National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for recycled cooking oil

  1. Recycled/Recyclable Printed with vegetable oil based inks on recycled paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    #12;Recycled/Recyclable Printed with vegetable oil based inks on recycled paper (minimum 50 renting, buying or renovating pre- 1978 housing. F ederal law requires that individuals receive certain information before renting, buying, or renovating pre-1978 housing: LANDLORDS have to disclose known infor

  2. Rape oil methyl ester (RME) and used cooking oil methyl ester (UOME) as alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohl, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents a review about the fleet tests carried out by the Austrian Armed Forces concerning the practical application of a vegetable oil, i.e Rape Oil Methyl Ester (RME) and Used Cooking Oil Methyl Ester (UOME) as alternative fuels for vehicles under military conditions, and reviews other research results carried out in Austria. As a result of over-production in Western European agriculture, the increase in crop yields has led to tremendous surpluses. Alternative agricultural products have been sought. One alternative can be seen in biological fuel production for tractors, whereby the farmer is able to produce his own fuel supply as was the case when he previously provided self-made feed for his horses. For the market introduction different activities were necessary. A considerable number of institutes and organizations including the Austrian Armed Forces have investigated, tested and developed these alternative fuels. The increasing disposal problems of used cooking oil have initiated considerations for its use. The recycling of this otherwise waste product, and its preparation for use as an alternative fuel to diesel oil, seems to be most promising.

  3. Thermal hydrocracking of heavy hydrocarbon oils with heavy oil recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denis, J.D.; Khulbe, C.P.; Pruden, B.B.

    1981-02-24

    An improved process is described for the hydrocracking of heavy hydrocarbon oils, such as oils extracted from tar sands. The heavy hydrocarbon oil feedstock in the presence of an excess of hydrogen is passed through a confined hydrocracking zone under upflow liquid conditions, and the effluent emerging from the top of the hydrocracking zone is passed into a hot separator where it is separated into a gaseous stream containing hydrogen and vaporous hydrocarbons and a liquid stream containing heavy hydrocarbons. The hot separator is maintained near the temperature of the hydrocracking zone and the effluent from the hydrocracking zone enters the separator in a lower region below the liquid level in the separator. The gaseous stream containing hydrogen and vaporous hydrocarbons is withdrawn from the top of the separator while a portion of the liquid phase in the separator is recycled to the hydrocracking zone without further treatment and in quantities sufficient to increase the superficial liquid flow velocity in the hydrocracking zone such that deposition of coke in the hydrocracking zone is substantially eliminated.

  4. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  5. Used Oil, Antifreeze, and Car Battery Recycling in Centre County* Location Used Oil Used Antifreeze Car Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Used Oil, Antifreeze, and Car Battery Recycling in Centre County* Location Used Oil Used Antifreeze Car Batteries College Heights Exxon 803 North Atherton Street State College, PA 16803 (814) 238) 237-0121 Yes No No #12;Location Used Oil Used Antifreeze Car Batteries Valvoline Instant Oil Change

  6. Hydrocracking of heavy oils using an ebullated bed technology with recycle of unconverted bottom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galiasso, R.; Gutierrez, M.; Caprioli, L.

    1986-01-01

    An hydrocracking process was studied to convert Cerro Negro heavy oil using an ebullated bed technology with recycle of uncoverted bottoms. Three levels of recycle were used to demonstrate its effect on the economy of the process. An apparent kinetics was developed for the properties studied and a CSTR model was used to simulate the hydrocracking reactor. The reactivity of the recycled decreases as a function of the number of pass and the level of conversion; the higher the recycle is the higher the catalyst consumption for constant level of conversion. There is an economic optimum level of recycle which depends on catalyst deactivation and the economic parameters, and properties of the feed.

