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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Feeding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feeding Feeding the Pipeline: The SNfactory Supernova Search Richard Scalzo NERSC User Group Meeting October 4, 2005 Outline Background ● Interest in supernova science ● Observational challenges in finding supernovae The SNfactory search pipeline ● Description of hardware ● Past searches and challenges in development ● Present and future Why supernovae are interesting Two types of SNe: "type Ia" and "core-collapse". SNe Ia ● Model: Thermonuclear explosion of degenerate star(s) (carbon-oxygen white dwarf + binary companion star) ● Characteristic Si II absorption line in spectrum ● Brightness very uniform → good distance indicators Other SNe (types Ib, Ic, II) ● Gravitational collapse of core of young, massive star ● Spectra are diverse; evidence of stellar envelope (H, He) ● Rate tracks star formation rate; may be GRB progenitors SNe

2

Downloads Feed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5:57:00 -0600 Wed, 08 Jan 2014 5:57:00 -0600 Wed, 08 Jan 2014 15:59:46 -0600 HIPAA Authorization for Release of Information (ANL-1008) http://www.anl.gov/downloads/hipaa-authorization-release-information-anl-1008 Request for release of health-related information to Argonne for resolution of a healthcare plan claim January 8, 2014 Downloads Feed Key Facts about Argonne National Laboratory http://www.anl.gov/downloads/key-facts-about-argonne-national-laboratory December 16, 2013 Downloads Feed FY14 Argonne Site Sustainability Plan http://www.anl.gov/downloads/fy14-argonne-site-sustainability-plan December 6, 2013 Downloads Feed Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois PPO Claim Form http://www.anl.gov/downloads/blue-cross-blue-shield-illinois-ppo-claim-form November 25, 2013 Downloads Feed Key Facts about the Computing, Environment

3

Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feed Composition Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low- Activity Waste Glass Mass J.D. Vienna & D.S. Kim - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory I.L. Pegg - Catholic University of America 1 LAW Glass Loading Limits WTP baseline (LAW Glass Formulation Algorithm) low uncertainty  thoroughly tested accounts for Na, S, Cl, F, Cr, K, and P impacts conservative loading Advanced silicate formulation higher uncertainty than baseline currently accounts for Na and S impacts impacts of other components not specifically tested, but, one can evaluate maxima from testing as a lower bound 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 SO 3 (target) wt% in Glass Na 2 O (target) wt% in Glass SO 3 ≤ 0.77 wt% Na 2 O ≤ 35.875 - 42.5*SO 3 (in wt%) Na 2 O ≤ 21 wt% Na 2 O + 0.66*K

4

Recycle Waste Collection Tank (RWCT) simulant testing in the PVTD feed preparation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

(This is part of the radwaste vitrification program at Hanford.) RWCT was to routinely receive final canister decontamination sand blast frit and rinse water, Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank bottoms, and melter off-gas Submerged Bed Scrubber filter cake. In order to address the design needs of the RWCT system to meet performance levels, the PNL Vitrification Technology (PVTD) program used the Feed Preparation Test System (FPTS) to evaluate its equipment and performance for a simulant of RWCT slurry. (FPTS is an adaptation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility feed preparation system and represents the initially proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed preparation system designed by Fluor-Daniel, Inc.) The following were determined: mixing performance, pump priming, pump performance, simulant flow characterization, evaporator and condenser performance, and ammonia dispersion. The RWCT test had two runs, one with and one without tank baffles.

Abrigo, G.P.; Daume, J.T.; Halstead, S.D.; Myers, R.L.; Beckette, M.R.; Freeman, C.J.; Hatchell, B.K.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

[Recycle of contaminated scrap metal]: Task 1.3.2, Bulk solids feed system. Topical report, October 1993-- January 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical requirement in DOE`s efforts to recycle, reuse, and dispose of materials from its decontamination and decommissioning activities is the design of a robust system to process a wide variety of bulk solid feeds. The capability to process bulk solids will increase the range of materials and broaden the application of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP). The term bulk solids refers to materials that are more economically fed into the top of a molten metal bath than by submerged injection through a tuyere. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) has characterized CEP`s ability to process bulk solid feed materials and has achieved significant growth in the size of bulk solid particles compatible with Catalytic Extraction Processing. Parametric experimental studies using various feed materials representative of the components of various DOE waste streams have validated design models which establish the reactor operating range as a function of feed material, mass flow rate, and particle size. MMT is investigating the use of a slurry system for bulk solid addition as it is the most efficient means for injecting soils, sludges, and similar physical forms into a catalytic processing unit. MMT is continuing to evaluate condensed phase product removal systems and alternative energy addition sources to enhance the operating efficiency of bulk solids CEP units. A condensed phase product removal system capable of on-demand product removal has been successfully demonstrated. MMT is also investigating the use of a plasma arc torch to provide supplemental heating during bulk solids processing. This comprehensive approach to bulk solids processing is expected to further improve overall process efficiency prior to the deployment of CEP for the recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from DOE decontamination and decommissioning Activities.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

ARM - About RSS Feeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance About RSS Feeds RSS, which stands for Really Simple Syndication, is an easy way to keep up with your favorite news and information. An RSS feed contains headlines,...

7

NETL: Gasification Systems - Feed Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Gasification Systems Feed Systems Research on commercial gasifier feed systems is occurring in two primary areas of fuel (i.e. coal, biomass, etc.) feed and advanced...

8

In The News Feed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

omputing-past-present-and-future August 15, 2013 In The News Feed Solar power to trump shale, helped by US military http:www.telegraph.co.ukfinancecomment...

9

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fluidized bed boiler feed system  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Coal feed lock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal feed lock is provided for dispensing coal to a high pressure gas producer with nominal loss of high pressure gas. The coal feed lock comprises a rotor member with a diametral bore therethrough. A hydraulically activated piston is slidably mounted in the bore. With the feed lock in a charging position, coal is delivered to the bore and then the rotor member is rotated to a discharging position so as to communicate with the gas producer. The piston pushes the coal into the gas producer. The rotor member is then rotated to the charging position to receive the next load of coal.

Pinkel, I. Irving (Fairview Park, OH)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NREL: News - RSS Feeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSS Feeds RSS Feeds RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, is an easy way to track NREL news automatically. NREL news is available in the following RSS feeds. Research Programs Biomass Buildings Concentrating Solar Power Defense Geothermal Technologies Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Photovoltaics Vehicles and Fuels Wind News Awards and Honors Continuum Magazine Feature Stories News Releases Community Involvement Education Education Center Executive Energy Program Technology Applications Sustainable NREL Technology Deployment Technology Transfer Learn more about RSS. Printable Version NREL Newsroom Home Feature News News Releases Events Awards Research Support Facility Energy Systems Integration Facility Related Links NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

13

Dust-feed mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

Milliman, E.M.

1981-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dust feed mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

Milliman, Edward M. (Benton City, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Blog Feed: Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

feed-vehicles 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington feed-vehicles 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 202-586-5000 en Our Best Energy Videos of 2013 http://energy.gov/articles/our-best-energy-videos-2013 Our Best Energy Videos of 2013

16

RSS Feed - Energy Innovation Portal  

The Energy Innovation Portal offers RSS feeds covering updates to technology marketing summaries. RSS stands for "Really Simple Syndication."

17

Feed-in tariffs Kosovo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper is presented the possibility of using the renewable energy resources and promoting the renewable energy resources (RER) by feed-in tariff schema. 'Feed-in' tariff is a description of a policy, a "tariff" used to purchase RER generated energy ... Keywords: CO2, biomass, clean environmental, energy, european directive, feed-in tariffs, water, wind

Blerim Rexha; Bedri Dragusha; Ilir Limani

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

posted on the website. RSS Feed icon Subscribe to the Clean Cities News feed. Additional Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy RSS Feeds DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and...

19

RSS Feeds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feeds Feeds RSS Feeds The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) offers RSS feeds covering news and other updates from EERE and its programs. Learn about RSS. Subscribe to Corporate EERE News EERE News Releases Subscribe to receive news releases covering all topics. Subscribe to receive EERE news releases feed. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network News Subscribe to receive ENN stories covering all topics. Subscribe to receive EERE Network News feed. EERE Blog The EERE Blog includes updates on current EERE projects, interviews with energy experts, and other stories about EERE's technology offices, crosscutting initiatives, and national laboratories. Learn more. Subscribe to RSS feed. Energy Saver Blog A place for consumers to learn about and discuss ways to be energy

20

In The News Feed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0:56:00 -0600 Wed, 08 Jan 2014 0:56:00 -0600 Wed, 08 Jan 2014 11:33:34 -0600 Report offers Congress alternatives to corral Asian carp and other aquatic nuisance species http://www.anl.gov/articles/report-offers-congress-alternatives-corral-asian-carp-and-other-aquatic-nuisance-species Argonne's Environmental Science Division has been working with the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study to determine the risks that aquatic nuisance species, such as Asian carp, will move between the two basins through aquatic pathways. January 8, 2014 In The News Feed A wrong molecular turn leads down the path to type 2 diabetes http://www.anl.gov/articles/wrong-molecular-turn-leads-down-path-type-2-diabetes Computing resources at Argonne have helped researchers better grasp how

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Multiple feed powder splitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Multiple feed powder splitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ecofys Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys Feed Ecofys Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

25

Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Feed Microscopy using microscopic examination of animal feed samples and AAFCO terminology. Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Micr

26

TMS RSS feeds and terms of use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How to Access TMS RSS Feeds. Subscribe to TMS' RSS (Really Simple Syndication) news feeds to get the latest society and materials technology news...

27

Rotary powder feed through apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for increasing the uniformity of solids within a solids fabrication system, such as a direct light fabrication (DLF) system in which gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention provides a feed through interface wherein gas entrained powders input from stationary input lines are coupled to a rotating head of the fabrication system. The invention eliminates the need to provide additional slack in the feed lines to accommodate head rotation, and therefore reduces feed line bending movements which induce non-uniform feeding of gas entrained powder to a rotating head.

Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ENDA Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENDA Feed ENDA Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

29

About RSS Feeds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feeds » About RSS Feeds Feeds » About RSS Feeds About RSS Feeds RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, is a format that Web site owners use to publish regularly-updated content. RSS is a great way for you to get updates from your favorite Web sites without having to go to the sites first. Many people use RSS feeds to stay informed on a variety of topics. How do I use RSS feeds? The first step is to choose an RSS reader, which collects and displays feeds in an easy-to-read format. Most Web browsers and e-mail applications have this capability built in. You can also sign up for free online readers or download and install a reader for your desktop. The reader automatically checks for new items and will display each one with a title and short description. How can I subscribe to an RSS feed?

30

Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Subscribe to RSS Feeds on AddThis.com... News Blog Newsletter Information for Media Subscribe to RSS Feeds The Clean Cities RSS (real simple syndication) feeds track news from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other sources, making it convenient and easy to stay up to date with the Clean Cities program and alternative transportation technologies. Learn more about RSS.

31

Feed mechanism and method for feeding minute items  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A feeding mechanism and method for feeding minute items, such as capacitors, resistors, or solder preforms. The mechanism is adapted to receive a plurality of the randomly-positioned and randomly-oriented extremely small or minute items, and to isolate, orient, and position the items in a specific repeatable pickup location wherefrom they may be removed for use by, for example, a computer-controlled automated assembly machine. The mechanism comprises a sliding shelf adapted to receive and support the items; a wiper arm adapted to achieve a single even layer of the items; and a pushing arm adapted to push the items into the pickup location. The mechanism can be adapted for providing the items with a more exact orientation, and can also be adapted for use in a liquid environment.

Stringer, Timothy Kent; Yerganian, Simon Scott

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

About RSS Feeds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Us » News & Blog » RSS Feeds » About RSS Feeds Us » News & Blog » RSS Feeds » About RSS Feeds About RSS Feeds RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, is a format that Web site owners use to publish regularly-updated content. RSS is a great way for you to get updates from your favorite Web sites without having to go to the sites first. Many people use RSS feeds to stay informed on a variety of topics. How do I use RSS feeds? The first step is to choose an RSS reader, which collects and displays feeds in an easy-to-read format. Most Web browsers and e-mail applications have this capability built in. You can also sign up for free online readers or download and install a reader for your desktop. The reader automatically checks for new items and will display each one with a title and short description.

33

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to RSS Feeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Club Award April 23, 2013 Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Sponsors Honored at 2013 ENERGY STAR Awards March 27, 2013 More News Subscribe to RSS News Feed RSS Feed icon Webinars...

34

Switching Feeding Among Sound and Infected Prey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we investigate the switching feeding behavior of predators in the context of one single prey population

Ines S. Hotopp; Horst Malchow; Ezio Venturino

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fossil Energy RSS Feeds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy RSS Feeds Fossil Energy RSS Feeds Fossil Energy RSS Feeds RSS, sometimes known as Really Simple Syndication, is a popular means of sharing content (such as news headlines) without requiring readers to constantly visit a Web site to see what's new. RSS feeds contain headlines and hyperlinks to longer articles or Web pages. RSS feeds from the Office of Fossil Energy provide updates of specific interest to the fossil fuel community. Fossil Energy RSS feeds are free of charge. RSS content can be read using software called an RSS reader, feed reader, or an aggregator, which can be web-based or desktop-based. Click on RSS button below to subscribe to Fossil Energy latest news. All Fossil Energy News Clean Coal Technology News Carbon Capture and Storage News Oil & Natural Gas News

36

Feed-in Tariff | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feed-in Tariff Feed-in Tariff Feed-in Tariff < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Hawaii Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Rates for Tier 1 and Tier 2 vary by system size and technology Rates for Tier 3 vary by technology Provider Hawaii Public Utilities Commission In September 2009, the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued a decision that established a feed-in tariff in Hawaii. The feed-in tariff is offered by the three investor-owned utilities: HECO, MECO and HELCO. The rates for the feed-in tariff, schedule, and standard interconnection agreements were approved on October 13, 2010. This program will be reviewed by the PUC two years after the start of the program and every three years

37

Burco Farm and Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burco Farm and Feed Burco Farm and Feed Jump to: navigation, search Name Burco Farm and Feed Facility Burco Farm and Feed Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Burco Farm and Feed Energy Purchaser Burco Farm and Feed Location Independence IA Coordinates 42.5638438°, -91.88753486° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5638438,"lon":-91.88753486,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

39

Waste feed delivery planning at Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan (IWFDP) describes how waste feed will be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to safely and efficiently accomplish the River Protection Project (RPP) mission. The IWFDP, which is integrated with the Baseline Case operating scenario, is comprised of three volumes. Volume 1 - Process Strategy provides an overview of waste feed delivery (WFD) and describes how the WFD system will be used to prepare and deliver feed to the WTP based on the equipment configuration and functional capabilities of the WFD system. Volume 2 - Campaign Plan describes the plans for the first eight campaigns for delivery to the WTP, evaluates projected feed for systematic issues, projects 242-A Evaporator campaigns, and evaluates double-shell tank (DST) space and availability of contingency feed. Volume 3 - Project Plan identifies the scope and timing of the DST and infrastructure upgrade projects necessary to feed the WTP, and coordinates over 30 projectized projects and operational activities that comprise the needed WFD upgrades.

Certa, Paul J.; West, Elizha B.; Rodriguez, Juissepp S.; Hohl, Ted M.; Larsen, Douglas C.; Ritari, Jaakob S.; Kelly, James W.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Joint Implementation Network Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Feed Network Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Climate Technology Initiative Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initiative Feed Initiative Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

42

Netherlands Development Organisation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organisation Feed Organisation Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

43

RSS and Podcast News Feeds | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

appropriate URL in your feed reader OSTI News Feed OSTI News Feed http:www.osti.govhomesiteswww.osti.gov.homefilesimportednewsfeedsrss-osti.xml OSTI News Feed OSTI Blog...

44

Transient Melt Pool Response in Wire Feed Electron Beam Direct ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Transient Melt Pool Response in Wire Feed Electron Beam Direct ... Abstract Scope, Wire feed electron beam direct digital manufacturing...

45

NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families ... NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families...

46

Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed  

SciTech Connect

A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

Hooper, Frederick M (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nutritional and Feeding Management of Broodmares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutritional well-being is an important part of an effective broodmare operation. The importance of roughage and concentrate feeds in the diets of broodmares at various stages of gestation and during lactation is discussed.

Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.; Vogelsang, M. M.

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Feeding Young Horses For Sound Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horse owners must decide whether their young horses will be fed for moderate or rapid growth. One concern is the occurrence of bone and joint disorders in young horses that develop rapidly. Research has shown that this and other problems can be decreased by ensuring that young horses receive proper nutrition. Specific recommendations are included for creep feeding foals and for feeding weanlings and yearlings. Nutritional levels are discussed in relation to the amount of exercise young horses receive.

Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

RSS Feeds | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Events » RSS Feeds Events » RSS Feeds Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE Announcements Publications Contact BES Home News & Events RSS Feeds Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE EFRC Announcements Feed DOE EFRC Announcements Feed - Official DOE news and events about the EFRCs. EFRC News Feed EFRC News Feed - External news coverage of the EFRCs EFRC Events Feed EFRC Events Feed - High profile events organized by the EFRCs RSS, which stands for Really Simple Syndication, is an easy way to keep up with your favorite news and information. An RSS feed contains headlines, summaries and links to full news stories on www.energy.gov. If you click an RSS link, you will see XML (or eXtensible M arkup Language) code in your

50

Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1921, to August 31, 1922.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction; Summary of the Texas Feed Law; How to Comply with the Texas Feed Law; Standards and Definitions Adopted; Rulings Under the Law; Tentative Guarantees for Feed; Average Composition of Feeding Stuffs on Basis of Inspection; Shipments Withdrawn from Sale; Co-operation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture; Wheat By-Products; Results of Analyses; Table of Inspection Results;

Youngblood, B. (Bonney)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A neural network approach to the selection of feed mix in the feed industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to frequent changes of feed mix, the anticipation of pellet quality becomes a cumbersome task for a mill. This paper suggests that the artificial neural network can be used to predict the production rate and percentage of dust for a particular mill. ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Feed cost, Least cost formulation, Pelleting cost, Pelleting rate

Supachai Pathumnakul; Kullapapruk Piewthongngam; Arthit Apichottanakul

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

International Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

53

Feed Resource Recovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Resource Recovery Feed Resource Recovery Jump to: navigation, search Name Feed Resource Recovery Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Product Start-up planning to convert waste to fertilizer and biomethane gas. Coordinates 42.29776°, -71.289744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.29776,"lon":-71.289744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

ClimateWorks Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ClimateWorks Feed ClimateWorks Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

55

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Feed: Vehicles Blog Feed: Vehicles Blog Feed: Vehicles RSS January 16, 2014 Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells Watch our Google+ Hangout on Energy 101: Fuel Cells to learn everything you need to know about fuel cells. January 15, 2014 Wide Bandgap Semiconductors: Essential to Our Technology Future Learn how wide bandgap semiconductor-based power electronics could impact clean energy technology and our daily lives. January 6, 2014 The Clean Energy Economy in Three Charts Over the last five years, American inventors and investors have made significant progress in developing and deploying key clean energy technologies -- supported by Energy Department policies. January 3, 2014 Our Best Energy Videos of 2013 Check out our best videos from 2013 -- from Secretary Moniz's first day on

56

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy.gov » Blog Feed: Vehicles Energy.gov » Blog Feed: Vehicles Blog Feed: Vehicles RSS January 9, 2014 Join us on Thursday, January 16, at 2 p.m. ET for a Google+ Hangout on Energy 101: Fuel Cells. | Graphic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells Join us for a Google+ Hangout on Energy 101: Fuel Cells to learn everything you need to know about fuel cells. January 6, 2014 The Clean Energy Economy in Three Charts Over the last five years, American inventors and investors have made significant progress in developing and deploying key clean energy technologies -- supported by Energy Department policies. January 3, 2014 Our Best Energy Videos of 2013 Check out our best videos from 2013 -- from Secretary Moniz's first day on the job, to the rivalry between Edison and Tesla, to a visit to a

57

World Watch Institute Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Watch Institute Feed World Watch Institute Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

58

United Nations Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

59

World Resources Institute Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Resources Institute Feed World Resources Institute Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

60

Feed-In Tariff | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Feed-In Tariff Feed-In Tariff < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info Start Date 2/14/2008 State California Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Tariff is based on the "Renewable Market Adjusting Tariff" Provider California Public Utilities Commission '''''Note: The California general feed-in tariff was amended by [http://leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/sen/sb_0001-0050/sb_32_bill_2009091... SB 32] of 2009 and [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/bill/sen/sb_0001-0050/sbx1_2_bill_20... SBX1-2] of 2011. The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Feed: Vehicles Blog Feed: Vehicles Blog Feed: Vehicles RSS September 11, 2013 Dr. Michael Knotek, Deputy Undersecretary for Science and Energy at the Energy Department, delivers remarks at the NASCAR Green Summit in Chicago, where the DOE-NASCAR MOU was announced. | Photo courtesy of NASCAR. New DOE-NASCAR Partnership Revs Deployment of Pollution Reducing Technologies From the electricity that powers race-day broadcasts to the fuel in the cars themselves, a new DOE-NASCAR Memorandum of Understanding pinpoints transformative energy technologies that will benefit NASCAR and its fans. September 4, 2013 Dr. Ping Liu of ARPA-E discusses the RANGE program and its innovative approach to energy storage for electric vehicles. | Photo courtesy of ARPA-E. ARPA-E Program Takes an Innovative Approach to Electric Vehicle Batteries

62

FORCE-FEEDING BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect

We propose that the growth of supermassive black holes is associated mainly with brief episodes of highly super-Eddington infall of gas ({sup h}yperaccretion{sup )}. This gas is not swallowed in real time, but forms an envelope of matter around the black hole that can be swallowed gradually, over a much longer timescale. However, only a small fraction of the black hole mass can be stored in the envelope at any one time. We argue that any infalling matter above a few percent of the hole's mass is ejected as a result of the plunge in opacity at temperatures below a few thousand degrees kelvin, corresponding to the Hayashi track. The speed of ejection of this matter, compared to the velocity dispersion {sigma} of the host galaxy's core, determines whether the ejected matter is lost forever or returns eventually to rejoin the envelope, from which it can be ultimately accreted. The threshold between matter recycling and permanent loss defines a relationship between the maximum black hole mass and {sigma} that resembles the empirical M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation.

Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [Also at Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA. (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

The relationship between residual feed intake and feeding behavior in growing heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine if feeding behavior traits are correlated with performance and feed efficiency traits in growing heifers. Individual dry matter intake (DMI) was measured in Brangus heifers (n = 115) fed a roughage-based diet (ME = 2.1 Mcal/kg) for 70 d using Calan gate feeders (6 heifers/pen). Residual feed intake (RFI) was computed as the residuals from linear regression of DMI on mid-test BW0.75 and average daily gain (ADG). Heifers with the highest (n = 18) and lowest (n = 18) RFI were identified for feeding behavior measurements. During days 28 through 56 of the 70-d feeding trial, continuous video recordings were obtained for all heifers. Video images of two sets of four 24-h periods, two weeks apart, were analyzed for the focal animals. All occurrences of feeding were timed and counted per day, and the eight 24-h periods averaged to derive the overall feeding event (FE) and meal duration and frequency for each focal heifer. Total feeding event duration was defined as the total min per day the animals head was down in the feed bunk. A meal included all visits an animal made to the feed bunk that were separated by less than 5 min. The mean RFI values for the low and high RFI heifers were (mean SE) - 1.03 and 1.00 0.03 kg/d, respectively. Low RFI heifers consumed 21.9% less (P < 0.0001) DMI, but had similar BW and ADG compared to high RFI heifers. Heifers with low RFI spent more time (P < 0.0001) eating (152 vs 124 4.26 min/d) at a lower eating rate (62.8 vs 99.6 3.28 g/min), but had similar FE frequencies compared to high RFI heifers. Feeding event duration was negatively correlated with RFI while FE frequency and FE eating rate were positively correlated with RFI. However, meal duration and frequency were not correlated with RFI. Therefore, measuring FE characteristics could prove more useful than analyzing meals when trying to predict RFI. Additionally, eating rate appeared to be more closely related to RFI than any of the other feeding behavior traits measured.

Bingham, Glenda Marie

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NON-BLOCKING STABILIZED FEED BACK AMPLIFIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plural stuge nonblocking degenerative feed-back amplifier was designed particularly suitable for counting circuits because of the stability and linearity in operation, characterized by the fact that the inltial stage employs a cathode coupled input circuit fed from a cathode follower and the final stage has a tline constant greater than those of the other stages.

Fairstein, E.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Staying aware of relevant feeds in context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To stay aware of relevant information and avoid productivity loss, a developer has to continuously read through new incoming information. Our approach supports the integration of dynamic and static information in a development environment that allows ... Keywords: feeds, human-centric software engineering

Thomas Fritz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Catalytic Cracking Recycle Feed Downstream Charge Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

68

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I:  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I: J2esearch Program Design Volume 2 EPRI EPRI CS-2323 Volume 2 Project 1884-6 Final Report March 1982 Keywords: Feed Pumps Feed Pump Reliability Feed Pump Hydraulics Feed Pump Design Feed Pump Research Feed Pump Specifications Prepared by Borg-Warner Corporation (Byron Jackson Pump Division and Borg-Warner Research Center) Carson, California and Massa^ f Technology Cambri__ . s ,-T. a a *a_^"nt.- ji^, w « ' jm.m ^j.^M\MMMim^mjii'mmmjmiiiimm\i- " I E CT R I C P 0 W E R R E S E A R C H I N ST ITO T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

69

High pressure electrical insulated feed thru connector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A feed-thru type hermetic electrical connector including at least one connector pin feeding through an insulator block within the metallic body of the connector shell. A compression stop arrangement coaxially disposed about the insulator body is brazed to the shell, and the shoulder on the insulator block bears against this top in a compression mode, the high pressure or internal connector being at the opposite end of the shell. Seals between the pin and an internal bore at the high pressure end of the insulator block and between the insulator block and the metallic shell at the high pressure end are hermetically brazed in place, the first of these also functioning to transfer the axial compressive load without permitting appreciable shear action between the pin and insulator block.

Oeschger, Joseph E. (Palo Alto, CA); Berkeland, James E. (San Jose, CA)

1979-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Pumped oil feed systems for rotary vacuum pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pumped oil feed systems developed by the authors and their colleagues provide positive lubrication under all inlet pressure conditions

H. Wycliffe; B. D. Power

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter

72

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. Fletcher Honemond Fletcher Honemond

73

Global Feed-in Tariffs Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Feed-in Tariffs Project Global Feed-in Tariffs Project Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Feed-in Tariffs Project Agency/Company /Organization: World Future Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Workshop, Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.worldfuturecouncil.org/arguing_fits.html References: WFC's Global Feed-in Tariffs Project [1] The WFC's Global Feed-in Tariffs Project website includes links to publications, a guide for policy makers, a FIT design website and upcoming workshops and events. References ↑ "WFC's Global Feed-in Tariffs Project" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Feed-in_Tariffs_Project&oldid=383252

74

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. Fletcher Honemond Fletcher Honemond

75

RSS and Podcast News Feeds | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

RSS and Podcast News Feeds RSS and Podcast News Feeds Use OSTI's RSS/Podcast feeds to Get OSTI news, announcements, and product or service updates delivered directly to your desktop or MP3 player. Subscribe to OSTI RSS News and Podcast Feeds: Copy and paste the appropriate URL in your feed reader OSTI News Feed OSTI News Feed http://www.osti.gov/home/sites/www.osti.gov.home/files/imported/newsfeeds/rss-osti.xml OSTI News Feed OSTI Blog News Feed http://www.osti.gov/ostiblog/home/feed/entries/rss DOePatents News Feed DOepatents News Feeds http://www.osti.gov/includes/doepatents/patents.xml DOE R&D Accomplishments News Feed DOE R&D Accomplishments News Feeds http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/newsfeeds/rss.xml OSTI's Podcast News Feed OSTI's Podcast News Feeds http://www.osti.govhome/sites/www.osti.gov.home/files/imported/newsfeeds/podcasts/ostipodcast.xml

76

Waste heat boiler with feed mixing nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat boiler of the type which is particularly suited for use in marine applications and which incorporates a feed mixing nozzle that is operative for purposes of effecting, by utilizing steam taken from the steam generating bank, a preheating of the feedwater that is fed to the steam drum. In addition to the aforesaid feed mixing nozzle, the subject waste heat boiler includes a feedwater control valve, a steam drum, a circulation pump, a steam generating bank and a centrifugal water separator. The feedwater control valve is employed to modulate the flow rate of the incoming feedwater in order to maintain the desired level of water in the steam drum. In turn the latter steam drum is intended to function in the manner of a reservoir for the circulating water that through the operation of the circulating pump is supplied to the steam generating bank. The circulating water which is supplied to the steam generating bank is heated therein to saturation temperature, and steam is generated thus. A water-steam mixture is returned from the steam generating bank to the steam drum and is directed into the centrifugal water separator that is suitably located within the steam drum. It is in the centrifugal water separator that the separation of the water-steam mixture is effected such that water is returned to the lower portion of the steam drum and the steam is supplied to the upper portion of the steam drum. The preheating of the feedwater is accomplished by directing the incoming feedwater through an internal feed pipe to the mixing nozzle, the latter being positioned in the line through which the water-steam mixture is returned to the steam drum.

