Sample records for recycling source reduction

  1. RecycleMania! Improving Waste Reduction and Recycling on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    RecycleMania! Improving Waste Reduction and Recycling on Campus from Universities to Big Business #12;Contact Information Tracy Artley Recycling Coordinator University of Michigan Tel: 734-763-5539 Email: recycle@umich.edu #12;Agenda Waste Impacts of Large Institutions Unique Challenges Overcoming

  2. Recycling, Source Reduction,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(DollarsCubicThousand68.76,760.25 AnnualDepartment

  3. Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource...

  4. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies BiomassBiogas, Coal with CCS,...

  5. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  6. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedgeland, H.; Kole, P. R.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.; Jardine, A. P. [Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x10{sup 19} atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  7. Global recycling services for short and long term risk reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arslan, M.; Grygiel, J.M.; Drevon, C.; Lelievre, F.; Lesage, M.; Vincent, O. [AREVA, 33 rue Lafayette, F-75009 Paris (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New schemes are being developed by AREVA in order to provide global solutions for safe and non-proliferating management of used fuels, thereby significantly contributing to overall risks reduction and sustainable nuclear development. Utilities are thereby provided with a service through which they will be able to send their used fuels and only get returned vitrified and compacted waste, the only waste remaining after reprocessing. This waste is stable, standard and has demonstrated capability for very long term interim storage. They are provided as well with associated facilities and all necessary services for storage in a demonstrated safely manner. Recycled fuels, in particular MOX, would be used either in existing LWRs or in a very limited number of full MOX reactors (like the EPR reactor), located in selected countries, that will recycle MOX so as to downgrade the isotopic quality of the Pu inventories in a significant manner. Reprocessed uranium also can be recycled. These schemes, on top of offering demonstrated operational advantages and a responsible approach, result into optimized economics for all shareholders of the scheme, as part of reactor financing (under Opex or Capex form) will be secured thanks to the value of the recycled flows. It also increases fuel cost predictability as recycled fuel is not subject to market fluctuations as much and allows, in a limited span of time, for clear risk mitigation. (authors)

  8. Potential GTCC LLW sealed radiation source recycle initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, D

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report suggests 11 actions that have the potential to facilitate the recycling (reuse or radionuclide) of surplus commercial sealed radiation sources that would otherwise be disposed of as greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The suggestions serve as a basis for further investigation and discussion between the Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Agreement States, and the commercial sector. Information is also given that describes sealed sources, how they are used, and problems associated with recycling, including legal concerns. To illustrate the nationwide recycling potential, Appendix A gives the estimated quantity and application information for sealed sources that would qualify for disposal in commercial facilities if not recycle. The report recommends that the Department of Energy initiate the organization of a forum to explore the suggested actions and other recycling possibilities.

  9. Hanford recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

  10. 7th Annual waste reduction, prevention, recycling and composting symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical papers from the Waste Reduction, Prevention, Recycling and Composting Symposium are presented. 21 of the 22 papers were selected for inclusion in the database. The majority of the papers focus on municipal wastes produced by the business sector; however, wastes generated in the residential and industrial sectors are also included. Topics addressed include workplace recycling, scrap tire and used oil recycling, employee education, construction and demolition waste reuse, composting, waste reduction, and market development for recycled products.

  11. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paviet-Hartmann, P. [Idaho National Laboratory, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Riddle, C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Material and Fuel Complex, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6150 (United States); Campbell, K. [University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89144 (United States); Mausolf, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Batelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most widely used reductant to partition plutonium from uranium in the Purex process was ferrous sulfamate, other alternates were proposed such as hydrazine-stabilized ferrous nitrate or uranous nitrate, platinum catalyzed hydrogen, and hydrazine, hydroxylamine salts. New candidates to replace hydrazine or hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) are pursued worldwide. They may improve the performance of the industrial Purex process towards different operations such as de-extraction of plutonium and reduction of the amount of hydrazine which will limit the formation of hydrazoic acid. When looking at future recycling technologies using hydroxamic ligands, neither acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) nor formohydroxamic acid (FHA) seem promising because they hydrolyze to give hydroxylamine and the parent carboxylic acid. Hydroxyethylhydrazine, HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 3} (HEH) is a promising non-salt-forming reductant of Np and Pu ions because it is selective to neptunium and plutonium ions at room temperature and at relatively low acidity, it could serve as a replacement of HAN or AHA for the development of a novel used nuclear fuel recycling process.

  12. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold promises as a replacement for AHA. FHA undergoes hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. Unfortunately, FHA powder was not stable in the experiments we ran in our laboratory. In addition, AHA and FHA also decompose to hydroxylamine which may undergo an autocatalytic reaction. Other reductants are available and could be extremely useful for actinides separation. The review presents the current plutonium reductants used in used nuclear fuel reprocessing and will introduce innovative and novel reductants that could become reducers for future research on UNF separation.

  13. RECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    phases of new wind turbines. There are plans about offshore wind farms in many countries e.g. in northernRECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES ­ AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE and an analysis of future removal and recycling processes of offshore wind turbines. The method is process

  14. Contribution of cooperative sector recycling to greenhouse gas emissions reduction: A case study of Ribeirão Pires, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Megan F., E-mail: mfking@uvic.ca [The Community-Based Research Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of Victoria, PO Box 3060 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3R4 (Canada); Gutberlet, Jutta, E-mail: gutber@uvic.ca [Department of Geography, University of Victoria, PO Box 3060 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3R4 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Cooperative recycling achieves environmental, economic and social objectives. • We calculate GHG emissions reduction for a recycling cooperative in São Paulo, Brazil. • The cooperative merits consideration as a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project. • A CDM project would enhance the achievements of the recycling cooperative. • National and local waste management policies support the recycling cooperative. - Abstract: Solid waste, including municipal waste and its management, is a major challenge for most cities and among the key contributors to climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced through recovery and recycling of resources from the municipal solid waste stream. In São Paulo, Brazil, recycling cooperatives play a crucial role in providing recycling services including collection, separation, cleaning, stocking, and sale of recyclable resources. The present research attempts to measure the greenhouse gas emission reductions achieved by the recycling cooperative Cooperpires, as well as highlight its socioeconomic benefits. Methods include participant observation, structured interviews, questionnaire application, and greenhouse gas accounting of recycling using a Clean Development Mechanism methodology. The results show that recycling cooperatives can achieve important energy savings and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and suggest there is an opportunity for Cooperpires and other similar recycling groups to participate in the carbon credit market. Based on these findings, the authors created a simple greenhouse gas accounting calculator for recyclers to estimate their emissions reductions.

  15. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved Justification MemorandaRecordsRecovery |Recycling

  16. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  17. Design of Recycle/Reuse Networks with Thermal Effects and Variable Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavala Oseguera, Jose Guadalupe

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN OF RECYCLE/REUSE NETWORKS WITH THERMAL EFFECTS AND VARIABLE SOURCES A Thesis by JOSE GUADALUPE ZAVALA OSEGUERA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DESIGN OF RECYCLE/REUSE NETWORKS WITH THERMAL EFFECTS AND VARIABLE SOURCES A Thesis by JOSE GUADALUPE ZAVALA OSEGUERA Submitted...

  18. Carbothermic reduction with parallel heat sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troup, Robert L. (Murrysville, PA); Stevenson, David T. (Washington Township, Washington County, PA)

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are apparatus and method of carbothermic direct reduction for producing an aluminum alloy from a raw material mix including aluminum oxide, silicon oxide, and carbon wherein parallel heat sources are provided by a combustion heat source and by an electrical heat source at essentially the same position in the reactor, e.g., such as at the same horizontal level in the path of a gravity-fed moving bed in a vertical reactor. The present invention includes providing at least 79% of the heat energy required in the process by the electrical heat source.

  19. EPA Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    accepting applications for the Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program to support pollution preventionsource reduction andor resource conservation projects that reduce or...

  20. Fermilab Antiproton Source, Recycler Ring, and Main Injector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Nagaitsev

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, the Accumulator and the Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world's only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II, neutrino experiments using 8-GeV and 120-GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120-GeV primary proton beams. This paper provides a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  1. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  2. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  3. Recycling effect of Germanium on ECR Ion Source P. Leherissier, C. Baru, C. Canet, M. Dubois, M. Dupuis, J.L. Flambard, G. Gaubert, P. Jardin, N. Lecesne,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recycling effect of Germanium on ECR Ion Source P. Leherissier, C. Barué, C. Canet, M. Dubois, M investigated the recycling effect of an SF6 plasma. The initial beam was produced by the classical method of production, the recycling effect and perspectives are described in this paper. #12;2 I. INTRODUCTION At GANIL

  4. Poloidal Distribution of Recycling Sources and Core Plasma Fueling in DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, and JET L-mode Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poloidal Distribution of Recycling Sources and Core Plasma Fueling in DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, and JET L-mode Plasmas

  5. RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. ·We collect over 40

  6. Recycling Best Practices Report August 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Recycling Best Practices Report August 2011 Elizabeth Fox, Recycling Best Practices Intern Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling University of Michigan Plant Building and Grounds Services #12;Recycling Best Practices Report Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling 1 Executive Summary Due to the high

  7. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed and promoting recycling and the use of recycled materials. We will actively encourage the recycling of office reduction techniques · Provide facilities for recycling on campus · Give guidance and information to staff

  8. Aluminum recycling from reactor walls: A source of contamination in a-Si:H thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longeaud, C.; Ray, P. P.; Bhaduri, A.; Daineka, D.; Johnson, E. V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris (UMR 8507 CNRS), Supelec, Universites Paris VI and XI, 11 Rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91190 Gif sur Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UMR 7647 CNRS), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the authors investigate the contamination of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films with aluminum recycled from the walls and electrodes of the deposition reactor. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared under various conditions by a standard radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process in two reactors, the chambers of which were constructed of either aluminum or stainless steel. The authors have studied the electronic properties of these thin films and have found that when using an aluminum reactor chamber, the layers are contaminated with aluminum recycled from the chamber walls and electrode. This phenomenon is observed almost independently of the deposition conditions. The authors show that this contamination results in slightly p-doped films and could be detrimental to the deposition of device grade films. The authors also propose a simple way to control and eventually suppress this contamination.

  9. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  10. The College Student's Guide to Recycling,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    The College Student's Guide to Recycling, Reduction, and Reuse UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY Phone Albany, NY 12222 Top 7 Recycling and Reuse TipsTop 7 Recycling and Reuse Tips University at Albany Office of Environmental Sustainability 1. Set up separate bins for recyclable materials such as plastics and papers. 2

  11. TAMING A TIGER IN THE CITY: COMPARISON OF MOTORIZED BACKPACK APPLICATIONS AND SOURCE REDUCTION AGAINST THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the current trend of shrinking budgets limits available resources for mosquito control programsTAMING A TIGER IN THE CITY: COMPARISON OF MOTORIZED BACKPACK APPLICATIONS AND SOURCE REDUCTION) motorized backpack applications and 2) source reduction (coupled with hand-applied applications of larvicide

  12. Responsible recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, A. (Britannia Refined Metals, Northfleet (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The issues that affect the recycling of lead-acid batteries and the challenges that this issue brings to both the lead industry and to the battery manufacturers are covered. Topics include the lead market (its size and structure), the economic constraints on the recycling system, recycling rates for batteries, the technology of recycling, and future considerations.

  13. Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 265271 Simultaneous oxygen-reduction and methanol-oxidation reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 265­271 Simultaneous oxygen-reduction and methanol-reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol- oxidation reaction (MOR) at the cathode of a DMFC. Good agreements between a significant poisoning effect on the ORR by the presence of methanol at the cathode. The results also indicated

  14. Estimation of residual MSW heating value as a function of waste component recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of packaging wastes may be compatible with incineration within integrated waste management systems. To study this, a mathematical model is presented to calculate the fraction composition of residual municipal solid waste (MSW) only as a function of the MSW fraction composition at source and recycling fractions of the different waste materials. The application of the model to the Lisbon region yielded results showing that the residual waste fraction composition depends both on the packaging wastes fraction at source and on the ratio between that fraction and the fraction of the same material, packaging and non-packaging, at source. This behaviour determines the variation of the residual waste LHV. For 100% of paper packaging recycling, LHV reduces 4.2% whereas this reduction is of 14.4% for 100% of packaging plastics recycling. For 100% of food waste recovery, LHV increases 36.8% due to the moisture fraction reduction of the residual waste. Additionally the results evidence that the negative impact of recycling paper and plastic packaging on the LHV may be compensated by recycling food waste and glass and metal packaging. This makes packaging materials recycling and food waste recovery compatible strategies with incineration within integrated waste management systems.

  15. The Primary and Recycling Sources of OH During the NACHTT-2011 Campaign: HONO as an Important OH Primary Source in the Wintertime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; VandenBoer, Trevor; Young, Cora; Riedel, Theran; Thornton, Joel A.; Swarthout, Bob; Sive, B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Roberts, James M.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wagner, Nicholas; Dube, William P.; Williams, Eric; Brown, Steve

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present OH observation results during the NACHTT-11 field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Weld County, Colorado. The observed OH levels during the daytime (at noon) were ~ 2.7 × 106 molecules cm-3 at the ground level (2 m above ground level, AGL). HONO and ozone photolysis were the two dominant photochemical OH production pathways during the field campaign. However, alkene ozonolysis, found an important source for OH by two previous winter season OH observations, was a minor contribution to OH primary production (~5 %). To evaluate recycling sources of OH from HO2 and RO2, an observation constrained University of Washington Chemical Mechanism (UWCM) box model is employed to simulated ambient OH levels with different model scenarios. For the base run without constraining observed HONO, the model simulated OH significantly underestimates the observed OH level (20.8 times in the morning and 7.2 times in the daytime). This indicates that the known HONO sources incorporated in the UWCM model cannot explain the observed HONO level. Once HONO is constrained by the observation, the discrepancy between observation and model simulation improves (5.1 times in the morning and 2.1 times in the daytime) but still out of the measurement uncertainty range (35 %). We explore two possible reasons for the observed unexplainably high wintertime OH levels. First, potential roles of Cl atoms produce organic peroxy radicals from the reactions between Cl atmos and alkane compounds. However, the Cl levels during the observation period are estimated very low (~ 103 atoms cm-3) to explain the enhanced OH levels. Second, Impacts of higher HONO levels on the ground was evaluated. Strong HONO gradient towards ground was observed especially during the early morning (6 am to 8 am) was observed and the lowest level available for the HONO observation during the campaign is 5 m AGL. Once we assume the twice of the observed HONO levels averaged between 5 m to 15 m at 2 m AGL, model predicted OH levels agree well within the observation uncertainty range. Wintertime photochemistry has not been investigated as much as the summer season. The results of this study along with a limited number of winter OH observations clearly urge further investigation on tropospheric oxidation capacity in the winter season considering implications of tropospheric oxidation capacity to the short-lived climate forcers especially methane.

  16. Extreme Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Singing the recycling blues because you have to separate your chipboard from your newspaper, your steel from your aluminum, your #1 from your #2 plastic? Pantywaists! The residents of Kamikatsu, Japan have no fewer than 34...

  17. Image reduction pipeline for the detection of variable sources in highly crowded fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claus A. Goessl; Arno Riffeser

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a reduction pipeline for CCD (charge-coupled device) images which was built to search for variable sources in highly crowded fields like the M31 bulge and to handle extensive databases due to large time series. We describe all steps of the standard reduction in detail with emphasis on the realisation of per pixel error propagation: Bias correction, treatment of bad pixels, flatfielding, and filtering of cosmic rays. The problems of conservation of PSF (point spread function) and error propagation in our image alignment procedure as well as the detection algorithm for variable sources are discussed: We build difference images via image convolution with a technique called OIS (Alard & Lupton, 1998), proceed with an automatic detection of variable sources in noise dominated images and finally apply a PSF-fitting, relative photometry to the sources found. For the WeCAPP project (Riffeser et al., 2001) we achieve 3 sigma detections for variable sources with an apparent brightness of e.g. m = 24.9 mag at their minimum and a variation of dm = 2.4 mag (or m = 21.9 mag brightness minimum and a variation of dm = 0.6 mag) on a background signal of 18.1 mag/arcsec^2 based on a 500 s exposure with 1.5 arcsec seeing at a 1.2 m telescope. The complete per pixel error propagation allows us to give accurate errors for each measurement.

  18. Nuclear fuel recycling in 4 minutes | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear fuel recycling in 4 minutes Share Topic Energy Energy sources Nuclear energy Nuclear fuel cycle Reactors...

  19. Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL; Kohl, James Arthur [ORNL; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL; Miller, Ross G [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL; Stansberry, Dale V [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL; Taylor, Russell J [ORNL; Dillow, David [None

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL operates the world's brightest neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Funded by the US DOE Office of Basic Energy Science, this national user facility hosts hundreds of scientists from around the world, providing a platform to enable break-through research in materials science, sustainable energy, and basic science. While the SNS provides scientists with advanced experimental instruments, the deluge of data generated from these instruments represents both a big data challenge and a big data opportunity. For example, instruments at the SNS can now generate multiple millions of neutron events per second providing unprecedented experiment fidelity but leaving the user with a dataset that cannot be processed and analyzed in a timely fashion using legacy techniques. To address this big data challenge, ORNL has developed a near real-time streaming data reduction and analysis infrastructure. The Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis (ADARA) system provides a live streaming data infrastructure based on a high-performance publish subscribe system, in situ data reduction, visualization, and analysis tools, and integration with a high-performance computing and data storage infrastructure. ADARA allows users of the SNS instruments to analyze their experiment as it is run and make changes to the experiment in real-time and visualize the results of these changes. In this paper we describe ADARA, provide a high-level architectural overview of the system, and present a set of use-cases and real-world demonstrations of the technology.

  20. Assessment of geothermal energy as a power source for US aluminum reduction plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enderlin, W.I.; Blahnik, D.E.; Davis, A.E.; Jacobson, J.J.; Schilling, A.H.; Weakley, S.A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of using hydrothermal resources as a primary power source for both existing and future aluminum reduction plants in the United States is explored. Applicable hydrothermal resources that should be considered by the aluminum industry for this purpose were identified and evaluated. This work also identified the major institutional parameters to be considered in developing geothermal energy resources for aluminum industry use. Based on the findings of this study, it appears technically and economically feasible to power existing aluminum reduction plants in the Pacific Northwest using electricity generated at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. It may also be feasible to power existing plants located on the Gulf Coast from Roosevelt Hot Springs, depending on the cost of transmitting the power.

  1. New approaches to recycling tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, R.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steel-belted radial tires are potentially one of the most recyclable products created by modern industry, although the potential has been barely tapped. Discarded tires pile up at an astonishing rate each year - 234 million in the US and 26 million passenger tire equivalents in Canada. They represent a mother lode of raw material waiting for modern day miners to transform them into recycled rubber, steel, fiber and energy. The tremendous increase in use of steel belted radials since the early 1970s has complicated their recyclability compared to the bias ply tire, but it has also accomplished waste reduction by tripling tire service life. Part one of this report describes processes being developed to convert tires to crumb rubber, as well as some potential uses of recycled rubber. Part two, to appear next month, will examine such uses as rubberized athletic tracks and highway asphalt.

  2. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Orphan Source Recovery Project in the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, J. W. [NSTec; Ahumada, A. D. [NSTec; Blanchard, T. A. [NNSA

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    After 9/11, officials at the United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grew more concerned about radiological materials that were vulnerable to theft and illicit use around the world. The concern was that terrorists could combine stolen radiological materials with explosives to build and detonate a radiological dispersal device (RDD), more commonly known as a “dirty bomb.” In response to this and other terrorist threats, the DOE/NNSA formed what is now known as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to consolidate and accelerate efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Although a cooperative program was already underway in the Russian Federation to secure nuclear materials at a range of different facilities, thousands of sealed radioactive sources remained vulnerable at medical, research, and industrial sites. In response, GTRI began to focus efforts on addressing these materials. GTRI’s Russia Orphan Source Recovery Project, managed at the Nevada National Security Site’s North Las Vegas facility, was initiated in 2002. Throughout the life of the project, Joint Stock Company “Isotope” has served as the primary Russian subcontractor, and the organization has proven to be a successful partner. Since the first orphan source recovery of an industrial cobalt-60 irradiator with 647 curies (Ci) at an abandoned facility in Moscow in 2003, the GTRI Orphan Source Recovery Project in the Russian Federation has accomplished substantial levels of threat reduction. To date, GTRI has recovered and securely disposed of more than 5,100 sources totaling more that 628,000 Ci. This project serves as an extraordinary example of how international cooperation can be implemented by partners with mutual interests to achieve significant goals.

  3. A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

  4. Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Saricks, C. L.

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  5. Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead of ContractingofReducing WasteReduction

  6. Printed on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    management by focusing University resources and capabilities on this pressing economic, environmental of waste generation and composition, waste reduction, risk management, environmental equity and publicPrinted on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste Management Institute CWMI is a program

  7. AzTEC Millimetre Survey of the COSMOS Field: I. Data Reduction and Source Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Scott; J. E. Austermann; T. A. Perera; G. W. Wilson; I. Aretxaga; J. J. Bock; D. H. Hughes; Y. Kang; S. Kim; P. D. Mauskopf; D. B. Sanders; N. Scoville; M. S. Yun

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1.1 mm wavelength imaging survey covering 0.3 sq. deg. in the COSMOS field. These data, obtained with the AzTEC continuum camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), were centred on a prominent large-scale structure over-density which includes a rich X-ray cluster at z = 0.73. A total of 50 millimetre galaxy candidates, with a significance ranging from 3.5-8.5 sigma, are extracted from the central 0.15 sq. deg. area which has a uniform sensitivity of 1.3 mJy/beam. Sixteen sources are detected with S/N > 4.5, where the expected false-detection rate is zero, of which a surprisingly large number (9) have intrinsic (de-boosted) fluxes > 5 mJy at 1.1 mm. Assuming the emission is dominated by radiation from dust, heated by a massive population of young, optically-obscured stars, then these bright AzTEC sources have FIR luminosities > 6 x 10^12 L(sun) and star formation-rates > 1100 M(sun)/yr. Two of these nine bright AzTEC sources are found towards the extreme peripheral region of the X-ray cluster, whilst the remainder are distributed across the larger-scale over-density. We describe the AzTEC data reduction pipeline, the source-extraction algorithm, and the characterisation of the source catalogue, including the completeness, flux de-boosting correction, false-detection rate and the source positional uncertainty, through an extensive set of Monte-Carlo simulations. We conclude with a preliminary comparison, via a stacked analysis, of the overlapping MIPS 24 micron data and radio data with this AzTEC map of the COSMOS field.

