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework Recognizing that the national and economic security of the United States depends on the reliable functioning of critical infrastructure, the President under Executive Order (EO) 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" of February 2013 directed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to work with stakeholders to

  8. The Enterprise Risk Management Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enterprise Risk Management Model Using the Risk Assessment Tool to Prepare a Justification Memorandum for the Development and Revision of Departmental Directives * On January 14,...

  9. The Power of Integrators, Financiers, and Insurers to Reduce Proliferation Risks: Nuclear Dual-Use Goods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weise, Rachel A.; Hund, Gretchen

    2015-05-01

    Globalization of manufacturing supply chains has changed the nature of nuclear proliferation. Before 1991, nonproliferation efforts focused almost exclusively on limiting the spread of materials and equipment specifically designed for nuclear use -- reactors, centrifuges, and fissile material. Dual-use items, those items with both nuclear and non-nuclear applications, were not closely scrutinized or controlled. However, in 1991 the international community discovered that Iraq had developed a fairly sophisticated nuclear weapons program by importing dual-use items; this discovery spurred the international community to increase controls on dual-use technologies. Despite these international efforts, dual-use items are still a challenge for those seeking to limit proliferation.

  10. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Roberts

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a publicly available database of energy retrofit measures containing performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 measures.

  11. Application of Chemically Accelerated Biotreatment to Reduce Risk in Oil-Impacted Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paterek, J.R.; Bogan, W.W.; Lahner, L.M.; Trbovic, V.

    2003-03-06

    Conducted research in the following major focus areas: (1) Development of mild extraction approaches to estimate bioavailable fraction of crude oil residues in contaminated soils; (2) Application of these methods to understand decreases in toxicity and increases in sequestration of hydrocarbons over time, as well as the influence of soil properties on these processes; (3) Measurements of the abilities of various bacteria (PAH-degraders and others more representative of typical soil bacteria) to withstand oxidative treatments (i.e. Fenton's reaction) which would occur in CBT; and (4) Experiments into the biochemical/genetic inducibility of PAH degradation by compounds formed by the chemical oxidation of PAH.

  12. Innovative permeable cover system to reduce risks at a chemical munitions burial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powels, C.C.; Bon, I.; Okusu, N.M.

    1997-12-31

    An innovative permeable sand cover with various integrated systems has been designed to contain and treat the Old O-Field chemical munitions landfill at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The 18,200 m{sup 2} (4.5 acre) landfill was used from the mid 1930s to the mid 1950s for the disposal of chemical, incendiary, and explosive munitions from domestic and foreign origins, together with contaminated wastes associated with the development and production of chemical warfare agents (CWA). The site is suspected to be contaminated with white phosphorous (WP) (which when dry, spontaneously burns when exposed to air), shock sensitive picric acid fuses and has the potential to contain large quantities of CWA-filled munitions. Historically, one to three explosions or fires occurred per ten-year period at the landfill. Such events have the potential to cause a CWA release to the environment, which could potentially affect densely populated areas. Recovery and decontamination projects conducted at the site in the late 1940s and early 1950s used large amounts of decontamination chemicals (containing solvents) and fuels which further contaminated the area. The groundwater downgradient of the landfill is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, metals, explosives and CWA degradation compounds and is currently being contained by a groundwater extraction and treatment system. This report describes a remedial action program for the site.

  13. Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlick, Skip; Walsh, Patrick; Rhodes, Greg; Fercho, Steven

    2015-06-30

    Ormat sited 2 full-size exploration wells based on 3D seismic interpretation of fractures, prior drilling results, and temperature anomaly. The wells indicated commercial temperatures (>300 F), but almost no permeability, despite one of the wells being drilled within 820 ft of an older exploration well with reported indications of permeability. Following completion of the second well in 2012, Ormat undertook a lengthy program to 1) evaluate the lack of observed permeability, 2) estimate the likelihood of finding permeability with additional drilling, and 3) estimate resource size based on an anticipated extent of permeability.

  14. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Battelleóa nonprofit research and development organization that operates many of the national laboratoriesóreached an Energy Department project milestone to demonstrate at least 1,000 hours of bio...

  15. Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the ...

  16. Development of Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-09-30

    GeoMechanics Technologies has completed a geomechanical caprock integrity analysis and risk assessment study funded through the US Department of Energy. The project included: a detailed review of historical caprock integrity problems experienced in the natural gas storage industry; a theoretical description and documentation of caprock integrity issues; advanced coupled transport flow modelling and geomechanical simulation of three large-scale potential geologic sequestration sites to estimate geomechanical effects from CO‚āā injection; development of a quantitative risk and decision analysis tool to assess caprock integrity risks; and, ultimately the development of recommendations and guidelines for caprock characterization and CO‚āā injection operating practices. Historical data from gas storage operations and CO‚āā sequestration projects suggest that leakage and containment incident risks are on the order of 10-1 to 10-2, which is higher risk than some previous studies have suggested for CO‚āā. Geomechanical analysis, as described herein, can be applied to quantify risks and to provide operating guidelines to reduce risks. The risk assessment tool developed for this project has been applied to five areas: The Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California, Kevin Dome in Montana, the Louden Field in Illinois, the Sleipner CO‚āā sequestration operation in the North Sea, and the In Salah CO‚āā sequestration operation in North Africa. Of these five, the Wilmington Graben area represents the highest relative risk while the Kevin Dome area represents the lowest relative risk.

  17. Risk Estimation Methodology for Launch Accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bechtel, Ryan D.

    2014-02-01

    As compact and light weight power sources with reliable, long lives, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have made space missions to explore the solar system possible. Due to the hazardous material that can be released during a launch accident, the potential health risk of an accident must be quantified, so that appropriate launch approval decisions can be made. One part of the risk estimation involves modeling the response of the RPS to potential accident environments. Due to the complexity of modeling the full RPS response deterministically on dynamic variables, the evaluation is performed in a stochastic manner with a Monte Carlo simulation. The potential consequences can be determined by modeling the transport of the hazardous material in the environment and in human biological pathways. The consequence analysis results are summed and weighted by appropriate likelihood values to give a collection of probabilistic results for the estimation of the potential health risk. This information is used to guide RPS designs, spacecraft designs, mission architecture, or launch procedures to potentially reduce the risk, as well as to inform decision makers of the potential health risks resulting from the use of RPSs for space missions.

  18. Reducing Contingency through Sampling at the Luckey FUSRAP Site - 13186

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frothingham, David; Barker, Michelle; Buechi, Steve; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    Typically, the greatest risk in developing accurate cost estimates for the remediation of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste sites is the uncertainty in the estimated volume of contaminated media requiring remediation. Efforts to address this risk in the remediation cost estimate can result in large cost contingencies that are often considered unacceptable when budgeting for site cleanups. Such was the case for the Luckey Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site near Luckey, Ohio, which had significant uncertainty surrounding the estimated volume of site soils contaminated with radium, uranium, thorium, beryllium, and lead. Funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) allowed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to conduct additional environmental sampling and analysis at the Luckey Site between November 2009 and April 2010, with the objective to further delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of contaminated soils in order to reduce the uncertainty in the soil volume estimate. Investigative work included radiological, geophysical, and topographic field surveys, subsurface borings, and soil sampling. Results from the investigative sampling were used in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory's Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling (BAASS) software to update the contaminated soil volume estimate for the site. This updated volume estimate was then used to update the project cost-to-complete estimate using the USACE Cost and Schedule Risk Analysis process, which develops cost contingencies based on project risks. An investment of $1.1 M of ARRA funds for additional investigative work resulted in a reduction of 135,000 in-situ cubic meters (177,000 in-situ cubic yards) in the estimated base volume estimate. This refinement of the estimated soil volume resulted in a $64.3 M reduction in the estimated project cost-to-complete, through a reduction in the uncertainty in the contaminated soil

  19. Biosafety Risk Assessment Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-05-27

    Software tool based on a structured methodology for conducting laboratory biosafety risk assessments by biosafety experts. Software is based upon an MCDA scheme and uses peer reviewed criteria and weights. The software was developed upon Microsoft¬ís .net framework. The methodology defines likelihood and consequence of a laboratory exposure for thirteen unique scenarios and provides numerical relative risks for each of the relevant thirteen. The software produces 2-d graphs reflecting the relative risk and a sensitivitymore¬†¬Ľ analysis which highlights the overall importance of each factor. The software works as a set of questions with absolute scales and uses a weighted additive model to calculate the likelihood and consequence.¬ę¬†less

  20. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  1. Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint We're dedicated to cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent across the Lab, from facilities to transportation. January 30, 2014 Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint From monitoring storm water run-off in Los Alamos Canyon to riding their bikes to work, employees in the field all over the Lab's 36 square miles see the landscape around them as an inspiration and reminder to go green at work

  2. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated lands |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated lands December 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A recently published report from Argonne's Environmental Science (EVS) division presents a methodology for assessing potential human health risks of developing utility-scale solar facilities on contaminated, previously developed sites. Developing on these lands rather than pristine, undeveloped lands can avoid or minimize environmental impacts, reduce

  3. Resources for global risk assessment: The International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) and Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullenweber, Andrea Kroner, Oliver; Kohrman, Melissa; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Rak, Andrew; Wexler, Philip; Tomljanovic, Chuck

    2008-11-15

    The rate of chemical synthesis and use has outpaced the development of risk values and the resolution of risk assessment methodology questions. In addition, available risk values derived by different organizations may vary due to scientific judgments, mission of the organization, or use of more recently published data. Further, each organization derives values for a unique chemical list so it can be challenging to locate data on a given chemical. Two Internet resources are available to address these issues. First, the International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) database ( (www.tera.org/iter)) provides chronic human health risk assessment data from a variety of organizations worldwide in a side-by-side format, explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations, and links directly to each organization's website for more detailed information. It is also the only database that includes risk information from independent parties whose risk values have undergone independent peer review. Second, the Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) is a database of in progress chemical risk assessment work, and includes non-chemical information related to human health risk assessment, such as training modules, white papers and risk documents. RiskIE is available at (http://www.allianceforrisk.org/RiskIE.htm), and will join ITER on National Library of Medicine's TOXNET ( (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/)). Together, ITER and RiskIE provide risk assessors essential tools for easily identifying and comparing available risk data, for sharing in progress assessments, and for enhancing interaction among risk assessment groups to decrease duplication of effort and to harmonize risk assessment procedures across organizations.

  4. Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2005-12-27

    Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

  5. Reduced AC losses in HTS coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2004-10-05

    Methods for reducing hysteresis losses in superconductor coated ribbons where a flux distribution is set into the superconductor coated ribbon prior to the application of alternating current.

  6. Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel 2002 DEER Conference ...

  7. Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water Treatment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing Logistics ...

  8. Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water Treatment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water ...

  9. Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study: Reducing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study: Reducing Water Consumption of Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation Report to Congress U.S. Department of Energy ...