Mastronarde, Th.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel cell with electrolyte feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell having a pair of electrodes at the sites of electrochemical reactions of hydrogen and oxygen and a phosphoric acid electrolyte provided with an electrolyte supporting structure in the form of a laminated matrix assembly disposed between the electrodes. The matrix assembly is formed of a central layer disposed between two outer layers, each being permeable to the flow of the electrolyte. The central layer is provided with relatively large pores while the outer layers are provided with relatively small pores. An external reservoir supplies electrolyte via a feed means to the central layer to compensate for changes in electrolyte volume in the matrix assembly during the operation of fuel cell.

Feigenbaum, Haim (Highland Park, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Continuous multi-phase feeding of broiler chickens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous multi-phase feeding of broiler chickens was evaluated to optimize broiler nutrition and minimize environmental impact related to excess nitrogen in poultry manure. Four experiments were conducted. Experiments 1 and 2 studied effects of continuous multi-phase feeding during a 3-week starting period using battery brooders while experiments 3 and 4 evaluated multi-phase feeding during a traditional 7-week growing period using both battery brooders and floor pens. In the first and second experiments, the nutrient content of the multi-phase diets was changed every 24 hours in comparison to single-phase feeding. Results indicated that during the starter period, continuous multi-phase feeding had no significant influence on feed consumption, daily gain, feed to gain ratio or fecal nitrogen. In the third and fourth experiments, a four phase industry type broiler feeding program was compared to intensive multi-phase feeding programs created by linearly blending three different diets based on typical industry nutrient values and a commercial nutrient modeling computer program (EFG Natal). In both intensive multi-phase feeding programs, the diets were changed every three days over a 7-week growth period. Broilers in experiment 3 were raised in Petersime battery brooders to primarily access nitrogen balance while birds in experiment 4 were raised in a floor pen on pine shaving litter to resemble commercial broiler production. The results indicated that intensive multi-phase feeding improved body weight gain and feed to gain ratio only in weeks 5 and 6 but not during the overall 7-week period. Nitrogen excretion and nitrogen retention were unaffected by the intensive multi-phase feeding systems. Economic analysis indicated that intensive multi-phase feeding programs could potentially lower feed costs per kilogram of gain. However, the high cost of implementing a continuous multi-phase feeding system may not justify the relatively small gain in lower feed cost per kilogram of gain. In conclusion, continuous multi-phase feeding of broiler chickens using corn-soy diets does not appear to be justified by either increased performance or reduced nitrogen excretion.

Nasril

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

B Plant ion exchange feed line leak  

SciTech Connect

>One of the objectives of the Waste Management Program is to separate the long-lived heat emitter /aup 137/Cs from the bulk of the high-level Iiquid wastes. This separation is accomplished by the ion exchange process in the 221-B Building. Interim storage of the cesium is in solution as a nitrate. The feed for the B Plant cesinm ion exchange process is pumped from the lag storage tank, 105-C, through a pipeline and several diversion boxes to the 221-B Building. On December 19, 1969, a leak was discovered near the 241-C-152 diversion box in the section of this line, V-122, from the 105-C tank. Although the leak represented a loss of feed for the processing of /sup 137/Cs, more important was the consequence of environmental contmination to the soil from the line leak. For this reason, an investigation was made to estblish the extent of the radioactivity spread. The results of a well drilling operation undertaken to define the boundary and to estimate the extent of the leak are summarized. (CR)

Tanaka, K.H.

1971-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

RSS Feeds | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSS Feeds RSS Feeds RSS Feeds Open Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Open DOE National Laboratory Announcements Discovery & Innovation News EFRC News & Events Jobs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Open Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) ASCR Open Funding Opportunities BES Open Funding Opportunities BER Open Funding Opportunities FES Open Funding Opportunities HEP Open Funding Opportunities NP Open Funding Opportunities Open DOE National Laboratory Announcements Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights Laboratory Science Highlights User Facility Science Highlights

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Feeding and growth of polar cod in fjords of Svalbard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polar cod (Boreogadus saida) were collected in two different fjords around Svalbard in 2006 to address their feeding ecology and growth. Kongsfjorden was sampled in (more)

Johannessen, Leif Sindre

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA Production Office tops ... NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal Posted: September 16, 2013 - 9:45am Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Employees of the National...

83

Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ... CFDBased Modelling on Interfacial Heat Transfer for Water Quenching.

84

Impact of ethanol expansion on the cattle feeding industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The U.S. has a history of producing surplus corn, but the current and projected growth in ethanol production combined with strong feed and export demand (more)

Daley, Erin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

static.nvd.nist.gov - /feeds/xml/cpe/dictionary/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

static.nvd.nist.gov - /feeds/xml/cpe/dictionary/. [To Parent Directory] 3/1/2013 1:27 AM 17303838 official-cpe-dictionary_v2 ...

86

RSS Feeds for Specific Tropical Cyclones of the North Atlantic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSS Feeds for Specific Tropical Cyclones of the North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico (English) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS...

87

Hazard Evaluation for Waste Feed Delivery Operations and Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the results of the hazard analysis that has been performed to address Waste Feed Delivery operations and activities.

RYAN, G.W.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

EFFECT OF FEEDING A BLEND OF NATURALLY-CONTAMINATED CORN ON NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY AND FEED PREFERENCE IN WEANLING PIGS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of feeding diets with a 2009 and 2010 naturally-contaminated corn to weaning pigs. For both experiments three (more)

Escobar, Carlos Santiago

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A FEED SCREW POWDER SEAL FOR THE REACTOR TOWER  

SciTech Connect

The two-way sealing of a feed screw for a fine powder corveyer is accomplished with a split gland. One end is externally threaded to receive the gland nut and the other end is flanged for bolting to a feed-screw housing. The correct installation of the gland is discussed. (C.J.G.)

Collier, M.

1959-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Apparatus and method for feeding coal into a coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a system for feeding coal into a gasifier operating at high pressures. A coal-water slurry is pumped to the desired pressure and then the coal is "dried" prior to feeding the coal into the gasifier by contacting the slurry with superheated steam in an entrained bed dryer for vaporizing the water in the slurry.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Friggens, Gary R. (Morgantown, WV); McGee, James P. (Morgantown, WV)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Feds Feed Families campaign underway | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Feds Feed Families campaign underway | National Nuclear Security Feds Feed Families campaign underway | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Feds Feed Families campaign underway Feds Feed Families campaign underway Posted By Office of Public Affairs An event featuring live music, a dunk tank and a barbeque was held yesterday as part of the 2012 Feds Feed Families campaign. The DOE-wide

92

Bangladesh-Feed the Future | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Feed the Future Bangladesh-Feed the Future Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Feed the Future Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/ Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References Bangladesh-Feed the Future (FY10)[1] Overview "The Feed the Future (FTF) FY 2010 implementation plans are working documents outlining U.S. government planning for the first year of the Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative. These plans represent a transition towards the development of multiyear strategies and are targeted at investments that lay the foundation for a new country-level and

93

Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

UNEP-Risoe Centre Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre Feed Centre Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

95

German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperation (GIZ) Feed Cooperation (GIZ) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

96

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

97

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

The DOE Feeds Families Festival | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The DOE Feeds Families Festival The DOE Feeds Families Festival The DOE Feeds Families Festival July 27, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Today, Department of Energy employees took a moment to give back to the Washington, D.C. community by holding our first "DOE Feeds Families Festival" outside of the Forrestal Building. Highlights from the event included a dunk tank for some of DOE's top officials (featuring NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, DOE Chief Human Capital Officer Michael Kane, and Senior Advisor Matt Rogers), and OPM Director, John Berry, to name a few. Additionally, Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman and his band "Yellowcake" graced the stage for a rock concert, featuring covers of popular classic rock songs.

99

EA-1790: Construction and Operation of a Heterogeneous Feed Biorefinery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1790: Construction and Operation of a Heterogeneous Feed EA-1790: Construction and Operation of a Heterogeneous Feed Biorefinery Enerkem Corporation Pontotoc, MS EA-1790: Construction and Operation of a Heterogeneous Feed Biorefinery Enerkem Corporation Pontotoc, MS SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) is proposing to provide cost share funding to Enerkem, Inc (Enerkem) for the final design, construction, and operation of a proposed Heterogeneous Feed Biorefinery Project to be located in Pontotoc, Mississippi (hereafter referred to as the biorefinery or the proposed project). The biorefinery would use the dried and post-sorted biomass fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW) and wood biomass as feedstock. Enerkem's biorefinery would produce approximately 10 million gallons (38 million liters) of ethanol per year

100

Feed-in Tariff Program (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feed-in Tariff Program (Ontario, Canada) Feed-in Tariff Program (Ontario, Canada) Feed-in Tariff Program (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Installer/Contractor Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Ontario Program Type Performance-Based Incentive The Feed-in Tariff (FIT) Program is a guaranteed funding structure that combines stable, competitive prices and long-term contracts for energy generated using renewable resources. Homeowners, business owners and private developers may apply to the FIT Program if they use one or more forms of renewable energy, including wind, waterpower, biomass and biogas,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers Massachusetts Institute of Technology Project Number: FE0012500 Project Description This project will develop and assess a slurry feeding system based on a suspension of coal in liquid CO2 that can be pumped into a high-pressure gasifier. The advantages of this solution are that CO2 has a low heat capacity, a low heat of vaporization and low viscosity. Thus, the liquid CO2 imposes a much smaller thermal load on the gasifier relative to a water slurry, and has the potential to improve the efficiency and economics of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with carbon capture and dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal fired power plants. Project Details

102

Community Feed-in Tariff (Nova Scotia, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Community Feed-In Tariff Program (COMFIT) is designed to increase local ownership of small-scale energy projects in Nova Scotia. The program provides an opportunity for community-based power...

103

Time phased alternate blending of feed coals for liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method for reducing process performance excursions during feed coal or process solvent changeover in a coal hydroliquefaction process by blending of feedstocks or solvents over time. ,

Schweigharett, Frank (Allentown, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Garg, Diwaker (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Production and Handling Slide 27: Feed Cylinder with Normal Assay...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Normal Assay (0.711%U) Arriving at Plant Refer to caption below for image description The enrichment process begins with "feed material," natural uranium that contains 0.711%...

105

NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families ... NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal Posted By Office of Public Affairs Employees of the NNSA Production Office (NPO) have donated 17,348 pounds of

106

NNSA Administrator Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign NNSA Administrator Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign June 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Administrator Thomas P. D'Agostino today helped the Department of Energy (DOE) kick off its third annual "Feds Feed Families" campaign to assist local food banks in replenishing supplies during the summer months. DOE and NNSA, in partnership with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and other Federal agencies are participating in the nationwide effort to raise 2 million pounds of non-perishable food items for food banks across the country. Administrator D'Agostino and DOE's Chief Human Capital Officer Mike Kane once again serve as DOE campaign co-chairs.

107

Pig feed prices in the E.E.C. H. MAROUBY, J.VANDERHAEGEN D. DARIDAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pig feed prices in the E.E.C. H. MAROUBY, J.VANDERHAEGEN D. DARIDAN LT.P., 34, boulevard de la Gare, 31500 Toulouse France The behaviour of pig feed prices determines to a great extent the profitability of the branch and in the overall trends of pig feed prices. Since 1975, the penetration rate of pig feed tends

Recanati, Catherine

108

Texas Bentonites as Amendments of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Poultry Feed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aflatoxins are toxic organic compounds produced by fungi in grains. Moderately contaminated grains that cannot be used as food are often directed to animal feed. Economically-feasible detoxification measures for contaminated feeds are needed. The objectives of this research were to identify effective bentonites as aflatoxin adsorbents and to evaluate the performance of the clays as aflatoxin amendments in feed for broiler chickens. Five bentonite samples from Gonzales, Texas, USA were collected and analyzed against the published selection criteria for aflatoxin adsorbents: aflatoxin adsorption capacity, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic carbon, particle size distribution, and mineralogical and structural compositions. Two bentonites were identified as potentially good aflatoxin adsorbents based on the analyses. These two bentonites were selected for an in vivo poultry experiment where chickens were fed with aflatoxin-contaminated corn (1400 ppb) to test the detoxification efficacy of the clays. Detailed mineralogy analyses were conducted on these two samples (4TX and 1TX) after size fractionation. Clay 4TX and 1TX contained 87 percent and 65 percent clay, respectively. Smectite was the dominant mineral phase in both clay fractions. Quartz and feldspars were also present in both samples. These minerals are unlikely to cause harmful effects on the chickens. The presence of pyrite and heavy metals in 1TX raised concerns about its use in animal feed. The clays were introduced into feed by mixing the dry bentonite powder with the feed for twelve minutes in a mechanical mixer. The body weight was increased by 21 percent with clay 4TX and 14 percent with clay 1TX in the aflatoxin diet. The concentration of total aflatoxins in liver was reduced by 36 percent with the addition of clays. Liver visual appearance was also improved from pale red to a more reddish color resembling the healthy red liver. All chickens fed clean feed had significantly higher body weights than those fed with highly contaminated feed, suggesting that the clays did not completely eliminate aflatoxin toxicity. The published aflatoxin binder selection criteria were useful for screening bentonites as aflatoxin amendments. The selected bentonites based on the criteria could effectively sequester aflatoxins in vivo. Yet direct mixing of bentonite as dry powder to highly contaminated poultry feed could not eliminate the toxicity of aflatoxins.

Barrientos Velazquez, Ana Luisa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High Level Waste Feed Certification in Hanford Double Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOEs River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (1 million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing of HLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch to batch operational adjustments that reduces operating efficiency and has the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

Thien, Micheal G.; Wells, Beric E.; Adamson, Duane J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 9, 2010 December 9, 2010 Country-Fried Biofuels Instead of tossing your grease and used cooking oil, let a clean cities coordinator in your area help recycle it into biodiesel. December 7, 2010 Country-Fried Biofuels Some Clean Cities coalitions, supported by the Vehicle Technologies Program in EERE, have worked with their local governments to make holiday drippings into clean fuel. December 3, 2010 Innovations: Making Biofuels More Efficient A new project is using thermophilic extremophiles -- microorganisms that grow optimally in temperatures above 160 deg F -- to produce a new highly efficient fuel. Learn more. December 2, 2010 Civil War Icon Becomes National Clean Energy Model Nearly a century and a half after the first shots of the Civil War, Fort Sumter National Monument is poised to become a national model for clean

111

United Nations Environment Programme Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Nations Environment Programme Feed United Nations Environment Programme Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

112

Institute of Development Studies Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute of Development Studies Feed Institute of Development Studies Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

113

Green Power Network - Green Power News RSS Feed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power News RSS Feed Green Power News RSS Feed Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Green Power News RSS Feed RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, is an easy way for Web site owners to post green power news onto their site, using such scripting languages as JavaScript, Perl, and PHP. Newshounds can also use an RSS reader to track green power news automatically. How do I use RSS?

114

International Institute for Sustainable Development Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

115

Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

116

Information for Development Program (infoDev) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Development Program (infoDev) Feed for Development Program (infoDev) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

117

Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State California Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Varies by technology and position in program capacity queue [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/01-02/bill/asm/ab_0101-0150/ab_117_bill_20... Assembly Bill 117], passed in 2002, allows communities in California to aggregate their load and to procure electricity from their own preferred sources. Under the authority of this law, California's first community

118

Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

119

Kumasi Institute of Technology and Environment Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

120

German Aerospace Center (DLR)Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar Feed-In Tariff | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar Feed-In Tariff Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar Feed-In Tariff Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar Feed-In Tariff < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 03/01/2009 State Florida Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount 2013 Contracts: Rooftop- or pavement-mounted systems Ground-mounted systems Rooftop- or pavement-mounted systems >10kW to 300kW: $0.18/kWh Ground-mounted systems >10kW to 25kW: $0.18/kWh Ground-mounted systems >25kW to 1,000kW: $0.15/kWh Provider Gainesville Regional Utilities NOTE: This program will re-open to new applicants from January 4, 2013

122

RSS Feeds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RSS Feeds RSS Feeds Subscribe to EIA's RSS Feeds Subscribe RSS Today in Energy Short, timely articles with graphics on energy facts, issues, and trends. RSS What's New Notification of new EIA products as they are released. RSS EIA Radio Provides free short broadcast stories on EIA energy data reports and analysis to radio stations nationwide. RSS Press Releases Receive EIA press releases RSS Energy in Brief Articles that explain important energy topics in plain language. Each Brief answers a question relevant to the public and recommends resources for further reading. RSS Gasoline & Diesel Fuel Update Retail gasoline and on-highway diesel fuel prices are usually updated each Monday by 5:00 pm EST. RSS This Week in Petroleum Weekly prices and an analytical summary of the petroleum industry.

123

Organization of American States (OAS) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organization of American States (OAS) Feed Organization of American States (OAS) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

124

An Update on Feds Feeds Families | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Update on Feds Feeds Families An Update on Feds Feeds Families An Update on Feds Feeds Families November 19, 2012 - 5:32pm Addthis As a result of DOE employee efforts, the Energy Department received an award from OPM for donating the highest amount of non-perishable food items within the “small agency” category of Federal agencies participating in this year’s Campaign. | Photo courtesy of OPM. As a result of DOE employee efforts, the Energy Department received an award from OPM for donating the highest amount of non-perishable food items within the "small agency" category of Federal agencies participating in this year's Campaign. | Photo courtesy of OPM. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me?

125

Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

126

United Nations Industrial Development Organization Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

127

Latin America Energy Organization Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latin America Energy Organization Feed Latin America Energy Organization Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

128

Coalition for Rainforest Nations Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

129

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

130

Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

131

Savannah River National Laboratory Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Savannah River National Laboratory Feed Savannah River National Laboratory Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

132

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

133

The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

134

Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

135

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

136

Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials.

Chapman, Christopher C. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus is described, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials. 3 figs.

Chapman, C.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

138

Statistical Methods and Tools for Hanford Staged Feed Tank Sampling  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to technically evaluate the current approach to staged feed sampling of high-level waste (HLW) sludge to meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for transfer from tank farms to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The current sampling and analysis approach is detailed in the document titled Initial Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria, 24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014, Revision 0 (Arakali et al. 2011). The goal of this current work is to evaluate and provide recommendations to support a defensible, technical and statistical basis for the staged feed sampling approach that meets WAC data quality objectives (DQOs).

Fountain, Matthew S.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

140

Feed Variability and Bulk Vitrification Glass Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The supplemental treatment (ST) bulk vitrification process will obtain its feed, consisting of low-activity waste (LAW), from more than one source. One purpose of this letter report is to describe the compositional variability of the feed to ST. The other is to support the M-62-08 decision by providing a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of bulk vitrification (BV), the process that has been selected to perform supplemental treatment, in handling the ST feed envelope. Roughly nine-tenths of the ST LAW feed will come from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment. This processed waste is expected to combine (1) a portion of the same LAW feed sent to the WTP melters and (2) a dilute stream that is the product of the condensate from the submerged-bed scrubber (SBS) and the drainage from the electrostatic precipitator (WESP), both of which are part of the LAW off-gas system. The manner in which the off-gas-product stream is concentrated to reduce its volume, and the way in which the excess LAW and off-gas product streams are combined, are part of the interface between WTP and ST and have not been determined. This letter report considers only one possible arrangement, in which half of the total LAW is added to the off-gas product stream, giving an estimated ST feed stream from WTP. (Total LAW equals that portion of LAW sent to the WTP LAW vitrification plant (WTP LAW) plus the LAW not currently treatable in the LAW vitrification plant due to capacity limitations (excess)).

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Vienna, John D.

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Report Audit Report Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site OAS-L-12-09 August 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's largest cleanup task involves the treatment, immobilization and disposal of 56 million gallons of hazardous and highly radioactive waste at the Hanford Site, located in Southeastern Washington State. As part of this effort, the Department is constructing

142

Fuzzy logic control of batch-feeding refuse incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The municipal solid waste (MSW) or refuse incineration plant is designated to reduce the volume of the refuse and recover energy from it. The steam generated from a boiler heated by burning refuse is sent to a turbine to generate the electricity. Batch-feeding ... Keywords: Singapore, Ulu Pandan refuse incineration plant, batch-feeding refuse incineration, boiler, boilers, combustion, complete combustion, electricity generation, energy recovery, flow control, fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, grate rotating rates, incomplete combustion, municipal solid waste plant, rule-base fuzzy logic control algorithms, steam flow rate, steam power stations, uncertain fluctuation, waste disposal, waste-to-energy power plants

Desong Chen

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, C.M.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coal-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustion chamber  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a fuel-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustor. In accordance with the present invention a perforated conveyor belt is utilized in place of the fixed grid normally disposed at the lower end of the fluidized bed combustion zone. The conveyor belt is fed with fuel, e.g. coal, at one end thereof so that the air passing through the perforations dislodges the coal from the belt and feeds the coal into the fluidized zone in a substantially uniform manner.

Gall, Robert L. (Morgantown, WV)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Liquid over-feeding air conditioning system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A refrigeration air conditioning system utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation is described. A liquid refrigerant accumulator-heat exchanger is placed in the system to provide a heat exchange relationship between hot liquid refrigerant discharged from condenser and a relatively cool mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant discharged from the evaporator. This heat exchange relationship substantially sub-cools the hot liquid refrigerant which undergoes little or no evaporation across the expansion device and provides a liquid over-feeding operation through the evaporator for effectively using 100 percent of evaporator for cooling purposes and for providing the aforementioned mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant. 1 figure.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Liquid over-feeding air conditioning system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A refrigeration air conditioning system utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation is described. A liquid refrigerant accumulator-heat exchanger is placed in the system to provide a heat exchange relationship between hot liquid refrigerant discharged from condenser and a relatively cool mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant discharged from the evaporator. This heat exchange relationship substantially sub-cools the hot liquid refrigerant which undergoes little or no evaporation across the expansion device and provides a liquid over-feeding operation through the evaporator for effectively using 100 percent of evaporator for cooling purposes and for providing the aforementioned mixture of liquid and vaporous refrigerant.

Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Program on Technology Innovation: Liquid CO2 Coal Slurry for Feeding Coal to Gasifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid CO2 (CO2(l)) has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal-gasification-based power plants. Liquid CO2 has a heat of vaporization that is less than one-quarter of that of water, and it has lower viscosity. Since future coal-based power plants may have to control CO2 emissions by use of a CO2 capture and storage system, it may make economic sense to recycle some of the captured CO2 back to the coal feeding system where it could be used as the...

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Feed Pump Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Turbines and Auxiliaries Program 65 and the Nuclear Maintenance Application Center have developed a series of maintenance guides to assist plant personnel with the performance of various maintenance tasks associated with a wide variety of plant components. The objective of this project was to publish a maintenance guide for the feed pump turbines that included an ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

Waste Feed Delivery Environmental Permits and Approvals Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes the environmental permits approvals, and other requirements that may affect establishment of a waste feed delivery system for the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This plan identifies and screens environmental standards for potential applicability, outlines alternatives for satisfying applicable standards, and describes preferred permitting and approval approaches.

TOLLEFSON, K.S.

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Extruders & Expanders in Pet Food, Aquatic & Livestock Feeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book serves as a source of information to anyone involved with the feed industry as a guide for understanding extrusion, the proper selection of the raw ingredients, the operation of extrusion equipment, and the processes involved in running an extend

151

Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad...

152

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Or

153

FEED SYSTEMS WWW.NETL.DOE.GOV Gasification Systems Program Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEED SYSTEMS WWW.NETL.DOE.GOV Gasification Systems Program Research and Development Areas are in Color. Feed Systems R&D Areas are Brighter. Grey sections are part of other closely...

154

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of

155

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of

156

International Atomic Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Atomic Energy Agency Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

157

Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria By Jared Sagoff * October 8, 2010 Tweet EmailPrint When cleaning the bathroom, we usually consider bacteria the enemy. However, a new study conducted by environmental scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has demonstrated a way to enlist bacteria in the fight to cleanse some of the country's most intractably polluted locations. Last year, a team of Argonne scientists led by Lorraine LaFreniere injected iron microparticles underneath fields long-polluted with carbon tetrachloride near Centralia, Kansas. The researchers coated the microparticles with organic material, which served as bait for bacteria that created the conditions necessary to safely convert the toxic chemical

158

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

159

A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toby D. Couture Toby D. Couture E3 Analytics Karlynn Cory Claire Kreycik National Renewable Energy Laboratory Emily Williams U.S. Department of State Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-44849 July 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design On the Cover Feed-in tari ff (FIT) policies can apply to several renewable energy technologies and their applications including (top to bottom) solar photovoltaics (PV) on commercial buildings (Art Institute of Chicago - Chicago, Illinois); on-site wind energy (Great Lakes Science Center - Cleveland, Ohio); rooftop PV on residences (Glastonbury, Connecticut); solar power tower

160

International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

RETHINKING FEED-IN TARIFFS AND PRIORITY DISPATCH FOR RENEWABLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the German System of feed-in tariffs for renewable electricity supply (RES) producers of renewable electricity also have the privilege of priority dispatch. Depending on the design of the tariff this is either a physical priority dispatch (guaranteed grid access) or a financial priority (bonus payments). In either case suppliers of renewable energy sources are inclined to deliver energy even when the cost of production exceeds the market price, i.e. the electricitys value. We suggest to remove the priority dispatch and to modify the design of feed-in tariffs in such a way that RES suppliers receive a payment for their potential supply in cases where the price of electricity drops below their marginal costs. Thereby, renewable electricity producers will suffer no drawbacks but social welfare increases.

Mark Andor; Kai Flinkerbusch; Matthias Janssen; Bjrn Liebau; Magnus Wobben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

FAT QUALITY AND FEEDING VALUE OF FAT FOR FEEDLOT CATTLE Imperial Valley Agricultural Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contaminated tallow (Metcalf, 1972). It would be expensive to analyze every shipment of feed fat for pesticide

Delany, Mary E.

164

Development of High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Dry Feed Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Background Even though coal-based power generation via Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is more efficient, cleaner, and uses less water than conventional pulverized coal burning systems, widespread IGCC deployment has not occurred because of its relatively high cost. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) high-pressure dry feed pump addresses IGCC cost disparity by enabling lower cost and more reliable coal feed

165

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3-ton military air conditioning unit has been experimentally studied for baseline and liquid over-feeding operation (LOF). The test results indicate that LOF outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At 95 F test point, the COP improvement for LOF is 19.8% over that of the baseline case. However, optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bolton, C. [Army CECOM Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Statistical modeling of root geometrical dimensions of gas turbine blade in creep feed grinding process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creep feed grinding is widely used in manufacturing suppe-ralloy materials. The main objectives of this research deal with the influences of major process parameters and their interactions of creep feed grinding process such as wheel speed, workpiece ... Keywords: analysis of variance, creep feed grinding, interactive effect, regression, root geometrical dimensions

A. R. Fazeli Nahrekhalaji

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Preliminary Report on the Feeding Habits of Tunas in the Gulf of Guinea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

551 Preliminary Report on the Feeding Habits of Tunas in the Gulf of Guinea by Paul N. Sund on the Feeding Habits of Tunas in the Gulf of Guinea By PAUL N. SUND and WILLIAM J. RICHARDS United States Fish;#12;Preliminary Report on the Feeding Habits of Tunas in the Gulf of Guinea^ By PAUL N. SUND, Oceanographer

168

Best Practices and Design Options for Feed-in Tariffs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Best Practices and Design Options for Feed-in Tariffs Best Practices and Design Options for Feed-in Tariffs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Best Practices and Design Options for Feed-in Tariffs Agency/Company /Organization: International Feed-in Cooperation Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices References: Evaluation of different feed-in tariff design options - Best practice paper for the International Feed-In Cooperation[1] Introduction.....1 2 Overview.....2 2.1 Definition of renewable energy sources.....2 2.2 Present status and historic development of RES-E in the EU.....2 2.3 Motivation to support RES-E and Member State targets.....5 2.4 Instruments to support RES-E....7 2.5 The International Feed-In Cooperation....8

169

Design and performance of feed delivery systems for simulated radioactive waste slurries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes for vitrifying simulated high-level radioactive waste have been developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) over the last several years. Paralleling this effort, several feed systems used to deliver the simulated waste slurry to the melter have been tested. Because there had been little industrial experience in delivering abrasive slurries at feed rates of less than 10 L/min, early experience helped direct the design of more-dependable systems. Also, as feed delivery requirements changed, the feed system was modified to meet these new requirements. The various feed systems discussed in this document are part of this evolutionary process, so they have not been ranked against each other. The four slurry feed systems discussed are: (1) vertical-cantilevered centrifugal pump system; (2) airlift feed systems; (3) pressurized-loop systems; and (4) positive-displacement pump system. 20 figures, 11 tables.