  7. Recycled waste oil: A fuel for medium speed diesel engines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, A.B.L.; Poynton, W.A.; Howard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the exploratory engine trials that Mirrlees Blackstone has undertaken to investigate the effect of fueling an engine using waste oil derived from used lubricants. The effect on the engine`s mechanical components, and thermal performance are examined, and the steps taken to overcome problems are discussed. The proposed engine is sited within the Research and Development facilities, housed separately from the manufacturing plant. The unit is already capable of operating on two different types of fuel with single engine set up. It is a 3 cylinder, 4-stroke turbocharged direct injection engine mounted on an underbase and it operates at 600 rpm, 15.0 bar B.M.E.P. (Brake Mean Effective Pressure). It is a mature engine, built {approximately} 20 years previously, and used for emergency stand-by duties in the company`s powerhouse. The test engine is coupled to an alternator and the electricity generated is fed to the national grid. Initial samples of treated fuel oil, analyzed by an independent oil analysis consultant, indicated that the fuel oil does not correspond to a normal fuel oil. They contained high concentrations of trace elements (i.e. calcium, phosphorus, lead, aluminum and silicon) which was consistent with sourcing from waste lubricating oils. The fuel oil was considered to be too severe for use in an engine.

  8. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort, January 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    Our objective, together with our CRADA partners, is to demonstrate advanced technology that could lead to an economic and environmentally acceptable commercialization of oil shale. We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  9. Continuous removal of polynuclear aromatics from hydrocarbon recycle oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosserman, P.J.; Taniguchi, V.T.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes an oil refining process. It comprises forming a liquid capable of solubilizing aromatic compounds having at least about 5 fused aromatic rings; and catalytically hydrocracking a hydrocarbon feedstock by: contacting the feedstock in a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a hydrocracking catalyst at a temperature and pressure sufficient to give a substantial conversion to lower boiling products; and condensing a hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone and separating the condensed effluent into (AA) a low boiling hydrocarbon product and (BB) an unconverted hydrocarbon oil containing one or more fused polynuclear aromatic compounds.

  10. A Feasibility Study for Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters In A Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph M. Smailer; Gregory L. Dressel; Jennifer Hsu Hill

    2002-01-21

    This feasibility study has indicated that of the approximately 120,000 tons of steel available to be recycled from used oil filters (UOF's), a maximum blast furnace charge of 2% of the burden may be anticipated for short term use of a few months. The oil contained in the most readily processed UOF's being properly hot drained and crushed is approximately 12% to 14% by weight. This oil will be pyrolized at a rate of 98% resulting in additional fuel gas of 68% and a condensable hydrocarbon fraction of 30%, with the remaining 2% resulting as carbon being added into the burden. Based upon the writer's collected information and assessment, there appears to be no operational problems relating to the recycling of UOF's to the blast furnace. One steel plant in the US has been routinely charging UOF's at about 100 tons to 200 tons per month for many years. Extensive analysis and calculations appear to indicate no toxic consideration as a result of the pyrolysis of the small contained oil ( in the 'prepared' UOFs) within the blast furnace. However, a hydrocarbon condensate in the ''gasoline'' fraction will condense in the blast furnace scrubber water and may require additional processing the water treatment system to remove benzene and toluene from the condensate. Used oil filters represent an additional source of high quality iron units that may be effectively added to the charge of a blast furnace for beneficial value to the operator and to the removal of this resource from landfills.

  11. A study of the composition of soap stock from cottonseed oil as influenced by variation in the length of time of cooking cotton-seed meats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siecke, Paul

    1932-01-01

    effect of temperature, time? an4 rate of heating cn the quality of cakes and the refining loss of the oil Eads (1) states Chat, "In oocking at high temperatures, the length of time in cooking should be less than fifty minutes. " Ls shown by Caldwell.... 839 s4. 685c 6 6OI st3e590 C3e480C 6+821 ss2. 68'7 c2. 608C 7. 3O6 Length of Cook vs. Yield ano anality of Oil 40 'oe 550 o 520 g z10 00 0;. 90 -15 220 250 "80 20 215 22 2 0 225 ]. 0 0 9 b( 8 215 40 60 Length o" Cook in Mi utes...

  12. Minimizing Waste from the Oil Industry: Scale Treatment and Scrap Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, M.