  8. Recycling universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Garriga; Alexander Vilenkin

    1997-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the effective cosmological constant is non-zero, our observable universe may enter a stage of exponential expansion. In such case, regions of it may tunnel back to the false vacuum of an inflaton scalar field, and inflation with a high expansion rate may resume in those regions. An ``ideal'' eternal observer would then witness an infinite succession of cycles from false vacuum to true, and back. Within each cycle, the entire history of a hot universe would be replayed. If there were several minima of the inflaton potential, our ideal observer would visit each one of these minima with a frequency which depends on the shape of the potential. We generalize the formalism of stochastic inflation to analyze the global structure of the universe when this `recycling' process is taken into account.

  9. A Novel Charge Recycling Approach to Low-Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulaganathan, Chandradevi [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL] [ORNL; Holleman, Jeremy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Blalock, Benjamin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel charge-recycling scheme has been designed and implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of operating digital circuits using the charge scavenged from the leakage and dynamic load currents inherent to digital logic. The proposed scheme uses capacitors to efficiently recover the ground-bound charge and to subsequently boost the capacitor voltage to power up the source circuit. This recycling methodology has been implemented on a 12-bit Gray-code counter within a 12-bit multichannel Wilkinson ADC. The circuit has been designed in 0.5 m BiCMOS and in 90nm CMOS processes. SPICE simulation results reveal a 46 53% average reduction in the energy consumption of the counter. The total energy savings including the control generation aggregates to an average of 26 34%.

  10. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse...

  11. ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete ·· Whatever steel goes into PCC must comeWhatever steel goes into PCC must come out for recycleout for recycle ·· Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling

  12. Authorization Recycling in RBAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authorization Recycling in RBAC Systems 1Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems ·motivation ·recycling approach recycling algorithms experimental evaluations summary & future work #12 issued before (precise recycling) #12;6 Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems

  13. Plastic Recycling Toter -ORANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    microfuge tubes - beakers - flasks - bottles - jars - Plastic disposable pipettes with cotton plugsPlastic Recycling Toter - ORANGE Glass Recycling Toter - TEAL Garbage Yellow sharps container Categories - All Plastic except Styrofoam - rinsed 3 times - may have contained Biohazard level 1 bacteria

  14. European update on recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, S.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the current status of recycling of automobiles in Europe based on a report compiled by Euromotor Reports and also discusses the move toward designing automobiles for disassembly to aid in the recycling process. Plastics and rubber are the emphasis of the report along with copper and aluminum. Problem areas in recycling or dismantling are also discussed.

  15. CHERRY: CHECKPOINTED EARLY RESOURCE RECYCLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrellas, Josep

    : Decouple recycling from retirement #12;Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Out Slide 4/41 PROPOSAL: EARLY RECYCLING Decouple resource recycling from instruction retirement Recycle1 2 3 CHERRY: CHECKPOINTED EARLY RESOURCE RECYCLING Jos´e F. Mart´inez1 , Jose Renau2 Michael C

  16. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  17. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  18. DNAPL source control by reductive dechlorination with iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Si Hyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) is a treatment method that could be economically applied to smaller DNAPL-contaminated sites and to those sites with impermeable soils. Reductive dechlorination is achieved...

  19. St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to allow you to recycle the following materials: To find your nearest Recycling Point please visit www.fifedirect.org.uk/wasteaware or call the Recycling Helpline on 08451 55 00 22. R&A GOLF CLUB OLD COURSE HOTEL UNIVERSITY NORTH HAUGH

  20. Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, A.

    The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

  1. Evaluating cost-reduction alternatives and low-cost sourcing opportunities for aerospace castings and forgings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obermoller, Amber J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As companies continue to outsource large portions of their manufacturing, managing costs in the supply chain is increasingly important in reducing overall costs and remaining competitive. Low-cost sourcing has become an ...

  2. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  3. Announcing: All Recycling Reduce your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    Announcing: All Recycling Go Green! Reduce your contribution to the landfill, by choosing to voluntarily recycle acceptable items in the green All Recycling toters and containers around campus. ONLY THE ITEMS BELOW ARE ACCEPTED FOR ALL RECYCLING Please do not contaminate the recycling containers with trash

  4. TRANSPARENCY RECYCLING PROGRAM PROCEDURES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transparencies to be recycled. 2.) SEPARATE the transparencies from ringed binders, plastic or paper folders, envelopes, andor files. 3.) PLACE the transparencies (only) into...

  5. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  6. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  7. New approaches for MOX multi-recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gain, T.; Bouvier, E.; Grosman, R.; Senentz, G.H.; Lelievre, F.; Bailly, F.; Brueziere, J. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean Millier, Paris La Defense, 92084 (France); Murray, P. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, 4800 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its low fissile content after irradiation, Pu from used MOX fuel is considered by some as not recyclable in LWR (Light Water Reactors). The point of this paper is hence to go back to those statements and provide a new analysis based on AREVA extended experience in the fields of fissile and fertile material management and optimized waste management. This is done using the current US fuel inventory as a case study. MOX Multi-recycling in LWRs is a closed cycle scenario where U and Pu management through reprocessing and recycling leads to a significant reduction of the used assemblies to be stored. The recycling of Pu in MOX fuel is moreover a way to maintain the self-protection of the Pu-bearing assemblies. With this scenario, Pu content is also reduced repetitively via a multi-recycling of MOX in LWRs. Simultaneously, {sup 238}Pu content decreases. All along this scenario, HLW (High-Level Radioactive Waste) vitrified canisters are produced and planned for deep geological disposal. Contrary to used fuel, HLW vitrified canisters do not contain proliferation materials. Moreover, the reprocessing of used fuel limits the space needed on current interim storage. With MOX multi-recycling in LWR, Pu isotopy needs to be managed carefully all along the scenario. The early introduction of a limited number of SFRs (Sodium Fast Reactors) can therefore be a real asset for the overall system. A few SFRs would be enough to improve the Pu isotopy from used LWR MOX fuel and provide a Pu-isotopy that could be mixed back with multi-recycled Pu from LWRs, hence increasing the Pu multi-recycling potential in LWRs.

  8. Peak Demand Reduction with Dual-Source Heat Pumps Using Municipal Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morehouse, J. H.; Khan, J. A.; Connor, L. N.; Pal, D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to examine a dual-source (air and/or water-coupled) heat pump concept which would reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental electrical resistance heating (strip heaters). The project examined two system options...

  9. Peak Demand Reduction with Dual-Source Heat Pumps Using Municipal Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morehouse, J. H.; Khan, J. A.; Connor, L. N.; Pal, D.

    The objective of this project was to examine a dual-source (air and/or water-coupled) heat pump concept which would reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental electrical resistance heating (strip heaters). The project examined two system options...

  10. RESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    ://www.thesoftlanding.com/ AVOIDING BISPHENOL-A Eden Organics Beans http://www.edenfoods.com/ CD and DVD recycling httpRESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS Batteries and Accessories Office Depot Cell Phones Any Verizon Plastics Call your local Solid Waste Management Facility eCycling resource (EPA) http

  11. AzTEC Millimetre Survey of the COSMOS Field: I. Data Reduction and Source Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K S; Perera, T A; Wilson, G W; Aretxaga, I; Bock, J J; Hughes, D H; Kang, Y; Kim, S; Mauskopf, P D; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N; Yun, M S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1.1 mm wavelength imaging survey covering 0.3 sq. deg. in the COSMOS field. These data, obtained with the AzTEC continuum camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), were centred on a prominent large-scale structure over-density which includes a rich X-ray cluster at z = 0.73. A total of 50 millimetre galaxy candidates, with a significance ranging from 3.5-8.5 sigma, are extracted from the central 0.15 sq. deg. area which has a uniform sensitivity of 1.3 mJy/beam. Sixteen sources are detected with S/N > 4.5, where the expected false-detection rate is zero, of which a surprisingly large number (9) have intrinsic (de-boosted) fluxes > 5 mJy at 1.1 mm. Assuming the emission is dominated by radiation from dust, heated by a massive population of young, optically-obscured stars, then these bright AzTEC sources have FIR luminosities > 6 x 10^12 L(sun) and star formation-rates > 1100 M(sun)/yr. Two of these nine bright AzTEC sources are found towards the extreme peripheral region of the X-ray clu...

  12. Methodology of recent solid waste stream assessments and summary of current recycling endeavors at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid Waste Stream Assessments determine the components of given waste streams. An evaluation of findings allows components to be targeted for effective source reduction, reuse, or recycling. LLNL assessed 10% of its onsite dumpster locations (25 of 250). Dumpsters were selected based on location and surrounding facility use. Dumpster contents were sorted according to type into containers. The filled containers were weighed and photographed. The information was noted on field tabulation sheets. Dumpster locations, date of sort, sort categories, weight, and cubic yardage were entered into a database for review and tabulation. LLNL sorted approximately 7000 pounds of waste in each of the two assessments. A high incidence of cardboard (uncompacted) was present in most dumpsters. A high incidence of polystyrene was also present at dumpsters serving the LLNL cafeterias. Very little glass or aluminium was found. Enough waste paper was present to indicate that the paper recycling program needed increased employee awareness and a possible expansion. As a result of our assessments, LLNL has expanded its cardboard and paper recycling programs and implemented moving box and pallet reuse programs. LLNL is also studying a possible recycling program for cafeteria polystyrene and possible program expansions for magazine, newsprint, and glass recycling.

  13. Sources of Emission Reductions: Evidence for US SO2 Emissions 1985-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A Denny; Dubroeucq, Florence

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -gas-fired, combined cycle units have displaced conventional generation that would have emitted about 800,000 tons of SO2; however, the effect has not been to reduce total SO2 emissions since the 9.0 million ton cap is unchanged, but to reduce the quantity... content of the fuel used to generate electricity (either by switching or retrofitting scrubbers) or by shifting generation to lower emitting units including new units. However, Title IV did not replace the source- specific limits and technology mandates...

  14. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  15. Recycling of electric-arc-furnace dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is one of the largest solid waste streams produced by steel mills, and is classified as a waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Successful recycle of the valuable metals (iron, zinc, and lead) present in the dust will result in resource conservation while simultaneously reducing the disposal problems. Technical feasibility of a novel recycling method based on using hydrogen as the reductant was established under this project through laboratory experiments. Sponge iron produced was low in zinc, cadmium, and lead to permit its recycle, and nontoxic to permit its safe disposal as an alternative to recycling. Zinc oxide was analyzed to contain 50% to 58% zinc by weight, and can be marketed for recovering zinc and lead. A prototype system was designed to process 2.5 tons per day (600 tons/year) of EAF dust, and a preliminary economic analysis was conducted. The cost of processing dust by this recycling method was estimated to be comparable to or lower than existing methods, even at such low capacities.

  16. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  17. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  18. Dual recycling for GEO600

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Freise

    2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual recycling is the combination of signal recycling and power recycling; both optical techniques improve the shot-noise-limited sensitivity of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. In addition, signal recycling can reduce the loss of light power due to imperfect interference and allows, in principle, to beat the standard quantum limit. The interferometric gravitational-wave detector GEO600 is the first detector to use signal recycling. We have recently equipped the detector with a signal-recycling mirror with a transmittance of 1%. In this paper, we present details of the detector commissioning and the first locks of the dual- recycled interferometer.

  19. Wastewater Recycle- A Sustainable Approach Towards Desalination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strictly Confidential WASTEWATER RECYCLE ? A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TOWARDS DESALINATION Presented at Industrial Energy Technology Conference 35th IETC ? 2013 New Orleans May 22, 2013 Arun Mittal Aquatech International Corporation, USA... Sustainable Solutions Water Source ?Surface ?Ground ?Sea ?Waste Environment ?Preserve Ground / Surface Water Goals of Sustainability ?Maximize Recovery / Efficiency of Process ?Minimize Energy Consumption ?Maximize Reuse ?Minimize Liquid Waste...

  20. Transverse instability at the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

  1. Recycling | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Each self service...

  2. Anaerobic Digestion of Algal Biomass Residues with Nutrient Recycle Microalgae are currently considered as a renewable source of liquid and gaseous biofuels and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    are currently considered as a renewable source of liquid and gaseous biofuels and a practical technology of the most sustainable and promising of biofuel feedstock, demonstrating particularly high growth rates, and their entrained lipids, can offer several different types of biofuel and bioenergy production options including

  3. Heisenberg-limited metrology with information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon A. Haine; Stuart S. Szigeti; Matthias D. Lang; Carlton M. Caves

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of atom interferometers by exploiting atom-light entanglement. In this paper, we apply information recycling to an interferometer where the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. We demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of number-correlated Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  4. Curbside recycling in the presence of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beatty, Timothy K.M.; Berck, Peter; Shimshack, Jay P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH MINOR REVISIONS). Curbside Recycling in the Presence ofConservation, Division of Recycling. The views expressed inThese historically high recycling rates have often been

  5. Issues in recycling galvanized scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koros, P.J. [LTV Steel Co., Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Hellickson, D.A. [General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI (United States); Dudek, F.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of the steel used for most galvanizing (and tinplate) applications makes scrap derived from their production and use a premier solid charge material for steelmaking. In 1989 the AISI created a Task Force to define the issues and to recommend technologically and economically sound approaches to assure continued, unhindered recyclability of the growing volume of galvanized scrap. The AISI program addressed the treatment of full-sized industrial bales of scrap. The current, on-going MRI (US)--Argonne National Laboratory program is focused on ``loose`` scrap from industrial and post-consumer sources. Results from these programs, issues of scrap management from source to steel melting, the choices for handling zinc in iron and steelmaking and the benefits/costs for removal of zinc (and lead) from scrap prior to melting in BOF and foundry operations are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  7. Scrap tire recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

  8. Power recycling for an interferometric gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    THESIS Power recycling for an interferometric gravitational wave detector Masaki Ando Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 3.3 Power recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.1 Principle of power recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.2 Recycling cavity

  9. Recycled Unbound Base Pooled Fund Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Recycled Unbound Base Pooled Fund Study Tuncer B. Edil Recycled Materials Resource Center Geological Engineering Program University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;·! Recycled Concrete Aggregate (RCA absorption ­! Un-Hydrated cement increases strength and durability ·! Recycled asphalt pavement (RAP

  10. Framework for Building Design Recyclability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Fan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of building materials is an important aspect of sustainable construction, while sustainable construction is a critical issue to fulfill overall sustainable development. Researchers have proved that building materials recycling...

  11. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Toner Recycling In FY...

  12. PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    PITT RECYCLES! Steel Aluminum Tin cans *Please empty cans! *Please empty containers! *Plastic bags can be recycled at Giant Eagle and Trader Joe's. Look on the bottom or the side of the container NOT Recyclable... Food waste Lunch bags Coffee cups Cellophane Tissues Paper towels Carbon paper Styrofoam Metals

  13. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

  14. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sulfur dioxide smelting reduction smelting reduction iron three-dimensional tonne top-gas recycling blast furnace tonnes per day ultra-low-

  15. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSORPTIVE RECYCLE OF DISTILLATION WASTE HEAT Donald C. Erickson and Edward J. Lutz Jr. Energy Concepts Company Annapolis, Maryland ABSTRACT When the heat source available to a distillation process is at a significantly higher temperature... which conserve 60 to 70%. Also, there are ver sions which incorporate separate low tem perature waste heat streams and thereby conserve over 90% of the required dis tillation energy. The main limitations of the R/AHP are the need for sufficient...

  16. Reverse Supply Chain Management and Electronic Waste Recycling: A Multitiered Network Equilibrium Framework for E-Cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Reverse Supply Chain Management and Electronic Waste Recycling: A Multitiered Network Equilibrium for the modeling of reverse supply chain management of electronic waste, which includes recycling. We describe the behavior of the various decision-makers, consisting of the sources of electronic waste, the recyclers

  17. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to pay for curbside recycling; A comparison of payment carefees needed to sustain recycling of covered electronicsbehavior: waste recycling in Hong Kong. Journal of

  18. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  19. Polyethelene terephthalate (PET) scrap recycling. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of polyethelene terephthalate (PET) products. Discarded bottles and household PET scrap are primary sources of this material. Recycling machinery, processes, and programs are discussed. Cable insulation, sheet films, foam products, and other products made from recycled PET are described. The impact of recycling on resource conservation and waste disposal problems is evaluated. (Contains a minimum of 73 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Waste Toolkit A-Z Battery recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Battery recycling How can I recycle batteries? The University Safety Office is responsible for arranging battery recycling for departments (see Contact at bottom of page). Colleges must in normal waste bins or recycling boxes. To recycle batteries, select either option 1 or 2 below: Option 1

  1. Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices Metal Bins Deskside Bins with Side Saddle Rubbermaid Bins.58 for auxiliaries. And Non-Public Areas Public Offices Non-Public Recyclables Recyclables RecyclablesTrash Trash Trash #12;New Recycling Bin Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions (as of December 2008) · Why

  2. Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Rutgers Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits Through WM's Recycling Program, our company saved energy and reduced Greenhouse Gases through recycling. Recycling uses less energy, preserves from recycled material than from virgin, raw material. RESOURCE SAVINGS 4203 Metric Tons (MTCO2E

  3. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A financing system for battery recycling in Switzerland.examines financing for battery recycling in Switzerland. He

  4. Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One company is actually recycling energy that has already been used to power manufacturing plants, which is helping facilities cut their energy expenses by up to 20 percent.

  5. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  6. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  7. Recycled rubber roads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes several innovative approaches for recycling old tires in the construction of roads. In one, 18 inches of shredded tire chips (2 X 2 inches) were used on top of 6-8 inches of small stone to construct a road across a sanitary landfill. No compacting or linders were needed. In another application, sidewall mats linked together with steel strapping were used as a sub-base for a road across a swampy area. A third application uses 1/2 inch bits of groundup rubber tires as a replacement for aggregate in an asphalt road base.

  8. Recycling Magnets | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-Setting MicroscopyJuneRecycling Magnets July 15, 2013

  9. Reduction of plasma density in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance experiment by using a helicon pre-ionization source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossack, Aaron C.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Victor, Brian S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Firman, Taylor; Prager, James R.; Ziemba, Timothy [Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc., 119 W. Denny Way, Suite 210, Seattle, Washington 98119 (United States)] [Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc., 119 W. Denny Way, Suite 210, Seattle, Washington 98119 (United States); Wrobel, Jonathan S. [979B West Moorhead Circle, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)] [979B West Moorhead Circle, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicon based pre-ionization source has been developed and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance (HIT-SI) spheromak. The source initiates plasma breakdown by injecting impurity-free, unmagnetized plasma into the HIT-SI confinement volume. Typical helium spheromaks have electron density reduced from (2–3) × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3} to 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Deuterium spheromak formation is possible with density as low as 2 × 10{sup 18} m{sup ?3}. The source also enables HIT-SI to be operated with only one helicity injector at injector frequencies above 14.5 kHz. A theory explaining the physical mechanism driving the reduction of breakdown density is presented.

  10. Alternative SO sub 2 and NO sub x emission reduction technologies for stationary sources: A comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmel, T.E. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA)); South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission control of acid rain precursors is currently the subject of intense debate on Capitol Hill. Numerous bills have been introduced which call for substantial reduction in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from operating utility and industrial boilers. The primary focus of the debates is on the cost, applicability and potential market impacts of emissions control options available to achieve the desired reductions. These topics are also the focus of a report in preparation for the 1990 Assessment of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). This paper summarizes some of the abatement technology information for utility boilers contained in the NAPAP report. First the major provisions in the proposed acid rain legislation are summarized and the emission reduction options potentially applicable to the utility boiler population discussed. This is followed by discussion of the retrofit issues for utility boilers and a synopsis of the applicability and cost of retrofit emission control options. Since the focus of the current proposed legislation is on near-term reduction requirements for utility boilers, this paper emphasizes retrofit control options. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education delivery channels with speculatively pre- computed authorizations and actively recycling them on a just Security Keywords authorization recycling, authorization flooding, access con- trol, authorization, publish

  12. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University recycling and waste management facilities in Swansea university To ensure that Waste Management Objectives

  13. The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia Alexander P. Miller Hang T. Nguyen Samantha D, and the recycling contacts from the participating Solid Waste Planning Units discussed in this study. #12;3 Table Determinants of Recycling_______________________________ 12 State Reports

  14. Single Stream Recycling Say Goodbye to Sorting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Single Stream Recycling Say Goodbye to Sorting Paper Please email recycle@umich.edu for more Containers Cardboard Please flatten all cardboard before placing into bin! Visit us at www.recycle

  15. RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY Panel Discussion Roundtable Moderator: S, although higher market values for recyclable will certainly stimulate increased interest in collection in recycling and deinking technologies and process design among North American, European, and Pacific Rim

  16. SOURCE?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is an open-source code package designed to be a common, low-cost, standardized tool...

  17. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  18. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xudong, E-mail: chen.xudong@nies.go.jp [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan); Xi Fengming [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Geng Yong, E-mail: gengyong@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujita, Tsuyoshi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. {yields} Mechanical technology leads to more CO{sub 2} emission reduction. {yields} Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. {yields} Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. {yields} Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO{sub 2}e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

  19. Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials In addition to the DOE making a final...

  20. A Study of Environmental Load Reduction Technique for University Facilities Part10 Retrofitting heat source based on diagnostic results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    -conditioning system in university facilities. Authors analyze the effect of CO2 emission reduction by retrofit. Simulation tools used are FACES and LCEM. 1. CO2 CO2 (TSCP)1)2006 2012CO215 TSCP 2. 1200 CO2 35 1000ton-CO2 35 75 CO2 2) 1 30 24CO2 15 1 RC 5 1 16,510m2 10131m2 6379m2

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  3. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  4. Recycling and Life Cycle Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses recycling and life cycle considerations related to the growing use of lightweight materials in vehicles. The chapter first addresses the benefit of a life cycle perspective in materials choice, and the role that recycling plays in reducing energy inputs and environmental impacts in a vehicle s life cycle. Some limitations of life cycle analysis and results of several vehicle- and fleet-level assessments are drawn from published studies. With emphasis on lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and polymer composites, the status of the existing recycling infrastructure and technological challenges being faced by the industry also are discussed.