  10. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  11. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  12. Risk Assessment/Management Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    RAMTool performs the following: ¬ē A tool to perform facility and programmatic risk assessments, produce risk registers, develop risk management plans (RMPs), link risks to improvement/risk-reduction projects, and actively manage risks ¬ē Ability to conduct risk assessments. Ease of determination of probability and consequence based on industry standard risk matrices. Complies with site risk management performance document. Provides multiple outputs/report for required risk forms. Conduct quick risk data analysis. ¬ē Performs/calculates a facility risk factormore¬†¬Ľ (RF) and a programmatic RF. Supports project and initiative prioritization and funding in order to make solid decisions on risk reduction. Assigns responsibility and accountability at a risk owner (RO) level. Monitors and tracks progress toward completing mitigation strategies. Ability to import massive amounts of data at the push of a button. Integrates development of a Risk Management Plan (RMP) Built for ease-of-use ¬Ė design, built, and used by technical/management personnel. Can be customized (functions and/or reports) for further analysis¬ę¬†less

  13. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-16

    This Guide provides a framework for identifying and managing key technical, schedule, and cost risks through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-7A, dated 1-12-11. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Quantitative risk of oil tanker groundings. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrozowicz, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The culture, design, and operation of the maritime industry all contribute to create an error-inducing system. As oil tankers have become larger, the tolerance for error has decreased as the consequences have increased. Tankers are the largest contributor by vessel type to worldwide oil spill volume. Human error has consistently been attributed to 80 percent of the marine accidents. A closer look reveals that many accidents attributed to human error are system errors. In fact, the term human error is unwarranted in many high-risk accidents and its use is a perforation of the context. The maritime industry has been identified as a high risk operation, requiring an active risk management program. A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) provides a formal process of determining the full range of possible adverse occurrences, probabilities, and expected costs for any undesirable event. A PRA can identify those areas that offer the greatest risk-reducing potential. This thesis focuses on the first level of a proposed three-level risk model to determine the probability of a tanker grounding. The approach utilizes fault trees and event trees and incorporates The Human Error Rate Prediction data to quantify individual errors. The result allows the identification of high-leverage factors in order to determine the most effective and efficient use of resources to reduce the probability of grounding; showing that the development of the Electronic Chart Display and Information System incorporated with the International Safety Management Code can significantly reduce the probability of grounding.

  15. Risk Analysis and Decision Making FY 2013 Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward; Thompson, J.

    2013-06-01

    Risk analysis and decision making is one of the critical objectives of CCSI, which seeks to use information from science-based models with quantified uncertainty to inform decision makers who are making large capital investments. The goal of this task is to develop tools and capabilities to facilitate the development of risk models tailored for carbon capture technologies, quantify the uncertainty of model predictions, and estimate the technical and financial risks associated with the system. This effort aims to reduce costs by identifying smarter demonstrations, which could accelerate development and deployment of the technology by several years.

  16. Resource handbook on transportation risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. Y.; Biwer, B. M.; Monette, F. A.; Environmental Assessment; SNL; BAPL; USOE; Battelle Memorial Inst.

    2003-01-01

    This resource handbook contains useful information to streamline radioactive material transportation risk assessments for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents prepared for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs. Streamlining refers to instituting steps that can increase the efficiency of future assessments, reduce costs, and promote increased quality and consistency across the DOE complex. This handbook takes advantage of the wealth of information developed through decades of DOE's NEPA experience. It contains a review of historical assessments; a description of comprehensive and generally acceptable transportation risk assessment methodology (i.e., models); and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and generally accepted assumptions. This handbook also includes a discussion paper that addresses cumulative impacts (Appendix A). The discussion paper illustrates the evolving and sometimes unresolved issues encountered in transportation risk assessment. Other topics, such as sabotage, environmental justice, and human factors, may be addressed in the future. This resource document was developed as the first primary reference book providing useful information for conducting transportation risk assessments for radioactive material in the NEPA context.

  17. Quantitative Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk Assessment - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  18. Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk Assessment - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  19. Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. Examining the Risk of Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsky, Galya; Severe, William R; Schoeneck, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    The need to stop illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials around the world is undeniable and urgent. This issue is particularly evident due to the highly dangerous consequences of the risks involved, the known interest of terrorist groups in acquiring such materials and the vulnerability of theft and diversion of such materials. Yet the phenomenon of nuclear trafficking remains a subject where the unknown dominates what is known on the subject. The trafficking panel at the Institute for Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Workshop on Reducing the Risk of Radioactive and Nuclear Materials that took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 10-11, 2009, dealt with some of the issues associated with nuclear trafficking. Different points of view on how to better address trafficking and thwart perpetrator efforts were discussed. This paper presents some of these views and addresses practical measures that should be considered to improve the situation.

  1. Risk assessment handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

    1990-09-01

    The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers' needs and the product have been established.

  2. Risk assessment handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

    1990-09-01

    The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG&G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers` needs and the product have been established.

  3. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2001-10-01

    Among the key barriers to investment in energy efficiency improvements are uncertainties about attaining projected energy savings and apprehension about potential disputes over these savings. The fields of energy management and risk management are thus intertwined. While many technical methods have emerged to manage performance risks (e.g. building commissioning), financial risk transfer techniques are less developed in the energy management arena than in other more mature segments of the economy. Energy Savings Insurance (ESI) - formal insurance of predicted energy savings - is one method of transferring financial risks away from the facility owner or energy services contractor. ESI offers a number of significant advantages over other forms of financial risk transfer, e.g. savings guarantees or performance bonds. ESI providers manage risk via pre-construction design review as well as post-construction commissioning and measurement and verification of savings. We found that the two mos t common criticisms of ESI - excessive pricing and onerous exclusions - are not born out in practice. In fact, if properly applied, ESI can potentially reduce the net cost of energy savings projects by reducing the interest rates charged by lenders, and by increasing the level of savings through quality control. Debt service can also be ensured by matching loan payments to projected energy savings while designing the insurance mechanism so that payments are made by the insurer in the event of a savings shortfall. We estimate the U.S. ESI market potential of $875 million/year in premium income. From an energy-policy perspective, ESI offers a number of potential benefits: ESI transfers performance risk from the balance sheet of the entity implementing the energy savings project, thereby freeing up capital otherwise needed to ''self-insure'' the savings. ESI reduces barriers to market entry of smaller energy services firms who do not have sufficiently strong balance sheets to self

  4. Supervisory Loan Specialist (Strategic Risk)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Department of Energy (DOE) Loans Programs Office (LPO), Risk Management Division (RMD or LP-40) Strategic Risk Group (LP-40). The incumbent is the supervisor for the...

  5. Risk communication in environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahm-Crites, L.

    1996-08-26

    Since the enactment of NEPA and other environmental legislation, the concept of `risk communication` has expanded from simply providing citizens with scientific information about risk to exploring ways of making risk information genuinely meaningful to the public and facilitating public involvement in the very processes whereby risk is analyzed and managed. Contemporary risk communication efforts attempt to find more effective ways of conveying increasingly complex risk information and to develop more democratic and proactive approaches to community involvement, in particular to ensuring the participation of diverse populations in risk decisions. Although considerable progress has been made in a relatively short time, risk communication researchers and practitioners currently face a number of challenges in a time of high expectations, low trust, and low budgets.

  6. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, Alfred J.

    1993-01-01

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

  7. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, A.J.

    1993-11-30

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

  8. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    If you are planning to install a small renewable energy system to make your own electricity, such as a solar electric system or small wind turbine, reducing your electricity...

  9. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  10. Reducing mode circulating fluid bed combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Yung-Yi; Sadhukhan, Pasupati; Fraley, Lowell D.; Hsiao, Keh-Hsien

    1986-01-01

    A method for combustion of sulfur-containing fuel in a circulating fluid bed combustion system wherein the fuel is burned in a primary combustion zone under reducing conditions and sulfur captured as alkaline sulfide. The reducing gas formed is oxidized to combustion gas which is then separated from solids containing alkaline sulfide. The separated solids are then oxidized and recycled to the primary combustion zone.

  11. Reducing Photovoltaic Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics ¬Ľ Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. The development of more efficient, affordable photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies are crucial to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative, and making solar cost-competitive with other sources of energy. DOE is fueling innovative solar technology solutions with focused project funding and partnerships with

  12. Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels Print Wednesday, 04 May 2016 12:11 Lignin is a polymer that permeates plant cell walls. Although beneficial to the plant, the lignin must be chemically broken down in a costly pretreatment step before the sugars inside can be released and fermented into useful chemicals and fuels. Previous attempts to silence lignin-producing genes resulted in weak plants with a lower sugar yield. In this work, researchers

  13. National Renewable Energy Laboratory To Reduce Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To Reduce Staff Last updated: November 14, 1995 For information contact: Robert Noun, (303) 275-3062 Kerry Masson (303) 275-4083 Golden, Colo., November 3, 1995 -- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced today a schedule for restructuring and reducing its work force in response to impending reductions in federal research budgets. Work force reductions may ultimately eliminate more than 10 percent of the present work force of about 900 full-time

  14. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  15. Risk perception in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Rayner, S.F.

    1985-02-15

    The paper briefly reviews: (1) what risk perception means to most people in developing countries; (2) some of the modern-technology-related risks to which people in these countries are exposed; and (3) some research evidence about risk perception that gives hints about how such perceptions will evolve in developing countries. (ACR)

  16. Regulatory cost-risk study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This study is intended to provide some quantitative perspective by selecting certain examples of criteria for which estimates of risks and costs can be obtained, and the balance of the various risks, (i.e., internal versus external risks), can be put into perspective. 35 refs., 39 tabs. (JDB)

  17. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-09-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoftģ Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the toolís design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  18. Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlon, B.

    2012-04-01

    Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on

  19. The reduced environmental liability of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie, A.C.D.; McMillen, M.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper the authors will discuss the waste stream minimization that future commercially operated clean coal technologies can effect. They will explore the ability of these now-beginning-to-mature technologies to reduce those aspects of the emission streams that have greatest potential for what the authors term as environmental liability. Environmental liability is manifested in a variety of forms. There are both current liabilities and future liabilities. In addition, uncertainties may reside in future anticipated regulatory compliance and the costs of such compliance. Exposure to liability translates into perceived risk which creates an air of uncertainty to the power industry and its lenders who provide the capital to build new power plants. In the context of electric power generation, newer, high efficiency power generation technologies developed in the course of the Clean Coal Technology Program of the US Department of Energy result in reduced waste stream emissions when compared against more aging conventional combustion technologies. This paper will discuss how the introduction of new clean coal technologies will help balance the conflict between adverse environmental impact and the global demand for increased energy. The authors will discuss how clean coal technologies will facilitate compliance with future air standards that may otherwise expose power producers to modification and cleanup costs, noncompliance penalties, or premature shut down.