    2002-02-26

    Naturally occurring radioactive material is technologically concentrated in the piping in systems in the oil and gas industry, especially in the offshore facilities. The activity, mainly Ra-226, in the scales in the systems are often at levels classified as low level radioactive waste (LSA) in the industry. When the components and pipes are descaled for maintenance or recycling purposes, usually by high-pressure water jetting, the LSA scales arising constitute a significant quantity of radioactive waste for disposal. A new process is under development for the treatment of scales, where the radioactive solids are separated from the inactive. This would result in a much smaller fraction to be deposited as radioactive waste. The radioactive part recovered from the scales will be reduced to a stable non-metallic salt and because the volume is significantly smaller then the original material, will minimize the cost for disposal. The pipes, that have been cleaned by high pressure water jetting can either be reused or free released by scrapping and melting for recycling.

  13. Donald Cook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Donald L. Cook serves as the Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration. Appointed to the position by President Barack Obama, Dr. Cook was sworn...

  14. Enabling Calorie-Aware Cooking in a Smart Kitchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    of the American Medical Association (2003) proper calorie time of cooking (loss of nutrition) amounts of salt + oil 90kcal + ...=930kcal decrease beef beef calorieunit calorieweightitem 140g 390 kcal 546 oil 10gUser performs an action pour oil "oil 90kcal" persuade to cook within proper calorie real-time calorie awareness

  15. Cooking with Applesauce 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    like) 1? cups applesauce ? cup milk 1 egg 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ? cup raisins ? cup nuts (if you like) How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Cream the butter or margarine with the sugar. 3. Add... nuts (if you like) ? cup raisins What you need 1? cups all-purpose flour ? cup oatmeal (regular or quick) ? cup packed brown sugar 1? teaspooons baking powder ? teaspoon baking soda ? teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon (if you...

  16. Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

    1998-01-01

    by the IINR of industrial used oil recycling and disposal inoil collection facilities, industrial minimization and recycling,industrial used oils; Environmental impacts of oil disposal practices; Organization of recycling

  17. Cooking with Dry Spaghetti 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    of mushroom soup 1 10.75-ounce can of tomato soup 4 cups cooked, hot spaghetti 1 teaspoon dried oregano (if you like) 1 teaspoon dried basil (if you like) How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area...

  18. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  19. A study of soap stock from cotton seed oil as influenced by variations in the cooking temperature of the cotton seed meats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Harvey Steinle

    1932-01-01

    , for lb minutes to permit tne drains. e of the oil, The oil and oake wore woi?"heu and samples of eaoh taken for analysis. The refinin loss, crude protein and color were deC ermined by the methods given in the Rules of ths National 1 Cottonseed..., There wore lar e amounts of sodium carbonate formed, whioh fused and made complete combustion diffioult, so dry smraonium nitrate was added to the partially i~~ited sample to give oomplete oxidation, The usual method for the determination of miosture...

  20. Cooking with Corn Syrup 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-09-10

    1 1 /2 cups chopped nuts 1 cup packed brown sugar 3 /4 cup melted butter or margarine 1 /2 cup corn syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking... 2 eggs 9- to 10-inch unbaked pie shell How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Mix the ingredients and pour the mixture into an unbaked pie shell. 3. Bake the pie for 45...

  1. Extreme Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-01-14

    Broadcast Transcript: Singing the recycling blues because you have to separate your chipboard from your newspaper, your steel from your aluminum, your #1 from your #2 plastic? Pantywaists! The residents of Kamikatsu, Japan have no fewer than 34...

  2. ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·· Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling the recycle mix #12;Uses of Recycled ConcreteUses of Recycled Concrete 1.1. Aggregate BaseAggregate Base 2ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete

  3. Beef -- Selection, Care, Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Maeona; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Reasonover, Frances

    1964-01-01

    and pound ihto the meat. 3. Cut the meat into individual portions and brown meat on both sides in hot fat in a heavy frying pan or kettle. 4. Add canned or sliced tomatoes or water to half cover meat. . - 5. Place lid on pan and simmer until meat... is tender. Cooking in liquid means using enough liquid to cover the meat. It is used in preparing both stews and large pieces of meat. This method often is designated as simmering, as the liquid in the kettle should be kept at a simmering temperature...

  4. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  5. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  6. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  7. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  8. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 636 580 46 1 Q 114.0...