  5. Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

  6. RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

  7. The Environment Team to Waste & Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    The Environment Team A-Z Guide to Waste & Recycling www.le.ac.uk/environment #12;Welcome ...to the University of Leicester's `A-Z Guide to Waste and Recycling'. Over the last 3 years, the Environment Team has introduced an award- winning recycling scheme across the campus that allows us to recycle paper, plastics

  8. 8. Has recycled ber been used appropriately?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8. Has recycled ber been used appropriately? 8.Recycledfiber Environmental aspects Social aspects appropriate environmental controls been applied? Recycled ber Has recycled fiber been used appropriately? Legality Have the products been legally produced? #12;#12;2.49 Recycling is common to the paper

  9. Recycled Materials Resource Jeffrey S. Melton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycled Materials Resource Center Jeffrey S. Melton Outreach Director Recycled Materials Resource Center NCC Meeting, April 9th, 2008 #12;Recycled Materials Resource Center Partner laboratory of FHWA Founded in 1998, renewed in 2007 Dedicated to the appropriate use of recycled materials in the highway

  10. A RECYCLED LAN DSCAPE Richard H. Durrell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    A RECYCLED LAN DSCAPE by Richard H. Durrell Department of Geology University of Cincinnati Drafting, May 1977 (R.A. Davis, editor) Reprinted 1982 A recycled landscape "Recycling" is the word of the day the same way, Nature recycles even the very hills and valleys beneath our feet. But, as usual, Nature

  11. Welcome new and returning residents! Help us make USC greener by recycling! Your Room Recycling Bin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Welcome new and returning residents! Help us make USC greener by recycling! Your Room Recycling Bin Every room is provided with a recycling bin to make it easy for you to recycle while living in University Housing. Use this bin to collect mixed recyclables in your room and take them to your nearest

  12. NITRO-HYDROLYSIS: AN ENERGY EFFICIENT SOURCE REDUCTION AND CHEMICAL PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT BIOSOLIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasson, KT

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The nitro-hydrolysis process has been demonstrated in the laboratory in batch tests on one municipal waste stream. This project was designed to take the next step toward commercialization for both industrial and municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) by demonstrating the feasibility of the process on a small scale. In addition, a 1-lb/hr continuous treatment system was constructed at University of Tennessee to treat the Kuwahee WWTF (Knoxville, TN) sludge in future work. The nitro-hydrolysis work was conducted at University of Tennessee in the Chemical Engineering Department and the gas and liquid analysis were performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nitro-hydrolysis of sludge proved a very efficient way of reducing sludge volume, producing a treated solution which contained unreacted solids (probably inorganics such as sand and silt) that settled quickly. Formic acid was one of the main organic acid products of reaction when larger quantities of nitric acid were used in the nitrolysis. When less nitric acid was used formic acid was initially produced but was later consumed in the reactions. The other major organic acid produced was acetic acid which doubled in concentration during the reaction when larger quantities of nitric acid were used. Propionic acid and butyric acid were not produced or consumed in these experiments. It is projected that the commercial use of nitro-hydrolysis at municipal wastewater treatment plants alone would result in a total estimated energy savings of greater than 20 trillion Btu/yr. A net reduction of 415,000 metric tons of biosolids per year would be realized and an estimated annual cost reduction of $122M/yr.

  13. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Recycling (incl. composting) Waste-to Energy Landfi ll #12;16 Treatment of Municipal Solid Waste in the EU 27 in 2006 Source: EUROSTAT 41% of Municipal Solid Waste across the EU 27 is still landfilled Rylander, CEO SYSAV, South Scania Waste Company, Sweden #12;2 The Waste Problem can only be solved

  14. Renewable and Recycled Energy Objective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2007, the North Dakota enacted legislation (H.B. 1506) establishing an ''objective'' that 10% of all retail electricity sold in the state be obtained from renewable energy and recycled...

  15. Key recycling in authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Portmann

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In their seminal work on authentication, Wegman and Carter propose that to authenticate multiple messages, it is sufficient to reuse the same hash function as long as each tag is encrypted with a one-time pad. They argue that because the one-time pad is perfectly hiding, the hash function used remains completely unknown to the adversary. Since their proof is not composable, we revisit it using a composable security framework. It turns out that the above argument is insufficient: if the adversary learns whether a corrupted message was accepted or rejected, information about the hash function is leaked, and after a bounded finite amount of rounds it is completely known. We show however that this leak is very small: Wegman and Carter's protocol is still $\\epsilon$-secure, if $\\epsilon$-almost strongly universal$_2$ hash functions are used. This implies that the secret key corresponding to the choice of hash function can be reused in the next round of authentication without any additional error than this $\\epsilon$. We also show that if the players have a mild form of synchronization, namely that the receiver knows when a message should be received, the key can be recycled for any arbitrary task, not only new rounds of authentication.

  16. Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husmoen, Derek Howard

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive biomass production in emerging bioenergy systems could increase nonpoint-source sediment and nutrient losses and impair surface and groundwater quality. Recycling biochar, a charcoal byproduct from pyrolysis of biomass, provides potential...

  17. RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep Setting #12;Why Recycle? Recycling saves resources Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees! Recycling saves energy Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for 3 hours! Recycling is easy There are 4 waste categories here at UM

  18. Recycling of nuclear spent fuel with AIROX processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, D. [ed.] [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jahshan, S.N.; Allison, C.M.; Kuan, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, T.R. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the concept of recycling light water reactor (LWR) fuel through use of a dry-processing technique known as the AIROX (Atomics International Reduction Oxidation) process. In this concept, the volatiles and the cladding from spent LWR fuel are separated from the fuel by the AIROX process. The fuel is then reenriched and made into new fuel pins with new cladding. The feasibility of the concept is studied from a technical and high level waste minimization perspective.

  19. Identification and Characterization of the Endosomal Recycling Inhibitor Endosidin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michelle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. , 2002). BFA inhibits recycling of proteins to the PMthe dark. By inhibiting endosomal recycling, ES2 increasedof the Endosomal Recycling Inhibitor Endosidin2 A

  20. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    documents. Else Refining & Recycling Ltd. , Shefford 54.and the potential for recycling other small electrical andon material recovery and recycling of end-of-life mobile

  1. Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Anderson, Diana

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas ? one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

  2. Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Diana

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas — one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

  3. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  4. Recycling and surplus chemical programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, T.J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988, 45 years of defense production came to a close at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The mission of the Hanford Site was formally changed to environmental restoration and remediation. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the management and operations (M&O) contractor leading the cleanup. Within the framework of future Site cleanup, Hanford recycling and surplus chemical programs are making a viable contribution today to waste minimization, diversion of materials from the waste stream, and setting a standard for future operations. This paper focuses on two successful efforts: paper recycling and surplus chemical sales.

  5. Linear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Linear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse Tara Demeyer Management Science I #12;Outline Introduction Construction Waste Recycling Paper Waste Recycling Printer Component Reuse #12;Reverse Logistics Returns/ Damaged Product Recycling of waste materials Reuse of product components #12

  6. Regional or global WEEE recycling. Where to go?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lopez N, Brenda N.; Liu, Lili; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Keli; Zheng, Lixia [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Source and Destination countries involved in the movement of WEEE have been studied. ? Legislation, facilities and EPR are presented in Source and Destination countries. ? Mostly Destination countries do not have EPR established and have informal facilities. ? Source countries: good technology, EPR established and mostly WEEE regulation enacted. ? Regional WEEE recycling should be under global standards for Sources and Destinations. - Abstract: If we consider Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) management, we can see the development of different positions in developed and developing countries. This development started with the movement of WEEE from developed countries to the developing countries. However, when the consequences for health and the environment were observed, some developing countries introduced a ban on the import of this kind of waste under the umbrella of the Basel Convention, while some developed countries have been considering a regional or global WEEE recycling approach. This paper explores the current movements between Source and Destination countries, or the importers and exporters, and examines whether it is legal and why illegal traffic is still rife; how global initiatives could support a global WEEE management scheme; the recycling characteristics of the source an destination countries and also to ascertain whether the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) has been established between the different stakeholders involved in WEEE management. Ultimately, the Full Extended Producer Responsibility is presented as a possible solution because the compensation of the environmental capacity for WEEE recycling or treatment could be made by the contribution of extra responsibility; and also generating an uniform standard for processing WEEE in an environmentally sound manner could support the regional or international solution of WEEE and also improve the performance of the informal sector.

  7. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen (Middletown, DE); Grot, Walther (Chadds Ford, PA)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  8. Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study Study ID Nos. 546B, 563 Prepared RECYCLING PROGRAMS Study ID Nos. 546B and 563 Prepared for Southern California Edison Rosemead, California

  9. Curbside recycling in the presence of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beatty, Timothy K.M.; Berck, Peter; Shimshack, Jay P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2006 JEL No. Q53 – Solid Waste and Recycling Q58 –regulates municipal solid waste and recycling with itsmillion tons of municipal solid waste annually, or 1.3 tons

  10. Automobile Recycling Policy: Findings and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Frank

    This report focuses on recycling. As an objective neutral party, MIT has compiled a knowledge base that examines the many complex issues relating to re-cycling. Although this report was prepared at the request of the ...

  11. WINDExchange Webinar: Wind Turbine Recycling and Repowering ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WINDExchange Webinar: Wind Turbine Recycling and Repowering WINDExchange Webinar: Wind Turbine Recycling and Repowering January 21, 2015 3:00PM to 5:00PM EST Add to calendar What...

  12. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

  13. Research Report Recycling gone bad: When the option to recycle increases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Research Report Recycling gone bad: When the option to recycle increases resource consumption Jesse Abstract In this study, we propose that the ability to recycle may lead to increased resource usage compared to when a recycling option is not available. Supporting this hypothesis, our first experiment

  14. TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling ALL plastics (#1 through #7) by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each and in LH100. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics and aluminum. However, any

  15. TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2012 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2012 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling #1 PET and #2 HDPE plastics by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics and aluminum. However, any trash or other

  16. TTUAB PLASTIC RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2011 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2011 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling #1 PET and #2 HDPE plastics by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each floor. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics. However, any trash or other

  17. Waste Management and Recycling in Lab Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Waste Management and Recycling in Lab · Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom · Electronic material can be recycled for free by MIT facilities (via SAP web) · Bulk equipment can be disposed be placed in recycling bin ­ Cardboard ­ Please break down and flatten boxes ­ Containers (aluminum, metal

  18. Where can I recycle it year-round? Item Local Recycling Locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Where can I recycle it year-round? Item Local Recycling Locations Styrofoam First Alternative Co-op Recycling Center, 1007 SE 3rd St., 541-753-3115 (small fee) Packing Peanuts OSU Surplus, 644 SW 13 th St., 541-737-7347 Commercial shipping stores Film Plastics First Alternative Co-op Recycling Center, 1007

  19. Green Screens: Local Recycling Information Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, Georgia

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tires at Firestone and automobile oil at Grease Monkey." When "Related Issues" is selected from CULINE's Recycling

  20. Proceedings of the waste recycling workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, R.E.; Thomas, A.F.; Ries, M.A. [eds.] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [eds.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recorded are seventeen talks from five sessions at the workshop. FERMCO`s recycling program, state of the art recycling technology, and an integrated demonstration of deactivation, decommissioning and decommissioning are presented in the plenary session. In the concrete session, decontamination and recycling are discussed. In the transite session, regulations are considered along with recycling and decontamination. In the metals session, radioactive scrap metals are emphasized. And in the regulatory considerations and liabilities session, DOE and EPA viewpoints are discussed. (GHH)

  1. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  2. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  3. Recycling at Mooov-In 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    Cardboard Recycling at Mooov-In 2011 For the second year in a row, Division of Housing and Food Service (DHFS) and Recycling & Sustainability teamed up to divert as much cardboard as possible from area landfills. In addition to the paper, cardboard, aluminum and plastic recycling available in all residence

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Volume 1 Pollution Abatement Office. Funds were also provided by BC Auto Recyclers, the BC Ministry of Environment 224 West Esplanade North Vancouver, B.C. Vm3H7 #12;BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE AUTO RECYCLING

  5. Material Recycling and Waste Disposal Document Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    1 Material Recycling and Waste Disposal Procedure Document Control Document Created by 23, treatment, handling, transport and disposal of recyclable materials and residual wastes so as to maximise the opportunity and value for the recyclable materials and to minimise the quantity of residual materials

  6. RECYCLE TO EARN Rishi Bhailal Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    RECYCLE TO EARN Rishi Bhailal Chandra Supply Chain Management, Accounting, Kelley School of Business, IUPUI Recycling is a key aspect of any sustainability effort, one that calls for the participation of the entire campus community. Getting students to recycle is very difficult. Students lack

  7. USF Physical Plant Recycling Program Updated November 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Recyclables (Bulbs, Tires, etc.) 7 tons #12;Recycle Ratio for FY 2012/2013 · Total waste generated: 3419 tonsUSF Physical Plant Recycling Program Updated November 2013 #12;Beginnings · Program initiated · Continuously expanding recycling efforts #12;Paper Recycling · Currently recycling mixed paper Office paper

  8. Rural recycling in southeast Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lariviere, R. (Prowers County Development, Inc., Lamar, CO (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a recycling effort developed for rural southeast Colorado. The program was inspired and manned by local volunteers and based on a drop-off method used in Europe. The topics of the article include getting started, funding, problems encountered, level of participation, and estimated savings in waste collection and landfilling fees.

  9. Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    5015/03/08 Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling Water and fizzy drinks bottles Contaminated plastic (food, fluids, etc.) Oil containers Toxic chemical containers Metal strips or fasteners Carrier bags and bin liners Margarine tubs, wall coverings Yoghurt pots, egg cartons, plastic packaging

  10. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  11. Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount for IndividualEnergy Political Activity

  12. An industry response to recycle 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motl, G.P.; Loiselle, V.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is expected to issue a policy early this year articulating DOE`s position on the recycle of DOE radioactive scrap metal. In anticipation of this `Recycle 2000` initiative, the nuclear industry has formed a new trade association called the Association of Radioactive Metal Recyclers (ARMR). This article describes the Recycle 2000 initiative, provides some background on the ARMR and its membership, and identifies industry views on the actions to be taken and issues to be resolved in Recycle 2000 is to become a reality.

  13. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  14. Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS Website at http://www.nems.nih.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information ­ Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS in COMMINGLED bin Rinse food/beverage containers before recycling No Pyrex or Styrofoam Printer and Copier Toner Cartridges in TONER CARTRIDGE bin Recycle packaging material in appropriate bin NIH charities

  15. Recycle of oily refinery wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartilucci, M.P.; Karsner, G.G.; Tracy, W.J. III.

    1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for recycling of petroleum containing sludge. It comprises segregating waste oil-containing sludges into a relatively high oil content sludge and a relatively high water content sludge; introducing the high oil content sludge into a delayed coking drum under delayed conditions in the presence of a liquid coker hydrocarbon feedstock to form coke; introducing the high water content sludge into a delayed coking drum to quench the coke formed in the coking drum.

  16. Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: • Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. • Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates • Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. • These metals were not detected in background air samples. • Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

  17. Scrap tire recycling in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses the problems associated with scrap tires. For example, surface storing of scrap tires poses a fire hazard and the rainwater trapped in the tire casings is an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes. Use as a fuel for energy production is unattractive as long as oil retails at its present low price. Past reclamation processes have not met expectations. Legislation alone is not the answer, because scrap tires cannot be regulated out of existence. However, the Minnesota state legislature has come up with an approach that seems to be successful. It has passed the Waste Tire Act, which not only formulates regulations but also provides funding for research and development. Thus, it has established a tire disposal fund for financing construction costs of tire recycling facilities. One of the outcomes was the construction of the St. Louis county Waste Tire Recycling Facility. Through a leasing arrangement with Minneapolis-based Rubber Elastomerics, Inc. (RRE), construction costs financed by the tire disposal fund eventually will be repaid by RRE to the fund. The arrangement is described in detail. By a process also described, RRE produces a product that can be used in thermoset and in thermoplastic compounds. The user can incorporate between 50 percent and 85 percent of the recycled product into a rubber or plastic compound without significantly affecting the physical properties of the compound.

  18. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 34. USAID Plastic Recycling Project. Accessed March Recycling Regulation in Macedoniathe Macedonian waste and recycling regulatory framework with

  19. The pinch of cold ions from recycling in the tokamak edge pedestal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Chen Yang [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Park, Gun-Young [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-Gu, DaeJeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong-Seock [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Stotler, Daren [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the ''natural fueling mechanism'' [W. Wan, S. E. Parker, Y. Chen, and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 17, 040701 (2010)] to the edge pedestal. The natural fueling mechanism is where cold ions naturally pinch radially inward for a heat-flux dominated plasma. It is shown from neoclassical-neutral transport coupled simulations that the recycling neutrals and the associated source ions are colder than the main ions in the edge pedestal. These recycling source ions will pinch radially inward due to microturbulence. Gyrokinetic turbulence simulations indicate that near the top of the pedestal, the pinch velocity of the recycling source ions is much higher than the main ion outgoing flow velocity. The turbulent pinch of the recycling source ions may play a role in the edge pedestal transport and dynamics. The cold ion temperature significantly enhances the pinch velocity of the recycling source ions near to the pedestal top. Neoclassical calculations show a cold ion pinch in the pedestal as well.

  20. Project Information Form Project Title Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Pavement (RAP), Recycled Asphalt Shingles (RAS), and Different Virgin Binder Sources on Performance of Research Project As virgin material sources become increasingly scarce, and the volume of pavement material for pavement construction. The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) has recently increased

  1. Recycling production designs : the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brommer, Tracey H. (Tracey Helenius)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an ...

  2. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

  3. Recycling Campaign Award Prizes for best project proposal to improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Recycling Campaign Award Prizes for best project proposal to improve waste recycling. Recycling bins contain inappropriate waste that cannot be recycled and thus are not picked up. THE REASON for picking up the waste. 60% of the waste budget. Your task: - To develop a new project to improve recycling

  4. Recycling Campaign Prizes for best project proposal to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Recycling Campaign Award Prizes for best project proposal to improve waste recycling The Guide #12;Recycling Campaign Award OIKOS Luxembourg in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg's Cell to participate in the Recycling Campaign Award. The Recycling Campaign Award invites you to work in teams

  5. Questions 1823 There are exactly three recycling centers in Rivertown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappello, Peter

    5 Questions 18­23 There are exactly three recycling centers in Rivertown: Center 1, Center 2, and Center 3. Exactly five kinds of material are recycled at these recycling centers: glass, newsprint, plastic, tin, and wood. Each recycling center recycles at least two but no more than three of these kinds

  6. Waste Toolkit A-Z Can I recycle stationery?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Stationery Can I recycle stationery? Yes! You can recycle paper and paper based products such as used note pads, paper and cardboard files in the University Grundon recycling boxes. You can't recycle mixed materials that are made of non- recyclable plastic, such as plastic files

  7. Waste Toolkit A-Z Can I recycle paper cups?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Paper cups Can I recycle paper cups? Yes. Paper cups can be recycled in the Grundon recycling boxes. Do not leave dregs of drink in them, as this will contaminate the recycling box. Although it is good to recycle paper cups, it is more sustainable to use china cups that can be washed

  8. Cryogenic grinding: an efficient method for recycling scrap rubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic grinding represents an opportunity for expanding recycling capabilities to a broad range of compounds. Many materials that can be reduced to a powder by conventional coarse grinding can be reduced more efficiently by using a super-cold agent such as liquid nitrogen at -320/sup 0/F to embrittle plastic or rubber polymers before grinding. In addition, cryogenic grinding makes possible the size reduction of many materials that cannot be ground by conventional ambient grinding methods. Some experiences of cryogenic grinding in practice at United Tire and Rubber company, Limited, headquartered in Rexdale, Ontario, are noted. A schematic of such a system is shown.

  9. Request for Information on Photovoltaic Module Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requests feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on issues related to photovoltaic (PV) module recycling technology. SunShot intends to understand the current state of recycling technology and the areas of research that could lead to impactful recycling technologies to support the developing PV industry. The intent of this request for information is to generate discussion related to planning for the end of life of photovoltaic modules and to create a list of high impact research topics in photovoltaics recycling.

  10. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE RECYCLING SCHEME Under the new recycling scheme commencing at the beginning of Hilary Term the following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE RECYCLING SCHEME Under the new recycling scheme commencing at the beginning in all student rooms and offices o one for normal waste o one for co-mingled recycling1 Bins these bins. If any recycling is contaminated it will be `waste' not recycling and it would need to go

  11. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| Department ofRightsSmartManagementRecycling

  12. Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das Department of Civil Engineering IIT Kanpur Introduction The bituminous pavement rehabilitation alternatives are mainly overlaying, recycling and reconstruction. In the recycling process the material from deteriorated pavement, known as reclaimed asphalt

  13. Recyclability of a layered silicateethermoplastic olefin elastomer nanocomposite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Recyclability of a layered silicateethermoplastic olefin elastomer nanocomposite M.R. Thompson*, K. Despite the occurrence of degradation in the nanocomposite during recycling, its rheological. All rights reserved. Keywords: Thermo-oxidative degradation; Nanocomposite; Recyclability; Organoclay

  14. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  15. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric iron reduction increased with both the flow rate of gas as well as the liquid flow rate (up to ~0.1 g/L/min). Pure carbon monoxide also reduced the ferric ion, but at a rate about one tenth that of pure hydrogen at similar conditions. The syngas mixture of equimolar hydrogen and carbon monoxide reacted at a rate intermediate between each gas as a pure stream (up to ~ 0.06 g/L/min). This gas mixture shows that some form of unpurified reformer gas could be used to reduce the ferric ion in the electrolyte solution. Nitrogen was inert causing very little to no reduction of ferric ion.

  16. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  18. PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete Pavements Mary E. Vancura, Derek Tompkins, & Lev Khazanovich 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference #12;·! Reassessment of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) use in rigid pavements ·! History of RCA use ·! Characteristics of RCA concrete ·! RCA production

  19. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  20. Broadband squeezing of quantum noise in a Michelson interferometer with Twin-Signal-Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André Thüring; Christian Gräf; Henning Vahlbruch; Moritz Mehmet; Karsten Danzmann; Roman Schnabel

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Twin-Signal-Recycling (TSR) builds on the resonance doublet of two optically coupled cavities and efficiently enhances the sensitivity of an interferometer at a dedicated signal frequency. We report on the first experimental realization of a Twin-Signal-Recycling Michelson interferometer and also its broadband enhancement by squeezed light injection. The complete setup was stably locked and a broadband quantum noise reduction of the interferometers shot noise by a factor of up to 4\\,dB was demonstrated. The system was characterized by measuring its quantum noise spectra for several tunings of the TSR cavities. We found good agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulations.