  20. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  1. Eastern European risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honey, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Here the authors assess Eastern European risk management practices through the evaluation of the nuclear power plants in the region. This evaluation is limited to the Soviet-designed and -built VVER-440 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) that are currently operating in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Russia, and the Ukraine and until recently operated at Greifswald in the former East Germany. This evaluation is based on the basic design of the plants, a safety evaluation of the Greifswald facility by representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany and personal visits by the author to Greifswald and Loviisa.

  2. Compliance & Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    environmental hazards and risks to protect human health and safety and the environment. ... Plans. Risk evaluation tools such as the Human Health and Ecological Risk Methods ...

  3. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  4. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  5. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  6. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  7. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-05-06

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  8. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid medium of the formula NR.sub.3 and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  9. Risk Analysis Virtual ENvironment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-02-10

    RAVEN has 3 major functionalities: 1. Provides a Graphical User Interface for the pre- and post-processing of the RELAP-7 input and output. 2. Provides the capability to model nuclear power plants control logic for the RELAP-7 code and dynamic control of the accident scenario evolution. This capability is based on a software structure that realizes a direct connection between the RELAP-7 solver engine (MOOSE) and a python environment where the variables describing the plant statusmore¬†¬Ľ are accessible in a scripting environment. RAVEN support the generation of the probabilistic scenario control by supplying a wide range of probability and cumulative distribution functions and their inverse functions. 3. Provides a general environment to perform probability risk analysis for RELAP-7, RELAP-5 and any generic MOOSE based applications. The probabilistic analysis is performed by sampling the input space of the coupled code parameters and it is enhanced by using modern artificial intelligence algorithms that accelerate the identification of the areas of major risk (in the input parameter space). This environment also provides a graphical visualization capability to analyze the outcomes. Among other approaches, the classical Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling algorithms are available. For the acceleration of the convergence of the sampling methodologies, Support Vector Machines, Bayesian regression, and collocation stochastic polynomials chaos are implemented. The same methodologies here described could be used to solve optimization and uncertainties propagation problems using the RAVEN framework.¬ę¬†less

  10. Risk Analysis Virtual ENvironment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-10

    RAVEN has 3 major functionalities: 1. Provides a Graphical User Interface for the pre- and post-processing of the RELAP-7 input and output. 2. Provides the capability to model nuclear power plants control logic for the RELAP-7 code and dynamic control of the accident scenario evolution. This capability is based on a software structure that realizes a direct connection between the RELAP-7 solver engine (MOOSE) and a python environment where the variables describing the plant status are accessible in a scripting environment. RAVEN support the generation of the probabilistic scenario control by supplying a wide range of probability and cumulative distribution functions and their inverse functions. 3. Provides a general environment to perform probability risk analysis for RELAP-7, RELAP-5 and any generic MOOSE based applications. The probabilistic analysis is performed by sampling the input space of the coupled code parameters and it is enhanced by using modern artificial intelligence algorithms that accelerate the identification of the areas of major risk (in the input parameter space). This environment also provides a graphical visualization capability to analyze the outcomes. Among other approaches, the classical Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling algorithms are available. For the acceleration of the convergence of the sampling methodologies, Support Vector Machines, Bayesian regression, and collocation stochastic polynomials chaos are implemented. The same methodologies here described could be used to solve optimization and uncertainties propagation problems using the RAVEN framework.

  11. Ten Ways to Lower Perceived Risk and Finance Rates within Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This provides an opportunity to reduce risk and obtain the lowest possible rate for a specific project. Many agencies leave all communication up to the utility or contractor, but there ...

  12. Probabilistic risk assessment course documentation. Volume 1: PRA fundamentals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breeding, R J; Leahy, T J; Young, J

    1985-08-01

    The full range of PRA topics is presented, with a special emphasis on systems analysis and PRA applications. Systems analysis topics include system modeling such as fault tree and event tree construction, failure rate data, and human Reliability. The discussion of PRA applications is centered on past and present PRA based programs, such as WASH-1400 and the Interim Reliability Evaluation Program, as well as on some of the potential future applications of PRA. The relationship of PRA to generic safety issues such as station blackout and Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) is also discussed. In addition to system modeling, the major PRA tasks of accident process analysis, and consequence analysis are presented. An explanation of the results of these activities, and the techniques by which these results are derived, forms the basis for a discussion of these topics. An additional topic which is presented in this course is the topic of PRA management, organization, and evaluation. 84 figs., 41 tabs.

  13. Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Security ... Home NNSA Blog Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Reducing emissions ...

  14. Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

  15. Reduced No.sub.x combustion method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delano, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    A combustion method enabling reduced NO.sub.x formation wherein fuel and oxidant are separately injected into a combustion zone in a defined velocity relation, combustion gases are aspirated into the oxidant stream prior to intermixture with the fuel, and the fuel is maintained free from contact with oxygen until the intermixture.

  16. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laabs, Gary W.; Funk, David J.; Asay, Blaine W.

    1998-01-01

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile.

  17. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-06-09

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

  18. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweatt, William C.

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  19. IEA-Risk Quantification and Risk Management in Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.iea-retd.orgfilesRISK%20IEA-RETD%20(2011-6)....

  20. Commentary: Risk Management and Reliability Design for Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Dennis L.; Cranwell, Robert M.; Hunter, Regina L.

    1999-05-28

    Where there is a significant actuarial basis for decision making (e.g., the occurrence of fires in single-family dwellings), there is little incentive for formal risk management. Formal risk assessments are most useful in those cases where the value of the structure is high, many people may be affected, the societal perception of risk is high, consequences of a mishap would be severe, and the actuarial uncertainty is large. For these cases, there is little opportunity to obtain the necessary experiential data to make informed decisions, and the consequences in terms of money, lives, and societal confidence are severe enough to warrant a formal risk assessment. Other important factors include the symbolic value of the structure and vulnerability to single point failures. It is unlikely that formal risk management and assessment practices will or should replace the proven institutions of building codes and engineering practices. Nevertheless, formal risk assessment can provide valuable insights into the hazards threatening high-value and high-risk (perceived or actual) buildings and structures, which can in turn be translated into improved public health, safety, and security. The key is to choose and apply the right assessment tool to match the structure in question. Design-for-reliability concepts can be applied to buildings, bridges, transportation sys- tems, dams, and other structures. The use of these concepts could have the dual benefits of lowering life-cycle costs by reducing the necessity for maintenance and repair and of enhancing the saiiety and security of the structure's users.

  1. Risk Management RM | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risk Management RM Risk Management RM This tool is the process of continuous and iterative identification and control of project risks and opportunities. Risks can be technical, financial, or programmatic. The goal for the risk management system is to either avoid the risk's threat by taking preemptive action or to minimize the risks negative impacts on project performance. Project opportunities identified through the project risk management process can be handled in a similar manner with the

  2. DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline May ...

  3. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes risk management training, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  4. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Reduced order models for prediction of groundwater quality impacts from CO‚āā and brine leakage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Liange; Carroll, Susan; Bianchi, Marco; Mansoor, Kayyum; Sun, Yunwei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-12-31

    A careful assessment of the risk associated with geologic CO‚āā storage is critical to the deployment of large-scale storage projects. A potential risk is the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by the leakage of CO‚āā and brine leakage from deep subsurface reservoirs. In probabilistic risk assessment studies, numerical modeling is the primary tool employed to assess risk. However, the application of traditional numerical models to fully evaluate the impact of CO‚āā leakage on groundwater can be computationally complex, demanding large processing times and resources, and involving large uncertainties. As an alternative, reduced order models (ROMs) can be used as highlymore¬†¬Ľ efficient surrogates for the complex process-based numerical models. In this study, we represent the complex hydrogeological and geochemical conditions in a heterogeneous aquifer and subsequent risk by developing and using two separate ROMs. The first ROM is derived from a model that accounts for the heterogeneous flow and transport conditions in the presence of complex leakage functions for CO‚āā and brine. The second ROM is obtained from models that feature similar, but simplified flow and transport conditions, and allow for a more complex representation of all relevant geochemical reactions. To quantify possible impacts to groundwater aquifers, the basic risk metric is taken as the aquifer volume in which the water quality of the aquifer may be affected by an underlying CO‚āā storage project. The integration of the two ROMs provides an estimate of the impacted aquifer volume taking into account uncertainties in flow, transport and chemical conditions. These two ROMs can be linked in a comprehensive system level model for quantitative risk assessment of the deep storage reservoir, wellbore leakage, and shallow aquifer impacts to assess the collective risk of CO‚āā storage projects.¬ę¬†less

  6. Reduced order models for prediction of groundwater quality impacts from CO? and brine leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Carroll, Susan; Bianchi, Marco; Mansoor, Kayyum; Sun, Yunwei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-12-31

    A careful assessment of the risk associated with geologic CO? storage is critical to the deployment of large-scale storage projects. A potential risk is the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by the leakage of CO? and brine leakage from deep subsurface reservoirs. In probabilistic risk assessment studies, numerical modeling is the primary tool employed to assess risk. However, the application of traditional numerical models to fully evaluate the impact of CO? leakage on groundwater can be computationally complex, demanding large processing times and resources, and involving large uncertainties. As an alternative, reduced order models (ROMs) can be used as highly efficient surrogates for the complex process-based numerical models. In this study, we represent the complex hydrogeological and geochemical conditions in a heterogeneous aquifer and subsequent risk by developing and using two separate ROMs. The first ROM is derived from a model that accounts for the heterogeneous flow and transport conditions in the presence of complex leakage functions for CO? and brine. The second ROM is obtained from models that feature similar, but simplified flow and transport conditions, and allow for a more complex representation of all relevant geochemical reactions. To quantify possible impacts to groundwater aquifers, the basic risk metric is taken as the aquifer volume in which the water quality of the aquifer may be affected by an underlying CO? storage project. The integration of the two ROMs provides an estimate of the impacted aquifer volume taking into account uncertainties in flow, transport and chemical conditions. These two ROMs can be linked in a comprehensive system level model for quantitative risk assessment of the deep storage reservoir, wellbore leakage, and shallow aquifer impacts to assess the collective risk of CO? storage projects.

  7. Managing risk in software systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, S.K.; Jansma, R.M.; Murphy, M.D.

    1995-07-01

    A methodology for risk management in the design of software systems is presented. It spans security, safety, and correct operation of software within the context of its environment, and produces a risk analysis and documented risk management strategy. It is designed to be iteratively applied, to attain appropriate levels of detail throughout the analysis. The methodology and supporting tools are discussed. The methodology is critiqued relative to other research in the field. Some sample applications of the methodology are presented.

  8. EMAB Risk Subcommittee Interim Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ADVISORY BOARD Incorporating Risk and Sustainability into Decision Making Submitted by the ... Secondly, the Subcommittee is tasked with reviewing"incorporating sustainability into the ...