  9. Cook stove assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFoort, Morgan W; Willson, Bryan D; Lorenz, Nathan; Brady, Michael P; Marchese, Anthony; Miller-Lionberg, Daniel D

    2014-12-02

    A combustion chamber, having an upper part and a lower part, may include an annular constriction, in combination with the combustion chamber, to aid in directing partially combusted gases such as carbon monoxide away from the periphery of the combustion chamber back toward its center, and into the flame front. The annular constriction may also impede the flow of partially combusted gases located at the periphery, thus increasing the time these gases spend within the combustion chamber and increasing the likelihood that any products of incomplete combustion will undergo combustion. The combustion chamber may further comprise a dual burner cooktop for directing combustion gases and exhaust to multiple cooking vessels. In further embodiments, the combustion chamber may be made of, lined, or clad with a metal alloy comprising iron, chromium, and aluminum.

  10. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  11. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-12-09

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

  12. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse...

  13. Cooking When the Power Goes Off 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2005-09-30

    After a storm has knocked out utility services, cooking can be a problem or even hazardous if basic safety measures are not taken. This publication explains how to cook safely using charcoal or gas grills, camp stoves or wood fires....

  14. Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style With Every Heartbeat Is Life #12;#12;Heart Recipe Substitutions for Heart Healthy Cooking at the heart of African American family life and special celebrations. This recipe book brings together many

  15. CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.

    2011-01-01

    the carbon, oil, and gas from the shale are combusted; andceases •t II Burner gas and shale heat shale ll>" ~Air AirFigure 2. Oil recovery Vent gas '\\Raw shale oil Recycled gas

  16. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

    1983-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  17. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

    1982-03-17

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  18. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  19. Extrusion-cooking of sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Marta Hilda

    1987-01-01

    . Runge (Head of Department) August 1987 ABSTRACT Extrusion-Cooking of Sorghum (August 198ij Marta Hilda Gomez B. S. . Facultad de Ciencias Aplicadas a la Industria, San Rafael, Argentina Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. L. W. Rooney Dr. R. D...

  20. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  2. Canola Oil: The Myths Debunked You're looking for more information about canola -the seed, the oil and the meal. Maybe you've

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Canola Oil: The Myths Debunked You're looking for more information about canola - the seed, the oil's the truth. We promise. Q: What is canola oil? A: Canola oil is the healthiest of all commonly used cooking oils. It is lowest in saturated fat, high in cholesterol-lowering mono-unsaturated fat and the best

  3. Putting the press to the test : effects of temperature on Shea nut oil output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tacoronte, Lisa Cristina

    2010-01-01

    In northern Ghana, part of a belt reaching from Sub-Saharan Africa to northern Uganda, women collect and process Shea nuts for their valuable oil. This oil is then used in various cosmetic, cooking, and medicinal products. ...

  4. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Donald C Cook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Donald C Cook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. A Smart Kitchen for Nutrition-Aware Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jen-Hao

    The paper discusses a kitchen that intelligently senses cooking activities and provides realtime nutritional information helps facilitate healthy cooking by letting family cooks make informed decisions. It creates opportunities ...

  6. Wild Game -- Care and Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussman, Wallace; Tribble, Marie; Mason, Louise; Reasonover, Frances; Cox, Maeona

    1963-01-01

    gamey flavor. t n 3 tablespoons minced onion Y2 cup mushrooms, sliced Y8 teaspoon crushed sage Y8 teaspoon crushed thyme Y8 teaspoon savory 6 strips bacon h p 2 pheasants, about 21;2 pounds each 2 teaspoons salt I Y2 cups long-grain rice 3 cups water 1... and mushroom and cook about 10 minutes. Add to rice along with herbs. Stuff bird lightly. Extra stuffing may be baked in a greased, covered casserole last 30 minutes of roasting time. Truss birds. See page 15. Brush birds with melted butter or margarine...