  1. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and...

  2. Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recycling Facilities Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling Facilities 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  3. ash quality recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: the logistics for recycling biochar to fields from which the biomass feedstocks are harvested. The contribution of biochar recycling from mobile pyrolysis...

  4. Economic Feasibility of Electrochemical Caustic Recycling at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Kurath, Dean E.; Holton, Langdon K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review of potential cost benefits of NaSICON Ceramic membranes for the separation of sodium from Hanford tank waste. The primary application is for caustic recycle to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreatment leaching operation. The report includes a description of the waste, the benefits and costs for a caustic-recycle facility, and Monte Carlo results obtained from a model of these costs and benefits. The use of existing cost information has been limited to publicly available sources. This study is intended to be an initial evaluation of the economic feasibility of a caustic recycle facility based on NaSICON technology. The current pretreatment flowsheet indicates that approximately 6,500 metric tons (MT) of Na will be added to the tank waste, primarily for removing Al from the high-level waste (HLW) sludge (Kirkbride et al. 2007). An assessment (Alexander et al. 2004) of the pretreatment flowsheet, equilibrium chemistry, and laboratory results indicates that the quantity of Na required for sludge leaching will increase by 6,000 to 12,000 MT in order to dissolve sufficient Al from the tank-waste sludge material to maintain the number of HLW canisters produced at 9,400 canisters as defined in the Office of River Protection (ORP) System Plan (Certa 2003). This additional Na will significantly increase the volume of LAW glass and extend the processing time of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Future estimates on sodium requirements for caustic leaching are expected to significantly exceed the 12,000-MT value and approach 40,000-MT of total sodium addition for leaching (Gilbert, 2007). The cost benefit for caustic recycling is assumed to consist of four major contributions: 1) the cost savings realized by not producing additional immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, 2) caustic recycle capital investment, 3) caustic recycle operating and maintenance costs, and 4) research and technology costs needed to deploy the technology. In estimating costs for each of these components, several parameters are used as inputs. Due to uncertainty in assuming a singular value for each of these parameters, a range of possible values is assumed. A Monte Carlo simulation is then performed where the range of these parameters is exercised, and the resulting range of cost benefits is determined.

  5. RECYCLING COORDINATOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP University of Nebraska--Lincoln Landscape Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    RECYCLING COORDINATOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP University of Nebraska--Lincoln Landscape Services, implementing and maintaining recycling on campus. Assist in annual recycler's survey; tracking of recycling drop- off program; assist in market research for selected recycled materials; assist in developing

  6. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forget, Benoit; Pope, Michael; Piet, Steven J.; Driscoll, Michael

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  7. Removing tritium and other impurities during industrial recycling of beryllium from a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dylst, K.; Seghers, J.; Druyts, F.; Braet, J. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling beryllium used in a fusion reactor might be a good way to overcome problems related to the disposal of neutron irradiated beryllium. The critical issues for the recycling of used first wall beryllium are the presence of tritium and (transuranic) impurities. High temperature annealing seems to be the most promising technique for detritiation. Purification of the de-tritiated beryllium can be achieved by chlorination of the irradiated beryllium and the subsequent reduction of beryllium chloride to highly pure metallic beryllium. After that, the beryllium can be re-fabricated into first wall tiles via powder metallurgy which is already a mature industrial practice. This paper outlines the path to define the experimental needs for beryllium recycling and tackles problems related to the detritiation and the purification via the chlorine route. (authors)

  8. Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart E. Strand

    2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

  9. Cellubrevin-targeted Fluorescence Uncovers Heterogeneity in the Recycling Endosomes*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machen, Terry E.

    Cellubrevin-targeted Fluorescence Uncovers Heterogeneity in the Recycling Endosomes* (Received, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3200 The pH and trafficking of recycling endosomes have-enriched recycling endosomes (pHCb) and FITC-transferrin to measure the pH of transferrin- enriched recycling

  10. Recycling Realities: ASU's Quest for Zero Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Recycling Realities: ASU's Quest for Zero Solid Waste Dawn RatcliffePast Recycling Coordinator Alana LevineRecycling Program Manager For the last 16 years, Dawn Ratcliffe has worked and volunteered in the sustainability and animal-advocacy fields. She has organized several Earth Day events, recycling events

  11. Evaluating Water Recycling in California Sachi De Souza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Evaluating Water Recycling in California By Sachi De Souza B.Sc.Hon (Queen's University) 2005 Recycling in California ii ABSTRACT This document describes how to complete an economic analysis, financial analysis, and cost allocation for a water recycling project. Water recycling is gaining importance

  12. Control structure selection for Reactor, Separator and Recycle Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control structure selection for Reactor, Separator and Recycle Process T. Larsson M.S. Govatsmark S to control", for a simple plant with a liquid phase reactor, a distillation column and recycle of unreacted processes is the presence of recycle. Variations of a plant with reaction, separation and mass recycle, see

  13. Recycling asphalt overview of more than 25 years of use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recycling asphalt overview of more than 25 years of use in France Y. Brosseaud ­ LCPC hal with ring for recycling ­ Average rate with high proportion : 30 to 50% ­ Used of rejuvenators (soft oil,version1-20May2011 #12;4 Hot recycling asphalt on mixing plant Recycling in place in hot or cold

  14. ReCycle: Pipeline Adaptation to Tolerate Process Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrellas, Josep

    ReCycle: Pipeline Adaptation to Tolerate Process Variation Abhishek Tiwari, Smruti R. Sarangi, Josep Torrellasg 1 #12;OutlineOutline · MotivationMotivation · ReCycle Idea U i R C l· Using ReCycle · ReCycle System overview · Results 2 #12;MotivationMotivation V i ti k t l th· Variation makes some

  15. RECYCLABILITY CHALLENGES IN "ABUNDANT" MATERIAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES Annick Anctila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECYCLABILITY CHALLENGES IN "ABUNDANT" MATERIAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES Annick Anctila and Fthenakisa of photovoltaic installations grow, greatly displacing traditional power- generation infrastructures, recycling a take-back- or recycling-program ahead of time. Our work explores the potential for material recycling

  16. Length sensing and control of a Michelson interferometer with Power Recycling and Twin Signal Recycling cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Gräf; André Thüring; Henning Vahlbruch; Karsten Danzmann; Roman Schnabel

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The techniques of power recycling and signal recycling have proven as key concepts to increase the sensitivity of large-scale gravitational wave detectors by independent resonant enhancement of light power and signal sidebands within the interferometer. Developing the latter concept further, twin signal recycling was proposed as an alternative to conventional detuned signal recycling. Twin signal recycling features the narrow-band sensitivity gain of conventional detuned signal recycling but furthermore facilitates the injection of squeezed states of light, increases the detector sensitivity over a wide frequency band and requires a less complex detection scheme for optimal signal readout. These benefits come at the expense of an additional recycling mirror, thus increasing the number of degrees of freedom in the interferometer which need to be controlled. In this article we describe the development of a length sensing and control scheme and its successful application to a tabletop-scale power recycled Michelson interferometer with twin signal recycling. We were able to lock the interferometer in all relevant longitudinal degrees of freedom, enabling the long-term stable operation of the experiment. We thus laid the foundation for further investigations of this interferometer topology to evaluate its viability for the application in gravitational wave detectors.

  17. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , 1999. Reducing solid waste: Linking recycling to135. EPA, 2005. Municipal Solid Waste in the United States:DC: Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.

  18. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DC: Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.of reducing municipal solid waste. Journal of EnvironmentalJ. , 1999. Reducing solid waste: Linking recycling to

  19. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    led to a patchwork of programs and higher costs, particularly for collection, which is a major expense for e-waste recycling (

  20. WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    , saves energy, and decreases greenhouse gas emissions. It prevents pollution and slows landfill expansion and truck manufacturing industry. Wages for works in the recycling industry are notably higher as well

  1. Design and Optimization of Photovoltaics Recycling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.K.; Fthenakis, V.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the growing production and installation of photovoltaics (PV) around the world constrained by the limited availability of resources, end-of-life management of PV is becoming very important. A few major PV manufacturers currently are operating several PV recycling technologies at the process level. The management of the total recycling infrastructure, including reverse-logistics planning, is being started in Europe. In this paper, we overview the current status of photovoltaics recycling planning and discuss our mathematic modeling of the economic feasibility and the environmental viability of several PV recycling infrastructure scenarios in Germany; our findings suggest the optimum locations of the anticipated PV take-back centers. Short-term 5-10 year planning for PV manufacturing scraps is the focus of this article. Although we discuss the German situation, we expect the generic model will be applicable to any region, such as the whole of Europe and the United States.

  2. Loveland Water and Power- Refrigerator Recycling Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water and Power is providing an incentive for its customers to recycle their old refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old refrigerator...

  3. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  4. Agony and ecstasy of tire recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logsdon, G.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the problem of used tires and the recycling of them. Shredded tires have a multitude of uses-new rubber, road construction, mulch, fuel, in composting and home insulation.

  5. Recycled Materials Resource Center Project No. 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 Recycled Materials Resource Center Project No. 27: Full Scale Monitoring for Assessment of Exothermal Reactions in Waste Tires Final Report February 2006 by Hailey L. Wappett1 Jorge G. Zornberg2 1....................................................................................................7 Tire Shredding

  6. Renewable, Recycled and Conserved Energy Objective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation (HB 1123) establishing an objective that 10% of all retail electricity sales in the state be obtained from renewable and recycled energy by 2015....

  7. Planning for municipal solid waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belnay, G.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research identifies those community characteristics and program components that have resulted in early, consistent, high levels of recycling participation in New Jersey. Discriminant analysis of socio-economic, demographic, institutional, and motivational factors is used to classify each of the state's 567 minor civil divisions into groups that describe participation levels. Of the four hypotheses advanced to explain the variation of recycling around the state, leadership emerges as the key factor in local program success. Local political and governmental leaders set the municipal recycling agenda, and through their knowledge, programs that fit the unique characteristics of their town are designed and aggressively implemented. Significant savings in the municipality's solid waste disposal budget and the added bonus of State Tonnage Grant Award Revenues are obtained by the urban, well-established, experienced recyclers identified by the analysis and confirmed by the individual case studies discussed.

  8. EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass Disposal Guide. Do not place empty chemical bottles in commingled recycling bins on hallways, trash cans and with a 20 gallons capacity. It is made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with 100% post-consumer recycled

  9. Economic Feasibility of Recycling Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.K.; Fthenakis, V.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has boomed over the last decade, and its expansion is expected to continue with the development of new technologies. Taking into consideration the usage of valuable resources and the generation of emissions in the life cycle of photovoltaic technologies dictates proactive planning for a sound PV recycling infrastructure to ensure its sustainability. PV is expected to be a 'green' technology, and properly planning for recycling will offer the opportunity to make it a 'double-green' technology - that is, enhancing life cycle environmental quality. In addition, economic feasibility and a sufficient level of value-added opportunity must be ensured, to stimulate a recycling industry. In this article, we survey mathematical models of the infrastructure of recycling processes of other products and identify the challenges for setting up an efficient one for PV. Then we present an operational model for an actual recycling process of a thin-film PV technology. We found that for the case examined with our model, some of the scenarios indicate profitable recycling, whereas in other scenarios it is unprofitable. Scenario SC4, which represents the most favorable scenario by considering the lower bounds of all costs and the upper bound of all revenues, produces a monthly profit of $107,000, whereas the least favorable scenario incurs a monthly loss of $151,000. Our intent is to extend the model as a foundation for developing a framework for building a generalized model for current-PV and future-PV technologies.

  10. Generalized teleportation and entanglement recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergii Strelchuk; Micha? Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new teleportation protocols which are generalizations of the original teleportation protocols that use the Pauli group [Bennett, et al. Physical Review Letters, 70(13) 1895-1899] and the port-based teleportation protocols, introduced by Hiroshima and Ishizaka [Physical Review Letters, 101(24) 240501], that use the symmetric permutation group. We derive sufficient condition for a set of operations, which in general need not form a group, to give rise to a teleportation protocol and provide examples of such schemes. This generalization leads to protocols with novel properties and is needed to push forward new schemes of computation based on them. Port-based teleportation protocols and our generalizations use a large resource state consisting of N singlets to teleport only a single qubit state reliably. We provide two distinct protocols which recycle the resource state to teleport multiple states with error linearly increasing with their number. The first protocol consists of sequentially teleporting qubit states, and the second teleports them in a bulk.

  11. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  12. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  13. Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine G.; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a constituent of dissolved organic matter, DNA may be consumed by microorganisms inhabiting various freshwater and marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of carbon, energy, nitrogen, and phosphorus for microorganisms residing in the upper layer of Columbia River (WA, USA) water column as well as a sole source of phosphorus for the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens and for Bacillus subtilis ATCC 49760. Our results suggest that DNA assimilation by S. oneidensis is linked to the activity of Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s) and extracellular phosphatase(s). The ability to use DNA as the sole source of phosphorus may be of particular ecological advantage for microorganisms living under Fe(III)-reducing conditions where bioavailability of inorganic phosphate may be limited by the formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H20].

  14. Separation and recovery process R&D to enhance automotive materials recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1976, the sales-weighted curb-weight of cars and light trucks sold in the United States has decreased by almost 800 pounds. Vehicle weight reduction has, of course, provided for a significant increase in US fleet fuel economy, from 17 to 27 miles per gallon. However, achievement of the weight reduction and concomitant increase in fuel economy was brought about, in part, by the substitution of lighter-weight materials, such as thinner-gauge coated sheet-steels replacing heavy-gauge noncoated sheet-steels and new aluminum alloys replacing steel as well as the increased use of plastics replacing metals. Each of these new materials has created the need for new technology for materials recycling. This paper highlights some of the R&D being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to develop technology that will enhance and minimize the cost of automotive materials recycling.

  15. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

  16. The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth'sConnect The ScienceSequence4629 Theh

  17. Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood.2 million cubic meters) of lumber treated with CCA are produced annually in the United States (Micklewright 1998). ·In 1997, for example, some 581.4 million cu. ft. was treated with waterborne preservatives

  18. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  19. Electroless nickel recycling via electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroless nickel is widely used in the metal finishing industry as a coating. It plates evenly on a variety of surfaces and replicates or enhances the surface finish. It has high hardness and good corrosion resistance and machinability. However, its bath life is limited and it has a tendency to spontaneously plate out on the tank and associated equipment. These problems add to the cost per unit component plated. Also, expensive waste treatment is required before users can dispose of the spent solution. Electroless nickel`s limited bath life is inherent in its chemical make-up. Using hypophosphite as the reducing agent for the nickel ion generates by-products of nickel metal and orthophosphite. When the level of orthophosphite in the solution reaches a high concentration, the reaction slows and finally stops. The bath must be disposed of, and its treatment and replacement costs are high. Metal salts have a tendency to plate out because of the dissolved solids present, and this also makes it necessary to discard the bath. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has conducted a study of an electrodialysis process that can reduce both chemical purchases and disposal costs. Electrodialysis employs a membrane, deionized water, and an electromotive potential to separate the orthophosphite and other dissolved solids from the nickel ions. With the aid of the electromotive potential, the dissolved solids migrate across the membrane from the process solution into the water in the recycling unit`s holding cell. This migration lowers the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the process solution and improves plating performance. The dialysis process makes it possible to reuse the bath many times without disposal.

  20. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are lead mining, lead smelting and battery recycling.Areas near Pb recycling facilities may be enriched bysoil with lead. A battery recycling site is a location where

  1. Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Water Distict Economic Evaluation for Water Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    -i- Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Water Distict Economic Evaluation for Water Recycling In Urban Areas........................................................................................................................................... 4 BENEFICIAL USES OF RECYCLED WATER................................................................................................ 5 MOTIVATIONS FOR RECYCLED WATER USE

  2. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, S.M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nitrogen mobilization and recycling in trees. Photosynthesisloci mapping for nitrogen recycling in rice. Journal ofNitrogen Assimilation and Recycling Stéphanie M. Bernard 1

  3. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lead smelting and battery recycling. Areas near Pb recyclingof soil with lead. A battery recycling site is a locationnear an automobile battery recycling facility. The soil was

  4. Experimental realisation of Shor's quantum factoring algorithm using qubit recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Martin-Lopez; Anthony Laing; Thomas Lawson; Roberto Alvarez; Xiao-Qi Zhou; Jeremy L. O'Brien

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computational algorithms exploit quantum mechanics to solve problems exponentially faster than the best classical algorithms. Shor's quantum algorithm for fast number factoring is a key example and the prime motivator in the international effort to realise a quantum computer. However, due to the substantial resource requirement, to date, there have been only four small-scale demonstrations. Here we address this resource demand and demonstrate a scalable version of Shor's algorithm in which the n qubit control register is replaced by a single qubit that is recycled n times: the total number of qubits is one third of that required in the standard protocol. Encoding the work register in higher-dimensional states, we implement a two-photon compiled algorithm to factor N=21. The algorithmic output is distinguishable from noise, in contrast to previous demonstrations. These results point to larger-scale implementations of Shor's algorithm by harnessing scalable resource reductions applicable to all physical architectures.

  5. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  6. New developments in RTR fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelievre, F.; Brueziere, J.; Domingo, X.; Valery, J.F.; Leroy, J.F.; Tribout-Maurizi, A. [AREVA, Tour AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As most utilities in the world, Research and Test Reactors (RTR) operators are currently facing two challenges regarding the fuel, in order to comply with local safety and waste management requirements as well as global non-proliferation obligation: - How to manage used fuel today, and - How fuel design changes that are currently under development will influence used fuel management. AREVA-La-Hague plant has a large experience in used fuel recycling, including traditional RTR fuel (UAl). Based on that experience and deep knowledge of RTR fuel manufacturing, AREVA is currently examining possible options to cope with both challenges. This paper describes the current experience of AREVA-La-Hague in UAl used fuels recycling and its plan to propose recycling for various types of fuels such as U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel or UMo fuel on an industrial scale. (authors)

  7. The value of recycling on water conservation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludi-Herrera, Katlyn D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is working to conserve water through recycling. This report will focus on the water conservation that has been accumulated through the recycling of paper, ceiling tiles, compost, and plastic. It will be discussed the use of water in the process of manufacturing these materials and the amount of water that is used. The way that water is conserved will be reviewed. From the stand point of SNL it will be discussed the amount of material that has been accumulated from 2010 to the first two quarters of 2013 and how much water this material has saved.

  8. Self-protection in dry recycle technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannum, W.H.; Wade, D.; Stanford, G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the INFCE conclusions, the U.S. undertook development of a new dry fuel cycle. Dry recycle processes have been demonstrated to be feasible. Safeguarding such fuel cycles will be dramatically simpler than the PUREX fuel cycle. At every step of the processes, the materials meet the {open_quotes}spent-fuel standard.{close_quotes} The scale is compatible with collocation of power reactors and their recycle facility, eliminating off-site transportation and storage of plutonium-bearing materials. Material diverted either covertly or overtly would be difficult (relative to material available by other means) to process into weapons feedstock.

  9. actinide ma recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 283 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  10. advanced recycle filter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 185 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  11. automobile catalyst recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 260 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  12. areva nc recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 329 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  13. asphalt recycling agency: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 259 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  14. avoids recycling endosomal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 214 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  15. as recycling process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 347 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  16. actinides recycling studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 197 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  17. asphalt recycling agents: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 235 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  18. activity recycles hydrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 172 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  19. Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling and Sustainability Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling and Sustainability May 21, 2014 6:30PM to 7:30PM PDT...

  20. Business plan for the Solar Recycle-o-Sort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalk, David O. (David Oliver)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists much room for growth in recycling participation with almost 1 in every 4 Americans still not recycling at all. In many communities this fraction is significantly higher, with low awareness of the benefits of ...

  1. A comparison of public policies for lead recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies that encourage recycling may be used to reduce environmental costs from waste disposal when direct restrictions on disposal are difficult to enforce. Four recycling policies have been advanced: (i) taxes on the ...

  2. Study of recycling impurity retention in Alcator C-mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Taekyun

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work was aimed at reproducing experimental results in impurity compression of Ar, as well as the screening of recycling and non-recycling impurities from reaching the core plasma. As part of the study the code was ...

  3. HOUSEHOLD WILLINGNESS TO RECYCLE ELECTRONIC WASTE - An Application to California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Nixon, Hilary; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Shapiro, Andrew A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. , & Schwer, R. (1998). Solid-waste recycling behavior andL. (1999). Reducing solid waste: Linking recycling toDwyer, W.O. (1995). Solid waste recovery: A review of

  4. actinide multi recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert B. 38 DOI: 10.1002adem.201400414 Self-Assembled Recyclable Hierarchical Bucky Aerogels** Physics Websites Summary: DOI: 10.1002adem.201400414 Self-Assembled Recyclable...

  5. Job Position Description Job Title: Groundskeeper/Recycler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Job Position Description Job Title: Groundskeeper/Recycler A. Main purpose of the job: Perform grounds keeping and recycling duties. B. Primary responsibilities or key duties of the job

  6. Regeneration of anion exchange resins by catalyzed electrochemical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anion exchange resins sorbed with perchlorate may be regenerated by a combination of chemical reduction of perchlorate to chloride using a reducing agent and an electrochemical reduction of the oxidized reducing agent. Transitional metals including Ti, Re, and V are preferred chemical reagents for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Complexing agents such as oxalate are used to prevent the precipitation of the oxidized Ti(IV) species, and ethyl alcohol may be added to accelerate the reduction kinetics of perchlorate. The regeneration may be performed by continuously recycling the regenerating solution through the resin bed and an electrochemical cell so that the secondary waste generation is minimized.