Perez, J.M. Jr.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Using CODEQ to Train Feed-forward Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CODEQ is a new, population-based meta-heuristic algorithm that is a hybrid of concepts from chaotic search, opposition-based learning, differential evolution and quantum mechanics. CODEQ has successfully been used to solve different types of problems (e.g. constrained, integer-programming, engineering) with excellent results. In this paper, CODEQ is used to train feed-forward neural networks. The proposed method is compared with particle swarm optimization and differential evolution algorithms on three data sets with encouraging results.

Omran, Mahamed G H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Solid fuel feed system for a fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed for the combustion of coal, with limestone, is replenished with crushed coal from a system discharging the coal laterally from a station below the surface level of the bed. A compartment, or feed box, is mounted at one side of the bed and its interior separated from the bed by a weir plate beneath which the coal flows laterally into the bed while bed material is received into the compartment above the plate to maintain a predetermined minimum level of material in the compartment.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Pressurized feed-injection spray-forming apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A spray apparatus and method for injecting a heated, pressurized liquid in a first predetermined direction into a pressurized gas flow that is flowing in a second predetermined direction, to provide for atomizing and admixing the liquid with the gas to form a two-phase mixture. A valve is also disposed within the injected liquid conduit to provide for a pulsed injection of the liquid and timed deposit of the atomized gas phase. Preferred embodiments include multiple liquid feed ports and reservoirs to provide for multiphase mixtures of metals, ceramics, and polymers.

Berry, Ray A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

THE HANFORD WASTE FEED DELIVERY OPERATIONS RESEARCH MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), the Hanford tank farm contractor, is tasked with the long term planning of the cleanup mission. Cleanup plans do not explicitly reflect the mission effects associated with tank farm operating equipment failures. EnergySolutions, a subcontractor to WRPS has developed, in conjunction with WRPS tank farms staff, an Operations Research (OR) model to assess and identify areas to improve the performance of the Waste Feed Delivery Systems. This paper provides an example of how OR modeling can be used to help identify and mitigate operational risks at the Hanford tank farms.

BERRY J; GALLAHER BN

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

NIPSCO - Feed-In Tariff | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » NIPSCO - Feed-In Tariff NIPSCO - Feed-In Tariff < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Rates may not exceed the published tariff rate Program Info Start Date 07/13/2011 State Indiana Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Wind 100kW or less: $0.17/kWh Wind 100kW-2MW: $0.10/kWh Solar 10kW or less: $0.30/kWh Solar 10kW-2MW: $0.26/kWh Biomass 5MW or less: $0.106/kWh Hydroelectric 1MW or less: $0.12/kWh Non-biomass facilities greater than 2 MW are subject to a formula rate Provider Northern Indiana Public Service Corporation

176

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Presentation, Lessons learned/best practices References: Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation[1] Logo: Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation This presentation reviews Feed-in Tariff (FIT) Policy Overview, FIT Policy Implementation in the U.S., Policy Design Comparison with Europe, FIT

178

Effects of corn processing and dietary wet corn gluten feed on newly received and growing cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of corn processing with or without the inclusion of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on growth and performance were analyzed in two experiments. Treatments (more)

Siverson, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Phase 1 High Level Waste Feed Tanks Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent revision of the US. Department of Energy privatization contract for the immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) at Hanford necessitates the investigation of alternative waste feed sources to meet contractual feed requirements. This analysis identifies wastes to be considered as HLW feeds and develops and conducts alternative analyses to comply with established criteria. A total of 12,426 cases involving 72 waste streams are evaluated and ranked in three cost-based alternative models. Additional programmatic criteria are assessed against leading alternative options to yield an optimum blended waste feed stream.

CRAWFORD, T.W.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

Doshi, Vinod B. (Monroeville, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Zelienople, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

408 January 2010 Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal Law Constraints and Possible Solutions Scott Hempling National Regulatory Research Institute Silver...

182

Global Energy Transfer - Feed-in Tariffs for Developing Countries | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Transfer - Feed-in Tariffs for Developing Countries Energy Transfer - Feed-in Tariffs for Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Energy Transfer - Feed-in Tariffs for Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Deutsche Bank Group Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: www.dbcca.com/dbcca/EN/investment-research/investment_research_2347.js References: Get FiT Program[1] This report provides information on best practices for adapting the design of feed-in tariffs in developing countries. Chapters The challenge of renewable energy in the developing world: A project level perspective.............................................................. 11 The GET FiT Solution...................................................................

183

ACTIVE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES FOR PROCESSING OF FEED MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

The carbonate and organic leaching processes for the recovery of U from its ores are outlined. The Excer prccess (ion-exchange conversion and electrolytic reduction) and the Fluorox process (starch-- HF reaction) for the production of UF/sub 4/ from ore concentrate and depleted reactor fuels are described. The fluidized-bed process for UF/sub 4/ production from UO/sub 2/(NO/ sub 3/)/sub 2/ is also described. Methods for improving the reactivity of UO/sub 3/ and mechanical and thermal processes for increasing the density of UF/sub 4/ were investigated. Applications of fluoride volatility prccesses to feed materials are discussed. (C.W.H.)

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

GABA in the nucleus accumbens shell participates in the central regulation of feeding behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated previously that injections of 6,7dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione into the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) elicits pronounced feeding in satiated rats. This glutamate antagonist blocks AMPA and kainate receptors and most likely increases food intake by disrupting a tonic excitatory input to the AcbSh, thus decreasing the firing rate of a population of local neurons. Because the application of GABA agonists also decreases neuronal activity, we hypothesized that administration of GABA agonists into the AcbSh would stimulate feeding in satiated rats. We found that acute inhibition of cells in the AcbSh via administration of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen elicited intense, dose-related feeding without altering water intake. Muscimol-induced feeding was blocked by coadministration of the selective GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline, but not by the GABAB receptor blocker saclofen. Conversely, baclofen-induced feeding was blocked by coadministration of saclofen, but was not affected by bicuculline. Furthermore, we found that increasing local levels of GABA by administration of a selective GABA-transaminase inhibitor, ?-vinyl-GABA, elicited robust feeding in satiated rats, suggesting a physiological role for endogenous AcbSh GABA in the control of feeding. A mapping study showed that although some feeding can be elicited by muscimol injections near the lateral ventricles, the ventromedial AcbSh is the most sensitive site for eliciting feeding. These findings demonstrate that manipulation of GABAsensitive cells in the AcbSh can have a pronounced, but specific, effect on feeding behavior in rats. They also constitute the initial description of a novel and potentially important component of the central mechanisms controlling food intake. Key words: GABA; food intake; nucleus accumbens shell; muscimol; baclofen; feeding behavior; ?-vinyl-GABA The nucleus accumbens is a basal forebrain structure that is perhaps best known for being an important constituent of the neural systems mediating reward and reinforcement (Koob and

Thomas R. Stratford; Ann E. Kelley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy? ICEPT Discussion Paper October 2010 University #12;2 Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy? Introduction This discussion paper is concerned with the potential to change the way the UK provides support for renewable energy

186

Active NOX Control of Cogen Gas Turbine Exhaust using a Nonlinear Feed Forward with Cascade Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active NOX Control of Cogen Gas Turbine Exhaust using a Nonlinear Feed Forward with Cascade control, cogeneration, gas turbine, model based control, feed forward, cascade ABSTRACT Presented is a model based strategy for controlling the NOX concentration of natural gas turbine emissions

Cooper, Doug

187

The effect of food hardness on feeding behaviour in frugivorous bats (Phyllostomidae): an experimental study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of food hardness on feeding behaviour in frugivorous bats (Phyllostomidae hardness. Data summarizing ingestive and fruit processing behaviours were collected during feeding experiments that consisted of eating hard and soft fruits of similar size, shape, and mass. Variables analysed

Dumont, Elizabeth R.

188

Reducing stress in sheep by feeding the seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feeding the extract of the seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANOD) has been shown to mediate the response of livestock to certain environmental stressors. To determine if feeding ANOD is useful in alleviating handling and transport stress, two trials were conducted. The dose response trial was conducted to determine at which rate ANOD should be fed to obtain beneficial results. Forty-four lambs received ANOD at either 0 (control), 0.5, 1, or 2% of dry matter intake per day (approximately 0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/kg of body wt per day). Sheep were administered ANOD twice daily for 14d. After 14d of supplementation, IgG and IgM antibody response to ovalbumin was reduced by ANOD. The sheep fed at the 2% rate had a narrower range of body temperature during transport than controls. The 2% rate also had lower body temperatures than the controls during times when the thermal heat index was above 80. The sheep fed the 2% rate had lower cortisol and aldosterone concentrations during walking and transport compared to the controls. Post transport, sheep supplemented at the 1 or 2% rates were less dehydrated as indicated by plasma chemistry profiles andelectrolyte concentrations. In a subsequent trial, the major components of the ANOD (fucoidan, salt, and betaine) were fed to determine which, if any, were responsible for the treatment effects in the dose response trial. After 14d supplementation, the salt and ANOD sheep had a depressed IgG and IgM antibody response to ovalbumin and an increase in white blood cell counts and lymphocyte numbers compared to controls. The ANOD sheep were generally lower in body temperature than the other treatments during transport. The ANOD and salt sheep had lower cortisol concentrations compared to controls. At the end of transport, sheep supplemented with ANOD or salt had lower electrolyte concentrations than control sheep. Supplementation with ANOD was associated with lowered body temperature; however, it also suppressed antibody titer which could leave animals susceptible to bacterial infection. The lowered antibody production is of concern and needs further study before ANOD can be recommended as a useful stress management tool.

Archer, Gregory Scott

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: United States Department of State Sector: Energy Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy10osti/44849.pdf A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design Screenshot References: FIT Policy Design Guide[1] Logo: A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design This report provides U.S. policymakers who have decided to enact FIT policies with a roadmap to the design options: It explains the policy and how it works, explores the variety of design options available, and

190

"Feds Feed Families" Events to Be Held at Department of Energy Facilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Feds Feed Families" Events to Be Held at Department of Energy "Feds Feed Families" Events to Be Held at Department of Energy Facilities "Feds Feed Families" Events to Be Held at Department of Energy Facilities August 4, 2011 - 9:23am Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman and his band "Yellow Cake" at last year's Feds Feed Families event. | Energy Department photo Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman and his band "Yellow Cake" at last year's Feds Feed Families event. | Energy Department photo What are the key facts? Events to be held at Forrestal Building on August 4 from 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m., and at the Germantown Building on August 11 from 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Last year, the DOE exceeded its donation goal by 300 percent with 120,014 lbs. of donations. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman is in a band called "Yellow Cake".

191

Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: E3 Analytics Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices, Technical report Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/50225.pdf Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): feed-in tariffs, feed tariffs, FITs, renewable energy, policy design, solar, wind, geothermal Language: English This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on

192

FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Case studies/examples Website: tech-action.org/Perspectives/FITuseEverywhere.pdf Cost: Free FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs Screenshot References: FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs[1] This article aims to provide a summary to governments and stakeholders in developing countries on the function, strengths and potential drawbacks of

193

Accepting Mixed Waste as Alternate Feed Material for Processing and Disposal at a Licensed Uranium Mill  

SciTech Connect

Certain categories of mixed wastes that contain recoverable amounts of natural uranium can be processed for the recovery of valuable uranium, alone or together with other metals, at licensed uranium mills, and the resulting tailings permanently disposed of as 11e.(2) byproduct material in the mill's tailings impoundment, as an alternative to treatment and/or direct disposal at a mixed waste disposal facility. This paper discusses the regulatory background applicable to hazardous wastes, mixed wastes and uranium mills and, in particular, NRC's Alternate Feed Guidance under which alternate feed materials that contain certain types of mixed wastes may be processed and disposed of at uranium mills. The paper discusses the way in which the Alternate Feed Guidance has been interpreted in the past with respect to processing mixed wastes and the significance of recent changes in NRC's interpretation of the Alternate Feed Guidance that sets the stage for a broader range of mixed waste materials to be processed as alternate feed materials. The paper also reviews the le gal rationale and policy reasons why materials that would otherwise have to be treated and/or disposed of as mixed waste, at a mixed waste disposal facility, are exempt from RCRA when reprocessed as alternate feed material at a uranium mill and become subject to the sole jurisdiction of NRC, and some of the reasons why processing mixed wastes as alternate feed materials at uranium mills is preferable to direct disposal. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of the specific acceptance, characterization and certification requirements applicable to alternate feed materials and mixed wastes at International Uranium (USA) Corporation's White Mesa Mill, which has been the most active uranium mill in the processing of alternate feed materials under the Alternate Feed Guidance.

Frydenland, D. C.; Hochstein, R. F.; Thompson, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the environmental survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), conducted June 16 through 27, 1986. The survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the FMPC. The survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at FMPC, and interviews with site personnel. The survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its onsite activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE national laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the FMPC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the FMPC survey. 41 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent renewable energy policy used globally to date, and there are many benefits to the certainty offered in the marketplace to reduce development risks and associated financing costs and to grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control in renewable energy policy design. In recent years, policy mechanisms for containing FIT costs have become more refined, allowing policymakers to exert greater control on policy outcomes and on the resulting costs to ratepayers. As policymakers and regulators in the United States begin to explore the use of FITs, careful consideration must be given to the ways in which policy design can be used to balance the policies' advantages while bounding its costs. This report explores mechanisms that policymakers have implemented to limit FIT policy costs. If designed clearly and transparently, such mechanisms can align policymaker and market expectations for project deployment. Three different policy tools are evaluated: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report employs case studies to explore the strengths and weaknesses of these three cost containment tools. These tools are then evaluated with a set of criteria including predictability for policymakers and the marketplace and the potential for unintended consequences.

Kreycik, C.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling the feed of molten metal in a continuous metal casting system comprising a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p{sub c} = p{sub g} {minus} p{sub m} where p{sub c} is the desired pressure in the caster, p{sub g} is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p{sub m} is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristic of the metal being cast. 8 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1989-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3.3-ton military air conditioning unit has been studied experimentally in both baseline (as received) and as modified for liquid over-feeding (LOF) operation. Tne baseline test, using a proper refrigerant charge, showed the measured cooling capacity to be less than 1% off the rated capacity at 95{degrees}F ambient temperature. The test results indicate that LOF operation outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At a 95{degrees}F test point, LOF operation has a cooling capacity of 51,100 BTU per hour, which is a 28.9% improvement over the baseline operation capacity of 39,600 BTU per hour. The COP for LOF at 95{degrees}F is 2.62, which is 29% better than the baseline COP of 2.03. However, an optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Policymaker's Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design  

SciTech Connect

Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most widely used renewable energy policy in the world for driving accelerating renewable energy (RE) deployment, accounting for a greater share of RE development than either tax incentives or renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies. FITs have generated significant RE deployment, helping bring the countries that have implemented them successfully to the forefront of the global RE industry. In the European Union (EU), FIT policies have led to the deployment of more than 15,000 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) power and more than 55,000 MW of wind power between 2000 and the end of 2009. In total, FITs are responsible for approximately 75% of global PV and 45% of global wind deployment. Countries such as Germany, in particular, have demonstrated that FITs can be used as a powerful policy tool to drive RE deployment and help meet combined energy security and emissions reductions objectives. This policymaker's guide provides a detailed analysis of FIT policy design and implementation and identifies a set of best practices that have been effective at quickly stimulating the deployment of large amounts of RE generation. Although the discussion is aimed primarily at decision makers who have decided that a FIT policy best suits their needs, exploration of FIT policies can also help inform a choice among alternative renewable energy policies.

Couture, T. D.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.; Williams, E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of gas feeding methods on optical properties of GaN grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Ga vacancies, GaN growth, gas feeding method, optical property, rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD), yellow luminescence

Sun Jung Kim; Young Hun Seo; Kee Suk Nahm; Yun Bong Hahn; Hyun Wook Shim; Eun-Kyung Suh; Kee Young Lim; Hyung Jae Lee

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Waste Feed Delivery System Phase 1 Preliminary RAM Analysis [SEC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the updated results of the preliminary reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis of selected waste feed delivery (WFD) operations to be performed by the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) during Phase I activities in support of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For planning purposes, waste feed tanks are being divided into five classes in accordance with the type of waste in each tank and the activities required to retrieve, qualify, and transfer waste feed. This report reflects the baseline design and operating concept, as of the beginning of Fiscal Year 2000, for the delivery of feed from three of these classes, represented by source tanks 241-AN-102, 241-AZ-101 and 241-AN-105. The preliminary RAM analysis quantifies the potential schedule delay associated with operations and maintenance (OBM) field activities needed to accomplish these operations. The RAM analysis is preliminary because the system design, process definition, and activity planning are in a state of evolution. The results are being used to support the continuing development of an O&M Concept tailored to the unique requirements of the WFD Program, which is being documented in various volumes of the Waste Feed Delivery Technical Basis (Carlson. 1999, Rasmussen 1999, and Orme 2000). The waste feed provided to the WTP must: (1) meet limits for chemical and radioactive constituents based on pre-established compositional envelopes (i.e., feed quality); (2) be in acceptable quantities within a prescribed sequence to meet feed quantities; and (3) meet schedule requirements (i.e., feed timing). In the absence of new criteria related to acceptable schedule performance due to the termination of the TWRS Privatization Contract, the original criteria from the Tank Waste Remediation System (77443s) Privatization Contract (DOE 1998) will continue to be used for this analysis.

DYKES, A.A.

2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) International Energy Agency (IEA)

205

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Feed Development Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

206

,"Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2010" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_a_(na)_ydr_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_a_(na)_ydr_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

207

Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Feed | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank Feed World Bank Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

208

Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); Lee, Lap-Keung (Cranbury, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Long Island Power Authority - Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff (New York) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff (New Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff (New York) Long Island Power Authority - Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 07/16/2012 Expiration Date 01/31/2014 State New York Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Determined through the Clearing Price Auction Provider Long Island Power Authority The Long Island Power Authority's (LIPA) Feed-in Tariff II (FIT II) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. The program operates under a sell-all arrangement, where the full amount of energy production from the facility

210

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low-Rank Coal to Gasifiers Project Number: DE-FE0007977 There is increased interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the power plant. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) aims to help reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS by using a portion of the high purity CO2 product stream as the carrier fluid to feed low rank coal (LRC) into the gasifier. EPRI proposes to confirm the potential advantages of LRC/liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) slurries by: Conducting plant-wide technical and economic simulations.

211

Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EM’s Nevada Site Office took first place in the site-submitted category of DOE’s CANstruction Sculpture Contest for its entry, shown here, inspired by London’s Tower Bridge during the 2012 Summer Olympics. EM's Nevada Site Office took first place in the site-submitted category of DOE's CANstruction Sculpture Contest for its entry, shown here, inspired by London's Tower Bridge during the 2012 Summer Olympics. EM Office of Strategic Planning and Analysis Director Barry Gaffney throws the ball that sends Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga into the dunk tank during an event to collect nonperishable food items for the DOE Feeds Families campaign.

212

RSS Feeds for Specific Tropical Cyclones of the North Atlantic, Caribbean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSS Feeds for Specific Tropical Cyclones of the North Atlantic, Caribbean RSS Feeds for Specific Tropical Cyclones of the North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico (English) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data RSS Feeds for Specific Tropical Cyclones of the North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico (English) Dataset Summary Description The National Weather Service (NWS) National Hurricane Center uses regularly updated RSS feeds to disseminate North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexcio tropical cyclone and marine forecasts. Tags {hurricanes,"tropical cyclones",warning,watch," forecast",discussion,outlooks,"",marine,temperature," Atlantic","Caribbean Sea","Gulf of Mexico. "}

213

Mathematical model of steam generator feed system at power unit of nuclear plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of a steam generator feed system at a power unit of a nuclear plant with variable values of transfer function coefficients is presented. The model is realized in the MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow event-driven simulation.

E. M. Raskin; L. A. Denisova; V. P. Sinitsyn; Yu. V. Nesterov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydrogen Technology Validation as a "Learning Demonstration" that Feeds the R&D Process (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, which provides information about how hydrogen technology validation is used as a learning demonstration that feeds the research and development process, was given at a National Hydrogen Association meeting in April 2004.

Wipke, K.; Gronich, S.; Hooker, D.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 24 Effects of Feeding Flaxseed to Pigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 24 Effects of Feeding Flaxseed to Pigs Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadabl

216

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission waste feed delivery plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a plan presenting the objectives, organization, and management and technical approaches for the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Program. This WFD Plan focuses on the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project`s Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission.

Potter, R.D.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

217

Metagenomic and functional analysis of hindgut microbiota of a wood-feeding higher termite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and western branches of the Wood/Ljungdahl pathway: how the1993). 55. Wood, T. Preparation of crystalline,of hindgut microbiota of a wood-feeding higher termite Falk

Warnecke, Falk

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ANALYSIS OF THE SALT FEED TANK CORE SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) immobilizes and disposes of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Low-level waste (LLW) streams from processes at SRS are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the SPF for treatment and disposal. The Salt Feed Tank (SFT) at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) holds approximately 6500 gallons of low level waste from Tank 50 as well as drain water returned from the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. Over the past several years, Saltstone Engineering has noted the accumulation of solids in the SFT. The solids are causing issues with pump performance, agitator performance, density/level monitoring, as well as taking up volume in the tank. The tank has been sounded at the same location multiple times to determine the level of the solids. The readings have been 12, 25 and 15 inches. The SFT is 8.5 feet high and 12 feet in diameter, therefore the solids account for approximately 10 % of the tank volume. Saltstone Engineering has unsuccessfully attempted to obtain scrape samples of the solids for analysis. As a result, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with developing a soft core sampler to obtain a sample of the solids and to analyze the core sample to aid in determining a path forward for removing the solids from the SFT. The source of the material in the SFT is the drain water return system where excess liquid from the Saltstone disposal vaults is pumped back to the SFT for reprocessing. It has been shown that fresh grout from the vault enter the drain water system piping. Once these grout solids return to the SFT, they settle in the tank, set up, and can't be reprocessed, causing buildup in the tank over time. The composition of the material indicates that it is potentially toxic for chromium and mercury and the primary radionuclide is cesium-137. Qualitative measurements show that the material is not cohesive and will break apart with some force.

Reigel, M.; Cheng, W.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Feed the Future Bangladesh: Baseline Integrated Household Survey Dataset Summary Description The Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey dataset is a thorough assessment of current standard of food security in Bangladesh taken from 2011-2012. The dataset includes all baseline household surveys made under the USAID-led Feed the Future initiative, a collaborative effort that supports country-owned processes and plans for improving food security and promoting transparency, and within the Zones of Influence as outlined by the Feed the Future Bangladesh plan .The BIHS sample is statistically representative at the following levels: (a) nationally representative of rural Bangladesh; (b) representative of rural areas of each of the seven administrative divisions of the country; and, (c) representative of the Feed the Future (FTF) zone of influence.

222

Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recycling paths for various materials. Aerosol cans Asphalt Batteries Cardboard Concrete Light bulbs Metal Pallets Paper Tires Toner cartridges Vegetation Environmental...

224

The feeding biomechanics of juvenile red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Juvenile red snapper are attracted to structure and settle onto low profile reefs, which serve as nursery grounds. Little is known about their life history during this time. However, recent studies from a shell bank in the NW Gulf of Mexico have shown higher growth rates for juveniles located on mud habitats adjacent to low profile reefs, perhaps due to varied prey availability and abundance. To further investigate the habitat needs of juvenile red snapper, individuals were collected from a low profile shell ridge (on-ridge) and adjacent mud areas (off-ridge) on Freeport Rocks, TX, and divided into three size classes (?3.9 cm SL, 4.0-5.9 cm SL, ?6 cm SL). Feeding morphology and kinematics were characterized and compared among size classes and between the two habitats. A dynamic jaw lever model was used to make predictions about feeding mechanics, and kinematic profiles obtained from high-speed videos of prey capture events validated the models predictive ability. Model output suggested an ontogenetic shift in feeding morphology from a juvenile feeding mode (more suction) to an adult feeding mode (more biting). Stomach contents revealed a concomitant shift in prey composition that coincided with the ontogenetic shift in feeding mode. The model also predicted that on-ridge juveniles would have faster jaw closing velocities compared to off-ridge juveniles, which had slower, stronger jaws. Analysis of prey capture events indicated that on-ridge juveniles demonstrated greater velocities and larger displacements of the jaws than off-ridge juveniles. Shape analysis was used to further investigate habitat effects on morphology. Off-ridge juveniles differed from on-ridge in possessing a deeper head and body. Results from model simulations, kinematic profiles, personal observations, and shape analysis all complement the conclusion that on-ridge juveniles exhibited more suction feeding behavior, whereas off-ridge juveniles used more biting behavior. Stomach contents demonstrated an early switch to piscivory in off-ridge juveniles compared to on-ridge juveniles, which may account for higher off-ridge growth rates. Habitat disparity, perhaps available prey composition, generated variations in juvenile feeding mechanics and consequently feeding behavior. This disparity may ultimately affect the growth rates and recruitment success of juvenile red snapper from different habitats.

Case, Janelle Elaine

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Interaction of temperature, dissolved oxygen and feed energy on ecophysiological performance of juvenile red drum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) is important for recreational fishing and aquacultural production in Texas' coastal waters and elsewhere in the nearshore Gulf of Mexico and in subtemperate to subtropical areas of the western North Atlantic Ocean. I performed indoor-tank and outdoor-pond experiments, in conjunction with automa ted respirometry and ecophysiological modeling, to assess interacting effects of temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentration (DO) and feed energy density on survival, growth, metabolism, and other measures of juvenile red drum performance. The main objective was to test an energy/metabolism tradeoff hypothesis, which states that growth of fish exposed to high temperatures can be limited by available feed energy; whereas, growth of fish exposed to lower temperatures can be limited by their metabolic capacity to exploit available feed energy. Also, I examined the influence of DO on this relationship and evaluated the effects of cyclical regimes of temperature and DO on fish performance. Insights from laboratory-based feeding trials were incorporated in experiments conducted in hatchery ponds to assess effects of oxygen supplementation and dietary additives - nucleotides and prebiotics - on performance in a more natural setting. In examining these issues, various technologies were developed. These included a computer-based apparatus for autonomously inducing cyclical regimes of temperature and DO in experimental tanks over an extended period of time. Additionally, I developed a soft feed with low energy-density to simulate natural forage. Experimental results supported the principal research hypothesis: At high temperature and DO, ecophysiological performance of juvenile red drum was enhanced by feeding to satiation with a high-energy feed (15.9 kJ/g) versus with a foragesimulating feed having lower energy density (4.1 kJ/g). Cyclical regimes of temperature and DO - as imposed in my particular laboratory experiments -did not impart growth benefits; however, the potential for enhanced growth via an appropriate cyclical environmental regime remains intact. Results from outdoor-pond experiments were consistent with laboratory results; however, the strong positive effect of feed energy density overwhelmed potential effects of dietary additives or oxygen supplementation on growth.

Fontaine, Lance Pierre

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

,"U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1987" Annual",2012,"6/30/1987" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" "Sourcekey","M_NA_YDR_NUS_MBBLD","MCRCCUS2","MCRCHUS2","MCRDFUS2" "Date","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Reforming Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Cracking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Hydrocracking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Delayed and Fluid Coking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)"

227

HIGH-LEVEL WASTE FEED CERTIFICATION IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (l million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing ofHLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch-to-batch operational adjustments that reduce operating efficiency and have the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

THIEN MG; WELLS BE; ADAMSON DJ

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

229

Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Rigby, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ensiling wet distillers grains with other feeds. SDSU Extension Extra 4029  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last century, livestock producers have relied heavily on highly valued crops to feed their cattle. Corn grain and silage, alfalfa hay and silage as well as other highly productive crops have been used extensively. Changes in oil prices have sparked interest into renewable energy alternatives. Ethanol production from corn has gained popularity in the Midwest resulting in increased availability of corn distillers grains. Corn distillers grains are an excellent feed for ruminants. They can usually be purchased as wet (40-70 % moisture) or dry. They supply approximately 10 % more energy than corn grain, and approximately 30 % protein, 10 % fat and 1 % phosphorus. These are highly priced nutrients and thus desirable in a feed, although they might pose a challenge when formulating diets. When distillers grains

A. D. Garcia; K. F. Kalscheur

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

LADWP - Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program (California) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LADWP - Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program (California) LADWP - Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program (California) LADWP - Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Maximum Rebate $0.3825/kWh Program Info Start Date 02/01/2013 State California Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $0.17/kWh adjusted by a time of delivery multiplier Base price will step down over time as certain MW goals are met Provider LADWP Note: LADWP accepted applications for the second 20 MW allocation of the 100 MW FiT Set Pricing Program between July 8 and July 12, 2013. This program is the first component of a 150 megawatt (MW) FiT Program, and is

232

Not long ago breast-feeding was considered a private affair, solely carried out  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not long ago breast-feeding was considered a private affair, solely carried out in the Not long ago breast-feeding was considered a private affair, solely carried out in the home. But today, many mothers are choosing to continue breast-feeding after they return to work. In order for mothers to keep producing ample supplies of milk, so they can avoid using formula supplements, nursing mothers need to pump their milk during the workday. At Department of Energy Headquarters, the Wellness Program works to support employees who are devoted to their families. This includes nursing mothers who want to continue lactation after they return to the office. The Occupational Health Clinics at the Forrestal and Germantown facilities house a dedicated lactation room, well appointed with a comfortable recliner, table and access to a restroom. Mothers have access to the

233

Tools for Management of Withering Syndrome in Abalone, Haliotis spp: PCR Detection and Feed-Based Therapeutic Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Abalone, Haliotis spp: PCR Detection and Feed-Basedprocessing (negative control). PCR amplification of WS-RLPDNA stool kit, perform PCR. An outline of the filtration

Friedman, Carolyn; Hedrick, R P; Moore, James D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process, Rev. 3  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, Charles Marshall

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Detection of Tool Flute Breakage in End Milling Using Feed-Motor Current Signatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, an effective algorithm based on improved time-domain averaging is proposed to detect tool flute breakage during end milling using feed-motor current signatures. The algorithm proposed is demonstrated to be effective in detecting tool flute breakage in real time through a series of milling experiments, and is also demonstrated to be insensitive to the effects for transients, such as cutter runout, entry/exit cuts, and noise in the feed-motor current signals. Results indicated that the approach showed excellent potential for practical, on-line application for tool flute breakage detection during end milling.