  9. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO), ORISE provides crisis and risk communication support through the management of its Joint Information Center (JIC)...

  10. R00475--FM Risk Mgmt

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to project success. The risk identification process on a project is typically one of brain- storming, and the usual rules of brainstorming apply: * The full project team should...

  11. New system reduces sludge management costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roll, R.R. ); Koser, M.R. )

    1993-06-01

    This article describes a recently completed a $2.7-million project to upgrade the sludge dewatering and stabilizing system at a 48-mgd wastewater treatment facility in Niagara Fall, New York. The work was necessitated by the deteriorated condition of the plant's original vacuum filters and increasing costs to landfill the dewatered sludge. The new equipment has restored sludge production capacity while reducing the final material's moisture content. The Niagara Falls plant is one of the few municipal physical-chemical treatment plants built in this country, and is the largest still functioning. Constructed in the mid-1970s, it was designed to treat a combination of domestic sewage and industrial wastes. One third of the flow and one half of the solids are industrial in nature. The changes made reduced electrical power consumption and sanitary landfill costs.

  12. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruether, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

  13. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-08-22

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

  14. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Chau, Hoi Fung

    1998-01-01

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  15. Cascaded Microinverter PV System for Reduced Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellus, Daniel R.; Ely, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-29

    In this project, a team led by Delphi will develop and demonstrate a novel cascaded photovoltaic (PV) inverter architecture using advanced components. This approach will reduce the cost and improve the performance of medium and large-sized PV systems. The overall project objective is to develop, build, and test a modular 11-level cascaded three-phase inverter building block for photovoltaic applications and to develop and analyze the associated commercialization plan. The system will be designed to utilize photovoltaic panels and will supply power to the electric grid at 208 VAC, 60 Hz 3-phase. With the proposed topology, three inverters, each with an embedded controller, will monitor and control each of the cascade sections, reducing costs associated with extra control boards. This report details the final disposition on this project.

  16. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  17. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  18. NREL Transportation Project to Reduce Fuel Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Project to Reduce Fuel Usage For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Barba Golden, Colo., Mar. 23, 2001 - The Jefferson County Seniors Resource Center (SRC) Paratransit Service has become an important part of Eulalia Gaillard's life since her stroke in 1996. She calls on SRC to drive her to cardiologist, neurologist and chiropractor appointments each week. "It's wonderful," Gaillard says. "I'd give this program 150 plus in regards

  19. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  20. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Arvizu, Dan

    2013-05-29

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

  1. Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Diesel | Department of Energy Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies 2002_deer_phillips.pdf (62.04 KB) More Documents & Publications Diesel Use in California Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market Dumping Dirty Diesels:

  2. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2005-02-15

    A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

  3. Understanding Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors Impacting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors Impacting Climate Change - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery

  4. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvizu, Dan

    2010-01-01

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

  5. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  6. Options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-08-01

    Improvements in energy efficiency can significantly reduce the annual growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Such improvements occur when energy intensity is reduced; no reduction in energy services is required. Using the concept of cost of conserved energy'' to develop conservation supply curves similar to resource supply curves, researchers consistently find that electricity and natural gas savings of nearly 50% of current consumption are possible for US buildings. Such reductions in energy consumption directly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. To capture these savings, we must continue to develop energy-efficient technologies and strategies. This paper describes three recent energy-efficient technologies that benefited from energy conservation research and development (R D) funding: high-frequency ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows. Other advanced technologies and strategies of spectrally selective windows, superwindows, electrochromic windows, advanced insulation, low-flow showerheads, improved recessed lamp fixtures, whitening surfaces and planting urban trees, daylighting, and thermal energy storage are also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Development of reduced crude cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hettinger, W.P. Jr. )

    1987-08-01

    In 1974 OPEC imposed an embargo on oil to the United States and caused a rapid rise in the price of a barrel of oil. At the time of the embargo, Ashland imported a considerable portion of its oil from the Middle East, thus raising the question of oil availability. As the problem increased in severity, Messrs. George Meyer, Oliver Zandona and Llyod Busch, began to explore alternative ways of squeezing more product from a given barrel of crude. After considering many alternatives, they arrived at the innovative thought that it might be possible to catalytically crack the 1050{degree}F plus fraction of the barrel directly to gasoline which would in effect, give them an additional volume of crude oil. Also, if vacuum fractionation were eliminated and if the entire 650{degree}F plus (reduced crude) portion of the barrel processed, this would further reduce operating costs. With these objectives and some new process innovations in mind, they began reduced crude cracking experimentation in a small 12,000 B/D FCC operating unit at Louisville. It was from these goals, concepts and a small operating unit, that the RCC process was born.

  8. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  9. Comparative risk analysis for the Rocky Flats Plant Integrated Project Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.E.; Shain, D.I.

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Flats Plant is developing a comprehensive planning strategy that will support transition of the Rocky Flats Plant from a nuclear weapons production facility to site cleanup and final disposition. Final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant materials and contaminants requires consideration of the interrelated nature of sitewide problems, such as material movement and disposition, facility and land use endstates, costs, relative risks to workers and the public, and waste disposition. Comparative Risk Analysis employs both incremental risk and cumulative risk evaluations to compare risk from postulated options or endstates. Comparative Risk Analysis is an analytical tool for the Rocky Flats Plant Integrated Project Planning which can assist a decision-maker in evaluating relative risks among proposed remedial options or future endstates. It addresses the cumulative risks imposed by the Rocky Flats Plant and provides risk information, both human health and ecological, to aid in reducing unnecessary resource and monetary expenditures. Currently, there is no approved methodology that aggregates various risk estimates. Along with academic and field expert review, the Comparative Risk Analysis methodology is being reviewed and refined. A Rocky Flats Plant Risk Assessment Focus Group was established. Stakeholder involvement in the development provides an opportunity to influence the information delivered to a decision-maker. This paper discusses development of the methodology.

  10. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated

  11. Computer Security Risk Assessment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-11

    LAVA/CS (LAVA for Computer Security) is an application of the Los Alamos Vulnerability Assessment (LAVA) methodology specific to computer and information security. The software serves as a generic tool for identifying vulnerabilities in computer and information security safeguards systems. Although it does not perform a full risk assessment, the results from its analysis may provide valuable insights into security problems. LAVA/CS assumes that the system is exposed to both natural and environmental hazards and tomore¬†¬Ľ deliberate malevolent actions by either insiders or outsiders. The user in the process of answering the LAVA/CS questionnaire identifies missing safeguards in 34 areas ranging from password management to personnel security and internal audit practices. Specific safeguards protecting a generic set of assets (or targets) from a generic set of threats (or adversaries) are considered. There are four generic assets: the facility, the organization''s environment; the hardware, all computer-related hardware; the software, the information in machine-readable form stored both on-line or on transportable media; and the documents and displays, the information in human-readable form stored as hard-copy materials (manuals, reports, listings in full-size or microform), film, and screen displays. Two generic threats are considered: natural and environmental hazards, storms, fires, power abnormalities, water and accidental maintenance damage; and on-site human threats, both intentional and accidental acts attributable to a perpetrator on the facility''s premises.¬ę¬†less

  12. The risk assessment information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, S.B.; Bonczek, R.R.; McGinn, C.W.; Land, M.L.; Bloom, L.D.; Sample, B.E.; Dolislager, F.G.

    1998-06-01

    In an effort to provide service-oriented environmental risk assessment expertise, the Department of Energy (DOE) Center for Risk Excellence (CRE) and DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) are sponsoring Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a web-based system for disseminating risk tools and information to its users. This system, the Risk Assessment Information System (RAIS), was initially developed to support the site-specific needs of the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program. With support from the CRE, the system is currently being expanded to benefit all DOE risk information users and can be tailored to meet site-specific needs. Taking advantage of searchable and executable databases, menu-driven queries, and data downloads, using the latest World Wide Web technologies, the RAIS offers essential tools that are used in the risk assessment process or anywhere from project scoping to implementation. The RAIS tools can be located directly at http://risk.lsd.ornl.gov/homepage/rap{_}tool.htm or through the CRE`s homepage at http://www.doe.gov/riskcenter/home.html.

  13. Risk Reduction with a Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, William W.; Broadhead, Ron; Mundorf, William R.

    2003-03-06

    A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, was developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs.

  14. Reducing gain shifts in photomultiplier tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohn, Charles E.

    1976-01-01

    A means is provided for reducing gain shifts in multiplier tubes due to varying event count rates. It includes means for limiting the number of cascaded, active dynodes of the multiplier tube to a predetermined number with the last of predetermined number of dynodes being the output terminal of the tube. This output is applied to an amplifier to make up for the gain sacrificed by not totally utilizing all available active stages of the tube. Further reduction is obtained by illuminating the predetermined number of dynodes with a light source of such intensity that noise appearing at the output dynode associated with the illumination is negligible.

  15. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  16. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Comaskey, Brian; Sutton, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

  17. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

    1994-04-19

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

  18. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-10-21

    The design is given of an apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives underground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accommodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure.

  19. Method and apparatus for reducing mixed waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Michael L.; Perez, Jr., Joseph M.; Chapman, Chris C.; Peters, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for in-can waste reduction. The method is mixing waste with combustible material prior to placing the waste into a waste reduction vessel. The combustible portion is ignited, thereby reducing combustible material to ash and non-combustible material to a slag. Further combustion or heating may be used to sinter or melt the ash. The apparatus is a waste reduction vessel having receiving canister connection means on a first end, and a waste/combustible mixture inlet on a second end. An oxygen supply is provided to support combustion of the combustible mixture.

  20. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  1. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-01-28

    An apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure is particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives under ground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accomodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure. (10 claims)

  2. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  3. Evaluation of risk prioritization and budget allocation methods for pollution prevention activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, J.; Jones, E.; Lmont, A.; Ladmn, T.; Watz, J.

    1997-01-01

    This study reviews the structure of two main risk prioritization budget allocation methods developed by the DOE Risk-Based Priority Mode (RPM) and Management Evaluation Matrix (MEM). It identifies potential augmentations to the process that will address both risk reduction and cost-effective investments of finite resources for future Environmental Management activities. The evaluation was performed in accordance with the EM ten-year vision and principles for site cleanup. The evaluation and recommendations in this report strive to reflect four key principles, namely to eliminate the most urgent risks, reduce mortgage and support costs to make funds available for further risk reduction, protect worker health and safety, and reduce the generation of wastes.

  4. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Y.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.; Jessee, M. A.; Mertyurek, U.