  7. Development of a countywide recycling program for Polk County, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing a recycling program for a rural county presents many more challenges in terms of transportation of materials and funding sources. Rural counties and communities typically have much smaller budgets and resources to draw from. In order to create a program that could realistically be implemented and also have widespread support, it was decided to allow ample time for public involvement in the design process. A multi-faceted approach was adopted to facilitate participation by individuals involved in solid waste handling and the general public. The approach included the use of surveys, formation of an advisory committee, public meetings, presentations to civic groups, personal contacts, news releases, and a logo contest. The public involvement turned out to be invaluable. Throughout the year, many concepts and ideas were presented for feedback. Consequently, some aspects of the program were modified, some were scrapped altogether, and a few new ideas were added. Undoubtedly, the process of refinement will continue as the program moves into the implementation phase. The extensive public involvement has resulted in strong support for the countywide program from many sectors, including private haulers and recycling businesses, local officials and county board supervisors, civic groups, environmental groups, and the general public.

  8. Pesticide Container Recycling "It's Just The Right Thing To Do!"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Pesticide Container Recycling "It's Just The Right Thing To Do!" Some of you may recall that when I Container Recycling Programs in counties around the state. Highlands County was one of the first counties to establish a Pesticide Container Recycling Collection Center (which is still in operation). I set up twenty

  9. Recycling Computed Answers in Rewrite Systems for Abduction Fangzhen Lin #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dekai

    Recycling Computed Answers in Rewrite Systems for Abduction Fangzhen Lin # http computed answers can be recycled arises. A yes answer could result in sub­ stantial savings of repeated tends to be­ lieve that the answer should be no, since recycling is a form of adding information

  10. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling and Its, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 In the CNS, receptor recycling is critical for synaptic plasticity; however, the recycling of receptors has never been observed at peripheral synapses. Using a novel

  11. PLACEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECYCLING CONTAINERS AROUND UBC CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLACEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECYCLING CONTAINERS AROUND UBC CAMPUS UBC SEEDS Project by Iong, Sin I (Jace RECYCLING CONTAINERS ON UBC CAMPUS by Jace Iong 24 April, 2009 INTRODUCTION This SEEDS (Social, Ecological recycling containers on UBC-Vancouver campus. Initiated by David Smith, the associate director of municipal

  12. Why Become a Master By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Why Become a Master Composter? By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle organic waste % of a typical household's waste can be recycled right in our own backyards. This significantly reduces Service Matt Freund, Freund's Farm Bob Jacquier, Laurelbrook Farm Connecticut Recycling Coalition

  13. Why Become a Master By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Why Become a Master Composter? By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle organic waste % of a typical household's waste can be recycled right in our own backyards. This significantly reduces Service Ken Longo, Manchester Recycling Center Matt Freund, Freund's Farm Bob Jacquier, Laurelbrook Farm

  14. 2014 International and Western States In-Place Recycling Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 International and Western States In-Place Recycling Conference August 5­7, 2014 Denver and the road to revitalizing in-place recycling technologies. · Join this prestigious forum especially designed/research agencies to discuss the status of in-place recycling. · Experience what we know today for each form of in

  15. Production and recycling of oceanic crust in the early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Thienen, Peter

    Chapter 6 Production and recycling of oceanic crust in the early Earth Abstract Because in the production and recycling of oceanic crust: (1) Small scale (x · 100km) convection involving the lower crust have been different from those in the present-day Earth. Crustal recycling must however have taken

  16. Archetypes: Durer's Rhino and the Recycling of Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, John P.

    Chapter 17 Archetypes: D¨urer's Rhino and the Recycling of Images 17.1 Introduction: Aref's Rule Rule-of-Thumb 5 (Aref's Rule) Never publish the same graph more than once. As we shall below, recycling illustrate when recycling of previously published images is good, and also when and how it can go

  17. Updated 9/23/2010 HOW TO RECYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, John

    Updated 9/23/2010 HOW TO RECYCLE Recycling & Solid Waste Magnuson Health Sciences Center http Peanuts #12;Updated 9/23/2010 · Televisions · 3-Ring Binders · Tip Boxes, Pipette · Tires · Tissue Paper (Room: I-534, Phone: 5-1584) has volunteered to handle the recycling of Styrofoam BLOCKS and BOXES

  18. Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaic Modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium- Telluride Photovoltaic Modules Postdoctoral: Wenming Wang-Talk Program July 21, 2005 #12;Recycling Retired Photovoltaic Modules to Valuable Products, Where Are We.M., Feasibility of Recycling of Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaics, Presented at 134th TMS Annual Meeting &Exhibition

  19. Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Libin

    Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill Department of Economics) 677-3374. #12;2 Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Abstract: The present paper considers a municipality that has a landfill (fixed in location) and plans to optimally locate a "recycling

  20. What materials can I recycle? Material Where Whose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What materials can I recycle? Material Where Whose responsibility Batteries Chatham reception desk Individuals Clay Recycled in the workshop Users of the purchased material Cardboard Designated skip Recycled via swop bins in the studios and outside the fabric store Unwanted items to Grumpy ( Greater

  1. Using OWL Ontologies Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using OWL Ontologies for Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling Arnab Sinha and Paul Couderc INRIA for better recycling of materials. Our motive for using ontologies is for representing and rea- soning, recyclable materials, N-ary relations 1 Introduction Today Pervasive computing is gradually entering people

  2. Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced mid-ocean-ridge basalt Jacqueline Eaby the deep mantle through the subduction and recycling of hydrated oceanic lithosphere. Here we address the question of recycling of water into the deep mantle by characterizing the volatile contents of different

  3. Bacteriorhodopsin production by cell recycle culture of Halobacterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacteriorhodopsin production by cell recycle culture of Halobacterium halobium Sang Yup Lee*, Ho halobium R1 was cultured with cell recycle in a bioreactor equipped with an external hollow fiber membrane- rhodopsin production. The results obtained from batch and cell recycle culture of H. halobium R1

  4. Waste Toolkit A-Z How can I recycle computers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Computers How can I recycle computers? The University policy for computer disposal is outlined in detail, here: www.ict.ox.ac.uk/oxford/disposal/index.xml Recycle/reuse 1. Before If the computer can't be reused, it should be recycled by an authorised contractor who will guarantee that all

  5. PET-Recycling Schweiz Naglerwiesenstrasse 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    PET-Recycling Schweiz Naglerwiesenstrasse 4 8049 Zurigo Telefono: 044 344 10 80 Fax: 044 344 10 99 E-mail: info@prs.ch www.petrecycling.ch #12;Il PET è un materiale riciclabile. Riciclare PET utilizzato il PET. Riconsegna le bottiglie PET, se no mancano altrove! #12;PET ­ più di un semplice materiale

  6. Energy and Environmental Considerations in Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Wh electricity saved · Note: aluminum foil & cans are different alloys #12;Steel · "Tin cans" are tin by magnet · Eddy current separators remove aluminum cans · Glass separated by color (clear, brown, amber://www.economist.com/node/9249262. #12;Aluminum · Metals can be recycled indefinitely · Virgin aluminum production is very energy

  7. Cooperative Secondary Authorization Recycling , Matei Ripeanu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    failures and network delays. This paper presents the design of our cooperative secondary authorization recy not employ cooperation. 2 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 Secondary and Approximate Authorization Model (SAAM) 7 3 Cooperative Secondary Authorization Recycling (CSAR) 8 3.1 Design Requirements

  8. Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

  9. WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were established for several of these laboratories. Initial cost estimates indicate that recycle may be preferable over burial if sufficient decontamination factors can be achieved during melt refining. Radiation levels of resulting ingots must be minimized in order to keep fabrication costs low. Industry has much of the expertise and capability to execute the recycling of radioactive scrap metal. While no single company can sort, melt, refine, roll and fabricate, a combination of two to three can complete this operation. The one process which requires development is in melt refining for removal of radionuclides other than uranium. WINCO is developing this capability in conjunction with academia and industry. This work will continue into FY-94.

  10. Recycling, production and use of reprocessed rubbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingensmith, B. (Akron Rubber Consulting, OH (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the various methods used to produce recycled rubber and to compare their characteristics and application. The topics discussed include reclaiming by chemical digestion, devulcanization by the severing of sulfur bonds, ambient temperature and cryogenically ground rubber, processing and mixing of ground rubber, and properties of reclaimed rubbers by reclamation method.

  11. REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

  12. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  13. CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM BATTERIES All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead are shrink wrapped and secured with bands to keep them intact during transportation to a permitted recycling

  14. T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, separator with recycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Liquid phase system gas phase systems methanol synthesis loop T. Larsson S, separator with recycle. Motivation, background and related work ¯ Common feature of many chemical processes

  15. T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, separator with recycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Liquid phase system gas phase systems methanol synthesis loop T. Larsson S, separator with recycle. Motivation, background and related work #15; Common feature of many chemical

  16. INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, D.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal.

  17. Model institutional infrastructures for recycling of photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How will photovoltaic modules (PVMS) be recycled at the end of their service lives? This question has technological and institutional components (Reaven, 1994a). The technological aspect concerns the physical means of recycling: what advantages and disadvantages of the several existing and emerging mechanical, thermal, and chemical recycling processes and facilities merit consideration? The institutional dimension refers to the arrangements for recycling: what are the operational and financial roles of the parties with an interest in PVM recycling? These parties include PVM manufacturers, trade organizations; distributors, and retailers; residential, commercial, and utility PVM users; waste collectors, transporters, reclaimers, and reclaimers; and governments.

  18. Recovery and recycling practices in municipal solid waste management in Lagos, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kofoworola, O.F. [Environment Division, Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)], E-mail: sholafemi28@yahoo.com

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population of Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, increased seven times from 1950 to 1980 with a current population of over 10 million inhabitants. The majority of the city's residents are poor. The residents make a heavy demand on resources and, at the same time, generate large quantities of solid waste. Approximately 4 million tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated annually in the city, including approximately 0.5 million of untreated industrial waste. This is approximately 1.1 kg/cap/day. Efforts by the various waste management agencies set up by the state government to keep its streets and neighborhoods clean have achieved only minimal success. This is because more than half of these wastes are left uncollected from the streets and the various locations due to the inadequacy and inefficiency of the waste management system. Whilst the benefits of proper solid waste management (SWM), such as increased revenues for municipal bodies, higher productivity rate, improved sanitation standards and better health conditions, cannot be overemphasized, it is important that there is a reduction in the quantity of recoverable materials in residential and commercial waste streams to minimize the problem of MSW disposal. This paper examines the status of recovery and recycling in current waste management practice in Lagos, Nigeria. Existing recovery and recycling patterns, recovery and recycling technologies, approaches to materials recycling, and the types of materials recovered from MSW are reviewed. Based on these, strategies for improving recovery and recycling practices in the management of MSW in Lagos, Nigeria are suggested.

  19. Reducing the solid waste stream: reuse and recycling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K. L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) increased its solid waste diversion by 365 percent over FY 1992 in five solid waste categories - paper, cardboard, wood, metals, and miscellaneous. (LLNL`s fiscal year is from October 1 to September 30.) LLNL reused/ recycled 6,387 tons of waste, including 340 tons of paper, 455 tons of scrap wood, 1,509 tons of metals, and 3,830 tons of asphalt and concrete (Table1). An additional 63 tons was diverted from landfills by donating excess food, selling toner cartridges for reconditioning, using rechargeable batteries, redirecting surplus equipment to other government agencies and schools, and comporting plant clippings. LLNL also successfully expanded its demonstration program to recycle and reuse construction and demolition debris as part of its facility-wide, comprehensive solid waste reduction programs.

  20. Recycling and recovery routes of plastic solid waste (PSW): A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Salem, S.M. [Centre for CO-2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Process Engineering, University College London (UCL), Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.al-salem@ucl.ac.uk; Lettieri, P.; Baeyens, J. [Centre for CO-2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Process Engineering, University College London (UCL), Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plastic solid waste (PSW) presents challenges and opportunities to societies regardless of their sustainability awareness and technological advances. In this paper, recent progress in the recycling and recovery of PSW is reviewed. A special emphasis is paid on waste generated from polyolefinic sources, which makes up a great percentage of our daily single-life cycle plastic products. The four routes of PSW treatment are detailed and discussed covering primary (re-extrusion), secondary (mechanical), tertiary (chemical) and quaternary (energy recovery) schemes and technologies. Primary recycling, which involves the re-introduction of clean scrap of single polymer to the extrusion cycle in order to produce products of the similar material, is commonly applied in the processing line itself but rarely applied among recyclers, as recycling materials rarely possess the required quality. The various waste products, consisting of either end-of-life or production (scrap) waste, are the feedstock of secondary techniques, thereby generally reduced in size to a more desirable shape and form, such as pellets, flakes or powders, depending on the source, shape and usability. Tertiary treatment schemes have contributed greatly to the recycling status of PSW in recent years. Advanced thermo-chemical treatment methods cover a wide range of technologies and produce either fuels or petrochemical feedstock. Nowadays, non-catalytic thermal cracking (thermolysis) is receiving renewed attention, due to the fact of added value on a crude oil barrel and its very valuable yielded products. But a fact remains that advanced thermo-chemical recycling of PSW (namely polyolefins) still lacks the proper design and kinetic background to target certain desired products and/or chemicals. Energy recovery was found to be an attainable solution to PSW in general and municipal solid waste (MSW) in particular. The amount of energy produced in kilns and reactors applied in this route is sufficiently investigated up to the point of operation, but not in terms of integration with either petrochemical or converting plants. Although primary and secondary recycling schemes are well established and widely applied, it is concluded that many of the PSW tertiary and quaternary treatment schemes appear to be robust and worthy of additional investigation.

  1. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  2. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  3. Probe for contamination detection in recyclable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detection system for detection of contaminants contained within a bulk material during recycling includes at least one neutron generator for neutron bombardment of the bulk material, and at least one gamma ray detector for detection of gamma rays emitted by contaminants within the bulk material. A structure for analyzing gamma ray data is communicably connected to the gamma ray detector, the structure for analyzing gamma ray data adapted. The identity and concentration of contaminants in a bulk material can also be determined. By scanning the neutron beam, discrete locations within the bulk material having contaminants can be identified. A method for recycling bulk material having unknown levels of contaminants includes the steps of providing at least one neutron generator, at least one gamma ray detector, and structure for analyzing gamma ray data, irradiating the bulk material with neutrons, and then determining the presence of at least one contaminant in the bulk material from gamma rays emitted from the bulk material.

  4. Compositional evaluation of asphalt binder recycling agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, Richard Charles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from: Exxon Research and Engineering Company, The National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science, Inc. Fellowship (GEM), and the DOW Technical Fellowship is greatly appreciated. I thank Sophie and Ignacio Madrid... for Recycled Blends . . . . . Asphaltic Materials. . 54 58 63 69 V-2 V-3 V-4 V-5 V-6 V-7 Fina DMO and Exxon Tank Compositions and Viscosities. . . . Blend Compositions and Viscosities...

  5. Recycling of Advanced Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The pace of development and fielding of electric vehicles is briefly described and the principal advanced battery chemistries expected to be used in the EV application are identified as Ni/MH in the near term and Li-ion/Li-polymer in the intermediate to long term. The status of recycling process development is reviewed for each of the two chemistries and future research needs are discussed.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home AboutMeeting: ProgramFebruaryJune 26,Recycling Sandia

  7. MSU Recycling recycle.msu.edu 517-355-1723 MARCH 15, 2014 9:00A.M.1:00P.M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    MSU Recycling · recycle.msu.edu · 517-355-1723 MARCH 15, 2014 · 9:00A.M.­1:00P.M. RECYCLINGLn Green Way Public Recycling Drop-o Center E-Waste Drop-o MSU Surplus Store & Recycling Center Service Rd Service Rd RecyclingDr NORTH Public Electronics Recycling March 15, 2014 · 9:00A.M.­1:00P.M. MSU Surplus

  8. Opportunities for the Multi Recycling of Used MOX Fuel in the US - 12122

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, P. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, 4800 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Bailly, F.; Bouvier, E.; Gain, T.; Lelievre, F.; Senentz, G.H. [AREVA NC, 33, rue La Fayette, 75 442 Paris Cedex 09 (France); Collins, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6152 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 50 years the US has accumulated an inventory of used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the region of 64,000 metric tons in 2010, and adds an additional 2,200 metric tons each year from the current fleet of 104 Light Water Reactors. This paper considers a fuel cycle option that would be available for a future pilot U.S. recycling plant that could take advantage of the unique opportunities offered by the age and size of the large U.S. UNF inventory. For the purpose of this scenario, recycling of UNF must use the available reactor infrastructure, currently LWR's, and the main product of recycling is considered to be plutonium (Pu), recycled into MOX fuel for use in these reactors. Use of MOX fuels must provide the service (burn-up) expected by the reactor operator, with the required level of safety. To do so, the fissile material concentration (Pu-239, Pu-241) in the MOX must be high enough to maintain criticality, while, in current recycle facilities, the Pu-238 content has to be kept low enough to prevent excessive heat load, neutron emission, and neutron capture during recycle operations. In most countries, used MOX fuel (MOX UNF) is typically stored after one irradiation in an LWR, pending the development of the GEN IV reactors, since it is considered difficult to directly reuse the recycled MOX fuel in LWRs due to the degraded Pu fissile isotopic composition. In the US, it is possible to blend MOX UNF with LEUOx UNF from the large inventory, using the oldest UNF first. Blending at the ratio of about one MOX UNF assembly with 15 LEUOx UNF assemblies, would achieve a fissile plutonium concentration sufficient for reirradiation in new MOX fuel. The Pu-238 yield in the new fuel will be sufficiently low to meet current fuel fabrication standards. Therefore, it should be possible in the context of the US, for discharged MOX fuel to be recycled back into LWR's, using only technologies already industrially deployed worldwide. Building on that possibility, two scenarios are assessed where current US inventory is treated; Pu recycled in LWR MOX fuels, and used MOX fuels themselves are treated in a continuous partitioning-transmutation mode (case 2a) or until the whole current UNF inventory (64,000 MT in 2010) has been treated followed by disposal of the MOX UNF to a geologic repository (case 2b). In the recycling scenario, two cases (2a and 2b) are considered. Benefits achieved are compared with the once through scenario (case 1) where UNF in the current US inventory are disposed directly to a geologic repository. For each scenario, the heat load and radioactivity of the high activity wastes disposed to a geologic repository are calculated and the savings in natural resources quantified, and compared with the once-through fuel cycle. Assuming an initial pilot recycling facility with a capacity of 800 metric tons a year of heavy metal begins operation in 2030, ?8 metric tons per year of Pu is recovered from the LEUOx UNF inventory, and is used to produce fresh MOX fuels. At a later time, additional treatment and recycling capacities are assumed to begin operation, to accommodate blending and recycling of used MOX Pu, up to 2,400 MT/yr treatment capacity to enable processing UNF slightly faster than the rate of generation. Results of this scenario analysis study show the flexibility of the recycling scenarios so that Pu is managed in a way that avoids accumulating used MOX fuels. If at some future date, the decision is made to dispose of the MOX UNF to a geologic repository (case 2b), the scenario is neutral to final repository heat load in comparison to the direct disposal of all UNF (case 1), while diminishing use of natural uranium, enrichment, UNF accumulation, and the volume of HLW. Further recycling of Pu at the end of the scenario (case 2a) would exhibit further benefits. As expected, Pu-241 and Am-241 are the source of long term HLW heat load and Am-241 and Np-237 are the source of long term radiotoxicity. When advanced technology is available, introduction of minor actinide recycling, in addition to Pu recycling, by t

  9. U. S. Navy shipboard-generated plastic-waste pilot-recycling program. Research and development report, Apr 90-Jan 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, L.B.; Huntley, J.Y.; Burgiel, J.J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From April 1990 through January 1991, the feasibility of recycling Navy shipboard-generated plastic wastes was explored. Normally, plastic wastes are source separated aboard Navy ships and retained for shoreside disposal in accordance with new fleet requirements implementing MARPOL Annex V that prohibits the discharge of plastics at sea. Over 23,000 pounds of shipboard plastic wastes from USS Lexington (AVT 16) and ships from the Norfolk Naval Base were recycled into park benches, picnic tables and carstops that have been distributed back to the Navy bases for use. Navy shipboard plastics must undergo sorting prior to recycling because Navy plastic waste contains large quantities of composite plastic items (e.g., plastic/paper) that are not easily recyclable. Recycling food-contaminated plastics is not practical due to sanitation problems encountered during handling. However, certain items have good resale value if separated by resin type and color (e.g., sonobuoy casings, hard plastic containers, packaging films). Education, feedback, and command support for shipboard recycling programs are required to ensure maximum participation and to minimize contamination with non-plastic items. Specially marked plastics only containers increase convenience and effectiveness of the recycling program.

  10. Strategies for recycling CdTe photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberspacher, C.; Gay, C.F. [UNISUN, Newbury Park, CA. (United States); Moskowitz, P.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling end-of-life cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules may enhance the competitive advantage of CdTe PV in the marketplace, but the experiences of industries with comparable Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S) challenges suggest that collection and recycling costs can impose significant economic burdens. Customer cooperation and pending changes to US Federal law may improve recycling economics.

  11. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Task Force, “Water Recycling 2030: Recommendation’s of2007. Water Funding Recycling Program Strategic Plan. Web.grants_loans/water_recycling/docs/strategicplan2007.pdf

  12. Assessing the benefits of design for recycling for plastics in electronics: A case study of computer enclosures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoplastics (A); Recycling (C); Performance indices (H)3. Economic modeling results: recycling base price scenario.4. Economic modeling results: recycling high price scenario.

  13. at the Weizmann Institute We are launching a new cardboard recycling e ort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Ehud

    Cardboard Recycling at the Weizmann Institute We are launching a new cardboard recycling e ort and brought to the Weizmann warehouse for reuse. Damaged boxes will be compressed and recycled by the by the recycling company (Kamam). Why do it? Re-using and recycling saves garbage burial space and frees space

  14. THE OPTIMAL LOCATION OF TWO RECYCLING CENTERS Jannett Highfill, Michael McAsey, Libin Mou1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Libin

    of the transportation costs from i) households to the recycling centers and ii) recycling centers to the landfill-recyclables are subsequently transported to the landfill. The landfill location and the proportion of waste recycled recycling center is located at the landfill. (R1: General Spatial Economics, H7: Publicly Provided Goods

  15. Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric)- Residential Appliance Recycling Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers for recycling older, inefficient refrigerators and freezers. All appliances must meet the program requirements listed on the...

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Affirmative Procurement and Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    are provided below: Commercial Sanitary Tissue Products Industrial wipes for cleaning optics and machine parts must be lint-free, anti- static, and non-abrasive. Recycled content...