Xiao Li

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Analysis of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotopes and optimal feed position  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the concentration distribution in a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures is different from that in a cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. This paper presents the governing equations for a multicomponent isotope separation cascade. Numerically predicted separation factors for the gas centrifuge cascade agree well with the experimental data. A theoretical optimal feed position is derived for a short square cascade for a two-component mixture in a close-separation case. The optimal feed position for a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent mixture is discussed.

Chuntong Ying; Hongjiang Wu; Mingsheng Zhou; Yuguang Nie; Guangjun Liu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Feed and Farm Supply Store Managers' Perceptions of Employee Training as a Contributor to Competitive Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the perception held by managers of feed and farm supply stores in Texas regarding the contribution of employee training to the competitiveness of the firm, determine if managers of feed and farm supply stores perceive that employee training can improve their competitive strength, and to determine if they will invest in employee training in order to gain a competitive advantage. The objectives of this study include: describe the operating environment of feed and farm supply stores in Texas; describe feed and farm supply store managers? perception of employee training?s contribution to their firm?s competitive advantage; identify barriers to employee training in feed and farm supply stores; determine Internet availability and potential use for employee training in feed and farm supply stores; and describe the willingness of feed and farm supply store managers to engage in employee training delivered via the Internet. This study employed a descriptive and correlational research design. A selfadministered questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample frame of 305 feed and farm supply stores randomly selected from 1,487 stores in Texas. These stores operate in a demanding, competitive environment that is changing at a rapid pace. They perceive that employee training improves customer satisfaction, contributes to business growth, improves productivity, and increases profits. The skills needed by their employees are increasing and they need training in sales, communication skills, technical knowledge, time management, retail merchandising, marketing, and business management to help the business stay competitive. Barriers to training include not being able to see immediate results, cost, difficulties created when key employees are not on the job, travel distances to attend training, and a lack of training programs relevant to their needs. Over 80 percent of these stores have both computers and Internet access. Managers will allow employees to use these resources for training purposes, encourage participation in online training, and allow their employees to participate in training during business hours. It is recommended that Internet based training programs be developed in sales, communication skills, technical knowledge, time management, retail merchandising, and business management for these small agribusinesses.

Springfield, Henry C., III

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dry Coal Feed System and Multi-Element Injector Test Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine technology to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. One key feature of the PWR concept is the use of an ultra-dense phase feed system to provide dry coal to the multi-element injector. This report describes the layout, test procedures, instrumentation and data acquisition requirements for an ultradense phase multi-element injector and feed system to be operated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC).

Ken Sprouse; Fred Widman; Alan Darby

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

recycled_uranium.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements in the uranium feed and waste products throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national complex. Subsequently, a DOE agency-wide Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project (RUMBP) was initiated. For the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (WSUFMP or later referred to as Weldon Spring),

240

3.1.1.2 Feed Processing and Handling DL2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report is the deliverable for our Feed Processing and Handling project. It includes results of wet biomass feedstock analysis, slurry pumping information, fungal processing to produce a lignin-rich biorefinery residue and two subcontracted efforts to quantify the amount of wet biomass feedstocks currently available within the corn processing and paper processing industries.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Wend, Christopher F.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fungal spore-feeding thrips (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae: Idolothripinae) from Iran with record of a fourth genus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The genus Allothrips Hood, with one species A. bournieri Mound, is reported for the first time in Iran and the generic classification of Phlaeothripidae is discussed briefly. A key is provided to distinguish the four genera recorded in Iran of the spore-feeding thrips in the Idolothripinae.

Kambiz Minaei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

2001-01-1334 Integrated, Feed-Forward Hybrid Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2001-01-1334 Integrated, Feed-Forward Hybrid Electric Vehicle Simulation in SIMULINK and its Use of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT A hybrid electric vehicle simulation tool (HE-VESIM) has been developed global crude oil supplies stimulate research aimed at new, fuel-efficient vehicle technologies. Hybrid-electric

Peng, Huei

244

Feed-forward and recurrent neural networks for source code informal information analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design recovery, which is a part of the reverse engineering process of source code, must supply programmers with all the information they need to fully understand a program or a system. In this paper, a connectionist method that can be used for design ... Keywords: design recovery, feed-forward networks, informal information analysis, program understanding, recurrent neural networks

Ettore Merlo; Ian McAdam; Renato De Mori

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hard prey, soft jaws and the ontogeny of feeding mechanics in the spotted ratfish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard prey, soft jaws and the ontogeny of feeding mechanics in the spotted ratfish Hydrolagus colliei is a holocephalan fish that consumes hard prey (durophagy) but lacks many morphological characters (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali) have branded them as hard prey specialists (Didier 1995; Grogan & Lund 2004

Summers, Adam P.

246

Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant.

JULYK, L.J.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Prediction of the index fund by Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy inference systems and feed-forward neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents (on the basis of passive investment strategies analysis) the design of the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy inference system and the feed-forward neural network (with pre-processing of inputs time series) for prediction of the index fund. By means ... Keywords: Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy inference systems, feed-forward neural network, index fund, indicators of technical analysis, prediction

Vladr Olej

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Demonstration of a Piston Plug feed System for Feeding Coal/Biomass Mixtures across a Pressure Gradient for Application to a Commercial CBTL System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Producing liquid transportation fuels and power via coal and biomass to liquids (CBTL) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) processes can significantly improve the nation's energy security. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 mandates increasing renewable fuels nearly 10-fold to >2.3 million barrels per day by 2022. Coal is abundantly available and coal to liquids (CTL) plants can be deployed today, but they will not become sustainable without large scale CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Co-processing of coal and biomass in CBTL processes in a 60 to 40 ratio is an attractive option that has the potential to produce 4 million barrels of transportation fuels per day by 2020 at the same level of CO{sub 2} emission as petroleum. In this work, Southern Research Institute (Southern) has made an attempt to address one of the major barriers to the development of large scale CBTL processes - cost effective/reliable dry-feeding of coal-biomass mixtures into a high pressure vessel representative of commercial entrained-flow gasifiers. Present method for dry coal feeding involves the use of pressurized lock-hopper arrangements that are not only very expensive with large space requirements but also have not been proven for reliably feeding coal-biomass mixtures without the potential problems of segregation and bridging. The project involved the development of a pilot-scale 250 lb/h high pressure dry coal-biomass mixture feeder provided by TKEnergi and proven for feeding biomass at a scale up to 6 ton/day. The aim of this project is to demonstrate cost effective feeding of coal-biomass mixtures (50:50 to 70:30) made from a variety of coals (bituminous, lignite) and biomass (wood, corn stover, switch grass). The feeder uses a hydraulic piston-based approach to produce a series of plugs of the mixture that act as a seal against high back-pressure of the gasification vessel in to which the mixture is being fed. The plugs are then fed one by one via a plug breaker into the high pressure gasification vessel. A number of runs involving the feeding of coal and biomass mixtures containing 50 to 70 weight % coal into a high pressure gasification vessel simulator have shown that plugs of sufficient density can be formed to provide a seal against pressures up to 450 psig if homogeneity of the mixture can be maintained. However, the in-homogeneity of coal-biomass mixtures can occur during the mixing process because of density, particle size and moisture differences. Also, the much lower compressibility of coal as opposed to biomass can contribute to non-uniform plug formation which can result in weak plugs. Based on present information, the piston plug feeder offered marginal economic advantages over lock-hoppers. The results suggest a modification to the piston feeder that can potentially seal against pressure without the need for forming plugs. This modified design could result in lower power requirements and potentially better economics.

Santosh Gangwal

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

A summary report on feed preparation offgas and glass redox data for Hanford waste vitrification plant: Letter report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tests to evaluate feed processing options for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) were conducted by a number of investigators, and considerable data were acquired for tests of different scale, including recent full-scale tests. In this report, a comparison was made of the characteristics of feed preparation observed in tests of scale ranging from 57 ml to full-scale of 28,000 liters. These tests included Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) laboratory-scale tests, Kernforschungszentrums Karlsruhe (KfK) melter feed preparation, Research Scale Melter (RSM) feed preparation, Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) feed preparation, Slurry Integrated Performance Testing (SIPT) feed preparation, and formic acid addition to Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) care samples.` The data presented herein were drawn mainly from draft reports and include system characteristics such as slurry volume and depth, sweep gas flow rate, headspace, and heating and stirring characteristics. Operating conditions such as acid feed rate, temperature, starting pH, final pH, quantities and type of frit, nitrite, nitrate, and carbonate concentrations, noble metal content, and waste oxide loading were tabulated. Offgas data for CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} were tabulated on a common basis. Observation and non-observation of other species were also noted.

Merz, M.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Catalyst Wire-feed Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Catalyst Wire-feed Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and A Catalyst Wire-feed Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Particles This invention pertains to a highly effective arc-based synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene particles using catalysts in the form of wires made from ion group alloys instead of commonly used catalyst powders. The catalyst wire can be introduced into the discharge either from the anode or cathode regions or into the inter-electrode gap. The catalyst introduction can be done automatically and controlled using feedback based on the ablation of the graphite electrode. To maintain simplicity and attractiveness for industrial applications, it is desirable that the catalyst composition be contained in a single wire alloy. No.: M-808 Inventor(s): Yevgeny Raitses

251

The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Relevance of Generation The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48987 October 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland

252

MILKY WAY SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE: DYNAMICAL FEEDING FROM THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect

The supermassive black hole (SMBH), Sgr A*, at the Galactic center is surrounded by a molecular circumnuclear disk (CND) lying between 1.5 and 4 pc radii. The irregular and clumpy structures of the CND suggest dynamical evolution and episodic feeding of gas toward the central SMBH. New sensitive data from the Submillimeter Array and Green Bank Telescope reveal several >5-10 pc scale molecular arms, which either directly connect to the CND or may penetrate inside the CND. The CND appears to be the convergence of the innermost parts of large-scale gas streamers, which are responding to the central gravitational potential well. Rather than being a quasi-stationary structure, the CND may be dynamically evolving, incorporating inflow via streamers, and feeding gas toward the center.

Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Wright, Melvyn [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sun, Ai-Lei [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Minh, Young Chol, E-mail: hlu@cfa.havard.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), 776 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Calcination of Fluorinel-sodium waste blends using sugar as a feed additive (formerly WINCO-11879)  

SciTech Connect

Methods were studied for using sugar as a feed additive for converting the sodium-bearing wastes stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant into granular, free flowing solids by fluidized-bed calcination at 500{degrees}C. All methods studied blended sodium-bearing wastes with Fluorinel wastes but differed in the types of sugar (sucrose or dextrose) that were added to the blend. The most promising sugar additive was determined to be sucrose, since it is converted more completely to inorganic carbon than is dextrose. The effect of the feed aluminum-to-alkali metal mole ratio on calcination of these blends with sugar was also investigated. Increasing the aluminum-to-alkali metal ratio from 0.6 to 1.0 decreased the calcine product-to-fines ratio from 3.0 to 1.0 and the attrition index from 80 to 15%. Further increasing the ratio to 1.25 had no effect.

Newby, B.J.; Thomson, T.D.; O`Brien, B.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Liquid over-feeding refrigeration system and method with integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A refrigeration system is described having a vapor compression cycle utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation with an integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger. Hot, high-pressure liquid refrigerant from the condenser passes through one or more lengths of capillary tubing substantially immersed in a pool liquid refrigerant in the accumulator-expander-heat exchanger for simultaneously sub-cooling and expanding the liquid refrigerant while vaporizing liquid refrigerant from the pool for the return thereof to the compressor as saturated vapor. The sub-cooling of the expanded liquid provides for the flow of liquid refrigerant into the evaporator for liquid over-feeding the evaporator and thereby increasing the efficiency of the evaporation cycle. 4 figs.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method of monitoring CO concentrations in hydrogen feed to a PEM fuel cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. The PEM-probe is intermittently purged of any CO build-up on the anode catalyst (e.g., by (1) flushing the anode with air, (2) short circuiting the PEM-probe, or (3) reverse biasing the PEM-probe) to keep the PEM-probe at peak performance levels.

Grot, Stephen Andreas (Rochester, NY); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Gutowski, Stanley (Pittsford, NY); Neutzler, Jay Kevin (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY); Weisbrod, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electronically controllable transmission line design for traveling wave array antenna feed network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, an electronically controllable transmission line (ECTL) is presented. By modulating the conductivity of a doped Si modulator in the ECTL, the wave propagation constant in the ECTL is controlled. Measured results show a phase change in the ECTL at a single frequency when non-zero bias voltage is applied. This ECTL is implemented in order to feed a traveling wave array antenna, which is composed of 8 aperture-coupled microstrip antenna elements. It is demonstrated that phase change in an ECTL feed line has applications as a traveling wave array antenna with beam steering. S-parameter measurements are presented which demonstrate phase change in an ECTL and main beam steering of an 8-element traveling wave array antenna. The design procedure for an aperture-coupled microstrip antenna with a specific input impedance at the resonant frequency and a matching circuit design for a traveling wave array antenna are discussed in detail.

Shin, Chang-Seok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Liquid over-feeding refrigeration system and method with integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A refrigeration system having a vapor compression cycle utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation with an integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger. Hot, high-pressure liquid refrigerant from the condenser passes through one or more lengths of capillary tubing substantially immersed in a pool liquid refrigerant in the accumulator-expander-heat exchanger for simultaneously sub-cooling and expanding the liquid refrigerant while vaporizing liquid refrigerant from the pool for the return thereof to the compressor as saturated vapor. The sub-cooling of the expanded liquid provides for the flow of liquid refrigerant into the evaporator for liquid over-feeding the evaporator and thereby increasing the efficiency of the evaporation cycle.

Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Alternatives generation and analysis for the Phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This alternatives generation and analysis (AGA) addresses the question: What is the design basis for the facilities required to stage low-level waste (LLW) feed to the Phase I private contractors? Alternative designs for the intermediate waste feed staging system were developed, analyzed, and compared. Based on these analyses, this document recommends installing mixer pumps in the central pump pit of double-shell tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Also recommended is installing decant/transfer pumps at these tanks. These recommendations have clear advantages in that they provide a low shedule impact/risk and the highest operability of all the alternatives investigated. This revision incorporates comments from the decision board.

Claghorn, R.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

549 549 March 2009 Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions Karlynn Cory, Toby Couture, and Claire Kreycik National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45549 March 2009 Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions Karlynn Cory, Toby Couture, and Claire Kreycik Prepared under Task No. PVB9.4210 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

264

Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya  

SciTech Connect

Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A. [Worldwide Fund for Nature, Nakuru (Kenya). Lake Nakuru Conservation and Development Project; Motelin, G.K. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Animal Health

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing  

SciTech Connect

During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

Seymour, R.G.

1995-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

GLASS FABRICATION AND ANALYSIS LITERATURE REVIEW AND METHOD SELECTION FOR WTP WASTE FEED QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Scope of the Report The objective of this literature review is to identify and review documents to address scaling, design, operations, and experimental setup, including configuration, data collection, and remote handling that would be used during waste feed qualification in support of the glass fabrication unit operation. Items addressed include: ? LAW and HLW glass formulation algorithms; ? Mixing and sampling; ? Rheological measurements; ? Heat of hydration; ? Glass fabrication techniques; ? Glass inspection; ? Composition analysis; ? Use of cooling curves; ? Hydrogen generation rate measurement.

Peeler, D.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Conceptual Design of an Ultra-Dense Phase Injector and Feed System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine technology to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. One key feature of the PWR concept is the use of an ultra-dense phase feed system to provide dry coal to the multi-element injector. This report describes the design of an ultra-dense phase multi-element injector and feed system for use on PWR gasifiers operating at pressures to 1,000 psia. For the design of this injector and feed system, the pulverized coal's Bingham fluid yield stress is approximately 11 Pascals (Pa) with a coefficient of rigidity of 10 centipoise (cp). These values are typical of earlier experimental testing conducted with dried pulverized coal below 18 wt% moisture -- see, e.g., Sprouse and Schuman (1983, 1986). Each individual injector element is designed for a coal flow rate between 3 and 4 tons/hr (0.76 to 1.0 kg/sec) at full flow conditions. Hence, a small 400 to 500 tons/day (4.2 to 5.25 kg/sec) gasifier will require a 6-element injector, a 1,500 tons/day (15.7 kg/sec) gasifier will require an 18-element injector and a 3,000 tons/day (31.5 kg/sec) gasifier will require a 36-element injector. These injectors and feed systems are capable of 'turn-down' below 50% of full-flow operation.

Ken Sprouse; Fred Widman; Alan Darby

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Experts Feed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Il Chang joined Argonne National Laboratory in 1974 and led the laboratory's advanced reactor design and fuel cycle technology development activities

July 1, 2013 Experts...

269

Evaluating Feed Delivery Performance in Scaled Double-Shell Tanks - 14070  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOCs? ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP WAC Data Quality Objectives must be demonstrated. The tank mixing and feed delivery must support both TOC and WTP operations. The tank mixing method must be able to remove settled solids from the tank and provide consistent feed to the WTP to facilitate waste treatment operations. Two geometrically scaled tanks were used with a broad spectrum of tank waste simulants to demonstrate that mixing using two rotating mixer jet pumps yields consistent slurry compositions as the tank is emptied in a series of sequential batch transfers. Testing showed that the concentration of slow settling solids in each transfer batch was consistent over a wide range of tank operating conditions. Although testing demonstrated that the concentration of fast settling solids decreased by up to 25% as the tank was emptied, batch-to-batch consistency improved as mixer jet nozzle velocity in the scaled tanks increased.

Lee, Kearn P.; Thien, Michael G.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impact of finite-rate kinetics on carbon conversion in a single-stage entrained flow gasifier with coal-CO2 slurry feed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with coal-CO2 slurry feed Cristina Botero , Randall P. Field, Howard J. Herzog, Ahmed F. Ghoniem Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract Coal-CO2 slurry feed has been suggested as an attractive alternative to coal-water slurry feed for single

271

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-03_Peeler_Feed Qualification for New Streams.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Qualification for New Streams Feed Qualification for New Streams to DWPF Connie C. Herman (Presented by David Peeler) Manager, Process Technology Programs Savannah River National Laboratory November 17, 2010 Print Close 2 Feed Qualification for New Streams to DWPF Presentation Outline Overview of High Level Waste System Considerations for Qualification Qualification Process Flowsheet Testing Glass Formulation and Processing Impacts Radioactive Sample Characterization & Verification Print Close 3 Feed Qualification for New Streams to DWPF Waste Removal Grout Vault H Area Tanks F Area Tanks 2F 2H 3H Evaporators Extended Sludge Processing Canisters of Vitrified Glass Saltstone S a l t Salt Processing Tank Closure Tank Farm Storage & Evaporation Waste Removal & Pretreatment Final Processing Washed Sludge Low Level

272

Tank Farm Contractor Phase 1 Feed Delivery and Storage and Disposal Mission Summary for 2006 Hot Start Extended Order  

SciTech Connect

This is the level one logic diagram for the River Protection Project (RPP), Tank Farm Contractor, Phase 1, Feed Delivery Storage and Disposal Mission Summary for 2006 Hot Start.

DAVIS, T.J.

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 18 Nutritional Properties and Feeding Values of Soybeans and Their Coproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 18 Nutritional Properties and Feeding Values of Soybeans and Their Coproducts Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science

274

Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal Law Constraints and Possible Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State legislatures and state utility commissions trying to attract renewable energy projects are considering feed-in tariffs, which obligate retail utilities to purchase electricity from renewable producers under standard arrangements specifying prices, terms, and conditions. The use of feed-in tariffs simplifies the purchase process, provides revenue certainty to generators, and reduces the cost of financing generating projects. However, some argue that federal law--including the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) and the Federal Power Act of 1935 (FPA)--constrain state-level feed-in tariffs. This report seeks to reduce the legal uncertainties for states contemplating feed-in tariffs by explaining the constraints imposed by federal statutes. It describes the federal constraints, identifies transaction categories that are free of those constraints, and offers ways for state and federal policymakers to interpret or modify existing law to remove or reduce these constraints. This report proposes ways to revise these federal statutes. It creates a broad working definition of a state-level feed-in tariff. Given this definition, this report concludes there are paths to non-preempted, state-level feed-in tariffs under current federal law.

Hempling, S.; Elefant, C.; Cory, K.; Porter, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuels at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consists of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal at up to 30% on a Btu basis, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing prior art with respect to high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. Activities and results thus far include the following. Several potential alternative fuels have been obtained for evaluation and testing as potential feedstocks, including sewage sludge, used railroad ties, urban wood waste, municipal solid waste, and used waste tires/tire-derived fuel. Only fuels with potential tipping fees were considered; potential energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge has been selected as one of the primary feedstocks for consideration at the Wabash plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary. High-temperature drop-tube furnace tests were conducted to determine if explosive fragmentation of high-moisture sludge droplets could be expected, but showed that these droplets underwent a shrinking and densification process that implies that the sludge will have to be well dispersed when injected into the gasifier. Fuel dispersion nozzles have been obtained for measuring how well the sludge can be dispersed in the second stage of the gasifier. Future work will include leasing a Schwing America pump to test pumping sewage sludge against 400 psig. In addition, sludge dispersion testing will be completed using two different dispersion nozzles to determine their ability to generate sludge particles small enough to be entrained out of the E-Gas entrained-flow gasifier.

Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

Tajbl, Daniel G. (Evanston, IL); Lee, Bernard S. (Lincolnwood, IL); Schora, Jr., Frank C. (Palatine, IL); Lam, Henry W. (Rye, NY)

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste feed delivery to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Hall (2008) includes WTP acceptance criteria that describe physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be certified as acceptable before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST. The objectives of Washington River Protection Solutions' (WRPS) Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project are to understand and demonstrate the DST sampling and batch transfer performance at multiple scales using slurry simulants comprised of UDS particles and liquid (Townson 2009). The SSMD project utilizes geometrically scaled DST feed tanks to generate mixing, sampling, and transfer test data. In Phase 2 of the testing, RPP-49740, the 5-part simulant defined in RPP-48358 was used as the waste slurry simulant. The Phase 2 test data are being used to estimate the expected performance of the prototypic systems in the full-scale DSTs. As such, understanding of the how the small-scale systems as well as the simulant relate to the full-scale DSTs and actual waste is required. The focus of this report is comparison of the size and density of the 5-part SSMD simulant to that of the Hanford waste. This is accomplished by computing metrics for particle mobilization, suspension, settling, transfer line intake, and pipeline transfer from the characterization of the 5-part SSMD simulant and characterizations of the Hanford waste. In addition, the effects of the suspending fluid characteristics on the test results are considered, and a computational fluid dynamics tool useful to quantify uncertainties from simulant selections is discussed.'

Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion ( 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effect of methanol crossover in a liquid-feed polymer-electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell employing a proton-exchange membrane electrolyte with Pt-Ru/C as anode and Pt/C as cathode is reported. The fuel cell can deliver a power density of ca. 0.2 W/cm{sup 2} at 95 C, sufficient to suggest that the stack construction is well worthwhile. Methanol crossover across the polymer electrolyte at concentrations beyond 2 M methanol affects the performance of the cell which appreciates with increasing operating temperature.

Ravikumar, M.K.; Shukla, A.K. [Indiana Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluation of 241-AZ tank farm supporting phase 1 privatization waste feed delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This evaluation is one in a series of evaluations determining the process needs and assessing the adequacy of existing and planned equipment in meeting those needs at various double-shell tank farms in support of Phase 1 privatization. A number of tank-to-tank transfers and waste preparation activities are needed to process and feed waste to the private contractor in support of Phase 1 privatization. The scope of this evaluation is limited to process needs associated with 241-AZ tank farm during the Phase 1 privatization.

CARLSON, A.B.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell Monitoring for Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. CLCM and cylinder tracking are two of several continuous-monitoring technologies that show promise in providing integrated safeguards of F&W operations at enrichment plants. Integrating different monitoring technologies allows advanced, automated event processing to screen innocuous events thereby minimizing false alerts to independent inspectors. Traditionally, international inspectors rely on batch verification of material inputs and outputs derived from operator declarations and periodic on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants or other nuclear processing facilities. Continuously monitoring F&W activities between inspections while providing filtered alerts of significant operational events will substantially increase the amount of valuable information available to inspectors thereby promising to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards and to improve efficiency in conducting on-site inspections especially at large plants for ensuring that all operations are declared.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Miller, Paul [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Visual language recognition with a feed-forward network of spiking neurons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analogy is made and exploited between the recognition of visual objects and language parsing. A subset of regular languages is used to define a one-dimensional 'visual' language, in which the words are translational and scale invariant. This allows an exploration of the viewpoint invariant languages that can be solved by a network of concurrent, hierarchically connected processors. A language family is defined that is hierarchically tiling system recognizable (HREC). As inspired by nature, an algorithm is presented that constructs a cellular automaton that recognizes strings from a language in the HREC family. It is demonstrated how a language recognizer can be implemented from the cellular automaton using a feed-forward network of spiking neurons. This parser recognizes fixed-length strings from the language in parallel and as the computation is pipelined, a new string can be parsed in each new interval of time. The analogy with formal language theory allows inferences to be drawn regarding what class of objects can be recognized by visual cortex operating in purely feed-forward fashion and what class of objects requires a more complicated network architecture.

Rasmussen, Craig E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garrett, Kenyan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sottile, Matthew [GALOIS; Shreyas, Ns [INDIANA UNIV.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Analysis of the Tank 5F Feed and Bleed Residual Solids  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. As part of Tank 5F Closure Mechanical Cleaning, SRR conducted a 'Feed and Bleed' process in Tank 5F. Following this 'Feed and Bleed' Mechanical Cleaning in Tank 5F, SRR collected two tank heel samples (referred to as sample 1 and sample 2) under Riser 5 to determine the composition of the material remaining in the tanks. This document describes sample analysis results. The conclusions from this analysis follow. (1) The anions measured all had a concentration less than 250 mg/kg, except for oxalate, which had a concentration of 2100-2400 mg/kg. (2) The measured cations with the highest concentration were iron (432,000-519,000 mg/kg), nickel (54,600-69,300 mg/kg), and manganese (35,200-42,100 mg/kg). All other cations measured less than 13,000 mg/kg. (3) The radionuclides present in the highest concentration are {sup 90}Sr (3.0 x 10{sup 10} dpm/g), {sup 137}Cs (6.8 x 10{sup 8} dpm/g), and {sup 241}Am (1.4 x 10{sup 8} - 1.8 x 10{sup 8} dpm/g). (4) The particle size analysis shows a large fraction of particles greater than 100 {micro}.

Poirier, M.; Diprete, D.: Coleman, C.; Washington, A.

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Compact Parallel-plane Perpendicular-current Feed for a Modified Equiangular Spiral Antenna and Related Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work describes the design and measurement of a compact bidirectional ultrawideband (UWB) modified equiangular spiral antenna with an integrated feed internally matched to a 50-Ohm microstrip transmission line. A UWB transition from microstrip to double-sided parallel-strip line (DSPSL) soldered to a short (1.14 mm) twin-line transmission line feeds the spiral. The currents on the feed travel in a direction approximately perpendicular to the direction of the currents on the spiral at the points where the feed passes the spiral in close proximity (0.57 mm). Holes were etched from the metal arms of the spiral to reduce the impedance mismatch caused by coupling between the transmission line feed and the spiral. This work also describes a low-loss back-to-back transition from coaxial line to DSPSL, an in-phase connectorized 3 dB DSPSL power divider made using three of those transitions, a 2:1 in-phase DSPSL power divider, a 3:1 in-phase DSPSL power divider, a radial dipole fed by DSPSL, an array of those dipoles utilizing the various power dividers, and a UWB circular monopole antenna fed by DSPSL. Measured and simulated results show good agreement for the designed antennas and circuits.