    2013-07-01

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has considerably improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This manuscript extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system. (authors)

  5. Recommendations for reducing ambiguity in written procedures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous work instructions (WIs) and operating procedures (OPs) can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. This report outlines some of the sources of ambiguity in written English and describes three recommendations for reducing ambiguity in WIs and OPs. The recommendations are based on commonly used research techniques in the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology. The first recommendation is to gather empirical data that can be used to improve the recommended word lists that are provided to technical writers. The second recommendation is to have a review in which new WIs and OPs and checked for ambiguities and clarity. The third recommendation is to use self-paced reading time studies to identify any remaining ambiguities before the new WIs and OPs are put into use. If these three steps are followed for new WIs and OPs, the likelihood of human errors related to ambiguity could be greatly reduced.

  6. Common trenching reduces damage to buried utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfiere, E.P.

    1982-09-01

    Since 1972 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. has established a utility corridor, installing 503 miles of buried gas mains and electric cables in a common trench. Their guidelines for common trenching included (1) the developer's responsibility for providing a subdivision map showing the location of each sidewalk, lot, and roadway, (2) an easement strip paralleling the front lot (street) line that is to be cleared and graded by the developer before construction is started, (3) an electric planning department to prepare detailed construction drawings, coordinate plans with other utilities, determine the responsibility for trenching and backfilling, and determine that all the necessary easements have been secured, and (4) construction specifications varying the width and depth of the trench with the number and type of utilties occupying the joint trench. Advantages of the common trench program comprise reduced exposure to digups, communication and concern for each utility's facility, water and sewer construction installed before the common trench, and cost sharing that would reduce each facility's construction and restoration costs.

  7. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‚Äėsplitting‚Äô a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore¬†¬Ľ or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.¬ę¬†less

  8. Tank waste remediation system risk management list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L.B.

    1995-10-31

    The Tank Waste Remedation System (TWRS) Risk Management List and it`s subset of critical risks, the Critical Risk Management List, provide a tool to senior RL and WHC management (Level-1 and -2) to manage programmatic risks that may significantly impact the TWRS program. The programmatic risks include cost, schedule, and performance risks. Performance risk includes technical risk, supportability risk (such as maintainability and availability), and external risk (i.e., beyond program control, for example, changes in regulations). The risk information includes a description, its impacts, as evaluation of the likelihood, consequences and risk value, possible mitigating actions, and responsible RL and WHC managers. The issues that typically form the basis for the risks are presented in a separate table and the affected functions are provided on the management lists.

  9. PRA and Risk Informed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernsen, Sidney A.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Balkey, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has introduced a risk based approach into Section XI that covers Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. The risk based approach requires application of the probabilistic risk assessments (PRA). Because no industry consensus standard existed for PRAs, ASME has developed a standard to evaluate the quality level of an available PRA needed to support a given risk based application. The paper describes the PRA standard, Section XI application of PRAs, and plans for broader applications of PRAs to other ASME nuclear codes and standards. The paper addresses several specific topics of interest to Section XI. Important consideration are special methods (surrogate components) used to overcome the lack of PRA treatments of passive components in PRAs. The approach allows calculations of conditional core damage probabilities both for component failures that cause initiating events and failures in standby systems that decrease the availability of these systems. The paper relates the explicit risk based methods of the new Section XI code cases to the implicit consideration of risk used in the development of Section XI. Other topics include the needed interactions of ISI engineers, plant operating staff, PRA specialists, and members of expert panels that review the risk based programs.

  10. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  11. Progress toward risk informed regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    For the last several years, the NRC, with encouragement from the industry, has been moving in the direction of risk informed regulation. This is consistent with the regulatory principle of efficiency, formally adopted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1991, which requires that regulatory activities be consistent with the degree of risk reduction they achieve. Probabilistic risk analysis has become the tool of choice for selecting the best of several alternatives. Closely related to risk informed regulation is the development of performance based rules. Such rules focus on the end result to be achieved. They do not specify the process, but instead establish the goals to be reached and how the achievement of those goals is to be judged. The inspection and enforcement activity is based on whether or not the goals have been met. The author goes on to offer comments on the history of the development of this process and its probable development in the future. He also addresses some issues which must be resolved or at least acknowledged. The success of risk informed regulation ultimately depends on having sufficiently reliable data to allow quantification of regulatory alternatives in terms of relative risk. Perhaps the area of human reliability and organizational performance has the greatest potential for improvement in reactor safety. The ability to model human performance is significantly less developed that the ability to model mechanical or electrical systems. The move toward risk informed, performance based regulation provides an unusual, perhaps unique, opportunity to establish a more rational, more effective basis for regulation.

  12. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    U-235 and uranium depleted in U-235) are cooled and accumulated in solid metallic form in canisters. The collected product and tails material is weighed and transferred into certified, critically safe, shipping containers (DOT specification 6M with 2R containment vessel). These will be temporarily stored, and then shipped offsite either for use by a fuel fabricator, or for disposal. Tails material will be packaged for disposal. A criticality risk assessment was performed for AVLIS IPD runs. In this analysis, the likelihood of occurrence of a criticality was examined. For the AVLIS process, there are a number of areas that have been specifically examined to assess whether or not the frequency of occurrence of a criticality is credible (frequency of occurrence > 10-6/yr). In this paper, we discuss only two of the areas: the separator and canister operations.

  13. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  14. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  15. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-03-07

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular flat front face comprising a plurality of load bearing struts of a predetermined size attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides and top thereof, a pair of pliable opposing flat sheets having an outside edge portion attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides thereof and an upper edge with a predetermined curve; the opposing flat sheets being bent and attached to the struts to form effective curved airfoil shapes, and a top pliable flat sheet disposed adjacent the top of the flat front face and having predetermined curved side edges, which, when the top sheet is bent and attached to the struts to form an effective curved airfoil shape, mate with the curved upper edges of the opposing sheets to complete the aerodynamic device.

  16. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-07-30

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  17. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

    2011-08-23

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  18. Method of data communications with reduced latency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A; Parker, Jeffrey J

    2013-11-05

    Data communications with reduced latency, including: writing, by a producer, a descriptor and message data into at least two descriptor slots of a descriptor buffer, the descriptor buffer comprising allocated computer memory segmented into descriptor slots, each descriptor slot having a fixed size, the descriptor buffer having a header pointer that identifies a next descriptor slot to be processed by a DMA controller, the descriptor buffer having a tail pointer that identifies a descriptor slot for entry of a next descriptor in the descriptor buffer; recording, by the producer, in the descriptor a value signifying that message data has been written into descriptor slots; and setting, by the producer, in dependence upon the recorded value, a tail pointer to point to a next open descriptor slot.

  19. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  20. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Anan

    2010-12-15

    The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, {var_epsilon}. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

  1. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rykoff, E.S.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Annis, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Hansen, S.M.; Hao, J.; Johnston, D.E.; McKay, T.A.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  2. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Risk Analysis Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01

    The Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), operated on behalf of the ratepayers of the PNW by BPA and other Federal agencies, faces many uncertainties during the FY 2007-2009 rate period. Among these uncertainties, the largest revolve around hydro conditions, market prices and river operations for fish recovery. In order to provide a high probability of making its U.S. Treasury payments, BPA performs a Risk Analysis as part of its rate-making process. In this Risk Analysis, BPA identifies key risks, models their relationships, and then analyzes their impacts on net revenues (total revenues less expenses). BPA subsequently evaluates in the ToolKit Model the Treasury Payment Probability (TPP) resulting from the rates, risks, and risk mitigation measures described here and in the Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS). If the TPP falls short of BPA's standard, additional risk mitigation revenues, such as PNRR and CRAC revenues are incorporated in the modeling in ToolKit until the TPP standard is met. Increased wholesale market price volatility and six years of drought have significantly changed the profile of risk and uncertainty facing BPA and its stakeholders. These present new challenges for BPA in its effort to keep its power rates as low as possible while fully meeting its obligations to the U.S. Treasury. As a result, the risk BPA faces in not receiving the level of secondary revenues that have been credited to power rates before receiving those funds is greater. In addition to market price volatility, BPA also faces uncertainty around the financial impacts of operations for fish programs in FY 2006 and in the FY 2007-2009 rate period. A new Biological Opinion or possible court-ordered change to river operations in FY 2006 through FY 2009 may reduce BPA's net revenues included Initial Proposal. Finally, the FY 2007-2009 risk analysis includes new operational risks as well as a more comprehensive analysis of non-operating risks. Both the operational

  3. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L.

    1990-12-31

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  4. Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Priorities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  5. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard builds upon Executive Order (E.O.) 11988 and is to be incorporated into existing Federal department and agency processes used to implement E.O. 11988.

  6. Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of the PTRA program is to develop new tools and approaches for understanding, limiting, and managing the risks of proliferation and physical security for fuel cycle options. NE, in...

  7. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce ...

  8. Risk Management Tool Attributes: | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risk Management Tool Attributes: Risk Management Tool Attributes: Risk Management Tool Attributes: (140.27 KB) More Documents & Publications Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency Idaho Operations AMWTP Fact Sheet Greenpower Trap Mufflerl System

  9. Mobius Risk Group LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mobius Risk Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mobius Risk Group LLC Place: Houston, Texas Zip: TX 77056 Product: A risk advisor to energy-consuming companies, utilities...

  10. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.; Hannaman, G.W.; Kryska, P.

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  11. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Risk Ranking Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking The CNS has purview of over ninety EM nuclear facilities across the DOE complex. To ensure that limited resources are applied in a risk-informed and balanced approach, the CNS performed a methodical assessment of the EM nuclear facilities. This risk-informed approach provides a data-driven foundation on which to construct a balanced set of operating plans and staff assignments. 2015 Risk Analysis Methodology.jpg

  12. Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

  13. Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by ...

  14. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and ...

  15. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle ...

  16. On-Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    On-Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) On-Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) October 8...

  17. Innovative Approach Reduces Costs of Removing Contaminated Oil...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Approach Reduces Costs of Removing Contaminated Oil from Paducah Site Innovative Approach Reduces Costs of Removing Contaminated Oil from Paducah Site January 27, 2016 - ...

  18. Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - ...

  19. Reduced spin-Hall effects from magnetic proximity (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced spin-Hall effects from magnetic proximity Prev Next Title: Reduced spin-Hall effects from magnetic proximity Authors: Zhang, Wei ; Jungfleisch, Matthias B. ; Jiang, ...

  20. Chicago Solar Express Reduces Costs, Wait Times | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chicago Solar Express Reduces Costs, Wait Times Chicago Solar Express Reduces Costs, Wait Times October 28, 2014 - 10:48am Addthis The Solar Express program in Chicago, ...

  1. Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in...

  2. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in ... More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review ...

  3. DOE Announces Webinars on Reducing Energy Use in Buildings, Integratin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Energy Use in Buildings, Integrating Bioenergy into the Classroom, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Reducing Energy Use in Buildings, Integrating Bioenergy into the ...

  4. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting ...

  5. Reduced shedding regenerator and method (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Reduced shedding regenerator and method A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the ...

  6. Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates for ...