  17. Waste Not, Want Not: Heisenberg-Limited Metrology With Information Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Simon A; Lang, Matthias D; Caves, Carlton M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of interferometers when the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. In this paper we demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  18. Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , nickel cadmium (Nicad), nickel metal hydride, lithium ion, silver button, mercury, magnesium carbon. Recycling rechargeable batteries Rechargeable batteries are often referred to as nickel cadmium, nickel Battery Per Bag Please sort the batteries by battery type, using a separate receptacle for nickel cadmium

  19. 1. Recycle all bottles and cans 2. Recycle all personal electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    as possible ENERGY CONSERVATION 6. Turn off the lights when not in use 7. Turn off your computer when. They provide air filters 24. Use energy efficient light bulbs 25. Buy supplies locally 26. Select efficient reusable grocery bags when shopping 4. Buy things with recycled material in them 5. Reduce waste as much

  20. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via EBCHR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6%-niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented.

  1. How to recycle asbestos containing materials (ACM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The current disposal of asbestos containing materials (ACM) in the private sector consists of sealing asbestos wetted with water in plastic for safe transportation and burial in regulated land fills. This disposal methodology requires large disposal volumes especially for asbestos covered pipe and asbestos/fiberglass adhering to metal framework, e.g. filters. This wrap and bury technology precludes recycle of the asbestos, the pipe and/or the metal frameworks. Safe disposal of ACM at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, likewise, requires large disposal volumes in landfills for non-radioactive ACM and large disposal volumes in radioactive burial grounds for radioactive and suspect contaminated ACM. The availability of regulated disposal sites is rapidly diminishing causing recycle to be a more attractive option. Asbestos adhering to metal (e.g., pipes) can be recycled by safely removing the asbestos from the metal in a patented hot caustic bath which prevents airborne contamination /inhalation of asbestos fibers. The dissolution residue (caustic and asbestos) can be wet slurry fed to a melter and vitrified into a glass or glass-ceramic. Palex glasses, which are commercially manufactured, are shown to be preferred over conventional borosilicate glasses. The Palex glasses are alkali magnesium silicate glasses derived by substituting MgO for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in borosilicate type glasses. Palex glasses are very tolerant of the high MgO and high CaO content of the fillers used in forming asbestos coverings for pipes and found in boiler lashing, e.g., hydromagnesite (3MgCO{sub 3} Mg(OH){sub 2} 3H{sub 2}O) and plaster of paris, gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}). The high temperate of the vitrification process destroys the asbestos fibers and renders the asbestos non-hazardous, e.g., a glass or glass-ceramic. In this manner the glass or glass-ceramic produced can be recycled, e.g., glassphalt or glasscrete, as can the clean metal pipe or metal framework.

  2. Recycled Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRay County,Open EnergyRecent contentRecycled

  3. Results of the 2013 Recycled Yard Art Contest Hillsborough County Extension Service and the Hillsborough County Fair sponsored the Recycled Yard Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    . Results of the 2013 Recycled Yard Art Contest Hillsborough County Extension Service and the Hillsborough County Fair sponsored the Recycled Yard Art Contest which was held at the Hillsborough County residents. Entries were created mostly with recycled or recyclable materials and had to be able to withstand

  4. Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132 adjustments. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from

  5. NREL Materials Recycling Procedure Purpose To promote environmental sustainability and stewardship, NREL provides the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL Materials Recycling Procedure Purpose To promote environmental sustainability and stewardship, NREL provides the infrastructure for workers to incorporate materials recycling in daily operations. This procedure identifies appropriate materials, collection locations, and rules and processes for recycling

  6. Analysis of the cost of recycling compliance for the automobile industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantec, Delphine

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cars are one of the most recycled commercial products. Currently, approximately 75% of the total vehicle weight is recycled. The EU directives on End-of-life vehicles try to push the recycling process further: it fixed the ...

  7. Expanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Forest Service research on recycling is being led by scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPLExpanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology Theodore L. Laufenberg, Program Manager Forest Products Conservation and Recycling Said Abubakr

  8. Recycling Krylov subspaces for CFD applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amritkar, Amit; ?wirydowicz, Katarzyna; Tafti, Danesh; Ahuja, Kapil

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular iterative linear solvers in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations are restarted GMRES and BiCGStab. At the beginning of most incompressible flow calculations, the computation time and the number of iterations to converge for the pressure Poisson equation are quite high. In this case, the BiCGStab algorithm, with relatively cheap but non-optimal iterations, may fail to converge for stiff problems. Thus, a more robust algorithm like GMRES, which guarantees monotonic convergence, is preferred. To reduce the large storage requirements of GMRES, a restarted version - GMRES(m) or its variants - is used in CFD applications. However, GMRES(m) can suffer from stagnation or very slow convergence. For this reason, we use the rGCROT method. rGCROT is an algorithm that improves restarted GMRES by recycling a selected subspace of the search space from one restart of GMRES(m) to the next as well as building and recycling this outer vector space from one problem to the next (subsequent time steps i...

  9. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  10. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. [Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  11. Preparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids Yong Lei,1 Qinglin Wu,1 Craig M. Clemons2 on recycled high density poly- ethylene (RHDPE) and organic clay were made by melt com- pounding. The influence of blending method, compatibil- izers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation

  12. AN EXAMINATION OF WOOD RECYCLING PROVISIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN GREEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American green building standards, with use of such materials awarded or specified. Construction-consumer materials shall be considered as recycled. In addition to reviewing provisions of various green building! ! ! AN EXAMINATION OF WOOD RECYCLING PROVISIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN GREEN BUILDING PROGRAMS DR. JIM

  13. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  14. Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs, The Cadmus Group, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs, The Cadmus Group, Inc. Refrigerator Description Refrigerator recycling programs are designed to save energy through the removal of old-but- operable refrigerators from service. By offering free pick-up, providing incentives, and disseminating

  15. Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.H. [Da-Yeh Univ., Chang-Hwa (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

  16. Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanyder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

  17. General Guidelines for Sustainable Purchasing 3R's -Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    ......................................................... 3R's - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle In order to conserve natural resources and to protect the environment considerations o Made of recycled materials, maximizing post-consumer content. o Remanufactured products, such as laser toner cartridges, tires, furniture, equipment and automotive parts whenever practicable and cost

  18. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

  19. Recycling technologies and market opportunities: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goland, A.N.; Petrakis, L. [eds.

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the result of our collective effort to meet that challenge. They reflect the dedication and commitment of many people in government, academia, the private sector and national laboratories to finding practical solutions to one of the most pressing problems of our time -- how to deal effectively with the growing waste s that is the product of our affluent industrial society. The Conference was successful in providing a clear picture of the scope of the problem and of the great potential that recycling holds for enhancing economic development while at the same time, having a significant positive impact on the waste management problem. That success was due in large measure to the enthusiastic response of our panelists to our invitation to participate and share their expertise with us.

  20. Del Norte means north to recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aquino, J.T.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Del Norte Regional Recycling and Transfer Station is owned by the city of Oxnard, California and operated by BLT Enterprises, Inc. The Del Norte facility--located in southwestern Ventura County about an hour northwest of Los Angeles--processes polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic containers, aluminum, steel, glass, old corrugated containers (OCC), newspapers, computer printout paper, white and colored ledger paper, coated book, supermix paper, telephone books, and old magazines. According to the company, there has been virtually no community opposition to the site. The facility has few neighbors, and those are agricultural. To keep the community relationship strong, the facility`s design and location all but eliminated odor and noise complaints. The building was designed against the prevailing wind pattern, and BLT processes odorous material fast. A misting system installed for dust suppression also can be used with a solution for odor control should the need arise.

  1. Metallurgical evaluation of recycled stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imrich, K.J.

    1997-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycled Type 304 stainless steel from both Carolina Metals Inc. (CMI) and Manufacturing Science Corporation (MSC) met all the requirements of ASTM A-240 required by Procurement Specification G-SPP-K-00005 Rev. 4. Mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of the material are adequate for service as burial boxes, overpacks, and drums. Inclusion content of both manufacturer`s material was high, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the corrosion resistance. Therefore, an evaluation of the service conditions should be performed before this material is approved for other applications. These heats of stainless steel are not suitable for fabricating DWPF glass canisters because the inclusion and carbon contents are high. However, MSC has recently installed a vacuum induction furnace capable of producing L grade material with a low inclusion content. Material produced from this furnace should be suitable for canister material if appropriate care is taken during the melting/casting process.

  2. Recycling`s regulatory burden: A case study -- the Modesto Tire Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomeo, E. [UAE Energy Operations Corp., San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modesto Tire Disposal Project is a 14 MW electric power generating facility in Westley, CA fueled on whole waste tires. A by-product of the incineration process is a zinc-rich fly ash which contains low concentrations of lead and cadmium. The project`s preferred disposition for the fly ash is recycling through reclamation of its valuable metals. Under California regulation, the fly ash is considered a hazardous waste, and its handling and transportation is severely restricted. Federal regulation doe snot impose such restrictions. The fly ash from the project was recycled for years. However, internal regulatory review and subsequent conference with regulators determined that the environmentally sound transportation practices that had been utilized were not regulatorily compliant. As a result of compliance initiatives, the valuable fly ash had to be disposed of in class 1 landfills for the past year. The return to a recycle option remains elusive. This presentation reviews some of the regulatory hurdles and the economic harm done to the project in order to maintain strict compliance with California hazardous waste regulations.

  3. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, Jr., Fred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  4. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, F.J. Jr.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  5. Paper waste - Recycling, incineration or landfilling? A review of existing life cycle assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villanueva, A. [European Topic Centre on Resource and Waste Management, Hojbro Plads 4, DK-1200 Copenhagen K (Denmark)], E-mail: alejandro@villanueva.dk; Wenzel, H. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of existing life cycle assessments (LCAs) on paper and cardboard waste has been undertaken. The objectives of the review were threefold. Firstly, to see whether a consistent message comes out of published LCA literature on optimum disposal or recycling solutions for this waste type. Such message has implications for current policy formulation on material recycling and disposal in the EU. Secondly, to identify key methodological issues of paper waste management LCAs, and enlighten the influence of such issues on the conclusions of the LCA studies. Thirdly, in light of the analysis made, to discuss whether it is at all valid to use the LCA methodology in its current development state to guide policy decisions on paper waste. A total of nine LCA studies containing altogether 73 scenarios were selected from a thorough, international literature search. The selected studies are LCAs including comparisons of different management options for waste paper. Despite claims of inconsistency, the LCAs reviewed illustrate the environmental benefits in recycling over incineration or landfill options, for paper and cardboard waste. This broad consensus was found despite differences in geographic location and definitions of the paper recycling/disposal systems studied. A systematic exploration of the LCA studies showed, however, important methodological pitfalls and sources of error, mainly concerning differences in the definition of the system boundaries. Fifteen key assumptions were identified that cover the three paper cycle system areas: raw materials and forestry, paper production, and disposal/recovery. It was found that the outcome of the individual LCA studies largely depended on the choices made in some of these assumptions, most specifically the ones concerning energy use and generation, and forestry.

  6. Multi-Fluid Modeling of Low-Recycling Divertor Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, R. D. [University of California, La Jolla; Pigarov, A. Y. [University of California, La Jolla; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, La Jolla; Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Soukhanovskii, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Rensink, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kugel, H. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-recycling regimes of divertor operation in a single-null NSTX magnetic configuration are studied using computer simulations with the edge plasma transport code UEDGE. The edge plasma transport properties pertinent to the low-recycling regimes are demonstrated. These include the flux-limited character of the parallel heat transport and the high plasma temperatures with the flattened profiles in the scrape-off-layer. It is shown that to maintain the balance of particle fluxes at the core interface the deuterium gas puffing rate should increase as the divertor recycling coefficient decreases. The radial profiles of the heat load to the outer divertor plate, the upstream radial plasma profiles, and the effects of the cross-field plasma transport in the low-recycling regimes are discussed. It is also shown that recycling of lithium impurities evaporating from the divertor plate at high surface temperatures can reverse the low-recycling divertor operational regime to the high-recycling one and may cause thermal instability of the divertor plate. (C) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  7. Analyzing Losses: Transuranics into Waste and Fission Products into Recycled Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert E. Cherry; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros; Candido Pereira; Denia Djokic

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All mass streams from separations and fuel fabrication are products that must meet criteria. Those headed for disposal must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the eventual disposal sites corresponding to their waste classification. Those headed for reuse must meet fuel or target impurity limits. A “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. The various types of losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of transuranic (TRU) material into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. We have analyzed four separation options and two fuel fabrication options in a generic fuel cycle. The separation options are aqueous uranium extraction plus (UREX+1), electrochemical, Atomics International reduction oxidation separation (AIROX), and melt refining. UREX+1 and electrochemical are traditional, full separation techniques. AIROX and melt refining are taken as examples of limited separations, also known as minimum fuel treatment. The fuels are oxide and metal. To define a generic fuel cycle, a fuel recycling loop is fed from used light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel (UOX) at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup. The recycling loop uses a fast reactor with TRU conversion ratio (CR) of 0.50. Excess recovered uranium is put into storage. Only waste, not used fuel, is disposed – unless the impurities accumulate to a level so that it is impossible to make new fuel for the fast reactor. Impurities accumulate as dictated by separation removal and fission product generation. Our model approximates adjustment to fast reactor fuel stream blending of TRU and U products from incoming LWR UOX and recycling FR fuel to compensate for impurity accumulation by adjusting TRU:U ratios. Our mass flow model ignores postulated fuel impurity limits; we compare the calculated impurity values with those limits to identify elements of concern. AIROX and melt refining cannot be used to separate used LWR UOX-51 because they cannot separate U from TRU, it is then impossible to make X% TRU for fast reactors with UOX-51 used fuel with 1.3% TRU. AIROX and melt refining can serve in the recycle loop for about 3 recycles, at which point the accumulated impurities displace fertile uranium and the fuel can no longer be as critical as the original fast reactor fuel recipe. UREX+1 and electrochemical can serve in either capacity; key impurities appear to be lanthanides and several transition metals.

  8. Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana generating plants producing one megawatt (MW) or more with an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for the new or expanded industry property tax reduction. This incentive...

  9. Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life...

  10. Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source...

  11. Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Principal Investigator: Y.-X. Tao Florida International...

  12. Planning of Waste Reduction Strategies under Uncertainty Andreas A. Linninger and Aninda Chakraborty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linninger, Andreas A.

    towers, distillation columns. Another peculiarity lies in limitations to direct recycle options in batch Chakraborty Laboratory for Product and Process Design Department of Chemical Engineering, University production campaigns and need material recovery and/or adequate treatment. The design of waste reduction

  13. Sequence-Dependent Sorting of Recycling Proteins by Actin-Stabilized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Orion

    Sequence-Dependent Sorting of Recycling Proteins by Actin-Stabilized Endosomal Microdomains degradation and recycling pathways. How receptors recycle efficiently, in a sequence-dependent manner that is distinct from bulk membrane recycling, is not known. Here, in live cells, we visualize the sorting

  14. Green Labs and EH&S, Nov. 2013 ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Green Labs and EH&S, Nov. 2013 ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide Non-contaminated, clean lab plastic containers and conical tubes may be recycled. To be accepted, containers must be clean, triple. Recycling bin located: PSB Loading Dock Alcohol cans and metal shipping containers may be recycled

  15. The Recycling Center at UAB opened March 2, 2009! It is located at 620 11th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    The Recycling Center at UAB opened March 2, 2009! It is located at 620 11th St. South. See map on the next UAB workday. UAB RECYCLING CENTER LAUNCHES DRIVE-THRU DROP-OFF SERVICE UAB RECYCLING CENTER 620 11 Paolone UAB Recycling Coordinator (205) 996-9043 GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Please bring separated materials

  16. Initial Low Recycling Improving Confinement and Current Drive in Advanced Tokamak (AT) and Hybrid Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initial Low Recycling Improving Confinement and Current Drive in Advanced Tokamak (AT) and Hybrid Scenarios

  17. Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from a recycling distribution G

  18. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shigui

    GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING SHIGUI RUAN AND XUE- type competition models with nutrient recycling. In the first model the recycling is instantaneous, whereas in the second, the recycling is delayed. They carried out the equilibrium analysis and obtained

  1. Recycling Evaluation of Newly Developed Environmentally Benign Pressure Sensitive Adhesive for Postage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Recycling Evaluation of Newly Developed Environmentally Benign Pressure Sensitive Adhesive stamp products that can be successfully recycled into fine paper products in a typical recycling additional burden on plants that are using recycled fiber. As a result of an initiative by the USPS, a team

  2. Why should I recycle? The average American generates 4.5 pounds of waste daily.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Why should I recycle? The average American generates 4.5 pounds of waste daily. Instead of throwing paper and containers in the trash,recycle them in single-stream receptacles conveniently located throughout campus.These guidelines will help you recycle more and waste less. What's recyclable? · Mixed

  3. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  4. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  5. Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Three years ago at Sacred Heart grade school in Norfolk, Neb., efforts to recycle were grim. "When I got here, we had...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Battery Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OnTo Technology LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced battery recycling.

  7. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  8. alternative recycled waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 156 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers Alternative Approaches to...

  9. International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theurer, Jean E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

  10. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  11. Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

  12. Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process: Energetics of the REE-X Systems (XA;, Mg, Zn, Si, Sn, Mn, Pb, Fe, Co, Ni) Apr 17 2015 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM In-Ho...

  13. Neutronic analysis of a proposed plutonium recycle assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solan, George Michael

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the neutronic analysis of plutonium recycle assemblies has been developed with emphasis on relative power distribution prediction in the boundary area of vastly different spectral regions. Such regions are ...

  14. Strategies for aluminum recycling : insights from material system optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Preston Pui-Chuen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dramatic increase in aluminum consumption over the past decades necessitates a societal effort to recycle and reuse these materials to promote true sustainability and energy savings in aluminum production. However, the ...

  15. Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, Alexandre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

  16. Considerations in the recycling of urban parking garages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Michael Johannes

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the decreasing use of private automobiles in city centers and because of usual development pressures, some urban parking garages will become available for replacement or recycling. The choice between replacement ...

  17. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  18. Design and analysis of recycled content sign blanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Ben Frank

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In response, industries have developed composite materials made of recycled plastic, fiber-reinforced plastics, and alloys made of recycled aluminum. Two predoininantly reclaimed inaterials have been investigated for use as sign substrates. The first... in avoiding costs from tort actions. Aluminuin and wood are the substrates most frequently used for traffic signs. Grades 6061 (heat beatable) and 5052 (non-heat treatable) aluminum alloys are widely used. Currently, grade 3000 aluminum alloys, which...

  19. Binary and recycled pulsars: 30 years after observational discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G S Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Binary radio pulsars, first discovered by Hulse and Taylor in 1974 [1], are a unique tool for experimentally testing general relativity (GR), whose validity has been confirmed with a precision unavailable in laboratory experiments. In particular, indirect evidence of the existence of gravitational waves has been obtained. Radio pulsars in binary systems (which have come to be known as recycled) have completed the accretion stage, during which neutron star spins reach millisecond periods and their magnetic fields decay 2 to 4 orders of magnitude more weakly than ordinary radio pulsars. Among about a hundred known recycled pulsars, many have turned out to be single neutron stars. The high concentration of single recycled pulsars in globular clusters suggests that close stellar encounters are highly instrumental in the loss of the companion. A system of one recycled pulsar and one 'normal' one discovered in 2004 is the most compact among binaries containing recycled pulsars [2]. Together with the presence of two pulsars in one system, this suggests new prospects for further essential improvements in testing GR. This paper considers theoretical predictions of binary pulsars, their evolutionary formation, and mechanisms by which their companions may be lost. The use of recycled pulsars in testing GR is discussed and their possible relation to the most intriguing objects in the universe, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, is examined.

  20. Improved fluid bed combustor efficiencies through fines recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickman, W.S.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon burnup efficiencies of 99.9% and higher have been attained on a 0.4-MW(t) atmospheric fluid bed combustor with fines recycle. A cyclone and sintered metal filter system separated the fines from the off-gas stream, returning them at 600/sup 0/C (1150/sup 0/F) to the fluid bed. The fines were metered through a unique rotary valve that also served as a pressure boundary between the fluid bed and the fines recycle hopper. Combustor operation was fully automated with a 100-channel process controller and supervisory computer. This high combustion efficiency is especially significant, since the fuel was graphite sized to less than 5 mm (1.3 in.) maximum size. More than 30% of the feed was fine enough to be quickly entrained, placing a substantial burden on the fines recycle system. Detailed modeling techniques were successfully developed to allow prediction of recycle rates and temperatures needed to maintain high combustion efficiency. This model has now been used to analyze coal combustion tests sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute. Surface reaction rate constants were first determined using combustor data taken during cold, low-flow fines recycle tests. These were then used to predict the effect of higher rates of recycle at various temperatures.

  1. Ratchet growth in recycled PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Darla Graff [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Geoff W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mang, Joseph T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olinger, Bart [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagelberg, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PBX 9502 is a plastic-bonded high explosive (PBX) containing 95 weight% TATB (triaminotrinitrobenzene) crystals in a polymer binder. TATB crystals are graphitic in nature, with a sheet-like structure and anisotropic CTE. Although the mechanism is not understood, solid-pressed TATB composites have been observed to undergo irreversible volume change ('ratchet growth') upon thermal cycling . This phenomenon has been studied but many aspects remain elusive and uncharacterized. Engineering or performance changes associated with ratchet growth have often been attributed to changes in density alone. We propose that the density changes which accompany ratchet growth involve a unique form of micro-damage distinguishable from the pore structure associated with low-pressed density. We have performed ratchet growth studies on Recycled PBX 9502 between -54 to 80{sup o}C with density changes of about 1.5%. Specimens of the same density were obtained using a lower pressure in the manufacturing process. Comparative measurements were made using quasi-static uniaxial tension tests, as well as micro x-ray computed tomography and ultra-small angle neutron scattering experiments. Through these measurements we have shown that ratchet grown PBX 9502 has properties quite different from predictions based on density alone. The pore size distribution of ratchet grown specimens is unique and easily distinguished from parts pressed to an equivalent density.