Eubanks, Travis Wayne

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The diversity, distribution and feeding behavior of solifuges (arachnida; solifugae) in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little is known of the diversity of solifuges in East Africa or their habitat preferences and feeding biologies. A survey was undertaken to improve our understanding of the diversity and distribution of solifuges in Kenya and these data were supplemented by the solifuge holdings of the National Museums of Kenya (NMK), which were identified as part of this study. Historical records of each species found during this survey were verified through assessment of the primary literature and distributions were mapped for all Kenyan spp. A feeding study was conducted to determine preference between hard and toxic prey, and owl pellets from Tucson, Arizona were dissected to determine the importance of solifuges as prey. Finally, various outreach activities that were led and organized during this study were discussed, detailing the importance of science outreach as the bridge between research and the general public. All solifuges used in the feeding study ate the termites that were used as a behavioral control, but only three individuals of one species of solifuge, Z. fordi, were able to eat both hard and toxic prey items repeatedly. Solifuges were more willing or able to eat toxic prey than hard. Burrowing owl pellets from Tucson, Arizona were examined for invertebrate parts and preference was assessed for the five most commonly eaten arthropods. Solifuges were the third most frequently encountered arthropod in the pellets, after caterpillars and beetles, and were also the third most abundant. Solifuges were sampled over a period of six months and collected from 28.V.2006-8.VI.2006 and 11.II.2007- 13.V.2007 from eight different localities in Kenya. During this survey two genera were newly recorded for Kenya, Tarabulida and Solpugyla. In addition, the Tarabulida specimen is the first male ever recorded for the genus. Three new species records for Kenya were added: Z. sericea, Z. lobatula and Z. meruensis, and six undescribed species were recorded from Kenya as a result of this survey, including five unidentified rhagodids and species of Tarabulida. The southernmost locality record for the Galeodidae and Galeodes arabs arabs was uncovered in the NMK holdings.

Reddick, Kristie Lynn

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Interim report VII, production test IP-549-A half-plant low alum feed water treatment at F Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A half-plant low alum water treatment test began at F Reactor on January 16, 1963. The test, which had been prompted by the analysis of ledge corrosion attack on fuel elements, will demonstrate whether or not high alum feed is responsible for increasing the frequency of ledge and groove corrosion attack on fuel element surfaces. The effect will be evaluated by comparing visual examination results obtained from the normal production fuel irradiated in process water treated with two different alum feed rates. Six 20-column fuel discharges, ten columns from each side of the reactor, have been taken during the test as follows: (1) One discharge prior to the start of the test. (2) One discharge such that the test side was exposed to coolant treated with both high and low alum feed. (3) Four discharges under test conditions. This report discusses the results obtained from the fifth discharge under test conditions.

Geier, R.G.

1964-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

RENEWABLE ENERGY AT WHAT COST? ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF FEED-IN TARIFF POLICIES ON CONSUMER ELECTRICITY PRICES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last two decades, feed-in tariffs (FIT) have emerged as the dominant policy instrument for supporting electricity from renewable sources in the European Union. (more)

Klein, Christopher A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

,"U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1987" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1987" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" "Sourcekey","M_NA_YDR_NUS_MBBLD","MCRCCUS2","MCRCHUS2","MCRDFUS2"

293

LONG-TERM CALIBRATION STABILITY OF A RADIO ASTRONOMICAL PHASED ARRAY FEED  

SciTech Connect

There are many challenges associated with the implementation of a phased array feed for radio astronomy applications. Among these is the need to have an adequate set of calibration measurements so that reliable beamformers can be computed. Changes in the operating environment and temporal gain drift in the electronics contribute to calibration drift, which affects the beamformer performance. We will show that calibration measurements are relatively stable over a 5 day period and may remain so for up to 70 days or longer. We have incorporated the use of a calibration update system that has the potential to refresh a set of old calibrators, specifically correcting for electronic gain drift. However, the long-term variations that are present with fresh, current calibrators are greater than the degradation due to using an old calibration set, suggesting that, at this time, there is not a need for sophisticated calibration update systems or algorithms.

Elmer, Michael; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SRAT CHEMISTRY AND ACID CONSUMPTION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to higher than expected hydrogen generation during the Tank 51-Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification run, DWPF engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to expand the ongoing catalytic hydrogen generation program. The work presented in this Technical Report was identified as part of SRNL/Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) meetings to define potential causes of catalytic hydrogen generation as well as from an external technical review panel commissioned to evaluate SRNL hydrogen related data and programs. New scope included improving the understanding of SRAT/SME process chemistry, particularly as it related to acid consumption and hydrogen generation. The expanded hydrogen program scope was covered under the technical task request (TTR): HLW-DWPF-TTR-2007-0016. A task technical and quality assurance plan (TT&QAP) was issued to cover focus areas raised in meetings with LWO plus a portion of the recommendations made by the review panel. A supporting analytical study plan was issued. It was also noted in the review of catalytic hydrogen generation that control of the DWPF acid stoichiometry was an important element in controlling hydrogen generation. A separate TTR was issued to investigate ways of improving the determination of the acid requirement during processing: HLWDWPF-TTR-0015. A separate TT&QAP was prepared for this task request. This report discusses some progress on this task related to developing alternative acid equations and to performing experimental work to supplement the existing database. Simulant preparation and preliminary flowsheet studies were already documented. The prior work produced a sufficient quantity of simulant for the hydrogen program and melter feed rheology testing. It also defined a suitable acid addition stoichiometry. The results presented in this report come from samples and process data obtained during sixteen 22-L SRAT/SME simulations that were performed in the second half of 2007 to produce eight SME products with frit 418 and a matching set of eight SME products with spherically beaded frit 418. The requirement to produce two 25 gallon batches of melter feed for the melter feed rheology modifier program fell under a separate task plan. One supporting 4-L SRAT simulation was performed with mercury, since the 22-L melter feed preparation runs had no mercury due to melter off-gas constraints. As a result of this work, a timeline of reactions has been developed showing the sequence of major reactions occurring during and shortly after acid addition. The traditional-style simulant used in this testing had fairly well defined speciation which enabled the reactions being observed to be related to acid consumption. The new coprecipitated simulants have somewhat different speciation, and it will be necessary to validate some of the conclusions from this testing using sample data from SRAT simulations with coprecipitated simulant. Noble metal dissolution data on timing and concentration were presented in a separate report discussing hydrogen generation. A few of those results will be brought into this report as part of the description of the SRAT chemistry timeline. The noble metal and mercury concentrations used in the preliminary flowsheet studies are summarized in Table 1 along with the ranges covered in this study.

Koopman, D; David Best, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed-in tariffs (FITs) have been used to promote renewable electricity development in over 40 countries throughout the past two decades. These policies generally provide guaranteed prices for the full system output from eligible generators for a fixed time period (typically 15-20 years). Due in part to the success of FIT policies in Europe, some jurisdictions in the United States are considering implementing similar policies, and a few have already put such policies in place. This report is intended to offer some guidance to policymakers and regulators on how generator interconnection procedures may affect the implementation of FITs and how state generator interconnection procedures can be formulated to support state renewable energy objectives. This report is based on a literature review of model interconnection procedures formulated by several organizations, as well as other documents that have reviewed, commented on, and in some cases, ranked state interconnection procedures.

Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

Krupa, J.F.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Capacity dynamics of feed-forward, flow-matching networks exposed to random disruptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While lean manufacturing has greatly improved the efficiency of production operations, it has left US enterprises in an increasingly risky environment. Causes of manufacturing disruptions continue to multiply, and today, seemingly minor disruptions can cause cascading sequences of capacity losses. Historically, enterprises have lacked viable tools for addressing operational volatility. As a result, each year US companies forfeit billions of dollars to unpredictable capacity disruptions and insurance premiums. In this dissertation we develop a number of stochastic models that capture the dynamics of capacity disruptions in complex multi-tier flow-matching feed-forward networks (FFN). In particular, we relax basic structural assumptions of FFN, introduce random propagation times, study the impact of inventory buffers on propagation times, and make initial efforts to model random network topology. These stochastic models are central to future methodologies supporting strategic risk management and enterprise network design.

Savachkin, Aliaksei

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material to provide fuels or chemical feed stock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for hydrocracking coal or other carbonaceous material to produce various aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, phenol and cresols in variable relative concentrations while maintaining a near constant maximum temperature. Variations in relative aromatic concentrations are achieved by changing the kinetic severity of the hydrocracking reaction by altering the temperature profile up to and quenching from the final hydrocracking temperature. The relative concentration of benzene to the alkyl and hydroxyl aromatics is increased by imposing increased kinetic severity above that corresponding to constant heating rate followed by immediate quenching at about the same rate to below the temperature at which dehydroxylation and dealkylation reactions appreciably occur. Similarly phenols, cresols and xylenes are produced in enhanced concentrations by adjusting the temperature profile to provide a reduced kinetic severity relative to that employed when high benzene concentrations are desired. These variations in concentrations can be used to produce desired materials for chemical feed stocks or for fuels.

Duncan, Dennis A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Impact of Feed Injection Strategies on Fluidization Dynamics for Biomass Thermochemical Conversion  

SciTech Connect

To better understand some of the key parameters that control biomass conversion processes in dense granular beds, an efficient computational framework for large-scale simulations of dense, reactive particulate flows using a Lagrange-Euler approach has been developed. This framework is applied here to the investigation of feed injection in a hot fluidized bed reactor, and how it may impact the biomass conversion dynamics. A simple, pseudo-two dimensional configuration is adopted to facilitate the parametric study. Chemical processes are modeled using global kinetics that accurately reproduce particle mass loss and gas release. A posteriori analysis of particle heating rate, mixing and segregation, along with products distribution and residence time inside the reactor is performed for different injection strategies, and compared to non-reactive cases. Results highlight some non-trivial coupling between chemistry and flow dynamics.

Malhotra, K. N.; Pepiot, P.; Capecelatro, J. S.; Desjardins, O.; Grout, R.; Nimlos, M. R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Optimization of a rapid microbiological method for the assessment of lysine bioavailability of animal feed proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving nutritional requirements can be a difficult hics. task with the wide variety of protein sources utilized in the feed industry. Assessing the biological availability of amino acids in protein sources rapidly is essential to satisfy dietary requirements and for least cost feed formulation. Of the amino acids, lysine is of key importance due to it being first or second limiting in poultry diets. Therefore, a deficiency or absence of lysine can halt protein synthesis in the animal hindering proper growth and maintenance. The standard method to quantitate the biological availability of lysine is to perform animal growth or digestibility assays, but such assays do not provide a cost effective, timely and reliable determination of lysine availability. Microbiological assays are a rapid and cost effective alternative to animal bioassays. Auxotrophic mutants of Escherichia coli have been shown to be an accurate indicator of amino acid availability in various protein sources when compared to animal and chemical data. The objective of this research is to develop a more rapid in vitro amino acid bioassay for lysine utilizing an E. coli lysine auxotroph that is comparable to conventional in vitro assays for lysine bioavailability. This involves (1) developing a standard medium for lysine assessment of protein sources that will eliminate background microform from protein sources (2) developing a standardized enzyme digest step that can be used on a wide variety of protein sources and (3) developing a luminescent lysine auxotroph strain of E. coli for more rapid lysine assessment. Completion of these objectives will allow the rapid determination of lysine availability and potentially replace animal bioassays resulting in improvements in nutritional quality and cost effectiveness of diets for animal consumption.

Erickson, Anne Marie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Simulant Development for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Mixing and Waste Feed Delivery Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Projection manages the River Protection Project, which has the mission to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms (Certa et al. 2011). Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) is responsible for a primary objective of this mission which is to retrieve and transfer tank waste to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). A mixing and sampling program with four separate demonstrations is currently being conducted to support this objective and also to support activities in a plan for addressing safety concerns identified by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board related to the ability of the WTP to mix, sample, and transfer fast settling particles. Previous studies have documented the objectives, criteria, and selection of non-radioactive simulants for these four demonstrations. The identified simulants include Newtonian suspending liquids with densities and viscosities that span the range expected in waste feed tanks. The identified simulants also include non-Newtonian slurries with Bingham yield stress values that span a range that is expected to bound the Bingham yield stress in the feed delivery tanks. The previous studies identified candidate materials for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian suspending fluids, but did not provide specific recipes for obtaining the target properties and information was not available to evaluate the compatibility of the fluids and particles or the potential for salt precipitation at lower temperatures. The purpose of this study is to prepare small batches of simulants in advance of the demonstrations to determine specific simulant recipes, to evaluate the compatibility of the liquids and particles, and to determine if the simulants are stable for the potential range of test temperatures. The objective of the testing, which is focused primarily on the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, is to determine the composition of simulant materials that give the desired density and viscosity or rheological parameters.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Tran, Diana N.; Buchmiller, William C.

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Waste Feed Delivery System Phase 1 Preliminary Reliability and Availability and Maintainability Analysis [SEC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The document presents updated results of the preliminary reliability, availability, maintainability analysis performed for delivery of waste feed from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AN-105 to British Nuclear Fuels Limited, inc. under the Tank Waste Remediation System Privatization Contract. The operational schedule delay risk is estimated and contributing factors are discussed.

CARLSON, A.B.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 9 Animal Feeding Strategies for Conjugated Linoleic Acid Enrichment of Milk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 9 Animal Feeding Strategies for Conjugated Linoleic Acid Enrichment of Milk Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 735D98CA0ABF7C8A10664FCCD

304

The Feed-Back from a Biodevices and Cellular Nano-Electronics Course Learned in an Electrical Engineering Faculty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the feed-back from a pilot new course, proposed in 2005 and accepted in 2006 for next years at the Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Romania, Faculty of Electronics, Microsystems Specialization at master studies. The BioNEC course ... Keywords: Bio-Learning, Electronics, Evaluation

Cristian Ravariu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many ornamentals grown in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vegetable crops. Horticultural oil sprays can help to control some aphids on fruit trees and ornamentalsAphids Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many tissue and remove the sap. Aphids can easily be distinguished by the two tube like appendages (cornicles

New Hampshire, University of

306

A system dynamics approach for managing the LNG procurement for an offshore platform feeding a power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was the development of a simulation model to verify the logistic feasibility of the construction of a new regazification offshore terminal feeding a power plant located in Africa, subjected to a possible future doubling. In ... Keywords: logistics, simulation, system dynamics, what if analysis

Enrico Briano; Claudia Caballini; Davide Modula; Roberto Revetria; Alessandro Testa

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

The following document is the final report for DE-FC26-05NT42327: Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater. This work was carried out under a cooperative agreement from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with additional funding from Keltech, Inc. The objective of the project was to improve the temperature control performance of an electric tankless water heater (TWH). The reason for doing this is to minimize or eliminate one of the barriers to wider adoption of the TWH. TWH use less energy than typical (storage) water heaters because of the elimination of standby losses, so wider adoption will lead to reduced energy consumption. The project was carried out by Building Solutions, Inc. (BSI), a small business based in Omaha, Nebraska. BSI partnered with Keltech, Inc., a manufacturer of electric tankless water heaters based in Delton, Michigan. Additional work was carried out by the University of Nebraska and Mike Coward. A background study revealed several advantages and disadvantages to TWH. Besides using less energy than storage heaters, TWH provide an endless supply of hot water, have a longer life, use less floor space, can be used at point-of-use, and are suitable as boosters to enable alternative water heating technologies, such as solar or heat-pump water heaters. Their disadvantages are their higher cost, large instantaneous power requirement, and poor temperature control. A test method was developed to quantify performance under a representative range of disturbances to flow rate and inlet temperature. A device capable of conducting this test was designed and built. Some heaters currently on the market were tested, and were found to perform quite poorly. A new controller was designed using model predictive control (MPC). This control method required an accurate dynamic model to be created and required significant tuning to the controller before good control was achieved. The MPC design was then implemented on a prototype heater that was being developed simultaneously with the controller development. (The prototype's geometry and components are based on a currently marketed heater, but several improvements have been made.) The MPC's temperature control performance was a vast improvement over the existing controller. With a benchmark for superior control performance established, five additional control methods were tested. One problem with MPC control is that it was found to be extremely difficult to implement in a TWH, so that it is unlikely to be widely adopted by manufacturers. Therefore the five additional control methods were selected based on their simplicity; each could be implemented by a typical manufacturer. It was found that one of these methods performed as well as MPC, or even better under many circumstances. This method uses a Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward algorithm that was developed for this project. Due to its simplicity and excellent performance this method was selected as the controller of choice. A final higher-capacity prototype heater that uses Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward control was constructed. This prototype has many improvements over the currently marketed heaters: (1) excellent control; (2) a modular design that allows for different capacity heaters to be built easily; (3) built-in fault detection and diagnosis; (4) a secondary remote user-interface; and (5) a TRIAC switching algorithm that will minimize 'flicker factor'. The design and engineering of this prototype unit will allow it to be built without an increase in cost, compared with the currently marketed heater. A design rendering of the new product is shown below. It will be launched with a new marketing campaign by Keltech in early 2009.

David Yuill

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

MBM fuel feeding system design and evaluation for FBG pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 1-5 g/s fuel feeding system for pilot scale FBG was designed, built and tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple conveying stages improve pressure balancing, flow control and stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary conveyor stage reduced output irregularity from 47% to 15%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic air sparging effective in dealing with poor flow ability of MBM powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic injection port plugs with char at gasification temperature of 850 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: A biomass fuel feeding system has been designed, constructed and evaluated for a fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) pilot plant at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, SK, Canada). The system was designed for meat and bone meal (MBM) to be injected into the gasifier at a mass flow-rate range of 1-5 g/s. The designed system consists of two stages of screw conveyors, including a metering stage which controlled the flow-rate of fuel, a rotary airlock and an injection conveyor stage, which delivered that fuel at a consistent rate to the FBG. The rotary airlock which was placed between these conveyors, proved unable to maintain a pressure seal, thus the entire conveying system was sealed and pressurized. A pneumatic injection nozzle was also fabricated, tested and fitted to the end of the injection conveyor for direct injection and dispersal into the fluidized bed. The 150 mm metering screw conveyor was shown to effectively control the mass output rate of the system, across a fuel output range of 1-25 g/s, while the addition of the 50 mm injection screw conveyor reduced the irregularity (error) of the system output rate from 47% to 15%. Although material plugging was found to be an issue in the inlet hopper to the injection conveyor, the addition of air sparging ports and a system to pulse air into those ports was found to successfully eliminate this issue. The addition of the pneumatic injection nozzle reduced the output irregularity further to 13%, with an air supply of 50 slpm as the minimum air supply to drive this injector. After commissioning of this final system to the FBG reactor, the injection nozzle was found to plug with char however, and was subsequently removed from the system. Final operation of the reactor continues satisfactorily with the two screw conveyors operating at matching pressure with the fluidized bed, with the output rate of the system estimated based on system characteristic equations, and confirmed by static weight measurements made before and after testing. The error rate by this method is reported to be approximately 10%, which is slightly better than the estimated error rate of 15% for the conveyor system. The reliability of this measurement prediction method relies upon the relative consistency of the physical properties of MBM with respect to its bulk density and feeding characteristics.

Campbell, William A., E-mail: bill.campbell@usask.ca [Fluidization Laboratory of Saskatchewan (FLASK) (Canada) and Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Fonstad, Terry [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Pugsley, Todd [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Gerspacher, Regan [Fluidization Laboratory of Saskatchewan (FLASK) (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Expulsion of Symbiotic Algae during Feeding by the Green Hydra a Mechanism for Regulating Symbiont Density?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Algal-cnidarian symbiosis is one of the main factors contributing to the success of cnidarians, and is crucial for the maintenance of coral reefs. While loss of the symbionts (such as in coral bleaching) may cause the death of the cnidarian host, over-proliferation of the algae may also harm the host. Thus, there is a need for the host to regulate the population density of its symbionts. In the green hydra, Chlorohydra viridissima, the density of symbiotic algae may be controlled through host modulation of the algal cell cycle. Alternatively, Chlorohydra may actively expel their endosymbionts, although this phenomenon has only been observed under experimentally contrived stress conditions. Principal Findings: We show, using light and electron microscopy, that Chlorohydra actively expel endosymbiotic algal cells during predatory feeding on Artemia. This expulsion occurs as part of the apocrine mode of secretion from the endodermal digestive cells, but may also occur via an independent exocytotic mechanism. Significance: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, active expulsion of endosymbiotic algae from cnidarians under natural conditions. We suggest this phenomenon may represent a mechanism whereby cnidarians can expel excess symbiotic algae when an alternative form of nutrition is available in the form of prey.

Yelena Fishman; Eliahu Zlotkin; Daniel Sher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Options for converting excess plutonium to feed for the MOX fuel fabrication facility  

SciTech Connect

The storage and safekeeping of excess plutonium in the United States represents a multibillion-dollar lifecycle cost to the taxpayers and poses challenges to National Security and Nuclear Non-Proliferation. Los Alamos National Laboratory is considering options for converting some portion of the 13 metric tons of excess plutonium that was previously destined for long-term waste disposition into feed for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). This approach could reduce storage costs and security ri sks, and produce fuel for nuclear energy at the same time. Over the course of 30 years of weapons related plutonium production, Los Alamos has developed a number of flow sheets aimed at separation and purification of plutonium. Flow sheets for converting metal to oxide and for removing chloride and fluoride from plutonium residues have been developed and withstood the test oftime. This presentation will address some potential options for utilizing processes and infrastructure developed by Defense Programs to transform a large variety of highly impure plutonium into feedstock for the MFFF.

Watts, Joe A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Psaras, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Jr., Edward L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Distributions of 15 elements on 58 absorbers from simulated Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF)  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 58 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, pillared layered materials, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) (pH 14.0). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 870 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2610 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing DSSF solutions.

Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume contains appendixes on pump design, cavitation damage, performance testing, hydraulics, two-phase flow in pumps, flow stability, and rotor dynamics.

Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

51 51 Revised June 2009 State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Toby Couture E3 Analytics Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45551 Revised June 2009 State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Toby Couture E3 Analytics Karlynn Cory

314

R&D to Prepare and Characterize Robust Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Prepare and Characterize Robust to Prepare and Characterize Robust Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Background Domestically abundant coal is a significant primary energy source and, when mixed with optimum levels of biomass, has lower carbon footprint compared to conventional petroleum fuels. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to produce liquid fuels and

315

Are state renewable feed-in tariff initiatives truly throttled by Federal statutes after the FERC California decision?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last few years, several local and state governments have adopted ''feed-in tariffs'' to promote development of dispersed, small-scale renewable generation through incentive pricing. Most FITs are intended to stimulate development of small solar or renewable energy facilities. In July, FERC issued a decision restating that the Federal Power Act and PURPA 210, not state (or local) legislation, govern the price that local utilities may pay under FITs. (author)

Yaffe, David P.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Review and Assessment of Commercial Vendors/Options for Feeding and Pumping Biomass Slurries for Hydrothermal Liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Advanced Biofuels Consortium is working to develop improved methods for producing high-value hydrocarbon fuels. The development of one such method, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process, is being led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The HTL process uses a wet biomass slurry at elevated temperatures (i.e., 300 to 360C [570 to 680F]) and pressures above the vapor pressure of water (i.e., 15 to 20 MPa [2200 to 3000 psi] at these temperatures) to facilitate a condensed-phase reaction medium. The process has been successfully tested at bench-scale and development and testing at a larger scale is required to prove the viability of the process at production levels. Near-term development plans include a pilot-scale system on the order of 0.5 to 40 gpm, followed by a larger production-scale system on the order of 2000 dry metric tons per day (DMTPD). A significant challenge to the scale-up of the HTL process is feeding a highly viscous fibrous biomass wood/corn stover feedstock into a pump system that provides the required 3000 psi of pressure for downstream processing. In October 2011, PNNL began investigating commercial feed and pumping options that would meet these HTL process requirements. Initial efforts focused on generating a HTL feed and pump specification and then providing the specification to prospective vendors to determine the suitability of their pumps for the pilot-scale and production-scale plants. Six vendors were identified that could provide viable equipment to meet HTL feed and/or pump needs. Those six vendors provided options consisting three types of positive displacement pumps (i.e., diaphragm, piston, and lobe pumps). Vendors provided capabilities and equipment related to HTL application. This information was collected, assessed, and summarized and is provided as appendices to this report.

Berglin, Eric J.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Results of Aging Tests of Vendor-Produced Blended Feed Simulant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is procuring through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) a minimum of five 3,500 gallon batches of waste simulant for Phase 1 testing in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). To make sure that the quality of the simulant is acceptable, the production method was scaled up starting from laboratory-prepared simulant through 15-gallon vendor prepared simulant and 250-gallon vendor prepared simulant before embarking on the production of the 3500-gallon simulant batch by the vendor. The 3500-gallon PEP simulant batches were packaged in 250-gallon high molecular weight polyethylene totes at NOAH Technologies. The simulant was stored in an environmentally controlled environment at NOAH Technologies within their warehouse before blending or shipping. For the 15-gallon, 250-gallon, and 3500-gallon batch 0, the simulant was shipped in ambient temperature trucks with shipment requiring nominally 3 days. The 3500-gallon batch 1 traveled in a 70-75F temperature controlled truck. Typically the simulant was uploaded in a PEP receiving tank within 24-hours of receipt. The first uploading required longer with it stored outside. Physical and chemical characterization of the 250-gallon batch was necessary to determine the effect of aging on the simulant in transit from the vendor and in storage before its use in the PEP. Therefore, aging tests were conducted on the 250-gallon batch of the vendor-produced PEP blended feed simulant to identify and determine any changes to the physical characteristics of the simulant when in storage. The supernate was also chemically characterized. Four aging scenarios for the vendor-produced blended simulant were studied: 1) stored outside in a 250-gallon tote, 2) stored inside in a gallon plastic bottle, 3) stored inside in a well mixed 5-L tank, and 4) subject to extended temperature cycling under summer temperature conditions in a gallon plastic bottle. The following series of aging tests were conducted to accomplish these objectives.

Russell, Renee L.; Buchmiller, William C.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Initial Investigation of Waste Feed Delivery Tank Mixing and Sampling Issues  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford tank farms contractor will deliver waste to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) from a staging double-shell tank. The WTP broadly classifies waste it receives in terms of Envelopes, each with different limiting properties and composition ranges. Envelope A, B, and C wastes are liquids that can include up to 4% entrained solids that can be pumped directly from the staging DST without mixing. Envelope D waste contains insoluble solids and must be mixed before transfer. The mixing and sampling issues lie within Envelope D solid-liquid slurries. The question is how effectively these slurries are mixed and how representative the grab samples are that are taken immediately after mixing. This report summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning jet mixing of wastes in underground storage tanks. Waste feed sampling requirements are listed, and their apparent assumption of uniformity by lack of a requirement for sample representativeness is cited as a significant issue. The case is made that there is not an adequate technical basis to provide such a sampling regimen because not enough is known about what can be achieved in mixing and distribution of solids by use of the baseline submersible mixing pump system. A combined mixing-sampling test program is recommended to fill this gap. Historical Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project and tank farms contractor documents are used to make this case. A substantial investment and progress are being made to understand mixing issues at the WTP. A summary of the key WTP activities relevant to this project is presented in this report. The relevant aspects of the WTP mixing work, together with a previously developed scaled test strategy for determining solids suspension with submerged mixer pumps (discussed in Section 3) provide a solid foundation for developing a path forward.

Fort, James A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

Koopman, D

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

Feed Materials Production Center waste management plan (Revision to NLCO-1100, R. 6)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the wastes generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF/sub 2/, slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program.

Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

1986-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Combined cycle electric power plant and a heat recovery steam generator having improved boiler feed pump flow control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes an economizer tube and a high pressure evaporator tube and a boiler feed pump for directing the heat exchange fluid serially through the aforementioned tubes. A condenser is associated with the steam turbine for converting the spent steam into condensate water to be supplied to a deaerator for removing undesired air and for preliminarily heating the water condensate before being pumped to the economizer tube. Condensate flow through the economizer tube is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the boiler feed pump at a predetermined, substantially constant rate. A bypass conduit is provided to feed back a portion of the flow heated in the economizer tube to the deaerator; the portion being equal to the difference between the constant flow through the economizer tube and the flow to be directed through the high pressure evaporator tube as required by the steam turbine for its present load.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Columbia River White Sturgeon Genetics and Early Life History: Population Segregation and Juvenile Feeding Behavior, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geographic area of the genetics study broadly covered the distribution range of sturgeon in the Columbia from below Bonneville Dam at Ilwaco at Lake Roosevelt, the Upper Snake River, and the Kootenai River. The two remote river sections provided data important for enhancement considerations. There was little electrophoretic variation seen among individuals from the Kootenai River. Upper Snake river sturgeon showed a higher percentage of polymorphic loci than the Kootenai fish, but lower than the other areas in the Columbia River we sampled. Sample size was increased in both Lake Roosevelt and at Electrophoretic variation was specific to an individual sampling area in several cases and this shaped our conclusions. The 1987 early life history studies concentrated on the feeding behavior of juvenile sturgeon. The chemostimulant components in prey attractive to sturgeon were examined, and the sensory systems utilized by foraging sturgeon were determined under different environmental conditions. These results were discussed with regard to the environmental changes that have occurred in the Columbia River. Under present river conditions, the feeding mechanism of sturgeon is more restricted to certain prey types, and their feeding range may be limited. In these situations, enhancement measures cannot be undertaken without consideration given to the introduction of food resources that will be readily available under present conditions. 89 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

Brannon, Ernest L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Bite performance and feeding kinematics in loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) within the context of longline fishery interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feeding biomechanics and foraging behavior are likely contributors to loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) bycatch in the pelagic longline fishery. To investigate these contributions, loggerhead bite performance was measured in several size classes of captive-reared juveniles, captive sub-adults and adults, as well as wild loggerheads. A kinematic study was conducted to investigate loggerhead interactions with modified longline hooks. Kinematic and behavioral variables were assessed in relation to five longline hooks to determine if loggerhead feeding behavior is modulated relative to hook type, size, and offset. The bite force study demonstrated that mean maximum post-hatchling bite force was 2.5N and mass was the best predictor of post-hatchling bite force. Mean maximum bite force of juveniles with mean straight carapace length (SCL) of 12, 31, 44, and 65 cm were 27, 152, 343, and 374 N, respectively. Sub-adult and adult mean maximum bite force was 575 N. Maximum bite force had a positive linear relationship with all head and body morphometrics (P<0.001). Carapace width was the best predictor of bite force throughout ontogeny. The kinematic study demonstrated no differences between hook treatments in all kinematic variables analyzed. The results of this study suggest loggerhead feeding behavior may be stereotypical. Only 33% of all interactions resulted in hooking events. Hooking was lowest in 16 gage circle hooks with no offset and the 18 gage circle hooks with 10offset which may be indicative of a lower possibility of the turtle drowning. Hooking was highest in the 16 gage circle hooks with 10offset. The proportion of turtles hooked in the mouth was significantly greater than those hooked in the throat (P=0.001). Sixteen gage circle hooks with 10 offset had the highest percentage of throat hooking, and the 18 gage circle hooks without offset resulted in the lowest percentage of throat hooking. When interacting with J hooks with a 25 offset (9 gage), turtles mostly oriented their head away from the hook offset; however, when interacting with the 16 and 18 gage circle hooks with 10 offset, turtles mostly oriented their heads toward the hook offset. These data suggest that turtles may distinguish between small and large offsets, and may modulate their feeding behavior accordingly. Alternatively, turtles may be detecting hook size or hook shape. A more thorough characterization of loggerhead bite performance and feeding kinematics will be useful when developing or modifying longline fishery gear aimed at reducing loggerhead bycatch.

Guzman, Alejandra

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Stable isotope assessment of temporal and geographic differences in feeding ecology of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feeding ecology of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) and their primary prey was examined by analyzing their skin tissues for stable-carbon and nitrogen isotope content. The Pribilof Island northern fur seal population was designated as depleted in 1988 because their numbers were, and continue to be, below their optimum sustainable population. The primary cause for this decline is thought to be a decrease in their prey base in the eastern Bering Sea. Determination of fur seal feeding ecology is important so that disturbances in prey availability can be further studied. This study was able to augment current northern fur seal dietary knowledge using stable-carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis. Parturient and lactating female and juvenile male skin tissue and prey items were analyzed. Female and male tissues were collected in July, August and November, and July and August, 1997, respectively, from both St. Paul and St. George Islands. July/August samples represented spring migratory diet, while November samples illustrated breeding season diet. Females were found to be more enriched isotopically in ?N and C over juvenile males during their migration. November females on St. Paul island were enriched in ?N over July/August females, while St. George females were not significantly enriched. July/August females on St. George Island were more enriched in C over November females, while St. Paul females were not significantly enriched. There were no differences in ?N or C enrichment for migratory animals of the some sex traveling to either island, and there was no difference in ?N between islands for November females. There was a significant difference in C values between islands for November females with St. Paul being more enriched. Prey analysis showed step-wise enrichments for two species and prey stable isotope values were compared to fur seal values for an estimation of dietary content. Females appear to be feeding at a higher trophic level and feeding more coastally than males during migration. Migratory females appear to be feeding more coastally than breeding season females.

Kurle, Carolyn Mary

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 13 Development of Tools to Study Immune-Mediated Allergenic Responses to Food and Feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 13 Development of Tools to Study Immune-Mediated Allergenic Responses to Food and Feed Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing

326

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - B

327

Feeding versus Feedback in NGC 4151 probed with Gemini NIFS. I. Excitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) to map the emission-line intensity distributions and ratios in the Narrow-Line Region (NLR) of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 in the Z, J, H and K bands at a resolving power ~ 5000, covering the inner 200 pc x 300 pc of the galaxy at a spatial resolution of 8 pc. We present intensity distributions I(r) in 14 emission lines. (1) For the ionized gas, I(r) is extended to ~ 100 pc from the nucleus along pos. angle PA=60/240 deg-- NE--SW), consistent with an origin in the known biconical outflow; while for the recombination lines I(r) ~ r^-1, for the forbidden lines I(r) is flat (r^0). (2) The H_2 emission lines intensity distributions avoid the region of the bicone, extending to r ~ 60 pc, perpendicular to the bicone axis, supporting an origin for the H_2-emitting gas in the galaxy plane. (3) The coronal lines show a steep intensity profile, described by r^-2. Using the line-ratio maps [Fe II]1.644/1.257 and Pa_b/Br_g we obtain a reddening of E(B-V)~0.5 along the NLR and E(B-V)>1 at the nucleus. Our line-ratio map [Fe II] 1.257/[P II] 1.189 is the first such map of an extragalactic source. Together with the [Fe II]/Pa_b map, these line ratios correlate with the radio intensity distribution, mapping the effects of shocks produced by the radio jet, which probably release the Fe locked in grains and produce the enhancement of the [Fe II] emission observed at ~ 1 arcsec from the nucleus. At these regions, we obtain densities N_e ~4000 cm^-3 and temperatures T_e ~ 15000K for the [Fe II]-emitting gas. For the H_2-emitting gas we obtain T ~ 2100K. The distinct intensity distributions, physical properties and locations of the ionized and molecular gas suggest that the H_2-emitting gas traces the AGN feeding, while the ionized gas traces its feedback.

T. Storchi-Bergmann; P. J. McGregor; Rogemar A. Riffel; R. Simoes-Lopes; T. Beck; M. Dopita

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State Universitys Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

Dr. Donal F. Day

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Flow Control of Real Time Multimedia Applications Using Model Predictive Control with a Feed Forward Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multimedia applications over the Internet are getting more and more popular. While non-real-time streaming services, such as YouTube and Megavideo, are attracting millions of visiting per day, real-time conferencing applications, of which some instances are Skype and Yahoo Voice Chat, provide an interesting experience of communication. Together, they make the fancy Internet world become more and more amusing. Undoubtedly, multimedia flows will eventually dominate the computer network in the future. As the population of multimedia flows increases gradually on the Internet, quality of their service (QoS) is more of a concern. At the moment, the Internet does not have any guarantee on the quality of multimedia services. To completely surpass this limitation, modifications to the network structure is a must. However, it will take years and billions of dollars in investment to achieve this goal. Meanwhile, it is essential to find alternative ways to improve the quality of multimedia services over the Internet. In the past few years, many endeavors have been carried on to solve the problem. One interesting approach focuses on the development of end-to-end congestion control strategies for UDP multimedia flows. Traditionally, packet losses and delays have been commonly used to develop many known control schemes. Each of them only characterizes some different aspects of network congestion; hence, they are not ideal as feedback signals alone. In this research, the flow accumulation is the signal used in feedback for flow control. It has the advantage of reflecting both packet losses and delays; therefore, it is a better choice. Using network simulations, the accumulations of real-time audio applications are collected to construct adaptive flow controllers. The reason for choosing these applications is that they introduce more control challenges than non-real-time services. One promising flow control strategy was proposed by Bhattacharya and it was based on Model Predictive Control (MPC). The controller was constructed from an ARX predictor. It was demonstrated that this control scheme delivers a good QoS while reducing bandwidth use in the controlled flows by 31 percent to 44 percent. However, the controller sometime shows erratic response and bandwidth usage jumps frequently between lowest and highest values. This is not desirable. For an ideal controller, the controlled bandwidth should vary near its mean. To eliminate the deficiency in the strategy proposed by Bhattacharya, it is proposed to introduce a feed forward term into the MPC formulation, in addition to the feedback terms. Simulations show that the modified MPC strategy maintains the benefits of the Bhattacharya strategy. Furthermore, it increases the probability of bandwidth savings from 58 percent for the case of Bhattacharya model to about 99 percent for this work.

Duong, Thien Chi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Results Summary Investigating the Use of Liquid CO2 Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to the E-Gas Gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of US Department of Energy (DOE) Award No. DE-FE0007977, Liquid CO2/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers, which investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO2/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas gasifier in an integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration.Liquid CO2 (LCO2) has several property differences from water that ...

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

HLW Feed Delivery AZ101 Batch Transfer to the Private Contractor Transfer and Mixing Process Improvements [Initial Release at Rev 2  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this business case is to provide Operations and Maintenance with a detailed transfer process review for the first High Level Waste (HLW) feed delivery to the Privatization Contractor (PC), AZ-101 batch transfer to PC. The Team was chartered to identify improvements that could be implemented in the field. A significant penalty can be invoked for not providing the quality, quantity, or timely delivery of HLW feed to the PC.

DUNCAN, G.P.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

Memory characteristics of MOSFET with silicon nanoclusters formed using a pulse-type gas-feeding technique in the LPCVD system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The digital gas-feeding method was used in this study, with Si"2H"6 as the source gas, in a low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition system, to grow Si nanoclusters with high densities and uniform sizes. The densities of the Si nanoclusters rose to 7x10^1^1cm^-^2, ... Keywords: Digital gas-feeding, Flash memory, Nanocrystal floating-gate memory, Nonvolatile memory, Si nanocluster

Eunkyeom Kim; Kyoungmin Kim; Daeho Son; Jeongho Kim; Sunghwan Won; Wan-Shick Hong; Junghyun Sok; Kyoungwan Park

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Feasibility analysis of ternary feed mixtures of methane with oxygen, steam, and carbon dioxide for the production of methanol synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of ternary feed mixtures of CH{sub 4} with O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} is analyzed in relation to the production of methanol syngas. Stoichiometric constraints are formulated in terms of three parameters characterizing the steam, partial oxidation, and carbon dioxide reforming reactions of methane. The equilibrium analysis is conducted using the methanol balance ratio {mu} and methane slip fraction {chi} as explicit design parameters. General results are derived for the feasibility of each ternary feed combination as a function of pressure and temperature in the range 1 < {mu} < 3 under carbon-free conditions. Numerical calculations indicate that CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} feeds can be used in single-stage adiabatic reformers at low values of {mu}, but the produced syngas requires further treatment. Reforming based on CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O feeds is endothermic at {mu} {ge} 2 under typical reaction conditions, thus requiring the application of a two-stage process involving primary and secondary reformers. Utilization of CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O feeds in single-stage adiabatic reactors is feasible for {mu} = 1.7--1.9, yielding syngas which can be upgraded by partial CO{sub 2} removal. The endothermic CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O feed combination is always feasible for 1 < {mu} < 3.

Tjatjopoulos, G.J. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Inst., Thessaloniki (Greece). Foundation for Research and Technology; Vasalos, I.A. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Corrosion/Erosion Resistance of Ultimet\\256 R31233 in a Simulated Feed for a Radioactive Vitrification Facility  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion, erosion and corrosion/erosion tests were performed to evaluate the performance of nickel and cobalt based alloys in a simulated sludge/borosilicate frit slurry representative of the feed preparation system for a radioactive waste vitrification facility. Alloys tested included Type 304L stainless steel, Hastelloy\\256 C-276, Stellite\\256 6B, and Ultimet\\256. Testing indicated that Ultimet\\256 had improved wear resistance and similar corrosion resistance compared to Hastelloy\\256 C-276 in the simulated sludge/frit environment.

Imrich, K.J.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

LSA large area silicon sheet task continuous liquid feed Czochralski growth. Quarterly report, April-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this phase of the continuous liquid feed program is the design and development of equipment and processes in order to ultimately demonstrate the continuous growth of crystals, by the use of the Czochralski method, suitable for producing monocrystalline silicon for use in solar cells. This involves the growth of at least 150 kg monocrystalline silicon ingots, 150 mm in diameter, obtained from a single growth container. Our approach to meeting this goal is to develop a furnace with continuous liquid replenishment to the growth crucible. Demonstrations using the silicon polyrod feed mechanism continued this quarter providing continuous melt replenishment to the meltdown chamber, subsequent transfer of this melt, and the simultaneous growth of silicon ingots in the growth chamber. The frame to the CLF furnace was extended in order to accommodate 50 kg crystal ingots above the gate valve, hence enabling us to accomplish our goal of 150 kg throughput. Development work continued on various aspects of the melt transfer system.

Walters, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.

Matheney, Kara J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

FINAL REPORT DURAMELTER 100 HLW SIMULANT VALIDATION TESTS WITH C-106/AY-102 FEEDS VSL-05R5710-1 REV 0 6/2/05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the DM100 tests were to determine the processing characteristics of several C-106/AY102 feeds derived from simulants prepared by different methods, which result in different physical characteristics of the feed. The VSL simulant used in a previous test was prepared by the direct hydroxide method, which was the method used for feed preparation in the bulk of previous VSL melter testing. The NOAH Technologies Corporation modified-rheology simulant was prepared to the same composition as the VSL simulant using a method that resulted in rheological properties closer to those of certain actual waste samples. The SIPP simulant was produced by processing a co-precipitated waste simulant through a non-radioactive pilot scale semi-integrated pretreatment facility. The general intent of these tests was to provide a basis for determining whether the variations in rheology or other feed physical characteristics arising from the different methods of simulant preparation have significant effects on the processing characteristics of the feed in the melter. Completion of the test objectives is detailed in a table.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE FIELD OF THORIUM CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY. VOLUME I. PREPARATION OF ELECTROLYTIC CELL FEED FOR PRODUCTION OF THORIUM METAL. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A research and development program in the field of thorium chemistry and metallurgy was conducted. Most of this activity was directed toward the development of techniques for the production of metal by fused salt electrolytic approaches, little effort being proportioned to the preparation of an electrolyte for the process. An aqueous method for the preparation of an anhydrous cell feed was set up and operated for several months. Relatively high operating expense and difficulties with materials of construction prompted the development of a more direct approach for the production of electrolytic cell feed. The system established for cell feed preparation converts thoriumn nitrate to a basic carbonate via the reaction between the nitrate and sodium carbonate, this precipitation being quantitative. Following a suitable filtration and drying operation, the thorium oxycarbonate is converted directly to the chloride by reaction with carbon and chlorine, forming a cell feed containing between 40 and 45% thorium in a molten matrix of sodium and potassium chlorides. The preparation of cell feed by the descrihed process was carried out on a small- tonnage basis, in 1,000-pound batches. The entire process is capable of heing operated on a continuous or semi-continuous basis and presents a commercially feasible approach for the preparation of high quality anhydrous electrolytes suitable for conversion to A.E.C. grade thorium metal by eleetrolytic techniques. A brief description of small-scale research and development experiments leading to the established system also is included. (auth)

Fisher, C.E.; Wyatt, J.L.

1956-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation of high-level waste vitrification feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant, FY 1994: Alternate flowsheets (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site will be pretreated to concentrate radioactive constituents and fed to the vitrification plant A flowsheet for feed preparation within the vitrification plant (based on the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) design) called for HCOOH addition during the feed preparation step to adjust rheology and glass redox conditions. However, the potential for generating H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} during treatment of high-level waste (HLW) with HCOOH was identified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Studies at the University of Georgia, under contract with Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and PNL, have verified the catalytic role of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru), present in the waste, in the generation of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. Both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies at SRTC have documented the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} generation phenomenal Because H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} may create hazardous conditions in the vessel vapor space and offgas system of a vitrification plant, reducing the H{sub 2} generation rate and the NH{sub 3} generation to the lowest possible levels consistent with desired melter feed characteristics is important. The Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 studies were conducted with simulated (non-radioactive), pre-treated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). Neutralized current acid waste is a high-level waste originating from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) plant that has been partially denitrated with sugar, neutralized with NaOH, and is presently stored in double-shell tanks. The non-radioactive simulant used for the present study includes all of the trace components found in the waste, or substitutes a chemically similar element for radioactive or very toxic species. The composition and simulant preparation steps were chosen to best simulate the chemical processing characteristics of the actual waste.

Smith, H.D.; Merz, M.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Smith, G.L.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal Law Constraints and Possible Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

08 08 January 2010 Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal Law Constraints and Possible Solutions Scott Hempling National Regulatory Research Institute Silver Spring, Maryland Carolyn Elefant The Law Offices of Carolyn Elefant Washington, D.C. Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Kevin Porter Exeter Associates, Inc. Golden, Colorado National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-47408 January 2010

342

Integrated, Feed-Forward Hybrid Electric Vehicle Simulation in SIMULINK and its Use for Power Management Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybdd electric vehicle simulation tool (HE-VESIM) has been developed at the Automotive Research Center of the University of Michigan to study the fuel economy potential of hybrid military/civilian trucks. In this paper, the fundamental architecture of the feed-forward parallel hybrid-electric vehicle system is described, together with dynamic equations and basic features of sub-system modules. Two vehicle-level power management control algorithms are assessed, a rule-based algorithm, which mainly explores engine efficiency in an intuitive manner, and a dynamic-programming optimization algorithm. Simulation results over the urban driving cycle demonstrate the potential of the selected hybrid system to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy, the improvement being greater when the dynamicprogramming power management algorithm is applied.

Chan-Chiao Lin; Zoran Fillipi; Yongsheng Wang; Loucas Louca; Huel Peng; Dennis Assanis; Jeffrey Stein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Synchrotron Infrared Spectroscopy with Multivariate Spectral Analyses Potentially Facilitates the Classification of Inherent Structures of Feed-Type of Sorghum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the inherent structural-chemical features of Chinese feed-type sorghum seed using synchrotron-radiation Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SRFTIRM) with two multivariate molecular spectral analysis techniques: Agglomerative Hierarchical cluster (AHCA) and principal component analyses (PCA). The results show that by application of these two multivariate techniques with the infrared spectroscopy of the SRFTIRM, it makes possible to discriminate and classify the inherent molecular structural features among the different layers of sorghum with a great efficiency. With the SRFTIRM, images of the molecular chemistry of sorghum could be generated at an ultra-spatial resolution. The features of nutrient matrix and nutrient make-up and interactions could be revealed.

Yu Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, S7N 5A8 (Canada); Liu Dasen [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northeast Agricultural University (China)

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Charpentier, Danielle [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Belair, Manon [Department of Radiology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Microbial dynamics in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor granules in response to short-term changes in substrate feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity and diversity of the microbial communities in biogranules from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor were determined in response to short-term changes in substrate feeds. The reactor was fed simulated brewery wastewater (SBWW) (70% ethanol, 15% acetate, 15% propionate) for 1.5 months (phase 1), acetate / sulfate for 2 months (phase 2), acetate-alone for 3 months (phase 3), and then a return to SBWW for 2 months (phase 4). Performance of the reactor remained relatively stable throughout the experiment as shown by COD removal and gas production. 16S rDNA, methanogen-associated mcrA and sulfate reducer-associated dsrAB genes were PCR amplified, then cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 16S clone libraries showed a relatively simple community composed mainly of the methanogenic Archaea (Methanobacterium and Methanosaeta), members of the Green Non-Sulfur (Chloroflexi) group of Bacteria, followed by fewer numbers of Syntrophobacter, Spirochaeta, Acidobacteria and Cytophaga-related Bacterial sequences. Methanogen-related mcrA clone libraries were dominated throughout by Methanobacter and Methanospirillum related sequences. Although not numerous enough to be detected in our 16S rDNA libraries, sulfate reducers were detected in dsrAB clone libraries, with sequences related to Desulfovibrio and Desulfomonile. Community diversity levels (Shannon-Weiner index) generally decreased for all libraries in response to a change from SBWW to acetate-alone feed. But there was a large transitory increase noted in 16S diversity at the two-month sampling on acetate-alone, entirely related to an increase in Bacterial diversity. Upon return to SBWW conditions in phase 4, all diversity measures returned to near phase 1 levels.

Kovacik, William P.; Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Hickey, Robert; Zhang, Weiwen; Brockman, Fred J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

LSA large area silicon sheet task continuous liquid feed Czochralski growth. Quarterly report, July-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, currently in its second phase, is directed toward the design and development of equipment and processes to demonstrate continuous growth of crystals by the Czochralski method, suitable for producing single silicon crystals for use in solar cells. Continuous is defined as the growth of at least 150 kg of monosilicon crystal, 150 mm in diameter, from one growth container. The approach to meeting this goal is to develop a furnace with continuous liquid replenishment of the growth crucible, accomplished by a meltdown system with a continuous solid silicon fedd methanism and a liquid transfer system, with associated automatic feedback controls. In order to establish process parameters for conventional CZ growth of 150 mm ingots, several runs with 12-kg charges were performed, and solidification rates of 2.7 to 3.5 kg/hr were achieved. Significant progress has been made in the development of a new melt transfer system. Basic material problems relating to the high temperature environment were solved. The cost of the new transfer mechanism is lowered substantially through multiple use of the major system components. Manufacturing of parts and installation of the polyrod feed mechanism for continuous recharging of the meltdown chamber were completed together with the feedback control system which uses the melt level sensor belonging to the growth crucible as input. The design for a continuous particle feeder into the meltdown chamber has been completed, and the fabrication of this system is currently in progress. Several short melt replenishment runs with 5 to 8 kg of continuous melt transfer were performed in an effort to develop feedback control systems for solid rod and particle feeding as well as to establish the permissible pressure region in which melt transfer can be assured.

Walters, D.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of the Opitutaceae Bacterium Strain TAV1, a Symbiont of the Wood-Feeding Termite Reticulitermes flavipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial communities in the termite hindgut are essential for degrading plant material. We present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the Opitutaceae bacterium strain TAV1, the first member of the phylum Verrucomicrobia to be isolated from wood-feeding termites. The genomic analysis reveals genes coding for lignocellulosic degradation and nitrogen fixation.

Isanapong, Jantiya [University of Texas, Arlington; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M. [University of Texas, Arlington

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Model of the Feed Water System Including a Generic Model of the Deaerator for a Full Scope Combined Cycle Power Plant Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the modelling of the Feed water System and an original generic model for closed vessels containing a fluid in two phases at equilibrium conditions with an incondensable gas. The model was used for the deaerator of a Combined Cycle ... Keywords: deaerator, pressurised vessels model, feedwater simulation

Edgardo J. Roldan-Villasana; Ana K. Vazquez

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Overview Gaming SciTech Fun BizWorld Downloads Mobile Minigames Search text in Everything Go!Submit News | RSS Feeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!Submit News | RSS Feeds :: All Innovation Environment Health Research Space Weather Animals Misc Ads it a try! VisualThesaurus.com Introducing the new Versa Best in Class Engine & Cabin Space 6 speed to Investing Gains Plus 5 Roaring Value Stocks:New Rpt www.investmentU.com/Research_Rpt Tech News | Science

Gosselin, Frédéric

350

Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, the United States generates biofuels (ethanol) from corn grain. Unfortunately, low crop yields and limited growth regions result in limited availability. Furthermore, the use of staple food crops for ethanol production has generated a highly controversial food vs. fuel debate. Because of its high abundance and relatively low cost, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising alternative feedstock for biofuel production; however, structural features of lignocellulose limit accessibility of enzymes or microorganisms. These structural barriers include high lignin content, acetyl groups on hemicellulose, high cellulose crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, and small pore volume. To overcome these barriers, a variety of pretreatment processes (chemical and mechanical) have been developed. Oxidative-lime pretreatment (OLP) is highly effective at reducing lignin content and removing acetyl groups from hemicellulose. Combining OLP with a mechanical treatment process greatly enhances the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulose. Recommended OLP conditions were determined for Dacotah (120 C, 6.89-bar O2, 240 min) and Alamo (110 C, 6-89-bar O2, 240 min) switchgrass. Using recommended conditions, 72-h glucan digestibilities (g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in raw biomass; 15 filter paper units/g raw glucan) of 85.2 and 88.5 were achieved for Dacotah and Alamo, respectively. Adding ball milling to OLP further enhanced glucan digestibility to 91.1 (Dacotah) and 90.0 (Alamo). In previous studies, shock treatment achieved promising results, but was often inconsistent. This work refined shock treatment with a focus on using consistent procedures and performance analysis. The combination of OLP and shock treatment enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock treatment plus OLP increased the total digestible nutrients (TDNN; g nutrients digested/100 g organic matter) of corn stover from 51.9 (untreated) to 72.6. Adding in pre-washed corn stover solubles to produce a combined feed (17.8 percent corn stover solubles and 82.2 percent shock OLP corn stover) increased TDNN to 74.9. Mixing in enough solubilized protein to match the crude protein content of corn grain further improved TDNN to 75.5, only 12.6 less than corn grain.

Falls, Matthew David

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear spirals as feeding channels to the Supermassive Black Hole: the case of the galaxy NGC 6951  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of gas streaming motions along nuclear spiral arms towards the LINER nucleus of the galaxy NGC 6951. The observations, obtained using the GMOS integral field spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope, yielded maps of the flux distributions and gas kinematics in the Halpha, [NII]6584 and [SII]6717,31 emission lines of the inner 7x5 arcsec^2 of the galaxy. This region includes a circumnuclear star-forming ring with radius 500pc, a nuclear spiral inside the ring and the LINER nucleus. The kinematics of the ionized gas is dominated by rotation, but subtraction of a kinematic model of a rotating exponential disk reveals deviations from circular rotation within the nuclear ring which can be attributed to (1) streaming motions along the nuclear spiral arms and (2) a bipolar outflow which seems to be associated to a nuclear jet. On the basis of the observed streaming velocities and geometry of the spiral arms we estimate a mass inflow rate of ionized gas of 3x10^(-4) Msun/yr, which is of the order of the accretion rate necessary to power the LINER nucleus of NGC 6951. Similar streaming motions towards the nucleus of another galaxy with LINER nucleus -- NGC 1097 -- have been reported by our group in a previous paper. Taken together, these results support a scenario in which nuclear spirals are channels through which matter is transferred from galactic scales to the nuclear region to feed the supermassive black hole.

Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann; Oli L. Dors Jr.; Rogemar A. Riffel; Kambiz Fathi; David J. Axon; Andrew Robinson; Alessandro Marconi; Goran Ostlin

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

REVIEW Algal Photosynthesis as the Primary Driver for a Sustainable Development in Energy, Feed, and Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract High oil prices and global warming that accompany the use of fossil fuels are an incentive to find alternative forms of energy supply. Photosynthetic biofuel production represents one of these since for this, one uses renewable resources. Sunlight is used for the conversion of water and CO2 into biomass. Two strategies are used in parallel: plantbased production via sugar fermentation into ethanol and biodiesel production through transesterification. Both, however, exacerbate other problems, including regional nutrient balancing and the world's food supply, and suffer from the modest efficiency of photosynthesis. Maximizing the efficiency of natural and engineered photosynthesis is therefore of utmost importance. Algal photosynthesis is the system of choice for this particularly for energy applications. Complete conversion of CO2 into biomass is not necessary for this. Innovative methods of synthetic biology allow one to combine photosynthetic and fermentative metabolism via the so-called Photanol approach to form biofuel directly from Calvin cycle intermediates through use of the naturally transformable cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Beyond providing transport energy and chemical feedstocks, photosynthesis will continue to be used for food and feed applications. Also for this application, arguments of efficiency will become more and more important as the size of the world population continues to increase. Photosynthetic cells can be used for food applications in various innovative forms, e.g., as a substitute for the fish proteins in the diet supplied to carnivorous fish or perhapsafter acid

Ida G. Anemaet; Martijn Bekker; Klaas J. Hellingwerf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

RELAP5/MOD3 assessment using the Semiscale 50% Feed Line Break test S-FS-11  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5/MOD3 5m5 code was assessed using the 1/1705 volume scaled Semiscale 50% Feed Line Break (FLB) test S-FS-11. Test S-FS-11 was designed in three phases: (a) blowdown phase, (b) stabilization phase, and (c) refill phase. The first objective was to assess the code applicability to 50% FLB situation, the second was to evaluate the FSAR conservatisms regarding SG heat transfer degradation, steam line check valve failure, break flow state, and peak primary system pressure, and the third was to validate the EOP effectiveness. The code was able to simulate the major T/H parameters except for the two-phase break flow and the secondary convective heat transfer rate. The two-phase break flow had still deficiencies. The current boiling heat transfer rate was developed from the data for flow inside of a heated tube, not for flow around heated tubes in a tube bundle. Results indicated that the assumption of 100% heat transfer until the liquid inventory depletion was not conservative, the failed affected steam generator main steam line check valve assumption was not either conservative, the measured break flow experienced all types of flow conditions, the relative proximity to the 110% design pressure limit was conservative. The automatic actions during the blowdown phase were effective in mitigating the consequences. The stabilization operation performed by operator actions were effective to permit natural circulation cooldown and depressurization. The voided secondary refill operations also verified the effectiveness of the operations while recovering the inventory in a voided steam generator.