  7. Next-Generation Power Electronics: Reducing Energy Waste and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next-Generation Power Electronics: Reducing Energy Waste and Powering the Future Next-Generation Power Electronics: Reducing Energy Waste and Powering the Future January 15, 2014 - ...

  8. Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange ...

  9. White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Federal Government White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ...

  10. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption. ...

  11. Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat ...

  12. New Truck Stop Electrification Station Maps Help Truckers Reduce...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capabilities because reducing heavy-duty truck idling is an important step in reducing ... fuels and vehicles, fuel blends, fuel economy, hybrid vehicles, and idle reduction

  13. Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands June 30, ...

  14. Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for ... is looking at innovative ways to reduce thermal energy storage (TES) system costs. ...

  15. Reduced Call-Backs with High Performance Production Builders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduced Call-Backs with High Performance Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation Reduced Call-Backs with High Performance Production Builders - Building America Top ...

  16. Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Comments on RFI on ...

  17. A Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates with Low Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates with Low Temperature Chemistry Title A Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates with Low Temperature Chemistry Publication Type...

  18. Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat & Cool Water Heating Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings Reduce Hot Water Use for ... Home Cooling Systems Home Heating Systems Heat Pump Systems Water Heating ...

  19. EERE Success Story-New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption EERE Success Story-New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The New York ...

  20. Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) was established to assist DOE in the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety related activities.

  1. Envisory Financial Risk Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Envisory Financial Risk Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Envisory Financial Risk Management Place: Mnchen, Bavaria, Germany Zip: 80331 Sector: Renewable Energy...

  2. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes trainings in risk management, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  3. Exploiting Data Similarity to Reduce Memory Footprints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; Franklin, D; Sherwood, T; Chong, F T

    2011-01-28

    Memory size has long limited large-scale applications on high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Since compute nodes frequently do not have swap space, physical memory often limits problem sizes. Increasing core counts per chip and power density constraints, which limit the number of DIMMs per node, have exacerbated this problem. Further, DRAM constitutes a significant portion of overall HPC system cost. Therefore, instead of adding more DRAM to the nodes, mechanisms to manage memory usage more efficiently - preferably transparently - could increase effective DRAM capacity and thus the benefit of multicore nodes for HPC systems. MPI application processes often exhibit significant data similarity. These data regions occupy multiple physical locations across the individual rank processes within a multicore node and thus offer a potential savings in memory capacity. These regions, primarily residing in heap, are dynamic, which makes them difficult to manage statically. Our novel memory allocation library, SBLLmalloc, automatically identifies identical memory blocks and merges them into a single copy. SBLLmalloc does not require application or OS changes since we implement it as a user-level library. Overall, we demonstrate that SBLLmalloc reduces the memory footprint of a range of MPI applications by 32.03% on average and up to 60.87%. Further, SBLLmalloc supports problem sizes for IRS over 21.36% larger than using standard memory management techniques, thus significantly increasing effective system size. Similarly, SBLLmalloc requires 43.75% fewer nodes than standard memory management techniques to solve an AMG problem.

  4. Automated software system reduces leak investigation time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    With more than a million customers in the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island, Brooklyn Union Gas Co. is one of the largest natural gas distributors in the US. In September 1993, the company began working with MapFrame Corp., Dallas, to develop a new program to automate their underground leak investigation process. Automating this process would greatly reduce time in finding a leaking main and result in improved customer relations and productivity gains. Keys to the success of this program were in using pen computers, wireless communications, and a jointly-developed software. MapFrame and Brooklyn Union Gas agreed that the application should allow onsite users to: display a model of the affected area using map data to show streets, services, buildings, manholes, street lights, and other landmarks; record bar hole readings, manipulate data, and use diagnostic tools to analyze gas concentrations; update leak records (per legal requirements); and integrate Map Data. The paper reviews this program.

  5. Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R

    2007-11-09

    The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Knoxville Utilities Board Reduces Petroleum

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Use Knoxville Utilities Board Reduces Petroleum Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Knoxville Utilities Board Reduces Petroleum Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Knoxville Utilities Board Reduces Petroleum Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Knoxville Utilities Board Reduces Petroleum Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Knoxville Utilities Board Reduces Petroleum Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Reduce Vehicle Idling in San

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Antonio, Texas Students Reduce Vehicle Idling in San Antonio, Texas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Reduce Vehicle Idling in San Antonio, Texas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Reduce Vehicle Idling in San Antonio, Texas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Reduce Vehicle Idling in San Antonio, Texas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Students Reduce Vehicle Idling in San Antonio, Texas on

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Trucks Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious

  9. Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

    2014-11-18

    Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

  10. Role of LEPCs in risk management and risk communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mannan, M.

    1995-12-31

    Under Section 112(r) of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required to develop regulations that would require development and implementation of risk management programs at facilities that manufacture, process, use, store, or otherwise handle regulated substances in quantities that exceed specified threshold quantities. On January 31, 1994, EPA published the final rule establishing the List of Regulated Substances and Thresholds for Accidental Release Prevention. The proposed rule will require covered facilities to develop and implement a risk management program. The proposed rule will also require facilities to communicate various information to the local emergency planning committee (LEPC). This information may be provided in the form of consultation and communication during the development of various elements of the risk management program and/or by providing access to the risk management plan (RMP). These requirements not only place an additional regulatory burden on facilities but also create the need for the LEPCs to start planning for strategies to deal with significant amount of technical information in a meaningful and effective manner. This paper presents a summary of EPA`s proposed rule, the role of LEPCs in the implementation of many aspects of the rule, and a description of the potential contents of an RMP. Covered facilities as well as the LEPCs may gain a significant advantage by engaging in early dialogue and proactive education to determine mutual needs.

  11. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  12. Initial Decision and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-29

    Decision and Risk Analysis capabilities will be developed for industry consideration and possible adoption within Year 1. These tools will provide a methodology for merging qualitative ranking of technology maturity and acknowledged risk contributors with quantitative metrics that drive investment decision processes. Methods and tools will be initially introduced as applications to the A650.1 case study, but modular spreadsheets and analysis routines will be offered to industry collaborators as soon as possible to stimulate user feedback and co-development opportunities.

  13. Overview of the Hanford risk management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, T.G.

    1998-03-26

    The Project Hanford Management Contract called for the enhancement of site-wide decision processes, and development of a Hanford Risk Management Plan to adopt or develop a risk management system for the Hanford Site. This Plan provides a consistent foundation for Site issues and addresses site-wide management of risks of all types. It supports the Department of Energy planning and sitewide decision making policy. Added to this requirement is a risk performance report to characterize the risk management accomplishments. This paper presents the development of risk management within the context of work planning and performance. Also discussed are four risk elements which add value to the context.

  14. Managing risks and hazardous in industrial operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almaula, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate that it makes good business sense to identify risks and hazards of an operation and take appropriate steps to manage them effectively. Developing and implementing an effective risk and hazard management plan also contibutes to other industry requirements and standards. Development of a risk management system, key elements of a risk management plan, and hazards and risk analysis methods are outlined. Comparing potential risk to the cost of prevention is also discussed. It is estimated that the cost of developing and preparing the first risk management plan varies between $50,000 to $200,000. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. LONG-TERM TECHNETIUM INTERACTIONS WITH REDUCING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Lilley, M.; Almond, P.; Powell, B.

    2011-03-15

    Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O{sub 2}; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured K{sub d} values, such that they are either very low, {approx}1 mL/g, or they are very high {approx}1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas in

  16. Threshold Values for Identification of Contamination Predicted by Reduced-Order Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energyís (DOEís) National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project is developing reduced-order models to evaluate potential impacts on underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) if CO2 or brine leaks from deep CO2 storage reservoirs. Threshold values, below which there would be no predicted impacts, were determined for portions of two aquifer systems. These threshold values were calculated using an interwell approach for determining background groundwater concentrations that is an adaptation of methods described in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencyís Unified Guidance for Statistical Analysis of Groundwater Monitoring Data at RCRA Facilities.

  17. Threshold Values for Identification of Contamination Predicted by Reduced-Order Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Last, George V.; Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project is developing reduced-order models to evaluate potential impacts on underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) if CO2 or brine leaks from deep CO2 storage reservoirs. Threshold values, below which there would be no predicted impacts, were determined for portions of two aquifer systems. These threshold values were calculated using an interwell approach for determining background groundwater concentrations that is an adaptation of methods described in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Unified Guidance for Statistical Analysis of Groundwater Monitoring Data at RCRA Facilities.

  18. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  19. Mathematical models for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikin, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    The use of mathematical models in risk assessment results in the proper understanding of many aspects of chemical exposure and allows to make more actual decisions. Our project ISCRA (Integrated Systems of Complex Risk Assessment) has the aim to create integrated systems of algorythms for prediction of pollutants` exposure on human and environmental health and to apply them for environmental monitoring, and decision-making. Mathematical model {open_quotes}MASTER{close_quotes} (Mathematical Algorythm of SimulaTion of Environmental Risk) represents the complex of algorythmical blocks and is intended for the prediction of danger of pollutants` exposure for human and environmental risk. Model LIMES (LIMits EStimation) is developed for prognosis of safety concentrations of pollutants in the environment both in the case of isolated exposure and in the case of complex exposure for concrete location. Model QUANT (QUANtity of Toxicant) represents the multicompartmental physiological pharmacokinetic model describing absorption, distribution, fate, metabolism, and elimination of pollutants in the body of different groups of human population, as a result of the different kind of exposure. Decision support system CLEVER (Complex LEVE1 of Risk) predicts the probability and the degree of development of unfavourable effects as result of exposure of pollutant on human health. System is based on the data of epidemiological and experimental researches and includes several mathematical models for analysis of {open_quotes}dose-time-response{close_quotes} relations and information about clinical symptoms of diseases. Model CEP (Combination Effect Prognosis) contains probabilistic algorythms for forecasting the effect of simultaneous impact of several factors polluting the environment. The result of the program work is the prediction of an independent exposure of two or more factors, and intensification or weakening of exposure in depending on factors` interactions.

  20. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  1. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  2. A Procedure for Using FMECA to Assess High-Risk Healthcare Processes (PSAM-0266)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.

    2006-01-12

    An applied research firm collaborated with staff at three community hospitals to apply Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) to reduce risk from several high-risk healthcare processes. This included medication ordering and delivery, X-Ray labelling, blood transfusion, prevention of wrong site surgery, prevention of patient falls and antibiotic IV administration. The collaborating team developed its own successful FMECA approach and an eight-step procedure to gather data, conduct FMECA sessions, identify medical process weaknesses and risk reduction measures.

  3. National Academy of Sciences survey on risks associated with nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A critical review of the literature pertaining to the risks associated with nuclear electric power was sponsored by the Committee on Science and Public Policy of the National Academy of Sciences. Although the full report (consisting of over 25 chapters) has not yet been published, this paper presents highlights from the Summary and Synthesis Chapter, which was released separately. Of the risks whose magnitudes can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, the most serious is the exposure of future generations to /sup 14/C from reactors and reprocessing plants. Prospects are good for reducing this risk considerably, since carbon can be collected and stored as waste.