  2. Duality and Recycling Computing in Quantum Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui Lu Long; Yang Liu

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computer possesses quantum parallelism and offers great computing power over classical computer \\cite{er1,er2}. As is well-know, a moving quantum object passing through a double-slit exhibits particle wave duality. A quantum computer is static and lacks this duality property. The recently proposed duality computer has exploited this particle wave duality property, and it may offer additional computing power \\cite{r1}. Simply put it, a duality computer is a moving quantum computer passing through a double-slit. A duality computer offers the capability to perform separate operations on the sub-waves coming out of the different slits, in the so-called duality parallelism. Here we show that an $n$-dubit duality computer can be modeled by an $(n+1)$-qubit quantum computer. In a duality mode, computing operations are not necessarily unitary. A $n$-qubit quantum computer can be used as an $n$-bit reversible classical computer and is energy efficient. Our result further enables a $(n+1)$-qubit quantum computer to run classical algorithms in a $O(2^n)$-bit classical computer. The duality mode provides a natural link between classical computing and quantum computing. Here we also propose a recycling computing mode in which a quantum computer will continue to compute until the result is obtained. These two modes provide new tool for algorithm design. A search algorithm for the unsorted database search problem is designed.

  3. Overview of the International R&D Recycling Activities of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has demonstrated over the last 30 years its capacity to produce base-load electricity at a low, predictable and stable cost due to the very low economic dependence on the price of uranium. However the management of used nuclear fuel remains the “Achilles’ Heel” of this energy source since the storage of used nuclear fuel is increasing as evidenced by the following number with 2,000 tons of UNF produced each year by the 104 US nuclear reactor units which equates to a total of 62,000 spent fuel assemblies stored in dry cask and 88,000 stored in pools. Two options adopted by several countries will be presented. The first one adopted by Europe, Japan and Russia consists of recycling the used nuclear fuel after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Ninety six percent of uranium and plutonium contained in the spent fuel could be reused to produce electricity and are worth recycling. The separation of uranium and plutonium from the wastes is realized through the industrial PUREX process so that they can be recycled for re-use in a nuclear reactor as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The second option undertaken by Finland, Sweden and the United States implies the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel into a geologic formation. One has to remind that only 30% of the worldwide used nuclear fuel are currently recycled, the larger part being stored (90% in pool) waiting for scientific or political decisions. A third option is emerging with a closed fuel cycle which will improve the global sustainability of nuclear energy. This option will not only decrease the volume amount of nuclear waste but also the long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste, as well as improving the long-term safety and the heat-loading of the final repository. At the present time, numerous countries are focusing on the R&D recycling activities of the ultimate waste composed of fission products and minor actinides (americium and curium). Several new chemical extraction processes, such as TRUSPEAK, EXAM, or LUCA processes are pursued worldwide and their approaches will be highlighted.

  4. Overview of the international R&D recycling activities of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has demonstrated over the last thirty years its capacity to produce base-load electricity at a low, predictable and stable cost due to the very low economic dependence of the price of uranium. However the management of used nuclear fuel (UNF) remains the “Achilles’ heel of this energy source since the storage of UNF is increasing as evidenced by the following number with 2,000 to 2,300 of UNF produced each year by the 104 US nuclear reactor units which equates to a total of 62,000 UNF assemblies stored in dry cask storage and 88,000 stored in pools. Alarmingly, more than half of US commercial reactor sites have filled their pools to capacity and have had to add dry cask storage facilities. Two options adopted by several countries will be discussed. The first one adopted by Europe, Japan and Russia consists of recycling the used nuclear fuel after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Ninety six percent of uranium and plutonium contained in the spent fuel could be reused to produce electricity and are worth recycling. The separation of uranium and plutonium from the wastes is realized through the industrial PUREX process so that they can be recycled for re-use in a nuclear reactor as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The second option undertaken by Finland, Sweden and the United States implies the direct disposal of UNF into a geologic formation. One has to remind that only 30% of the worldwide UNF are currently recycled, the larger part being stored (90% in pool) waiting for scientific or political decisions. A third option is emerging with a closed fuel cycle which will improve the global sustainability of nuclear energy. This option will not only decrease the volume amount of nuclear waste but also the long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste, as well as improving the long-term safety and the heat-loading of the final repository. At the present time, numerous countries are focusing on the R&D recycling activities of the ultimate waste composed of fission products and minor actinides (americium and curium). Several new chemical extraction processes, such as TRUSPEAK, EXAM, or LUCA processes are pursued worldwide and their approaches will be highlighted.

  5. FSC-Watch: FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global warming FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the May/June 2008 Eco-Journal of the Manitoba Eco-Network, Canada, which we are happy to reproduce pile of collected paper, which can either be burned or landfilled, or shipped to more distant recycling

  6. Novel reactions of a neutral organic reductant : reductive coupling and nanoparticle synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mork, Anna Jolene

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed bis-pyridinylidene neutral organic electron donor captured our interest as a potential source of new chemistries for reductive coupling and the synthesis of group IV nanoparticles. This super electron ...

  7. Removal of {sup 14}C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the checmical from of {sup 14}C inirradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approimately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 ({sup 14}C), with a half-life of 5730 years.

  8. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the heat source available to a distillation process is at a significantly higher temperature than the reboiler temperature, there is unused availability (ability to perform work) in the heat supplied to the reboiler. Similarly, if the reflux...

  9. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  10. Recycling readiness of advanced batteries for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungst, R.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximizing the reclamation/recycle of electric-vehicle (EV) batteries is considered to be essential for the successful commercialization of this technology. Since the early 1990s, the US Department of Energy has sponsored the ad hoc advanced battery readiness working group to review this and other possible barriers to the widespread use of EVs, such as battery shipping and in-vehicle safety. Regulation is currently the main force for growth in EV numbers and projections for the states that have zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) programs indicate about 200,000 of these vehicles would be offered to the public in 2003 to meet those requirements. The ad hoc Advanced Battery Readiness Working Group has identified a matrix of battery technologies that could see use in EVs and has been tracking the state of readiness of recycling processes for each of them. Lead-acid, nickel/metal hydride, and lithium-ion are the three EV battery technologies proposed by the major automotive manufacturers affected by ZEV requirements. Recycling approaches for the two advanced battery systems on this list are partly defined, but could be modified to recover more value from end-of-life batteries. The processes being used or planned to treat these batteries are reviewed, as well as those being considered for other longer-term technologies in the battery recycling readiness matrix. Development efforts needed to prepare for recycling the batteries from a much larger EV population than exists today are identified.

  11. SNX17 regulates Notch pathway and pancreas development through the retromer-dependent recycling of Jag1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the retromer-dependent recycling of Jag1. Cell RegenerationWnt secretion by recycling Yin et al. Cell Regenerationthe retromer-dependent recycling of Jag1 Wenguang Yin 1 ,

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS, VOL. 19, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1 Cooperative Secondary Authorization Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secondary Authorization Recycling Qiang Wei, Matei Ripeanu, Member, IEEE, and Konstantin Beznosov, Member recycles previously received authorizations and shares them with other application servers to mask authorization recycling system and its evaluation using simulation and prototype implementation. The results

  13. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  14. Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, Alessandro [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Passarini, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.passarini@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Vassura, Ivano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Instituto IMDEA Energy, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Morselli, Luciano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

  15. Doing the impossible: Recycling nuclear waste

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A Science Channel feature explores how Argonne techniques could be used to safely reduce the amount of radioactive waste generated by nuclear power?the most plentiful carbon-neutral energy source. Read more at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/ArgonneNow/Fall_2009/nuclear.html

  16. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  17. Recycling of used Ni-MH rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, T.; Ono, H.; Shirai, R. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd., Ageo, Saitama (Japan). Corporate R and D Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ni-MH (nickel metal hydride) rechargeable battery was developed several years ago. Its higher electrochemical capacity and greater safety compared with the Ni-Cd rechargeable battery have resulted in very rapid increase in its production. The Ni-MH rechargeable battery consists of Ni, Co and rare earth metals, so that recycling is important to recover these valuable mineral resources. In this study, a basic recycling process for used Ni-MH rechargeable batteries has been developed, in which the Ni, Co and rare earth elements are recovered through a combination of mechanical processing and hydrometallurgical processing.

  18. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  19. Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included. (Contains a minimum of 76 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included. (Contains a minimum of 83 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Minnesota recycling directory, 1991. Statewide markets and collection locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cera, D.; Cloutier, C.; Estrem, L.; Halpine, C.; Johnson, K.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Table of Contents: Minnesota Recycling Industries: (Individual Company Listings; Recycling Industries by County; Glass Collection, Processing and End-Use by County; Metal Collection, Processing and End-Use by County; Paper Collection, Processing and End-Use by County; and Plastic Collection, Processing and End-Use by County); Appendices: (Used Auto Parts Dealers by County; Barrel Reconditioners; Spent Lead-Acid Battery Collection and Processing by County; Used Oil Collection Centers by County; Waste Tire Collection, Processing and End-Use by County; Wood Waste Processors; and Regional End-Markets); and Update Form.

  4. Summary of Fermilab's Recycler Electron Cooler Operation and Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Recycler ring was used as a storage ring for accumulation and subsequent manipulations of 8 GeV antiprotons destined for the Tevatron collider. To satisfy these missions, a unique electron cooling system was designed, developed and successfully implemented. The most important features that distinguish the Recycler cooler from other existing electron coolers are its relativistic energy, 4.3 MV combined with 0.1-0.5 A DC beam current, a weak continuous longitudinal magnetic field in the cooling section, 100 G, and lumped focusing elsewhere. With the termination of the Tevatron collider operation, so did the cooler. In this article, we summarize the experience of running this unique machine.

  5. Bioanalytical tools for the evaluation of organic micropollutants during sewage treatment, water recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Micropollutants Toxicity Water recycling Indirect potable reuse a b s t r a c t A bioanalytical test battery recycling and drinking water generation Miroslava Macova a , Simon Toze b,d , Leonie Hodgers b , Jochen F

  6. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    general public more about battery recycling. When asked whatbattery campaign. Hence, giving the general public access to recyclingand recycling system to the standards set out in the European acquis. The plastic bottle and battery

  7. Contemporary evolution, allelic recycling, and adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    Contemporary evolution, allelic recycling, and adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback within ten generations. Rare freshwater-adapted alleles have been recycled from freshwater to oceanic evolve very slowly led him to study artificial selection, natural selection's component mechanisms (e

  8. S98-1 Recycling Papers and Defining Plagiarism Legislative History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    S98-1 Recycling Papers and Defining Plagiarism Legislative History: At its meeting of February 2: "Approved as University Policy." Signed Robert Caret, 2-19-98 Policy Recommendation Recycling Papers

  9. Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husmoen, Derek Howard

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the logistics for recycling biochar to fields from which the biomass feedstocks are harvested. The contribution of biochar recycling from mobile pyrolysis systems to ecological services provided by agriculture, including sustained soil, water...

  10. A Feasibility Study for Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters In A Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph M. Smailer; Gregory L. Dressel; Jennifer Hsu Hill

    2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study has indicated that of the approximately 120,000 tons of steel available to be recycled from used oil filters (UOF's), a maximum blast furnace charge of 2% of the burden may be anticipated for short term use of a few months. The oil contained in the most readily processed UOF's being properly hot drained and crushed is approximately 12% to 14% by weight. This oil will be pyrolized at a rate of 98% resulting in additional fuel gas of 68% and a condensable hydrocarbon fraction of 30%, with the remaining 2% resulting as carbon being added into the burden. Based upon the writer's collected information and assessment, there appears to be no operational problems relating to the recycling of UOF's to the blast furnace. One steel plant in the US has been routinely charging UOF's at about 100 tons to 200 tons per month for many years. Extensive analysis and calculations appear to indicate no toxic consideration as a result of the pyrolysis of the small contained oil ( in the 'prepared' UOFs) within the blast furnace. However, a hydrocarbon condensate in the ''gasoline'' fraction will condense in the blast furnace scrubber water and may require additional processing the water treatment system to remove benzene and toluene from the condensate. Used oil filters represent an additional source of high quality iron units that may be effectively added to the charge of a blast furnace for beneficial value to the operator and to the removal of this resource from landfills.

  11. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 2, Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second volume contains detailed information on a number of specific topics relevant to the recovery/recycling of plastics.

  12. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1: technical feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical progress made on the development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber.

  13. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Designing Optimal Districts in the Recycling of Electronic Goods with Integer Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Algorithm Wrap-up #12;New recycling directive WEEE (Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment) of the EC

  18. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 242249 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 242­249 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Resources, Conservation and Recycling journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/resconrec Factors influencing the rate of recycling: An analysis of Minnesota counties Shaufique F. Sidiquea, , Satish V. Joshib

  19. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 847869 Modeling obsolete computer stock under regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 847­869 Modeling obsolete computer stock under and recycling systems using GIS, and demonstrate the potential economic benefits from diverting electronic buildings. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Computer recycling; Product inventory

  20. Less Haste, Less Waste: On Recycling and its Limits in Strand Displacement Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condon, Anne

    Less Haste, Less Waste: On Recycling and its Limits in Strand Displacement Systems Anne Condon Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z4 Abstract. We study the potential for molecule recycling in chemical reaction systems and their DNA strand displacement realizations. Recycling happens when a product

  1. Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a, *, J.C. Poggiale b , P recycling is taken into account. The food chain is formed by a nutrient and two populations, prey. The excreted material together with death material, detritus, is decomposed and this gives the recycling

  2. RCRA Waste Minimization and Recycling Initiatives at the Health Center (Rev. 12/09)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    RCRA Waste Minimization and Recycling Initiatives at the Health Center 1/11/08 (Rev. 12/09) PURPOSE, with environmentally-sound recycling as a second and higher priority over treatment and disposal. Section 3002(b feasible; pollution that cannot be prevented should be recycled in an environmentally safe manner, whenever

  3. Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with Unstable First Order Forward Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with Unstable First Order Forward Loop J. F. M Abstract Unstable time-delay systems and recycling systems are challenging problems for control analysis and design. When an unstable time-delay system has a recycle, its control problem becomes even more difficult

  4. Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzey, Jack

    Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final://people.anu.edu.au/jack.pezzey (J.C.V. Pezzey) Keywords: emission pricing, tax-versus-trading, uncertainties, revenue recycling, and revenue recycling. Including multiple, independent parties greatly reduces the welfare advantage

  5. Cherry-MP: Correctly Integrating Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Chip Multiprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez, José F.

    Cherry-MP: Correctly Integrating Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Chip Multiprocessors 14853 USA http://m3.csl.cornell.edu/ ABSTRACT Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling (Cherry by performing aggres- sive resource recycling decoupled from instruction retire- ment, using a checkpoint

  6. Combining Retiming and Recycling to Optimize the Performance of Synchronous Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    Combining Retiming and Recycling to Optimize the Performance of Synchronous Circuits Luca P, CA 94720-1772 Abstract Recycling was recently proposed as a system-level design tech- nique to facilitate the building of complex System-on-Chips (SOC) by assembling pre-designed components. Recycling

  7. Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

  8. Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Out-of-order Microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez, José F.

    Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Out-of-order Microprocessors£ Jos´e F. Mart of Rochester michael.huang@ece.rochester.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents CHeckpointed Early Resource RecYcling (Cherry), a hybrid mode of execution based on ROB and checkpoint- ing that decouples resource recycling

  9. Blue Laboratory Recycling Bins Thank you for your efforts in greening the NIH!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Blue Laboratory Recycling Bins Thank you for your efforts in greening the NIH! Instructions: Please empty the contents of your bin into the larger centralized recycling bins for collection whenever Information: To request a centralized recycling bin or a hamper for large cleanouts, please contact

  10. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 163170 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 163­170 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Resources, Conservation and Recycling journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/resconrec The effects of behavior and attitudes on drop-off recycling activities Shaufique F. Sidiquea, , Frank Lupib , Satish V

  11. The Covered Device Recycling (Act 108) of 2010 (CDRA) A General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    The Covered Device Recycling (Act 108) of 2010 (CDRA) A General Overview Electronic products address the manufacture, sales, and end-of-life collection, management and recycling of covered devices to their covered devices. o Must establish and conduct ongoing recycling programs that offer covered device

  12. vol. 171, no. 4 the american naturalist april 2008 Nutrient Recycling Affects Autotroph and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menge, Duncan

    vol. 171, no. 4 the american naturalist april 2008 Nutrient Recycling Affects Autotroph recycling a potentially im- portant process influencing autotroph stoichiometry. To quantita- tively investigate the relationship between available N and P, auto- troph N : P, and nutrient recycling, we analyze

  13. Weathering Effects on Mechanical Properties of Recycled HDPE Based Plastic Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weathering Effects on Mechanical Properties of Recycled HDPE Based Plastic Lumber Jennifer K. Lynch recycled plastic lumber (RPL) decking was exposed to the environment for eleven years. The weathering in the construction of the deck were a commingled recycled plastic material referred to as curbside tailings, NJCT

  14. JABSOM EHSO E-WASTE Recycling Program Created: May 13, 2010 Revised: January 6, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    JABSOM EHSO ­ E-WASTE Recycling Program Created: May 13, 2010 ­ Revised: January 6, 2013 Page 1 of 2 UH eWaste Recycling Program at JABSOM Kaka'ako The University of Hawaii has established a long-term, free-of-charge quarterly recycling program of UH electronic waste (eWaste), compliments of APPLE

  15. Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path J. F. Marquez Rubio, B. del Muro Cu´ellar and Olivier Sename Abstract-- Unstable time delay system and recycling system pose a challenge problem in their own. When unstable time delay system have recycle the control problem becomes

  16. Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1 Ovidiu Ghita2 Pedro. In this paper we present a novel methodology to automate the recycling process of non-ferrous metal Waste from that the proposed solution can be used to replace the manual procedure that is currently used in WEEE recycling

  17. ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN LINERLESS SELF-ADHESIVE COIL STAMPS: R&D AND RECYCLING STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN LINERLESS SELF-ADHESIVE COIL STAMPS: R&D AND RECYCLING STUDIES Kim K been easy and quick to use, and have offered consistent adhesion. For recyclers, however, these adhesive stamps have caused concern for their paper recycling processes. In addition, there is the issue

  18. Non-parametric Bootstrap Recycling Val erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-parametric Bootstrap Recycling Val#19;erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132 adjustments. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from

  19. Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. Cold in-place recycling with bitumen emulsion Animesh Das1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Cold in-place recycling with bitumen emulsion Animesh Das1 Introduction The cold in-place recycling (CIPR) is a process where the existing bituminous pavement is recycled without application of heat breaking (depends on temparture, humidity and wind), the breakdown rolling is initiated with large rubber-tired

  2. Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    into compost in 14 days, when mixed with wood chippings (from your grounds/gardens). The waste is heated usingWaste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site) How can I recycle food waste on-site? Recycling food waste on-site is a new concept as the University typically has its waste collected and taken away

  3. What can you recycle at MIT? All Paper in desk side and blue-top bins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    What can you recycle at MIT? All Paper in desk side and blue-top bins Bottles, Cans and Containers Paper Computer Monitors / Electronics contact recycling@mit.edu Aluminum cans & foil Glass Bottles All Centers (DMC's) For more information: Working Group Recycling Committee at http

  4. Ancient recycled mantle lithosphere in the Hawaiian plume: OsmiumHafnium isotopic evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Ancient recycled mantle lithosphere in the Hawaiian plume: Osmium­Hafnium isotopic evidence from that recycled (i.e. previously subducted) basaltic oceanic crust (with or without sediments) is part of an ancient (N2 Ga) depleted and recycled mantle lithosphere that is part of the upwelling Hawaiian plume

  5. An Updated Evaluation of ReCycle Abhishek Tiwari and Josep Torrellas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrellas, Josep

    An Updated Evaluation of ReCycle Abhishek Tiwari and Josep Torrellas Department of Computer Science stage. ReCycle was proposed in ISCA 2007 as a framework for comprehensively applying cycle time stealing with a period close to the average latency of the stages. This paper duplicates the evaluation of ReCycle

  6. RPM-2: A recyclable porous material with unusual adsorption capability: self assembly via structural transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    RPM-2: A recyclable porous material with unusual adsorption capability: self assembly via, fully recyclable porous material (RPM-2) with a very high sorption capability. Self recent explora- tory study on such a structure, the 3D porous RPM-1 (RPM: Rutgers Recyclable Porous

  7. Material Recycling at Product End-of-Life Jeffrey B. Dahmus and Timothy G. Gutowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    Material Recycling at Product End-of-Life Jeffrey B. Dahmus and Timothy G. Gutowski Department, Massachusetts, USA Abstract--This work focuses on developing a compact representation of the material recycling different ores, the work here provides insight into the relative attractiveness of recycling different

  8. Plasma wall interaction induced oscillations and their effects on the global recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    1 Plasma wall interaction induced oscillations and their effects on the global recycling from Devices 2007.05.20-22 NIFS #12;2 contents 1. MOTIVATION (ULFE & termination) 2. dynamics of recycling 3 in signals on heat loads, particle recycling, and impurity influx and contents. Frequency ~ 1-2¥10-3 Hz

  9. The Low-Recycling Lithium Boundary and Implications for Plasma Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    The Low-Recycling Lithium Boundary and Implications for Plasma Transport Erik Michael Granstedt transport mechanism in high-temperature low-recycling fusion experiments, and in the absence of stabilizing hydrogen and impurity emission in LTX in order to determine the lower bound on recycling that can

  10. PPPL3157 Preprint Date: March 1996, UC421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PPPL­3157 ­ Preprint Date: March 1996, UC­421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling material to be ejected into the plasma. This recycling of plasma fuel, which occurs primarily on the inner influx from the edge. Despite its importance, a full understanding of the factors influencing recycling

  11. PPPL-3157 -Preprint Date: March 1996, UC-421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PPPL-3157 - Preprint Date: March 1996, UC-421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling material to be ejected into the plasma. This recycling of plasma fuel, which occurs primarily on the inner influx from the edge. Despite its importance, a full understanding of the factors influencing recycling

  12. UWM does recycle Published in the UWM Post on 28 February 2011.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM does recycle Published in the UWM Post on 28 February 2011. By Michelle Sanchez Contrary to many rumors, UW-Milwaukee's recycling habits extend far beyond the "paper/cardboard" and "commingle" containers strewn across campus. The university also concerns itself with recycling materials such as metal

  13. Comptes Rendus des JNC 17 -Poitiers 2011 Comparaison microstructurale et mcanique de polypropylnes-choc recycls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    comparison of recycled impact modified polypropylenes: damage evolution and ageing L. Chocinski-Arnault1 , F-chocs recyclés. Abstract This study deals with impact modified polypropylenes issued from recycling of end-of-life vehicle bumpers. Two ways are studied for the use of recycled material: either by mixing with new material

  14. STABILITY OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN A CSTR WITH DELAYED RECYCLE STREAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    STABILITY OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN A CSTR WITH DELAYED RECYCLE STREAM Brad Lehman' Departmentof. Severalof these papers alsoinclude the effectsof a recycle stream on the reactors dynamic response, and hence the cost of reaction, its use is widespread in industry. For example, recycling is almost always

  15. 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS #12;2 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS-recycled plastics (NRP). The study presented in this Report is based on 2011 data, compiled in the EEC 2013 Survey

  16. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  17. advanced recycling reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling wastewater) 80:349­355 DOI 10.1007/s00253-008-1546-7 L. Huang School of Environmental and Biological Science of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA e

  19. Design and analysis of recycled content sign blanks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Ben Frank

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Other Structures. A design example for a two-pole sign is performed for one of the recycled materials collected during the study. Adequacy of the preliminary design is checked using a finite element model of the structure in conjunction with a set...