Lee, E.J.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

CE IGCC Repowering Project: Use of the Lockheed Kinetic Extruder for coal feeding; Topical report, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

ABB CE is evaluating alternate methods of coal feed across a pressure barrier for its pressurized coal gasification process. The Lockheed Kinetic Extruder has shown to be one of the most promising such developments. In essence, the Kinetic Extruder consists of a rotor in a pressure vessel. Coal enters the rotor and is forced outward to the surrounding pressure vessel by centrifugal force. The force on the coal passing across the rotor serves as a pressure barrier. Should this technology be successfully developed and tested, it could reduce the cost of IGCC technology by replacing the large lockhoppers conventionally used with a much smaller system. This will significantly decrease the size of the gasifier island. Kinetic Extruder technology needs testing over an extended period of time to develop and prove the long term reliability and performance needed in a commercial application. Major issues to be investigated in this program are component design for high temperatures, turn-down, scale-up factors, and cost. Such a test would only be economically feasible if it could be conducted on an existing plant. This would defray the cost of power and feedstock. Such an installation was planned for the CE IGCC Repowering Project in Springfield, Illinois. Due to budgetary constraints, however, this provision was dropped from the present plant design. It is believed that, with minor design changes, a small scale test version of the Kinetic Extruder could be installed parallel to an existing lockhopper system without prior space allocation. Kinetic Extruder technology represents significant potential cost savings to the IGCC process. For this reason, a test program similar to that specified for the Springfield project would be a worthwhile endeavor.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

OSTIblog RSS Feed  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

entries/rss Most recent posts entries/rss Most recent posts from the US Department of Energy OSTIblog at http://www.osti.gov/home/ostiblog en Enjoy the benefits of LED lighting http://www.osti.gov/home/ostiblog/enjoy-benefits-led-lighting

358

Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

359

Fluidic fuel feed system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and testing of a fluidic fuel injector for a coal-water slurry fueled diesel engine. The objective of this program was to improve the operating life of coal-water slurry fuel controls and injector components by using fluidic technology. This project addressed the application of fluidic devices to solve the problems of efficient atomization of coal-water slurry fuel and of injector component wear. The investigation of injector nozzle orifice design emphasized reducing the pressure required for efficient atomization. The effort to minimize injector wear includes the novel design of components allowing the isolation of the coal-water slurry from close-fitting injector components. Three totally different injectors were designed, fabricated, bench tested and modified to arrive at a final design which was capable of being engine tested. 6 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Badgley, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Bird-Feeding Boards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

live here all winter. Now is the time. The simplest device is a board or a piece of plywood nailed on a window sill. It should be at least 12 inches wide and 24 inches long, set...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: RSS Feeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Science Bowl http:www.netl.doe.govrsseducation.xml Smart Grid http:www.netl.doe.govrsssmartgrid.xml Technology Transfer http:www.netl.doe.govrsstech-transfer.xml...

362

NETL: RSS Feeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

account then visit our various Twitter profiles listed below. News Links to the latest NETL News Releases, NetLog Newsletters, and multimedia productions. Visit NETLNews at...

363

Coal Feed Pump- PWR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness

Jenny B. Tennant; Dr. Steven Chu; Secretary Of Energy; Coe Reduction; Coe Decrease; Advanced Gasification; Low-rank Coal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

EERE News: RSS Feeds  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercialization and Deployment Federal Energy Management Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cells International Industry Solar Vehicle Technologies Water Power Weatherization Wind...

365

Speeds and Feeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Reaming, free-machining low-carbon steels, wrought...M7 260 0.006 0.010 0.015 0.025 0.030 0.035 C-2 75 0.008 0.012 0.018 0.030 0.035 0.040 C-2 150??200 Hot rolled, normalized, annealed or

366

Influence of gas feed composition and pressure on the catalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons using a traditional cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} using a traditional Fischer-Tropsch Co-Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for the production of valuable hydrocarbon materials is investigated. The ability to direct product distribution was measured as a function of different feed gas ratios of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} (3:1, 2:1, and 1:1) as well as operating pressures (ranging from 450 to 150 psig). As the feed gas ratio was changed from 3:1 to 2:1 and 1:1, the production distribution shifted from methane toward higher chain hydrocarbons. This change in feed gas ratio is believed to lower the methanation ability of Co in favor of chain growth, with possibly two different active sites for methane and C2-C4 products. Furthermore, with decreasing pressure, the methane conversion drops slightly in favor of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} paraffins. Even though under certain reaction conditions product distribution can be shifted slightly away from the formation of methane, the catalyst studied behaves like a methanation catalyst in the hydrogenation of CO{sub 2}. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Robert W. Dorner; Dennis R. Hardy; Frederick W. Williams; Burtron H. Davis; Heather D. Willauer [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States). Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability Branch

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

EVALUATION OF AN ENGINEERING DEMONSTRATION OF THE MODIFIED ZIRFLEX AND NEUFLEX PROCESSES FOR THE PREPARATION OF SOLVENT EXTRACTION FEEDS FROM UNIRRADIATED ZIRCONIUM-BASE REACTOR FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to recover uranium from zirconium-base reactor fuels by solvent extraction, the metailic fuel and cladding must first be dissolved and a suitable feed solution prepared. Such preparations of solvent extraction feeds were successfully accomplished batchwise using both the Modified Zirflex and Neuflex processes employing an NH/sub 4/F -- oxidant mixture to dissolve the fuel elements, and the feed. (The d Zirflex feed, and H/sub 2/O for the Neuflex feed.) In the Modified Zirflex process, a dissolvent about 6 M in NH/sub 4/F with an excess of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ to oxidize uranium to the more-soluble U(VI) valence state. The off-gas, after NH/sub 3/ removal, is an H/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ mixture of small volume, which is diluted with air to a safe concentration. Then nitric acid-aluminum nitrate is added to the dissolution product, yielding a solvent extraction feed from which uranium is recovered by using TBP-Amsco as the extractant. In the Neuflex process, the dissolvent is NH/sub 4/F--H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, with less than a stoichiometric amount of NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/. Without NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/, the scrubbed off-gas is principally hydrogen, on the hydrogen-rich side of the flammable range of H/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ mixtures, Only water is added to this dissolution product, yielding a neutral fluoride feed from which uranium is extractable by use of Dapex reagents. ln both processes the F: Zr charge ratio, initial surface condition, and maximum section thickness of the fuel element were the principa1 determinants of total dissolution time. The zirconium loading as determined by the free fluoride - zirconium solubility relationship limited the capacity of fuels containing less than 2% U, while the free-fluoride-to-uranium ratio of about 100 required for solution stability was the limiting factor with alloys containing higher percentages of uranium, Hydrogen peroxide concentration was not an important factor in solution stability; the role of ammonla or NH/sub 4/OH was not studied. The feasibility of both processes was demonstrated by a series of batch dissolutions of kilogram quartities of various fuels containing 1 to 8% uranium. Continuous dissolution was demonstrated as was application to TRIGA fuel alloy (8% U-- ZrH). Stainless steel type 347 and a low-carbon nickel alloy were suitable materials of construction for the dissolution and the solvent extraction equipment. Since there were some discrepancies betweeq small-scale and engineering-scale work, especially in the prevention of precipitate formation near the end of the dissolution cycle, it is advised that some further investigation be made prior to attempted scaleup to plant operation. (auth)

Kitts, F.G.

1964-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Serum concentrations of cortisol induced by exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) are not predictive of residual feed intake (RFI) in Brahman cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of feed efficient cattle by determination of residual feed intake (RFI) of individual animals is both laborious and expensive (negative RFI value=efficient; positive RFI value=inefficient). A less costly method to predict RFI is needed. Knott et al. reported that rams with poor feed efficiency (positive RFI values) are more responsive to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH); thus, we tested the hypothesis that response to an ACTH challenge in Brahman cattle is directly associated with RFI. Brahman bulls (n=12) (39019 kg BW) and heifers (n=12) (33412 kg BW), age 151 mon, with established RFI values were used. To establish RFI, after the calves were weaned, they were evaluated in separate 70 d test periods for each gender during which the animals were limit fed (2.65% BW/d) in a Calan gate feeding system. The 6 lowest and 6 highest ranking of each gender, males and females, respectively, were used to assess cortisol response to exogenous ACTH, total n = 24. Blood samples were taken via indwelling jugular catheter every 15 min from 3 h prior to challenge through 4 h after challenge at time 0 h with ACTH (0.1 IU/kg BW). Serum concentrations of cortisol were determined by radioimmunoassay using Coat-A-Count kits (intra-assay variation of 7.7% and inter-assay variation of 7.6%). Data were analyzed using GLM specific for repeated measures. Cortisol concentrations were affected by time (P0.10). Basal cortisol concentrations (M=71; F=142 ng/ml), peak cortisol concentrations (M=373; F=644 ng/ml), amplitude of responses (M=313; F=494 ng/ml), and area under the curves pre-challenge (M=18930; F=41460 ng/mlh) differed (Pdata indicate that cortisol response to an ACTH challenge is not a useful predictor of RFI in Brahman cattle. However, a sexual dimorphism in the cortisol response to an ACTH challenge was detected in Brahman cattle.

Agado, Bryan Joseph

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes renewable energy feed-in tariff (FIT) policies and explores the different FIT policies currently implemented in the United States. It also discusses of a few proposed policies, the best practices in FIT policy design, and examines how FITs can be used to target state policy goals. The report covers current and potential future interactions between FITs and other state and federal energy policies while also providing an overview of the impacts FIT policies have in terms of renewable energy deployment, job creation, and economic development.

Couture, T.; Cory, K.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Arachidonic Acid Accumulation and Delta-5 Desaturation in Felines After Feeding a Gamma-Linolenic Acid Enriched Diet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feline lipid metabolism is a topic for greater exploration due to this specie?s unique characteristics. Cats express limited Delta 6-desaturase activity necessary for conversion of linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) to arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6). The possibility exists that Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) may serve as a precursor of AA in reproductive tissues especially if coupled with chain elongation and a functionally active Delta 5-desaturase. In addition no research has been conducted regarding feline reproductive Delta 8-desaturase activity as an alternate to the production of AA. To investigate desaturation activities, a group of 26 adult female cats were randomly assigned into 1 of 3 groups based on the diet fed: High Linoleic Acid (HL, n=7), Low Linoleic Acid (LL, n=9), and High Gamma-Linolenic Acid (GLA, n=10).The diets were fed for 300 days prior to ovariohysterectomy at which time EDTA plasma and ovarian, uterine, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were collected. Homogenates of each tissue were prepared and frozen in aliquots at -80 degrees C. Total lipids were extracted from the plasma and tissue homogenates followed by phospholipid (PL) fractionation via thin layer chromatography and fatty acid (FA) analyses by gas chromatography. The Shapiro-Wilks test was used to determine normal distribution of FA data followed by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparisons (p<0.05). Plasma PLs were significantly increased in both GLA and dihomo-Gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6Delta8,11,14) in the GLA group and statistically increased in 20:2n-6 and 20:3n-6(Delta5,11,14) in the HL group. Uterine tissue homogenates had significantly increased amounts of DGLA and AA, however ovarian tissue showed an increase of only DGLA. Adipose tissue FAs showed significantly high amounts of DGLA in the GLA group. It is concluded that a high GLA diet results in increased AA in uterine, but not ovarian, tissues and thus may supply eicosanoid precursors in support of reproduction. The presence of increased amounts of 20:3n-6(Delta5,11,14) and not AA in the plasma and uterine tissues in the HL group suggests that Delta6-desaturase cannot be induced and that Delta8-desaturase is not active when feeding high dietary LA. Furthermore, the increase in DGLA may provide an adipose storage reservoir for additional conversion under times of metabolic need. These data support the presence of a functionally active Delta5-desaturase in uterine, but not ovarian, tissues. The findings also suggest that increased dietary GLA may be used to meet the AA requirements for reproduction in cats in the absence of an animal based pre-formed source of AA.

Chamberlin, Amy Jo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Polymers go full circle in new plastics recycling process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling waste, especially post-consumer plastic packaging waste, is a growing issue. Pressure to find alternatives to landfilling and conserve resources has prompted governments to limit the amount of material that can be disposed in traditional ways. One approach, chemical recycling of mixed plastics back to the feedstock for virgin plastic products, is receiving increased attention. British-based BP Chemicals, in collaboration with other polymer producers, is pioneering this alternative. The process involves cracking polymers to a hydrocarbon intermediate suitable for feeding to existing petrochemical plants, such as the steam crackers that produce the basic building blocks for plastics. BP's recycled product already can be used with four leading steam-cracking processes.

Lock, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mountain Home Geothermal Project: geothermal energy applications in an integrated livestock meat and feed production facility at Mountain Home, Idaho. [Contains glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home Geothermal Project is an engineering and economic study of a vertically integrated livestock meat and feed production facility utilizing direct geothermal energy from the KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) southeast of Mountain Home, Idaho. A system of feed production, swine raising, slaughter, potato processing and waste management was selected for study based upon market trends, regional practices, available technology, use of commercial hardware, resource characteristics, thermal cascade and mass flow considerations, and input from the Advisory Board. The complex covers 160 acres; utilizes 115 million Btu per hour (34 megawatts-thermal) of geothermal heat between 300/sup 0/F and 70/sup 0/F; has an installed capital of $35.5 million;produces 150,000 hogs per year, 28 million lbs. of processed potatoes per year, and on the order of 1000 continuous horsepower from methane. The total effluent is 200 gallons per minute (gpm) of irrigation water and 7300 tons per year of saleable high grade fertilizer. The entire facility utilizes 1000 gpm of 350/sup 0/F geothermal water. The economic analysis indicates that the complex should have a payout of owner-invested capital of just over three years. Total debt at 11% per year interest would be paid out in 12 (twelve) years.

Longyear, A.B.; Brink, W.R.; Fisher, L.A.; Matherson, R.H.; Neilson, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

SciTech Connect

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

Defining the needs for non-destructive assay of UF6 feed, product, and tails at gas centrifuge enrichment plants and possible next steps  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of UF{sub 6} bulk material used in the process of enrichment at GCEPS. The inspectors also take destructive assay (DA) samples for analysis off-site which provide accurate, on the order of 0.1 % to 0.5% uncertainty, data on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, DA sample taking is a much more labor intensive and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of the results and contains the possibility of the loss of the continuity of knowledge of the samples during the storage and transit of the material. Use of the IAEA's inspection sampling algorithm shows that while total sample size is fixed by the total population of potential samples and its intrinsic qualities, the split of the samples into NDA or DA samples is determined by the uncertainties in the NDA measurements. Therefore, the larger the uncertainties in the NDA methods, more of the sample taken must be DA samples. Since the DA sampling is arduous and costly, improvements in NDA methods would reduce the number of DA samples needed. Furthermore, if methods of on-site analysis of the samples could be developed that have uncertainties in the 1-2% range, a lot of the problems inherent in DA sampling could be removed. The use of an unattended system that could give an overview of the entire process giving complementary data on the enrichment process as well as accurate measures of enrichment and weights of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product would be a major step in enhancing the ability of NDA beyond present attended systems. The possibility of monitoring the feed, tails, and product header pipes in such a way as to gain safeguards relevant flow and enrichment information without compromising the intellectual property of the operator including proprietary equipment and operational parameters would be a huge step forward. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including such process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector measurements reducing the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GeEPs safeguards.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moran, Bruce W [IAEA; Lebrun, Alain [IAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The distribution of Ga and Sb impurities in Ge-Si crystals grown by the Bridgman method using a feeding rod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gallium- and antimony-doped Ge{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} crystals (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.25) have been grown by the improved Bridgman method using a silicon seed and a macrohomogeneous feeding Ge-Si rod of the corresponding composition. The impurity concentration profiles along the grown crystals were determined from Hall measurements. The mathematical problem of impurity distribution along two-component mixed crystals grown from a melt with uniform and graded composition is solved in the Pfann approximation and within the virtual-crystal model for the solid solution. It is shown that the experimental impurity distributions in Ge{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} crystals are described well by the data calculated on the assumption of linear change in the impurity segregation coefficient with the crystal composition.

Azhdarov, G. Kh., E-mail: zangi@physics.ab.az [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan); Zeynalov, Z. M. [Ganja State University (Azerbaijan); Huseynli, L. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Data:56e4009c-31bf-49c8-a6fe-ed7ed4d5fcc4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

56e4009c-31bf-49c8-a6fe-ed7ed4d5fcc4 56e4009c-31bf-49c8-a6fe-ed7ed4d5fcc4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rochester Gas & Electric Corp Effective date: 2013/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: SERVICE CLASSIFICATION NO. 4 RESIDENTIAL SERVICE - TIME-OF-USE RATE ESS (Retail Access Rate Choice) Schedule I Sector: Residential Description: APPLICABLE TO USE OF SERVICE FOR: All purposes, in Entire Territory, by any customer who would otherwise be served under Service Classification No. 1 of this schedule. The use of this service is voluntary for all customers. This Retail Access choice includes fixed components for RG&E delivery service, a Transition Charge (Non-Bypassable Charge ["NBC"] as described in Section 12.B.), and a Bill Issuance charge. Customers that elect ESS and receive a Consolidated Bill will not be subject to the Bill Issuance Charge. An Energy Service Services Company ("ESCO") provides Electric Power Supply to the customer. RG&E provides the delivery service only. Flat rate Adjustments = SBC+RPS+POR+TCV POR (http://www.rge.com/MediaLibrary/2/5/Content%20Management/RGE/SuppliersPartners/PDFs%20and%20Docs/STAT%20DISC%2019_8%20_2_.pdf)

379

Feeding and nutritional ecology of the sea urchins Echinometra lucunter (Linnaeus, 1758) and Arbacia punctulata (Lamarck, 1816) Echinodermata: Echinoidea): the importance of animal foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of gut contents of Echinometra lucunter and Arbacia punctulata revealed that A. punctulata consumes significantly greater amounts of animal material--barnacles, mollusks, and bryozoans--than E. lucunter. Where these two species live sympatrically on the South Padre Island jetty, niche partitioning appears to be occurring. Different behavioral modes of feeding by urchins of the same species were demonstrated. The different natural diets of A. punctulata collected from two different locations (South Padre Island jetty and the Port Aransas jetty) can probably be attributed to food availability. Similarly, E. lucunter collected from the South Padre Island rock rubble area ingested more higher-plant material and less algal material than the same species on the nearby jetty. Determination of digestion coefficients of E. lucunter for three different diets showed that absorption of protein was more efficient from invertebrate (crab and squid) material than from algae or mixed food items. Absorption of carbohydrate was highest for the algal diet treatment. Absorption of lipid occurred at nearly the same efficiency for all three diets. Based on the high absorption efficiencies for protein, these results lend support to the idea that the consumption of invertebrate or animal material by urchins may enhance growth and reproductive fitness. Gonad indices calculated at the termination of the feeding experiment indicated that the diets offered were not adequate to maintain or increase gonad weight. Gonad indices tended to drop off after reaching a maximum in urchins with a test diameter size of 5 cm. Field trials of chemoreception showed that E. lucunter exhibited a greater number of successful movements towards food items than A. punctulata. Nocturnal chemoreception of prey items was demonstrated by E lucunter. E. lucunter did not exhibit a preference in the field for tiny one particular food item.

Pestovic, Jennifer Beth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hanford recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

Leonard, I.M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Battery Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Battery Recycling. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals...

382

Recycled roads  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the efforts of various states in the USA to recycle waste materials in highway construction as fill and pavements. The topics of the article include recycling used tires whole, ground, and shredded, cost of recycling, wood fiber chips as fill material in embankments, and mining wastes used to construct embankments and as coarse aggregates in asphalt pavement.

Tarricone, P.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Tuna-Dolphin-Bird Feeding Assemblages in the Galapagos Islands and Their Response to the Physical Characteristics of the Upper Water Column  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tuna-dolphin-bird feeding assemblages are unique to the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (ETP). These multiple species groups are believed to forage together in response to the physical properties of the near surface ocean as these constrain the distribution of prey. In the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR), intra-annual and interannual changes affect the properties of the water column, inducing mesoscale and fine scale temporal variability. Four three-week oceanographic surveys took place, in September 2008, April 2009, October 2009, and September 2010, between the coast of Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands and one small boat survey took place in June 2010 within the GMR. Marine mammal surveys were conducted during daylight hours and Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) sensor casts were taken throughout the survey. Data were analyzed to determine the types of water masses present and the strength and depth of the thermocline layer. These data were compared with the sightings of marine mammals, bird feeding groups, and tuna-dolphin-bird assemblages. Additionally, these data were used to predict where tuna would be likely to associate with dolphin groups. Results show Equatorial Surface Water was the dominant water mass throughout the archipelago, regardless of season or ENSO index. High salinity, cold water west of Isla Isabela indicated topographic upwelling of the Equatorial Undercurrent. Tropical Surface Waters from the Panama Current were detected north of the Equatorial Front to the east of the islands. Obvious changes in the water column properties were observed between El Nio and La Nia events in the GMR. Most mixed groups were sighted west and south of Isla Isabela during the four oceanographic surveys, as well as north and west of Isla San Cristobal in June 2010. Most sightings were in cool, high salinity waters, and high chlorophyll concentrations. There were a greater number of sightings during the April 2009 survey (ENSO-neutral conditions) than during any of the three fall surveys. Additionally, tuna-dolphin-bird groups were more likely to be seen near Isla Isabela, with the majority of them sighted during the April 2009 survey and a few sighted in each of the September 2008 and October 2009 surveys. No tuna-dolphin-bird groups were sighted during the September 2010 surveys. Results show that the presence and location of these multi-species groups may be controlled by the inter-annual cycles, the intra-annual cycles, or a combination of both types of changes seen within the Galapagos.

Johnston, Michelle

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

APPLICATION OF COLUMN EXTRACTION METHOD FOR IMPURITIES ANALYSIS ON HB-LINE PLUTONIUM OXIDE IN SUPPORT OF MOX FEED PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The current mission at H-Canyon involves the dissolution of an Alternate Feedstocks 2 (AFS-2) inventory that contains plutonium metal. Once dissolved, HB-Line is tasked with purifying the plutonium solution via anion exchange, precipitating the Pu as oxalate, and calcining to form plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed product for the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, and the anion exchange raffinate will be transferred to H-Canyon. The results presented in this report document the potential success of the RE resin column extraction application on highly concentrated Pu samples to meet MOX feed product specifications. The original 'Hearts Cut' sample required a 10000x dilution to limit instrument drift on the ICP-MS method. The instrument dilution factors improved to 125x and 250x for the sample raffinate and sample eluent, respectively. As noted in the introduction, the significantly lower dilutions help to drop the total MRL for the analyte. Although the spike recoveries were half of expected in the eluent for several key elements, they were between 94-98% after Nd tracer correction. It is seen that the lower ICD limit requirements for the rare earths are attainable because of less dilution. Especially important is the extremely low Ga limit at 0.12 {mu}g/g Pu; an ICP-MS method is now available to accomplish this task on the sample raffinate. While B and V meet the column A limits, further development is needed to meet the column B limits. Even though V remained on the RE resin column, an analysis method is ready for investigation on the ICP-MS, but it does not mean that V cannot be measured on the ICP-ES at a low dilution to meet the column B limits. Furthermore, this column method can be applicable for ICP-ES as shown in Table 3-2, in that it trims the sample of Pu, decreasing and sometimes eliminating Pu spectral interferences.

Jones, M.; Diprete, D.; Wiedenman, B.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

LAB-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION BY ANION EXCHANGE, PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION, AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

SciTech Connect

H-Canyon and HB-Line are tasked with the production of PuO{sub 2} from a feed of plutonium metal. The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed material for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility. After dissolution of the Pu metal in H-Canyon, the solution will be transferred to HB-Line for purification by anion exchange. Subsequent unit operations include Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination to form PuO{sub 2}. This report details the results from SRNL anion exchange, precipitation, filtration, calcination, and characterization tests, as requested by HB-Line1 and described in the task plan. This study involved an 80-g batch of Pu and employed test conditions prototypical of HB-Line conditions, wherever feasible. In addition, this study integrated lessons learned from earlier anion exchange and precipitation and calcination studies. H-Area Engineering selected direct strike Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation to produce a more dense PuO{sub 2} product than expected from Pu(III) oxalate precipitation. One benefit of the Pu(IV) approach is that it eliminates the need for reduction by ascorbic acid. The proposed HB-Line precipitation process involves a digestion time of 5 minutes after the time (44 min) required for oxalic acid addition. These were the conditions during HB-line production of neptunium oxide (NpO{sub 2}). In addition, a series of small Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation tests with different digestion times were conducted to better understand the effect of digestion time on particle size, filtration efficiency and other factors. To test the recommended process conditions, researchers performed two nearly-identical larger-scale precipitation and calcination tests. The calcined batches of PuO{sub 2} were characterized for density, specific surface area (SSA), particle size, moisture content, and impurities. Because the 3013 Standard requires that the calcination (or stabilization) process eliminate organics, characterization of PuO{sub 2} batches monitored the presence of oxalate by thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). To use the TGA-MS for carbon or oxalate content, some method development will be required. However, the TGA-MS is already used for moisture measurements. Therefore, SRNL initiated method development for the TGA-MS to allow quantification of oxalate or total carbon. That work continues at this time and is not yet ready for use in this study. However, the collected test data can be reviewed later as those analysis tools are available.

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Mock UF6 Feed and Withdrawal System for Testing Safeguards Monitoring Systems and Strategies Intended for Nuclear Fuel Enrichment and Processing Plants  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an engineering-scale, mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) system, its operation, and its intended uses. This system has been assembled to provide a test bed for evaluating and demonstrating new methodologies that can be used in remote, unattended, continuous monitoring of nuclear material process operations. These measures are being investigated to provide independent inspectors improved assurance that operations are being conducted within declared parameters, and to increase the overall effectiveness of safeguarding nuclear material. Testing applicable technologies on a mock F&W system, which uses water as a surrogate for UF6, enables thorough and cost-effective investigation of hardware, software, and operational strategies before their direct installation in an industrial nuclear material processing environment. Electronic scales used for continuous load-cell monitoring also are described as part of the basic mock F&W system description. Continuous monitoring components on the mock F&W system are linked to a data aggregation computer by a local network, which also is depicted. Data collection and storage systems are described only briefly in this report. The mock UF{sub 6} F&W system is economical to operate. It uses a simple process involving only a surge tank between feed tanks and product and withdrawal (or waste) tanks. The system uses water as the transfer fluid, thereby avoiding the use of hazardous UF{sub 6}. The system is not tethered to an operating industrial process involving nuclear materials, thereby allowing scenarios (e.g., material diversion) that cannot be conducted otherwise. These features facilitate conducting experiments that yield meaningful results with a minimum of expenditure and quick turnaround time. Technologies demonstrated on the engineering-scale system lead to field trials (described briefly in this report) for determining implementation issues and performance of the monitoring technologies under plant operating conditions. The ultimate use of technologies tested on the engineering-scale test bed is to work with safeguards agencies to install them in operating plants (e.g., enrichment and fuel processing plants), thereby promoting new safeguards measures with minimal impact to operating plants. In addition, this system is useful in identifying features for new plants that can be incorporated as part of 'safeguards by design,' in which load cells and other monitoring technologies are specified to provide outputs for automated monitoring and inspector evaluation.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bates, Bruce E [ORNL; Chesser, Joel B [ORNL; Koo, Sinsze [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEFs extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with simulated double-shell slurry feed at 90/degree/C: Hanford Grout Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with a low-level radioactive waste slurry called double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). The evaluation was necessary as part of the permitting process authorized by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL-94-580. Materials that were examined included five flexible membrane liners (Hytrel/reg sign/ polyester, polyurethane, 8130 XR5/reg sign/, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The liner and pipe samples were immersed for 120 days in the synthetic DSSE at 90/degree/C, the maximum expected temperature in the waste disposal scenario. Physical properties of the liner and pipe samples were measured before immersion and every 30 days after immersion, in accordance with EPA Method 9090. In addition, some of the materials were exposed to four different radiation doses after 30 days of immersion. Physical properties of these materials were measured immediately after exposure and after an additional 90 days of immersion to determine each material's response to radiation, and whether radiation exposure affected the chemical compatibility of the material. 20 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs.