  4. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  5. RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Balch; Ron Broadhead

    2005-03-01

    Incomplete or sparse data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduce a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results when working with sparse data. State-of-the-art expert exploration tools, relying on a database, and computer maps generated by neural networks and user inputs, have been developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk has been reduced with the use of these properly verified and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tools.'' Through the course of this project, FEE Tools and supporting software were developed for two producing formations in southeast New Mexico. Tools of this type can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In today's oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lack the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, volatile oil prices, and scarcity of domestic exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tools benefit a diverse group in the U.S., allowing a more efficient use of scarce funds, and potentially reducing dependence on foreign oil and providing lower product prices for consumers.

  6. The application of risk-based inspection methodology in the petroleum and petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.T.

    1996-12-01

    Nineteen petrochemical companies are currently sponsoring a project to develop risk-based inspection (RBI) methodology for application in the refining and petrochemical industry. This paper describes that particular RBI methodology and gives an update of the progress toward developing an industry standard (API Recommended Practice 580) that will allow all companies to access the technology for their own benefit. Also included is a review of the first pilot project to validate the methodology by applying RBI to several existing refining units. The failure of pressure equipment in a process unit can have several undesirable effects. For the purpose of RBI analysis, the API RBI program categorizes these effects into four basic risk outcomes: flammable events, toxic releases, major environmental damage, and business interruption losses. API RBI is both a qualitative and quantitative process for understanding and reducing these risks associated with operating pressure equipment. This paper shows how API RBI assesses the potential consequences of a failure of the pressure boundary, as well as assessing the likelihood of failure. Risk-based inspection prioritizes risk levels in a systematic manner so that the owner-user can then plan an inspection program that focuses more resources on the higher risk equipment; while possibly saving inspection resources that are not doing an effective job of reducing risk.

  7. Risk-based inspection methodology for the petroleum and petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.T.; Aller, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    Seventeen API member companies are currently sponsoring a project to develop risk-based inspection (RBI) methodology for application in the refining and petrochemical industry. This paper describes that particular RBI methodology and gives an update of the progress toward developing an industry standard (API Recommended Practice 580) that will allow all companies to access the technology for their own benefit. Also included is a review of the first pilot project to validate the methodology by applying RBI to several existing refining units. The failure of pressure equipment in a process unit can have several undesirable effects. For the purpose of RBI analysis, this program categorizes these effects into four basic risk outcomes: flammable event, toxic releases, major environmental damage, and business interruption losses. RBI is both a qualitative and quantitative process for understanding and reducing the risks associated with operating pressure equipment. This paper will show how RBI assesses the potential consequences of a failure of the pressure boundary, as well as assessing the likelihood of failure. Risk-based inspection prioritizes risk levels in a systematic manner so that the owner-user can then plan an inspection program that focuses more resources on the higher risk equipment; while possibly saving inspection resources that are not doing an effective job of reducing risk.

  8. Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems Energy Department Announces 7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems November 15, 2011 - 4:52pm ...

  9. Construction of energy-stable projection-based reduced order...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Construction of energy-stable projection-based reduced order models Prev Next Title: Construction of energy-stable projection-based reduced order models Our paper aims to ...

  10. Energy Department Announces Up to $25 Million to Reduce Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Up to 25 Million to Reduce Costs of Algal Biofuels Energy Department Announces Up to 25 Million to Reduce Costs of Algal Biofuels September 30, 2014 - 10:15am Addthis In support ...

  11. Tall and Skinny QR factorizations in MapReduce architectures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: MapReduce 2011 held June 8, 2011 in San Jose, CA.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the MapReduce 2011 held June 8, 2011 in San ...

  12. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. | Photo courtesy of istockphotodiane555 Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce waste and save money. |...

  13. Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation November 19, 2013 - 3:49pm Addthis A combination solid-state laser turret cutter and stamping machine ...

  14. Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heat & Cool Water Heating Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings One easy energy lifehack: fix leaky faucets to save money and ...

  15. Reduced-Order Model Based Feedback Control For Modified Hasegawa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model Based Feedback Control For Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reduced-Order Model Based Feedback Control For Modified ...

  16. Los Alamos reduces water use by 26 percent in 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos reduces water use Los Alamos reduces water use by 26 percent in 2014 The Lab decreased its water usage by 26 percent, with about one-third of the reduction attributable ...

  17. Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Heating Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings One easy energy lifehack: fix leaky faucets to save money and energy. One easy ...

  18. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 ... New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases ...

  19. Appendix A, Field Sampling Data and Appendix B, Field Reduced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A, Field Sampling Data and Appendix B, Field Reduced Data Appendix A, Field Sampling Data and Appendix B, Field Reduced Data Docket No. EO-05-01: Appendix A, Field Sampling Data ...

  20. ATHENA desktop human "body" could reduce need for animal drug...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATHENA could reduce need for animal drug tests ATHENA desktop human "body" could reduce need for animal drug tests ATHENA project team is developing four human organ constructs that ...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electrified Parking Areas Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware

  2. Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air Infiltration in Furnaces Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces This tip sheet describes how to save process heating energy and costs by reducing air infiltration in industrial furnaces; tips include repairing leaks and increasing insulation. PROCESS HEATING TIP SHEET #5 Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces (January 2006) (237.12 KB) More Documents & Publications Furnace Pressure Controllers Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment Load Preheating Using Flue Gases from a Fuel-Fired

  3. Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 Request for information on reducing regulatory burden, E.O. 13563 Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 (140.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Notice of Availability of Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules Reducing Regulatory Burden

  4. Replace Pressure-Reducing Valves with Backpressure Turbogenerators |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Pressure-Reducing Valves with Backpressure Turbogenerators Replace Pressure-Reducing Valves with Backpressure Turbogenerators This tip sheet on replacing pressure-reducing valves provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #20 Replace Pressure-Reducing Valves with Backpressure Turbogenerators (January 2012) (451.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Consider Installing High-Pressure

  5. Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: On Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201)

  6. NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    NREL demonstrates that zonal climate control can reduce air conditioning power and improve range while maintaining driver thermal sensation.

  7. Methods of using cellulase for reducing the viscosity of feedstock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Geddes, Claudia C.; Peterson, James J.; Mullinnix, Michael T.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham

    2016-04-26

    The invention provides methods for treatment of feedstock to reduce the relative viscosity and promote release of fermentable sugars.

  8. Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs May 3, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. |

  9. Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Reply Comments) | Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Comments on RFI on reducing regulatory burden Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) (89.49 KB) More Documents & Publications Re: Regulatory Burden RFI RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue

  10. Comments on reducing regulatory burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reducing regulatory burden Comments on reducing regulatory burden Comments on reducing regulatory burden from Ingersoll Rand, Residential Solutions, manufacturer of Trane and American Standard residential air conditioners, heat pumps, furnaces, and accessories Comments on reducing regulatory burden (115.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI [76 FR 75798] Notice of Availability of Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy

  11. MapReduceXMT v. Beta 0.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-02-24

    The MapReduceXMT library ports the MapReduce framework onto the Cray XMT. MapReduce is a programming paradigm and an approach to data management for unstructured problems. It has gained relevance due to its ability to map serial operations onto parallel distributed architectures, significantly improving developer/analyst productivity. The MapReduceXMT implements the key aspects of MapReduce for the Cray XMT, a massively threaded system that is inherently difficult to program. MapReduceXMT allows users to utilize the machine effectivelymore¬†¬Ľ and efficiently without extensive training in multi-threaded programming. The MapReduceXMT library ports the MapReduce framework onto the Cray XMT. MapReduce is a programming paradigm and an approach to data management for unstructured problems. It has gained relevance due to its ability to map serial operations onto parallel distributed architectures, significantly improving developer/analyst productivity. The MapReduceXMT implements the key aspects of MapReduce for the Cray XMT, a massively threaded system that is inherently difficult to program. MapReduceXMT allows users to utilize the machine effectively and efficiently without extensive training in multi-threaded programming.¬ę¬†less

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Systems Risk Assessment action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.C.

    1990-11-01

    Recent events in the Hanford waste storage tanks and delays in the startup of US Department of Energy vitrification plans suggest that the schedule for waste vitrification activities at the Hanford Site should be reexamined. As a result, a Hanford Waste Vitrification Systems Risk Assessment will be performed to identify significant risks associated with the vitrification of Hanford high-level and transuranic wastes. This document defines the purpose, scope, plan of execution, responsibilities, reporting requirements, and preliminary schedule and cost estimate to complete this assessment. The study will identify and evaluate uncertainties, quantify potential consequences from these uncertainties, and identify the risks to successful completion of the Hanford vitrification mission. Waste characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification will be addressed. Uncertainties associated with the vitrification of double-shell and single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules, as well as a limited assessment of the grouting of low-level wastes, will be defined. Technical, regulatory (safety and environmental), and programmatic (cost and schedule) uncertainties will be defined. Recommendations for mitigating strategies and assessments of technical alternatives will be made to reduce substantial risks. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Development and validation of instantaneous risk model in nuclear power plant's risk monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, J.; Hu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The instantaneous risk model is the fundament of calculation and analysis in a risk monitor. This study focused on the development and validation of an instantaneous risk model. Therefore the principles converting from the baseline risk model to the instantaneous risk model were studied and separated trains' failure modes modeling method was developed. The development and validation process in an operating nuclear power plant's risk monitor were also introduced. Correctness of instantaneous risk model and rationality of converting method were demonstrated by comparison with the result of baseline risk model. (authors)

  14. Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per; Bergh, Niklas; Hedin, Gunnar

    2013-07-01

    -necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

  15. Transportation scenarios for risk analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.

    2010-09-01

    Transportation risk, like any risk, is defined by the risk triplet: what can happen (the scenario), how likely it is (the probability), and the resulting consequences. This paper evaluates the development of transportation scenarios, the associated probabilities, and the consequences. The most likely radioactive materials transportation scenario is routine, incident-free transportation, which has a probability indistinguishable from unity. Accident scenarios in radioactive materials transportation are of three different types: accidents in which there is no impact on the radioactive cargo, accidents in which some gamma shielding may be lost but there is no release of radioactive material, and accident in which radioactive material may potentially be released. Accident frequencies, obtainable from recorded data validated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, are considered equivalent to accident probabilities in this study. Probabilities of different types of accidents are conditional probabilities, conditional on an accident occurring, and are developed from event trees. Development of all of these probabilities and the associated highway and rail accident event trees are discussed in this paper.

  16. RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear...

  17. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    risk-informed and balanced approach, the CNS performed a methodical assessment of the EM nuclear facilities. This risk-informed approach provides a data-driven foundation on which...

  18. United States Environmental Protection Agency: Use of risk assessment and risk management methodologies. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamuro, R.J.