  20. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  1. OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62% Landfill 1080 tons / 38% Electricals 36 Landfill As of Monday 7 March 2011, no general waste generated from the Bloomsbury Campus has been sent to landfill. Through partnership between UCL Estates and Office and General, an agreement has been reached

  2. Recycling practices of spent MgO-C refractories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recycling options of spent MgO-C refractories from an electrical arc furnace (EAF) have been evaluated. The economic, quality of spent refractories and products made from it, the ease of implementation of a recycling practice and the interest of steel melt shops were considered. It was decided that the best option of most EAF shops would be to recycle spent MgO-C refractory as a foaming slag conditioner because of their MgO content. Crushed MgO-C spent refractories can be reused directly back into an EAF without complex and costly beneficiation. Even though this practice is simple, it is critical to know the optimum amount of MgO in the slag to achieve the best foaming quality. A computer model was designed to find the optimum MgO amount. This modeling also helps the melt shop extend refractory service life, increase the energy efficiency, increase productivity, and decrease the amount of slag. Issues related to the refractory recycling will be discussed.

  3. NFLP EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATION FORM *FA877* Please recycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    NFLP EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATION FORM *FA877* Please recycle. DIRECTIONS--By signing this document you Faculty Loan Program (NFLP). This program requires you to be employed full-time as nurse faculty in the School of Nursing for a complete year. Section 3 must be completed by your employer. Keep a copy

  4. please recycle. Creating Leaders of Consequence for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    on the other. In short: We need environmental managers who know business, law, public policy and/or engineeringplease recycle. Creating Leaders of Consequence for a Sustainable Future Hybrid Environmental Professional Program Providing financial aid for dual degree students Today's environmental leaders need a foot

  5. Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality Manuel Vasquez, Juan Sandoval acquisition of solar power, nuclear power, and biofuels to diversify the country's domestic energy profile, the chemical make-up of biofuels allows them to be readily converted into their petroleum counterparts making

  6. Environmentally Sound Design and Recycling of Future Wind Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmentally Sound Design and Recycling of Future Wind Power Systems Presentation at the IEA R state-of-the-art wind power system Mapping current trends of wind power technologies and concepts Expert wind power systems Expert panel brainstorm on environmental aspects of decommissioning current

  7. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

  8. Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

  9. Packaging laws motivate industry to draw up global recycling pacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesche, E.S.

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spurred by criticism that plastics contribute to the solid waste problem, some plastics industry associations are joining forces to find global solutions. For one, manufacturers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) protective foam packaging from the US, Germany, Austria, and Japan have entered an agreement to encourage the collection and recycling of postconsumer material. Meanwhile, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) makers from Japan, Europe, and North and South America met in September and agreed to develop systems and technology for PVC recycling as well as incineration. The EPS agreement was motivated by fears that packaging material made outside of Germany would not meet the country's new Packaging Ordinance, says a spokesman for the Association of Foam Packaging Recyclers (AFPR; Washington). AFPR chairman John O'Leary Jr., who is also president and CEO of Tuscarora Inc. (New Brighton, PA), says [open quotes]Some consumer product manufacturers in the US incorrectly believe that EPS protective foam packaging may not be acceptable in Germany.[close quotes] The agreement was signed by EPSY-Germany, EPSY-Austria, AFPR, and the Japan EPS Recycling Association. The AFPR is affiliated with the Society of the Plastics Industry (Washington).

  10. Impact of increased electric vehicle use on battery recycling infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Hammel, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Jungst, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and Federal regulations have been implemented that are intended to encourage more widespread use of low-emission vehicles. These regulations include requirements of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and regulations pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and the Energy Policy Act. If the market share of electric vehicles increases in response to these initiatives, corresponding growth will occur in quantities of spent electric vehicle batteries for disposal. Electric vehicle battery recycling infrastructure must be adequate to support collection, transportation, recovery, and disposal stages of waste battery handling. For some battery types, such as lead-acid, a recycling infrastructure is well established; for others, little exists. This paper examines implications of increasing electric vehicle use for lead recovery infrastructure. Secondary lead recovery facilities can be expected to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead-acid electric vehicle battery recycling. However, they face stringent environmental constraints that may curtail capacity use or new capacity installation. Advanced technologies help address these environmental constraints. For example, this paper describes using backup power to avoid air emissions that could occur if electric utility power outages disable emissions control equipment. This approach has been implemented by GNB Technologies, a major manufacturer and recycler of lead-acid batteries. Secondary lead recovery facilities appear to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead waste from electric vehicles, but growth in that capacity could be constrained by environmental regulations. Advances in lead recovery technologies may alleviate possible environmental constraints on capacity growth.

  11. FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE L. EL-GUEBALY,* P. WILSON for Publication February 3, 2004 The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management

  12. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  13. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  14. Un-reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins Bruveris; David C. P. Ellis; Francois Gay-Balmaz; Darryl D. Holm

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a full geometric development of a new technique called un-reduction, for dealing with dynamics and optimal control problems posed on spaces that are unwieldy for numerical implementation. The technique, which was originally concieved for an application to image dynamics, uses Lagrangian reduction by symmetry in reverse. A deeper understanding of un-reduction leads to new developments in image matching which serve to illustrate the mathematical power of the technique.

  15. Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation sets goals for the reduction of solid waste generated by households, businesses, and governments, through source reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting. The state aims to...

  16. ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE DIVISION FY2008 SELF-ASSESSMENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    ....................................................................3 E4. Division participates in pollution prevention, energy conservation, recycling, and wasteADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE DIVISION FY2008 SELF-ASSESSMENT REPORT November 7, 2008 Prepared by to confined space, energized electrical work); waste management criteria (SAAs, waste sampling, NCARs

  17. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance technical barriers, making plutonium diversion more difficult by not isolating plutonium or/and coexistence of fission products with plutonium.

  18. Cold bond agglomeration of waste oxides for recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Alessio, G.; Lu, W.K. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of waste oxides has been an on-going challenge for integrated steel plants. The majority of these waste oxides are collected from the cleaning systems of ironmaking and steelmaking processes, and are usually in the form of fine particulates and slurries. In most cases, these waste materials are contaminated by oils and heavy metals and often require treatment at a considerable expense prior to landfill disposal. This contamination also limits the re-use or recycling potential of these oxides as secondary resources of reliable quality. However, recycling of some selected wastes in blast furnaces or steelmaking vessels is possible, but first requires agglomeration of the fine particulate by such methods as cold bond briquetting. Cold bond briquetting technology provides both mechanical compacting and bonding (with appropriate binders) of the particulates. This method of recycling has the potential to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The nature of the present study is cold bond briquetting of iron ore pellet fines with a molasses-cement-H{sub 2}O binder for recycling in a blast furnace. The inclusion of molasses is for its contribution to the green strength of briquettes. During the curing stage, significant gains in strength may be credited to molasses in the presence of cement. The interactions of cement (and its substitutes), water and molasses and their effects on the properties of the agglomerates during and after various curing conditions were investigated. Tensile strengths of briquettes made in the laboratory and subjected to experimental conditions which simulated the top part of a blast furnace shaft were also examined.

  19. Recyclable transmission line concept for z-pinch driven inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Groot, J. S. (University of California, Davis, CA); Olson, Craig Lee; Cochrane, Kyle Robert (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA)

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recyclable transmission lines (RTL)s are being studied as a means to repetitively drive z pinches to generate fusion energy. We have shown previously that the RTL mass can be quite modest. Minimizing the RTL mass reduces recycling costs and the impulse delivered to the first wall of a fusion chamber. Despite this reduction in mass, a few seconds will be needed to reload an RTL after each subsequent shot. This is in comparison to other inertial fusion approaches that expect to fire up to ten capsules per second. Thus a larger fusion yield is needed to compensate for the slower repetition rate in a z-pinch driven fusion reactor. We present preliminary designs of z-pinch driven fusion capsules that provide an adequate yield of 1-4 GJ. We also present numerical simulations of the effect of these fairly large fusion yields on the RTL and the first wall of the reactor chamber. These simulations were performed with and without a neutron absorbing blanket surrounding the fusion explosion. We find that the RTL will be fully vaporized out to a radius of about 3 meters assuming normal incidence. However, at large enough radius the RTL will remain in either the liquid or solid state and this portion of the RTL could fragment and become shrapnel. We show that a dynamic fragmentation theory can be used to estimate the size of these fragmented particles. We discuss how proper design of the RTL can allow this shrapnel to be directed away from the sensitive mechanical parts of the reactor chamber.

  20. Informal electronic waste recycling: A sector review with special focus on China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi Xinwen, E-mail: x.chi@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Streicher-Porte, Martin [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Technology and Society Laboratory, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Wang, Mark Y.L. [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Reuter, Markus A. [Outotec Pty Ltd., Melbourne, 12 Kitchen Road, Dandenong, VIC 3175 (Australia)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Informal recycling is a new and expanding low cost recycling practice in managing Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE or e-waste). It occurs in many developing countries, including China, where current gaps in environmental management, high demand for second-hand electronic appliances and the norm of selling e-waste to individual collectors encourage the growth of a strong informal recycling sector. This paper gathers information on informal e-waste management, takes a look at its particular manifestations in China and identifies some of the main difficulties of the current Chinese approach. Informal e-waste recycling is not only associated with serious environmental and health impacts, but also the supply deficiency of formal recyclers and the safety problems of remanufactured electronic products. Experiences already show that simply prohibiting or competing with the informal collectors and informal recyclers is not an effective solution. New formal e-waste recycling systems should take existing informal sectors into account, and more policies need to be made to improve recycling rates, working conditions and the efficiency of involved informal players. A key issue for China's e-waste management is how to set up incentives for informal recyclers so as to reduce improper recycling activities and to divert more e-waste flow into the formal recycling sector.

  1. Th/U-233 multi-recycle in PWRs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, D.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thorium in current or advanced light water reactors (LWRs) has been of interest in recent years. These interests have been associated with the need to increase nuclear fuel resources and the perceived non-proliferation advantages of the utilization of thorium in the fuel cycle. Various options have been considered for the use of thorium in the LWR fuel cycle including: (1) its use in a once-through fuel cycle to replace non-fissile uranium or to extend fuel burnup due to its attractive fertile material conversion, (2) its use for fissile plutonium burning in limited recycle cores, and (3) its advantage in limiting the transuranic elements to be disposed off in a repository (if only Th/U-233 fuel is used). The possibility for thorium utilization in multirecycle system has also been considered by various researchers, primarily because of the potential for near breeders with Th/U-233 in the thermal energy range. The objective of this project is to evaluate the potential of the Th/U-233 fuel multirecycle in current LWRs, with focus this year on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In this work, approaches for ensuring a sustainable multirecycle without the need for external source of makeup fissile material have been investigated. The intent is to achieve a design that allows existing PWRs to be used with minimal modifications. In all cases including homogeneous and heterogeneous assembly designs, the assembly pitch is kept consistent with that of the current PWRs (21.5 cm used). Because of design difficulties associated with using the same geometry and dimensions as a PWR core, the potential modifications (other than assembly pitch) that would be needed for PWRs to ensure a sustainable multirecycle system have been investigated and characterized. Additionally, the implications of the use of thorium on the LWR fuel cycle are discussed. In Section 2, background information on studies evaluating the use of thorium in the fuel cycle is provided, but focusing on Th/U-233 multirecycle. Recent studies done internationally and in the U.S. are briefly summarized. Additionally, the previous U.S. thorium breeder experiment in the Shippingport reactor is briefly discussed. The objective of this work and the reactor design issues associated with multirecycle of Th/U-233 are discussed in Section 3. The approaches required to achieve a sustainable system are discussed and evaluated. Homogeneous assembly modeling results are presented in this section. In Section 4, a 17-by-17 heterogeneous assembly design has been selected and evaluated, based on its positive attributes for sustainable Th/U-233 multirecycle. A feasibility study is briefly discussed at the end of this section followed by recommendations for future activities. Section 5 discusses the attributes of the 17-by-17 heterogeneous assembly design. The material mass flow data and fuel cycle impact data are reported in this section. Discussions on the fuel cycle implications of thorium fuel utilization are provided in Section 6. This includes information on fuel sources, fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, and re-fabrication. The conclusions of the study are provided in Section 7.

  2. Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solution and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal. 18 figures.

  3. Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland J. (Wading River, NY); Gillow, Jeffrey B. (Valley Cottage, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solutin and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal.

  4. Reductive glutamine metabolism is a function of the ?-ketoglutarate to citrate ratio in cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    Reductively metabolized glutamine is a major cellular carbon source for fatty acid synthesis during hypoxia or when mitochondrial respiration is impaired. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of what determines reductive ...

  5. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  6. Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee Grant #DMI-0423484 Analysis of Recycling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    #DMI-0423484 Analysis of Recycling Systems Timothy G. Gutowski Malima I. Wolf Jeffrey B. Dahmus Dominic 02139 Abstract: This paper outlines past and future work on the topic of recycling systems. This project focuses on the performance of recycling systems from a range of perspectives. The recyclability

  7. Control Structure Selection for Reactor, Separator, and Recycle T. Larsson, M. S. Govatsmark, S. Skogestad,* and C. C. Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control Structure Selection for Reactor, Separator, and Recycle Processes T. Larsson, M. S to control", for a simple plant with a liquid-phase reactor, a distillation column, and recycle of unreacted processes is the presence of recycle. Variations of a plant with reaction, separation, and mass recycle (see

  8. Recycling flows in eMergy evaluation: A Mathematical Paradox? N.Y. Amponsah, O. Le Corre1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Recycling involving recycling or reuse of waste. If waste exergy (its residual usefulness) is not negligible, wastes could serve as input to another process or be recycled. In cases of continuous waste recycle or reuse

  9. Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    European Tire Recycling Association (ETRA), 1996. “WorldInternational Conference on Tire Recycling. Brussels. Mayin a database. The tire recycling company could keep more

  10. Energy Management by Recycling of Vehicle Waste Oil in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Ali Durrani

    Abstract: Pakistan has been suffering from an energy crisis for about half a decade now. The power crisis is proving to be unbearable, so importing huge amount of hydrocarbons from abroad to meet its energy needs. This study therefore focuses on the analysis of energy and environmental benefits for vehicle waste lubricant oil pertaining to its reuse by means of: (i) regain the heating value of used oils in a combustion process and (ii) recycling of waste oil to make fresh oil products. The waste oil samples were tested by ICP method and the test results were compared with standard requirements. It was found that the matter could effectively be solved by means of waste oil management practices together with collection centers, transports and processors by encouraging and financial help for the recycling industry. The importance and worth of this work concludes minor levels of hazardous elements when regained the heating value from the waste lubricating oil.

  11. Lead contamination around a kindergarten near a battery recycling plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung-Der Wang; Chang-Sheng Jang; Yaw-Huei Hwang; Zueng-Sang Chen [National Taiwan Univ. (China)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead poisoning has been noticed for more than a thousand years. Increased lead absorption and/or impaired neurobehavioral function among children who lived nearby lead smelters were reported in many different countries. In November of 1987, a worker from a lead battery recycling smelter suffered from anemia and bilateral weakness of his extremities. He was diagnosed as lead poisoning at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). A subsequent epidemiological survey of the workers from this recycling smelter showed that 31 out of 64 who came for a medical examination suffered from lead poisoning. Since there was a kindergarten next to the factory, we performed this study to determine whether there was an increased lead absorption among children of the exposed kindergarten and its association with the extent of air and soil pollution in the surrounding area. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Superharmonic Injection Locked Quadrature LC VCO Using Current Recycling Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalusalingam, Shriram

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    superharmonic coupling????..?.. 7 3.1 Conventional LC VCO?????..??????????.. 8 3.2 Proposed quadrature voltage controlled oscillator??..??? 9 3.3 Current recycling mechanism?????????..???? 11 3.4 Comparison of amplitude between proposed and conventional... QVCO????????????????????..?? 13 3.5 Modeling of QVCO for mathematical analysis?????...? 16 3.6 Quadrature catch up of proposed QVCO???????..?.. 18 3.7 Impedance plot of parallel RLC??????????..?? 23 3.8 Quadrature phase error vs coupling factor...

  13. Power-recycled weak-value-based metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Kevin; Jordan, Andrew N; Howell, John C; Kwiat, Paul G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We improve the precision of the interferometric weak-value-based beam deflection measurement by introducing a power recycling mirror, creating a resonant cavity. This results in \\emph{all} the light exiting to the detector with a large deflection, thus eliminating the inefficiency of the rare postselection. The signal-to-noise ratio of the deflection is itself magnified by the weak value. We discuss ways to realize this proposal, using a transverse beam filter and different cavity designs.

  14. Power-recycled weak-value-based metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Lyons; Justin Dressel; Andrew N. Jordan; John C. Howell; Paul G. Kwiat

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We improve the precision of the interferometric weak-value-based beam deflection measurement by introducing a power recycling mirror, creating a resonant cavity. This results in \\emph{all} the light exiting to the detector with a large deflection, thus eliminating the inefficiency of the rare postselection. The signal-to-noise ratio of the deflection is itself magnified by the weak value. We discuss ways to realize this proposal, using a transverse beam filter and different cavity designs.

  15. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  16. Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

  17. Which Elements Should be Recycled for a Comprehensive Fuel Cycle?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Robert Hill; Chris Laws; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire; Roald Wigeland

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium recovery can reduce the mass of waste and possibly the number of waste packages that require geologic disposal. Separated uranium can be managed with the same method (near-surface burial) as used for the larger quantities of depleted uranium or recycled into new fuel. Recycle of all transuranics reduces long-term environmental burden, reduces heat load to repositories, extracts more energy from the original uranium ore, and may have significant proliferation resistance and physical security advantages. Recovery of short-lived fission products cesium and strontium can allow them to decay to low-level waste in facilities tailored to that need, rather than geologic disposal. This could also reduce the number and cost of waste packages requiring geologic disposal. These savings are offset by costs for separation, recycle, and storage systems. Recovery of technetium-99 and iodine-129 can allow them to be sent to geologic disposal in improved waste forms. Such separation avoids contamination of the other products (uranium) and waste (cesium-strontium) streams with long-lived radioisotopes so the material might be disposed as low-level waste. Transmutation of technetium and iodine is a possible future alternative.

  18. Selecting fines recycle methods to optimize fluid bed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickman, W.S.; Fields, D.E.; Brimhall, W.L.; Callahan, S.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and analysis of a number of different fines recycle methods for fluid bed combustors has led to a generalized modeling technique. This model accounts for the effect of pertinent variables in determining overall combustion efficiencies. Computer application of this model has allowed trade-off studies to be performed that show the overall process effects of changes in individual operating parameters. Verification of the model has been accomplished in processing campaigns while combusting fuels such as graphite and bituminous coal. A 0.4 MW test unit was used for the graphite experimental work. Solid fuel was typically crushed to 5 mm maximum screen size. Bed temperatures were normally controlled at 900/sup 0/C; the combustor was an atmospheric unit with maximum in-bed pressures of 0.2 atm. Expanded bed depths ranged from 1.5 to 3 meters. Additional data was taken from recycle tests sponsored by EPRI on the B and W 6 ft x 6 ft fluid bed combustor. These tests used high sulfur coal in a 1.2 meter deep, 850/sup 0/C atmospheric fluidized bed of limestone, with low recycle rates and temperatures. Close agreement between the model and test data has been noted, with combustion efficiency predictions matching experimental results within 1%.

  19. Recycling of Waste Oxides in Steelmaking - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R. J.

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research primarily examined the use of waste oxide briquettes (WOB), prepared from blast furnace and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) dusts and mill scale, in BOFs and in particular, the reasons for the methods to reduce slopping in BOF when WOBs are used. Also, the recycling of EAF and stainless steelmaking dusts were examined. It is found that at a critical FeO content in the slag, metal drops emulsify increasing the reaction area and rate drastically, promoting slopping. Recommendations were made to delay the build-up of FeO in the slag to this critical value, thus reducing slopping. Although recycling of EAF dusts in the EAF increased energy use and decreased productivity, it provides Fe units, reduces dust disposal by 25-40%, and increases the Zn content of the dust to acceptable levels for the use by Zn-producers. Stainless steelmaking dusts can also be recycled as WOBs adding Cr to the melt and generating CO gas resulting in good slag foaming.

  20. AISI waste oxide recycling program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E.; Downing, K.B.; Sarma, B.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1995 AISI completed a five-year, $60 million collaborative development program on Direct Steelmaking cost-shared by DOE under the Metals Initiative. This program defined an energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly technology to produce hot metal for steelmaking directly from coal and iron ore pellets without incurring the high capital costs and environmental problems associated with traditional coke oven and blast furnace technology. As it becomes necessary to replace present capacity, this new technology will be favored because of reduced capital costs, higher energy efficiency, and lower operating costs. In April 1994, having failed to move forward with a demonstration plant for direct ironmaking, despite substantial efforts by both Stelco and Geneva Steel, an alternative opportunity was sought to commercialize this new technology without waiting until existing ironmaking capacity needed to be replaced. Recycling and resource recovery of steel plant waste oxides was considered an attractive possibility. This led to approval of a ten-month, $8.3 million joint program with DOE on recycling steel plant waste oxides utilizing this new smelting technology. This highly successful trial program was completed in December 1994. The results of the pilot plant work and a feasibility study for a recycling demonstration plant are presented in this final technical report.