Farnsworth, R.K.; Hymas, C.R.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Spiral inflow feeding the nuclear starburst in M83, observed in H-alpha emission with the GHAFAS Fabry-Perot interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of the nearby barred starburst galaxy, M83 (NGC5236), with the new Fabry-Perot interferometer GHAFAS mounted on the 4.2 meter William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The unprecedented high resolution observations, of 16 pc/FWHM, of the H-alpha-emitting gas cover the central two kpc of the galaxy. The velocity field displays the dominant disk rotation with signatures of gas inflow from kpc scales down to the nuclear regions. At the inner Inner Lindblad Resonance radius of the main bar and centerd at the dynamical center of the main galaxy disk, a nuclear $5.5 (\\pm 0.9) \\times 10^8 M_\\odot$ rapidly rotating disk with scale length of $60 \\pm 20$ pc has formed. The nuclear starburst is found in the vicinity as well as inside this nuclear disk, and our observations confirm that gas spirals in from the outer parts to feed the nuclear starburst, giving rise to several star formation events at different epochs, within the central 100 pc radius of M83.

Kambiz Fathi; John E. Beckman; Andreas A. Lundgren; Claude Carignan; Olivier Hernandez; Philippe Amram; Philippe Balard; Jacques Boulesteix; Jean-Luc Gach; Johan H. Knapen; Monica Relao

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Methanol Decomposition over Palladium Particles Supported on Silica: Role of Particle Size and Co-Feeding Carbon Dioxide on the Catalytic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monodisperse palladium particles of six distinct and controlled sizes between 4-16 nm were synthesized in a one-pot polyol process by varying the molar ratios of the two palladium precursors used, which contained palladium in different oxidation states. This difference permitted size control by regulation of the nucleation rate because low oxidation state metals ions nucleate quickly relative to high oxidation state ions. After immobilization of the Pd particles on silica by mild sonication, the catalysts were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and applied toward catalytic methanol decomposition. This reaction was determined as structure sensitive with the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency) increasing with increasing particle size. Moreover, observed catalytic deactivation was linked to product (carbon monoxide) poisoning. Co-feeding carbon dioxide caused the activity and the amount of deactivation to decrease substantially. A reaction mechanism based on the formation of the {pi}-bond between carbon and oxygen as the rate-limiting step is in agreement with antipathetic structure sensitivity and product poisoning by carbon monoxide.

Hokenek, Selma; Kuhn, John N. (USF)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

An investigation of the influence of Trichoderma virens (hypocreales: hypocreaceae) on reticulitermes virginicus (isoptera: rhinotermitidae) feeding, with an evaluation of the use of labral morphology for identification of reticulitermes from Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subterranean termites encounter numerous kinds of fungi during foraging and feeding activities. Nearly nine decades of research have exposed only a small fraction of the termitefungal interactions that exist in nature. The first portion of research presented here focused on how feeding behaviors of Reticulitermes virginicus (Banks) were affected by the fungus Trichoderma virens (Miller, Giddens & Foster) von Arx. Tests were performed with 'P' (GLT+) and 'Q'(GLT-) strains of T. virens. Both strains were applied to filter paper and wood disks cut from southern yellow pine and Sentricon?® monitoring devices. The first bioassay assessed the termites' feeding responses to fungal extracts removed from liquid media on days 2 through 7, and again on day 15. Only the GLT+ extracts from days 6 and 7 inhibited termite feeding significantly from the controls (16% and 54% less area loss, respectively). Response to wood covered by live T. virens mycelia was tested in the second bioassay. No significant differences in termite consumption were seen between fungal strains, but both substantially reduced the area loss due to termite feeding of treated wood by an average of 35%. A vacuum impregnation system was used to inoculate wood disks with fungal homogenate in the third bioassay. The wood treated with either GLT+ or GLT- homogenates did not have significant differences in area loss due to termite feeding. Overall, these results reiterated the plasticity that exists with termitefungal relationships. The second research topic addressed the applicability of labrum-based identification techniques to Reticulitermes Holmgren in Texas. Soldier labral morphology of four species, R. flavipes (Kollar), R. hageni (Banks), R. tibialis Banks, and R. virginicus (Banks), was evaluated as a character to separate species. Length and width measurements of five soldier labra were taken from each of the eight collection sites. These results were then judged against molecular analysis of the mtDNA 16S rRNA gene. Findings showed that labral shape was an unreliable diagnostic characteristic when comparing all species. A combination of length and length-towidth ratio successfully segregated all four Reticulitermes species. Comparison of a morphology-based dendogram to the phylogenetic analysis revealed a shared pattern between phenotypic and genotypic variations.

Heintschel, Bryan P.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Recycling 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 7, 2012 ... 6xxx Series Alloy Design Considerations Relating to Recycling: Malcolm ... Reuse of Al Dross as an Engineered Product: Chen Dai1; Diran...

396

Performance of a Treatment Loop for Recycling Spent Rinse Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation of a treatment loop designed to upgrade the quality of spent rinse waters discharged from 10 wet benches located in the fab at Sandia's Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL). The goal of the treatment loop is to make these waters, presently being discharged to the fab's acid waste neutralization (AWN) station, suitable for recycling as feed water back into the fab's ultrapure water (UPW) plant. The MDL typically operates 2 shifts per day, 5 days per week. Without any treatment, the properties of the spent rinse waters now being collected have been shown to be compatible with recycling about 30% (50/168) of the time (weekends primarily, when the fab is idling) which corresponds to about 12% of the present water discharged from the fab to the AWN. The primary goal of adding a treatment loop is to increase the percentage of recyclable water from these 10 wet benches to near 100%, increasing the percentage of total recyclable water to near 40% of the total present fab discharge to the AWN. A second goal is to demonstrate compatibility with recycling this treated spent rinse water to the present R/O product water tank, reducing both the present volume of R/O reject water and the present load on the R/O. The approach taken to demonstrate achieving these goals is to compare all the common metrics of water quality for the treated spent rinse waters with those of the present R/O product water. Showing that the treated rinse water is equal or superior in quality to the water presently stored in the R/O tank by every metric all the time is assumed to be sufficient argument for proceeding with plans to incorporate recycling of these spent rinse waters back into MDL's R/O tank.

DONOVAN,ROBERT PATRICK; TIMON,ROBERT P.; DEBUSK,MICHAEL JOHN; JONES,RONALD V.; ROGERS,DARELL M.

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hg and Se capture and fly ash carbons from combustion of complex pulverized feed blends mainly of anthracitic coal rank in Spanish power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the petrology and chemistry of fly ashes produced in a Spanish power plant from the combustion of complex pulverized feed blends made up of anthracitic/meta-anthracitic coals, petroleum, and natural coke are investigated. It was found that the behavior of fly ash carbons derived from anthracitic coals follows relatively similar patterns to those established for the carbons from the combustion of bituminous coals. Fly ashes were sampled in eight hoppers from two electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows. The characterization of the raw ashes and their five sieved fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) showed that glassy material, quartz, oxides, and spinels in different proportions are the main inorganic components. As for the organic fraction, the dominant fly ash carbons are anisotropic carbons, mainly unburned carbons derived from anthracitic vitrinite. The concentration of Se and Hg increased in ashes of the second ESP row, this increase being related to the higher proportion of anisotropic unburned carbons, particularly those largely derived from anthracitic vitrinite in the cooler ashes of the ESP (second row) and also related to the decrease in the flue gas temperature. This suggests that the flue gas temperature plays a major role in the concentration of mercury for similar ratios of unburned carbons. It was also found that Hg is highly concentrated in the medium-coarser fractions of the fly ashes ({gt} 45 {mu}m), there being a positive relationship between the amount of these carbons, which are apparently little modified during the combustion process, in the medium-coarse fractions of the ashes and the Hg retention. According to the results obtained, further research on this type of fly ash could be highly productive. 28 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

I. Surez-Ruiz; J.C. Hower; G.A. Thomas [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Recycling Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...countries with low energy costs, such as Canada, Venezuela, Brazil, and Australia Recycling will increase in importance. For the United States, and ultimately for the rest of the aluminum-consuming world, recycling and resource recovery will play an increasingly important strategic role in ensuring a...

399

Green Power Network - RSS Feed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Network (GPN) provides news and information on green power Green Power Network (GPN) provides news and information on green power markets and related activities. The site provides up-to-date information on green power providers, product offerings, consumer protection issues, and policies affecting green power markets. http://apps3.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/index.shtml en-us green power green pricing green marketing REC Renewable Energy Certificates TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 TVA Expands Power Purchase Programs by 7%http://apps3.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/news/news_template.shtml?id=1886 Mon, 30 Dec 2013 00:00:00 -0700 Duke Energy Carolinas Approved to Launch New Green Power Program North Carolina PUC Approves Green Source Riderhttp://apps3.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/news/news_template.shtml?id=1885

400

RSS Feed - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission and Distribution: Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software: Energy Storage: Geothermal: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell: Hydropower, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

RSS Feed Comments Twitter Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GreenBoulder.com Updates Subscribe powered by MailChimp! Latest Green News Commission approves Naturita uranium mill

Neff, Jason

402

CARE AND FEEDING OF FROGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Propellers' are features in Saturn's A ring associated with moonlets that open partial gaps. They exhibit non-Keplerian motion (Tiscareno et al.); the longitude residuals of the best-observed propeller, 'Bleriot', appear consistent with a sinusoid of period {approx}4 years. Pan and Chiang proposed that propeller moonlets librate in 'frog resonances' with co-orbiting ring material. By analogy with the restricted three-body problem, they treated the co-orbital material as stationary in the rotating frame and neglected non-co-orbital material. Here we use simple numerical experiments to extend the frog model, including feedback due to the gap's motion, and drag associated with the Lindblad disk torques that cause Type I migration. Because the moonlet creates the gap, we expect the gap centroid to track the moonlet, but only after a time delay t{sub delay}, the time for a ring particle to travel from conjunction with the moonlet to the end of the gap. We find that frog librations can persist only if t{sub delay} exceeds the frog libration period P{sub lib}, and if damping from Lindblad torques balances driving from co-orbital torques. If t{sub delay} << Pl{sub ib}, then the libration amplitude damps to zero. In the case of Bleriot, the frog resonance model can reproduce the observed libration period P{sub lib} {approx_equal} 4 yr. However, our simple feedback prescription suggests that Bleriot's t{sub delay} {approx} 0.01P{sub lib}, which is inconsistent with the observed libration amplitude of 260 km. We urge more accurate treatments of feedback to test the assumptions of our toy models.

Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Earthquake Feeds | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Email lisa@usgs.gov Unique Identifier DOI-34512 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary comcat.cr.usgs.govfdsnwsevent1 Data Download URL http:earthquake.usgs.gov...

404

Self pressuring HTP feed systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide tanks can be pressurized with decomposed HTP (high test hydrogen peroxide) originating in the tank itself. In rocketry, this offers the advantage of eliminating bulky and heavy inert gas storage. Several prototype self-pressurizing HTP systems have recently been designed and tested. Both a differential piston tank and a small gas-driven pump have been tried to obtain the pressure boost needed for flow through a gas generator and back to the tank. Results include terrestrial maneuvering tests of a prototype microsatellite, including warm gas attitude control jets.

Whitehead, J.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, comprehensive executive summary. Final report, September 30, 1993--March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R&D activities have demonstrated Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to be a robust, one-step process process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. The feed size and composition compatible with CEP have been increased in a short period of time, and additional R&D should lead to the ability to accept a drum (and larger?) size feed of completely uncharacterized waste. Experiments have validated the CPU (Catalytic Processing Unit). Two commercial facilities have been commissioned and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. Expansion of CEP to transuranic and high level wastes should be the next step in the development and deployment of CEP for recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from DOE decontamination and decommissioning activities.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Designer Sorghum Combining the High Digestibility and Waxy Grain Traits of Sorghum for Improved Nutrition Bioethanol Beer Feed and Food Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L). Moench) is used for human consumption in parts of Africa and Asia and as an animal feed mainly in the U.S. Though sorghum grain contains higher amounts of protein than other cereal grains such as wheat and corn, it is not as readily available for enzyme degradation in humans and animals. Protein body matrices called kafirins surround the starch granules in sorghum. Because the protein is less digestible, the starch is also less digestible for biofuel production. However variation for this trait exists and the line P850029 has a higher protein digestibility compared to other normal grain sorghum lines. This increase in digestibility of protein is due to the rearrangement of the kafirins in the prolamin protein bodies where, the ?-kafirins are rearranged in the seed endosperm and the amount of ?-kafirin in the grain is also reduced. The assay to phenotype the HD trait is time consuming and unpredictable. So identifying a quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the protein digestibility trait in sorghum would be beneficial in breeding. A recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population derived from P850029 x Sureno, were developed and used to map QTL regulating the protein digestibility trait. A single QTL was identified on chromosome 1 between Xtxp43 and Xtxp329. Validation of the identified QTL was done on heterogenous inbred families (HIFs). The results validate the same QTL identified on the RIL population on chromosome 1. Later the high digestibility trait (HD) was integrated with the Waxy trait in sorghum. The Waxy (WX) sorghums have starch completely in the form of amylopectin. The effect of endosperm type on ethanol yield and fermentation efficiencies was studied among HD, WX and HD-WX lines. The HD-WX lines fermented in a shorter time i.e. completed fermentation in 48 h and their fermentation efficiencies were also higher around 90%. The DDGS of the HD-WX lines also had lower residual starch content and 50% higher amino acid lysine content when compared to wildtype sorghum. Moreover, the relation between endosperm traits and grain yield in sorghum has not been fully explored. In this study, we compared the yield and yield components of four unique endosperm phenotypes, HD, WX, HD-WX and wildtype lines. A total of 100 F2:4 derived recombinant inbred lines population from a cross between Tx2907/P850029 were selected with 25 lines from each HD, WX, HD-WX and wild-type line were included in the study. These lines were grown in three replications in College Station and Halfway, Texas in a randomized complete block design. The results show that there are no significant differences in the grain yield.

Jampala, Babitha

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Microprobing the Molecular Spatial Distribution and Structural Architecture of Feed-type Sorghum Seed Tissue (Sorghum Bicolor L.) using the Synchrotron Radiation Infrared Microspectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorghum seed (Sorghum bicolor L.) has unique degradation and fermentation behaviours compared with other cereal grains such as wheat, barley and corn. This may be related to its cell and cell-wall architecture. The advanced synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) technique enables the study of cell or living cell biochemistry within cellular dimensions. The objective of this study was to use the SR-IMS imaging technique to microprobe molecular spatial distribution and cell architecture of the sorghum seed tissue comprehensively. High-density mapping was carried out using SR-IMS on beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA). Molecular images were systematically recorded from the outside to the inside of the seed tissue under various chemical functional groups and their ratios [peaks at {approx}1725 (carbonyl C=O ester), 1650 (amide I), 1657 (protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix), 1628 (protein secondary structure {beta}-sheet), 1550 (amide II), 1515 (aromatic compounds of lignin), 1428, 1371, 1245 (cellulosic compounds in plant seed tissue), 1025 (non-structural CHO, starch granules), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160 (CHO), 1150 (CHO), 1080 (CHO), 930 (CHO), 860 (CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2960 (CH{sub 3} anti-symmetric), 2929 (CH{sub 2} anti-symmetric), 2877 (CH{sub 3} symmetric) and 2848 cm{sup -1} (CH{sub 2} asymmetric)]. The relative protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratio image, protein amide I to starch granule ratio image, and anti-symmetric CH{sub 3} to CH{sub 2} ratio image were also investigated within the intact sorghum seed tissue. The results showed unique cell architecture, and the molecular spatial distribution and intensity in the sorghum seed tissue (which were analyzed through microprobe molecular imaging) were generated using SR-IMS. This imaging technique and methodology has high potential and could be used for scientists to develop specific cereal grain varieties with targeted food and feed quality, and can also be used to monitor the degree of grain maturity, grain damage, the fate of organic contaminants and the effect of chemical treatment on plant and grain seeds.

P Yu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX); Anderson, George H. (Houston, TX); Trachte, Ken L. (Baytown, TX); Hsia, Steve J. (Friendswood, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Aluminum Association: Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2008 ... This webpage provides some historical information on aluminum recycling and describes the processes done by various recyclers: used...

412

Federal Recycling Program Printed on recycled paper.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Federal Recycling Program Printed on recycled paper. The Forest Health Technology Enterprise. This book was pub- lished by FHTET as part of the technology transfer series. http.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis

Hoddle, Mark S.

413

Recycling | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycling Recycling Recycling In support of the Department's goal of implementing environmental sustainability practices across the complex, all DOE employees and contractors should incorporate the three "R's" of wise resource use as a core principle of their daily activities: reduce, reuse, and recycle. The Department's recycling program at Headquarters earns monetary credits from the GSA which is then credited to the Sheila Jo Watkins Memorial Child Development Centers for tuition assistance and the purchase of furniture and equipment. What Can Be Recycled, And Where What you can recycle Where to recycle White office paper, printed with any color ink. Staples are acceptable but paperclips, binder clips, plastic flags, tabs and colored post-it notes must be removed. Receptacles for white office paper are located in office suites and next to copy machines. Blue collection bins for individual offices may be obtained from the Facilities Management Helpdesk at (202) 586-6100 or by e-mailing:

414

Recycling General Sessions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and design based on recyclability; life-cycle analysis of materials; properties; and ... Al Recycling Batch Planning in a Constrained Secondary Material Market ... Mullites Bodies Produced From the Kaolin Residue Using Microwave Energy.

415

Mixed Waste Recycling Exemption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented the process for obtaining state approval to apply the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) recycling exemption. This report examines the regulatory basis for the recycling exemption and the strategy for designing and operating a recycling facility to meet that exemption. Specifically addressed is the process of submitting an actual recycling exemption request to an RCRA authorized state and potential roadblocks utilities m...

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Battery Recycling - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The symposium will cover all aspects of battery recycling from legislation, collection, safety issues & transportation regulations and current recycling...

417

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 17, 2010 February 17, 2010 Energy Savers in the Community: Fuel Cell Vehicle Pioneer As the communications coordinator for EERE's Clean Cities program, I'm always on the lookout for interesting stories about alternative fuel vehicles. February 4, 2010 How Has Saving Energy Affected Your Health? We don't often speak of it in these terms, but saving energy can sometimes have a positive influence on your health. February 2, 2010 Sites I Thought About Last Wednesday While President Obama was talking about his plans and goals for the future, it made me think of a lot of the work that EERE is already doing. January 26, 2010 Electric Cars Coming to Former Delaware GM Plant If a company's cars are luxurious enough for the Crown Prince of Denmark, then just imagine how the vehicles - which have a 50-mile, emission-free

418

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 18, 2011 January 18, 2011 Fuel Economy on the Fly If you're in the market for a new car, FuelEconomy.gov can help you pick the most fuel-efficient vehicle for your needs. January 12, 2011 A Look Inside the Detroit Auto Show A first hand perspective from the floor of the North American International Auto Show. January 11, 2011 Chevy Volt and replica battery | Photo Courtesy of Argonne Lab's Flickr The Department of Energy's Innovation in GM's Chevrolet Volt Argonne National Laboratory's breakthrough battery technology makes its way into the Chevy Volt. January 3, 2011 10 Ways to Save Money and Energy in the New Year These easy tips are great way to save money and energy throughout the New Year. December 22, 2010 The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis Pat Davis, the Director of our Vehicle Technologies Program, doles out the

419

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 22, 2011 February 22, 2011 Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles, ranging from gaseous fuels to hybrid cars. February 18, 2011 Racing Ahead in Automotive Education Does your school have what it takes to develop the next generation of automotive engineers? If so, develop and expand your curriculum by becoming a Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center of Excellence. February 14, 2011 Jeff Chamberlain Speaks at Brookings Battery Forum | Photo Courtesy of Audra Capas, 5StarPR Argonne Lab's Breakthrough Cathode Technology Powers Electric Vehicles of Today Jeff Chamberlain, who leads Argonne's Energy Storage Initiative, explains what goes into taking advanced battery technologies from the lab to the

420

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2013 May 17, 2013 Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) -- a group of regional transit agencies in Northern California -- operates twelve, zero-emission, fuel cell buses in real-world service throughout the Bay Area's diverse communities and landscapes. | Photo courtesy of Leslie Eudy, NREL. Top 11 Things You Didn't Know About Fuel Cells Test your fuel cell knowledge with these little-known facts. May 15, 2013 Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Switching to propane vehicles is helping a Mississippi nonprofit save money and maintain key services.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "recycled feeds feeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 14, 2012 February 14, 2012 Fuel Economy Valentines What's more romantic this Valentine's Day than taking a drive with your sweetheart? January 17, 2012 New Energy 101 Video: Electric Vehicles Electric vehicles, sometimes called EVs, can give drivers like you a convenient way to get around, while saving you money on fuel, reducing emissions, and supporting the nation's energy security. January 13, 2012 Arun Majumdar speaks at Idaho National Lab (INL) during a visit to the site earlier this week. | Photo courtesy of INL. EV Technology Accelerates in Colorado While the North American International Auto Show began this week in Detroit, ARPA-E Director Arun Majumadar is visiting another town on the cutting edge of vehicle R&D - Longmont, Colorado, home of UQM Technologies.

422

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 30, 2012 November 30, 2012 Argonne scientists Ira Bloom (front) and Javier Bareño prepare a sample of battery materials for Raman spectroscopy, which is used to gather information regarding the nature of the materials present in the sample. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Building a Better Battery for Vehicles and the Grid The new Batteries and Energy Storage Hub is a coordinated effort designed to push the limits on battery advances. November 30, 2012 Scientists and engineers at the Energy Department and its national laboratories are finding new, more efficient ways to convert biomass into biofuels that can take the place of conventional fuels like gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Science Division, graduate students and researchers use transplanted trees in a number of studies, including those involving biomass conversion to biofuels. In this photo, graduate student Alina Campbell is removing damaged leaves from Eastern Cottonwood trees, which helps stimulate the trees' growth.| Photo courtesy of Jason Richards.

423

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2011 July 29, 2011 President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton) New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation President Obama announced a landmark agreement with automakers that sets aggressive new fuel-economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks. Find out how the Energy Department is unleashing innovation that will create jobs and make sure that the fuel-efficient vehicles of the future are made in America.

424

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 29, 2011 November 29, 2011 This Month on Energy Savers: November 2011 The holiday season is in full swing. We've been focusing on ways to keep our homes warm during the cold months of winter, whether we're home or on vacation. November 17, 2011 How Do You Save Energy While on Vacation? What steps do you take to save energy at home or on the road while you're on vacation? November 15, 2011 New Calculator Helps You Buy the Energy-Saving Vehicle of Your Dreams Every day, people across America are making the choice to buy energy-efficient vehicles that save energy and money, protect the environment, and help reduce America's dependence on foreign oil. November 10, 2011 Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Tom D'Agostino, Sustainability Performance Office Director Jennifer MacDonald, Chris Evans and Deputy Secretary of Energy and Daniel Poneman at the 2011 Sustainability Awards. | Image courtesy of the Energy Department

425

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 24, 2010 March 24, 2010 Novozymes was awarded a $28.4 million tax credit to build an enzyme facility in Blair, Neb. | Photo courtesy of Novozymes Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska The biofuels company Novozymes received a $28.4 million tax credit under the Recovery Act for the construction of a new facility in Blair, Neb., that produces enzymes to turn waste into fuel. The project, sparked by the increasing demand for cellulosic fuel, will create 100 jobs and reduce the company's transportation costs. March 22, 2010 Advanced batteries will enable electricity generated through renewable energy sources to be used in plug-in vehicles. | File photo Battery Jobs Coming to Michigan A123 Systems, of Watertown, Mass., was awarded a $249 million Recovery Act

426

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2010 September 13, 2010 Back to School: Emphasizing Green in the Bluegrass State How Recovery Act funding is helping schools in the Bluegrass State go green. September 13, 2010 Biodiesel Offers a Renewable Alternative Biodiesel is a renewable fuel made of vegetable oils or animal fats. It can be produced from new oils such as soy or used vegetable oils like restaurant grease. September 10, 2010 North Lauderdale Gets 'Smart' on Cars The Parks and Recreation Department of North Lauderdale, Fla., is saving money and reducing its carbon footprint, thanks to the recent addition of two energy efficient "Smart Cars" to the city's fleet. September 10, 2010 Ed McNeel, superintendent of Corbin's school district, poses aboard the district's new hybrid-diesel bus. | Photo Courtesy of Susie Hart.

427

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 16, 2012 May 16, 2012 Getting It Right: Accurate Testing and Assessments Critical to Deploying the Next Generation of Auto Fuels Today, the Coordinating Research Council released a report on the effects of E15 and E20 on vehicle engines. We, at the Energy Department, believe the study is significantly flawed. May 14, 2012 The Race is On: Clean Energy and New Jobs in America, Starting in Michigan Deputy Secretary Poneman travels to Michigan to highlight how America can win the clean energy race May 11, 2012 Do You Have Your Own Tips for Saving Fuel? Do you have any other ideas for saving gas this summer? May 9, 2012 A Few Simple Steps for Better Gas Mileage One woman's quest to improve fuel economy on her family's summer roadtrip with simple maintenance and other easy techniques.

428

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2011 December 12, 2011 John Ferrell (center -- 4th from left) participates in a ribbon cutting ceremony marking the grand opening of a cellulosic ethanol demonstration facility in Tennessee. | Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess. Biomass for the Nation: How One Energy Department Expert Has Helped Lead the Way A look at one Energy Department employee's impact on the biofuels industry. December 12, 2011 Rajit Sapar analyzes samples at the Joint BioEnergy Institute's lab. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel Researchers at the Office of Science's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have tapped an unlikely source to help create a renewable alternative to diesel fuel. December 12, 2011 Dr. Riccardo Signorelli, CEO of FastCAP Systems meets with Secretary Chu. Signorelli founded a startup focused on researching and developing carbon nanotube ultracapacitors and was chosen by Technology Review as a "35 Under 35" innovator along with Foro Energy's Dr. Joel Moxely (another ARPA-E performer). | Courtesy of ARPA-E.

429

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 8, 2010 June 8, 2010 What's Up With Fuel Cells? We hear a lot about renewables like wind and solar these days, but what's the deal with fuel cells and is there a future in them? May 26, 2010 An artist's rendering of a Nissan LEAF charging outside a café. | Courtesy The EV Project LEAFing Through New Vehicle Technology The LEAF is a five-passenger hatchback, powered by advanced lithium-ion batteries - with a range of more than 100 miles on a single charge. The vehicle will cost drivers about $25,000 after a federal tax credit. May 20, 2010 Are You Participating in Bike-to-Work Day? Are you participating in Bike-to-Work day? Tell us about your plans! May 18, 2010 EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge Beyond the use of advanced technology, EcoCAR is unique among student competitions in that it provides students with access to and training on

430

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2011 31, 2011 This Month on Energy Savers: May 2011 A recap of May news on Energy Savers. May 27, 2011 Making Memorial Day Plans? Be Sure They're Efficient Useful tips from Energy Savers - from cooking, to entertaining, to driving - how to stay energy efficient this Memorial Day weekend. May 27, 2011 Clean Cities Reaches Across the Sea Clean Cities International collaborates with leaders from Kazakhstan and Sweden share best practices and accomplish mutual goals. May 26, 2011 NREL's Large-Volume Battery Calorimeter has the highest-capacity chamber in the world for testing of this kind. From bottom clockwise:NREL researchers Matthew Keyser, Dirk Long & John Ireland | Photo Courtesy of Dennis Schroeder Electric Vehicle Battery Testing: It's Hot Stuff! A look at the Large Volume Battery Calorimeter, a tool developed by

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Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25, 2013 July 25, 2013 Data compiled by Yan (Joann) Zhou at Argonne National Laboratory. (*) Sales from the second quarter of 2013 for Tesla Model S are based off of estimates provided by the Hybrid Market Dashboard. Data updated 9/25/2013. Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales Our new interactive chart lets you explore the continued growth of electric vehicle sales. July 24, 2013 By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

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Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 26, 2011 September 26, 2011 Berkeley Lab researchers have designed a new anode -- a key component of lithium ion batteries -- made from a "tailored polymer" (pictured above at right in purple). It has a greater capacity to store energy since it can conduct electricity itself rather than using a polymer binder (such as PVDF, pictured above at left in brown) in the traditional method. National Labs Leading Charge on Building Better Batteries Teams at two of the Energy Department's laboratories are making headway on two projects that will enable building a new lithium battery that charges faster, lasts longer, runs more safely, and might also arr