    1992-09-30

    Make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. This is the primary mission of the Risk Assessment and Management Commission (Risk Commission). The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), created the Risk Commission reflecting Congress' concern over agency use of risk assessment and risk management techniques and methodologies to implement federal laws protective of human health. The Risk Commission is to consider: methods for measuring and describing risks of chronic health effects from hazardous substances; methods to reflect uncertainties associated with estimation techniques, and whether it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology or a consistent standard of acceptable risk for various federal programs.

  19. State and Regional Energy Risk Assessment Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE is leading a State and Regional Energy Risk Assessment Initiative to help States better understand risks to their energy infrastructure so they can be better prepared to make informed decisions about their investments, resilience and hardening strategies, and asset management. As part of this Initiative, OE has developed a series of State and Regional Energy Risk Profiles that examine the relative magnitude of the risks that each State's energy infrastructure routinely encounters in comparison with the probable impacts.

  20. EPA`s risk assessment guidelines: Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, D.E.

    1990-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment guidelines for cancer, quantification, and exposure issues are discussed.

  1. Loan Specialist (Risk Management) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loan Specialist (Risk Management) Loan Specialist (Risk Management) Submitted by admin on Mon, 2016-08-08 00:15 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency SubElement Department of Energy Locations District of Columbia, District of Columbia Announcement Number DOE-MP-16-LP-00290-DE Job Summary This position is located in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Loan Programs Office (LPO), Risk Management Division (RMD), and Enterprise Risk Management & Compliance Branch. The LPO

  2. Hydrogen Risk Assessment Model (HyRAM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  3. Treatment methods and comparative risks of thorium removal from waste residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, R.D.; Hamby, D.M.; Martin, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    This study was done to examine the risks of remediation and the effectiveness of removal methods for thorium and its associated radioactive decay products from various soils and wastes associated with DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Removal of {sup 230}Th from uranium process residues would significantly reduce the buildup of {sup 226}Ra (half-life of 1600 years), and since {sup 230}Th concentrations at most of the important sites greatly exceed the {sup 226}Ra concentrations, such removal would reduce the accumulation of additional radiation risks associated with {sup 226}Ra and its products; and, if treatment also removed {sup 226}Ra, these risks could be mitigated even further. Removal of {sup 232}Th from thorium process residues would remove the source material for {sup 228}Ra, and since {sup 228}Ra has a half-life of 5.76 years, its control at FUSRAP sites could be done with land use controls for the 30--50 years required for {sup 228}Ra and the risks associated with its decay products to decay away. It must be recognized, however, that treatment methods invariably require workers to process residues and waste materials usually with bulk handling techniques. These processes expose workers to the radioactivity in the materials, therefore, workers would incur radiological risks in addition to industrial accident risks. An important question is whether the potential reduction of future radiological risks to members of the public justifies the risks that are incurred by remediation workers due to handling materials. This study examines, first, the effectiveness of treatment and then the risks that would be associated with remediation.

  4. Blackout 2003: U.S. - Canada Task Force Presents Final Report...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Secretary of Energy, and the Honorable R. John Efford, Minister of Natural Resources Canada, released the Final Report of the U.S. -Canada Power System Outage Task Force. ...

  5. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code calledmore¬†¬Ľ NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.¬ę¬†less

  6. How to Prepare Your Home for a Blackout | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    matches Also, do not light candles andor oil lamps if there is a possibility of a gas leak in your home. Keep the emergency number for your electric utility handy in case you...

  7. Blackout 2003: Conference for public review draft report on implementation of the task force recommendations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Thursday, June 22, in Washington, D.C., the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force will hold a conference for stakeholders and the public to comment on the draft of the final report of the...

  8. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.

  9. Using Wireless Technology to Reduce Facility Energy Usage | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Using Wireless Technology to Reduce Facility Energy Usage Using Wireless Technology to Reduce Facility Energy Usage This presentation details the U.S. Department of Energy's TEAM initiative's wireless technologies and their applications. Using Wireless Technology to Reduce Facility Energy Usage (December 4, 2009) (2.57 MB) More Documents & Publications New and Emerging Technologies Figure 1: Chamber experiment to study impact of air movement on thermal comfort using personally

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Overcoming Comfort Issues Due to Reduced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flow Room Air Mixing | Department of Energy Case Study: Overcoming Comfort Issues Due to Reduced Flow Room Air Mixing Technology Solutions Case Study: Overcoming Comfort Issues Due to Reduced Flow Room Air Mixing Energy efficiency upgrades reduce heating and cooling loads on a house. With enough load reduction and if the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system warrants replacement, the HVAC system is often upgraded with a more efficient, lower capacity system that meets the

  11. The President's Plan to Reduce Carbon Pollution: Myths v. Reality |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The President's Plan to Reduce Carbon Pollution: Myths v. Reality The President's Plan to Reduce Carbon Pollution: Myths v. Reality June 26, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis President Obama lays out his vision for a comprehensive plan to reduce carbon pollution, prepare our country for the impacts of climate change and lead global efforts to fight it. Heather Zichal Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change More information on President Obama's Climate Action

  12. METHOD FOR REDUCING THE IMPURITY RESISTIVITY OF SODIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-08-13

    The inherent resistivity of sodium, at cryogenic temperatures, can be reduced by clustering the impurity atoms within the crystal latiice structure of the sodium, thereby reducing the effective electron collision cross section and thus reducing the number of collisions between the electrons and such lattice imperfections. The clustering is effected by heating the sodium to a temperature approaching its melting point, and maintaining the temperature for a period of time ranging generally from two to six days. (AEC)

  13. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment This tip sheet describes how to save process heating energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces. PROCESS HEATING TIP SHEET #7 Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment (January 2006) (277.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A

  14. Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of

  15. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ape011_lai_2010_o.pdf (4.46 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Electro-thermal-mechanical Simulation and Reliability

  16. Federal Agencies Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bills | Department of Energy Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Home Energy Bills Federal Agencies Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Home Energy Bills July 11, 2005 - 2:07pm Addthis Department of Housing and Urban Development; Department of Energy; Environmental Protection Agency WASHINGTON, DC- The Bush administration today announced a major new partnership aimed at reducing household energy costs by 10 percent over the next decade. The Partnership for

  17. DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    through Deployment of Advanced Technology | Department of Energy Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Deployment of Advanced Technology DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Deployment of Advanced Technology September 22, 2005 - 10:45am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today released for public review and comment a plan for accelerating the development and reducing the cost of new and advanced

  18. Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Pressure Steam | Department of Energy Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam This tip sheet on steam jet ejectors and thermocompressors provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #29 Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam (January 2012)

  19. Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use Iowa Community College Campuses Reduce Energy Use August 27, 2010 - 1:05pm Addthis DMACC will be installing nearly 1,500 occupancy sensors in the college's classrooms to help conserve energy.| Photo Courtesy of DMACC DMACC will be installing nearly 1,500 occupancy sensors in the college's classrooms to help conserve energy.| Photo Courtesy of DMACC Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Energy retrofit projects estimated to reduce annual energy use

  20. Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Transfer Losses | Department of Energy Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses This research discusses how reducing heat-transfer losses from pressure oscillation can increase low-temperature combustion engine efficiency. p-22_splitter.pdf (360.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI

  1. CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE With both the household use and cost of electricity increasing and an abundance of older homes, Connecticut's market was ripe for residential energy efficiency upgrades. Through a two-year pilot program, the Connecticut Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) sought to improve the state's existing residential energy efficiency programs, with

  2. Systems approach to project risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kindinger, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the need for better performance in the planning and execution of projects and examines the capabilities of two different project risk analysis methods for improving project performance. A quantitative approach based on concepts and tools adopted from the disciplines of systems analysis, probabilistic risk analysis, and other fields is advocated for managing risk in large and complex research & development projects. This paper also provides an overview of how this system analysis approach for project risk management is being used at Los Alamos National Laboratory along with examples of quantitative risk analysis results and their application to improve project performance.

  3. Assessing Coal Unit Retirement Risk

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ventures Analysis 1901 N. Moore St. Arlington, VA 22209 (703) 276 8900 A S S E S S I N G C O A L U N I T R E T I R E M E N T R I S K Tom Hewson Principal June 14, 2016 Presentation for the US Energy Information Administration Workshop Coal Fleet Aging 1 COAL CAPACITY CHALLENGES E N E R G Y V E N T U R E S A N A L Y S I S , I N C . ÔĀģ Environmental Regulatory Risk-- Compliance often requires coal units to make large capital investment in additional retrofit control measures and/or increase their

  4. Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using the Risk, Responsibility, and Performance Matrix Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk, Responsibility, and Performance Matrix ...

  5. EO 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (1997) (As Amended by EO 13229 (2001) and EO 13296 (2003)) EO 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and ...

  6. First Capitol Risk Management LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capitol Risk Management LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: First Capitol Risk Management, LLC Place: Galena, Illinois Zip: 61036 Product: First Capitol Risk Management...

  7. Risk Management Guide - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7A, Risk Management Guide by John Makepeace Functional areas: Risk Management, Safety and Security This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the...

  8. Webinar: Genetically Modified Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment Webinar: Genetically Modified Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment Genetically Modified (GM) Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment PDF icon...

  9. Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Michael Salmon,...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Financial Plan Risk Mitigation Master...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within acceptable bounds BPA Financial Plan Workshop 5 Financial Plan Risk Metrics Agenda Origin of the Risk Metrics Issue History of risk mitigation measures and origin of...

  11. State and Regional Energy Risk Assessment Initiative | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Energy Sector Risk Profile Nevada State of Nevada Energy Sector Risk Profile New Hampshire State of New Hampshire Energy Sector Risk Profile New Jersey State of New Jersey ...

  12. River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12, 2011 River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health Risk Assessment (Volume 2) * RCBRA Human Health Risk Assessment is final - Response provided to HAB ...

  13. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative OE is leading a State Energy Risk...

  14. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Jason Lai Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University June 10, 2010 This presentation does not ...

  15. New design strategy reduces time and cost of material discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New design strategy New design strategy reduces time and cost of material discovery Iteratively guiding experiments toward finding materials with the desired target properties May ...

  16. Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces U.S. Navy Energy Use As ... One such technology- retrofitting rooftop air- conditioning units with an advanced rooftop ...

  17. Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes ...

  18. Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing (October 2005) (209.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Select an Energy-Efficient Centrifugal Pump Effect of Intake on Compressor ...

  19. Feedstocks with Reduced Acetylation for Higher Product Yields...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute (JBEI) has developed a method of using plants that have reduced levels of acetylation of their cellulose. The plants are positioned to provide higher yields of sugar ...

  20. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BENEFITS A Motor Challeng NEW WATER BOOSTER PUMP SYSTEM REDUCES ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY 80 ... General Motors (GM) needed to relocate the facility's city water booster pumping system. ...