  7. Alfreda Cook | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallenges | Department ofEnergyofEnergy Alden FishAlfreda Cook

  8. Method to separate and recover oil and plastic from plastic contaminated with oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS); Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Olson, Ronald B. (Kansas City, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO)

    1998-01-27

    The present invention provides a method to separate and recover oils and recyclable plastic from plastic contaminated with oil. The invention utilizes the different solubility of oil in as liquid or supercritical fluid as compared to a gas to effect separation of the oil from the plastic.

  9. Method to separate and recover oil and plastic from plastic contaminated with oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, H.M.; Bohnert, G.W.; Olson, R.B.; Hand, T.E.

    1998-01-27

    The present invention provides a method to separate and recover oils and recyclable plastic from plastic contaminated with oil. The invention utilizes the different solubility of oil in a liquid or supercritical fluid as compared to a gas to effect separation of the oil from the plastic. 3 figs.

  10. Cook-off Experiments with Surrogate Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cook-off Experiments with Surrogate Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Drum Contents Cook-off Experiments with Surrogate Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Drum Contents This...

  11. Scrap tire recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

    1997-03-01

    As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

  12. Hydrocracking. Upgrade recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazer, J.L.; Schott, M.E.; Stapf, L.A. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (US))

    1988-10-01

    Savings in make-up hydrogen of 6% or thruput increases of 10% are demonstrated for hydrocrackers by adding membrane hydrogen purifier units. These high-pressure units process slip streams taken form the hydrocracker recycle loop. Other advantages of these units include increased catalyst life, lengthened periods between catalyst regeneration cycles and less off-quality product.

  13. Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

  14. Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whisman, Marvin L. (Bartlesville, OK); Reynolds, James W. (Bartlesville, OK); Goetzinger, John W. (Bartlesville, OK); Cotton, Faye O. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1978-01-01

    A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

  15. Cooking for One or Two. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggard, Marilyn A.

    1980-01-01

    until just slightly warm arfd remove the meat. Place the meat in the broth, top oil 4 0" .. with'- canned biscuits or fresh biscuit dough, cover and simmer for about 20 minutes. For your personal touch, add your favorite seasonings to the broth...

  16. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    in Natural Gas Cooking Burners, LBNL Page 16 Palmes, E. D. ,from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation- Basedin Natural Gas Cooking Burners, LBNL Page 1 Disclaimer This

  17. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobscheid, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Natural Gas Cooking Burners   Agnes B.  Lobscheid 1,* , from Natural Gas Cooking Burners Agnes B. Lobscheid 1,* ,resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air.

  18. Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, Alessandro; Passarini, Fabrizio; Vassura, Ivano; Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

  19. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  20. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burch, Steven D. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber therebetween. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food.

  1. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.; Burch, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber there between. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food. 26 figs.

  2. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Germantown Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Toner...

  3. Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One company is actually recycling energy that has already been used to power manufacturing plants, which is helping facilities cut their energy expenses by up to 20 percent.

  4. How Chula Vista, California Is Turning Cooking Oil Into Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - Buildingof EnergyTown, Summer|Are

  5. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallonssquare foot) Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption...

  6. Recycling of pavement materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Randy Jim

    1976-01-01

    roadway which was to be recycle 1 was a lightly reinforced Portland cement concrete pa remcnt an asphalt c&ncrete overlay. Thc mater ial was broken wjth ld a headache ball and the reinforcing steel cut with cutting torches. After hauling to a central... which was an 18 foot wide concrete pavement of cI-6-9 design. The reinforcing steel in the thickened edge pavement consisted of two 1/2-inch bars along each side with 1/2-inch by $- foot bars acting as tie bars between lanes. Dowels were placed...

  7. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  8. Evaluation of legume cooking characteristics using a rapid screening method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, Hway-Seen

    2009-05-15

    Consumer preferences for legume cooking properties should be considered at an earlier stage in the breeding process. Hence, we developed an effective, low-cost method to analyze the cooking quality attributes of cowpeas. The ...

  9. Dr. Donald L. Cook | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Dr. Cook led efforts in pulsed power accelerator design and experimentation, fusion research, hydrodynamics, radiography, diagnostic development, and computational code...

  10. m heat. Saut gar en everything is cooked th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    of the layers. Do not stir. Simmer, covered, for 1 hour. Meanwhile, pan fry catfish fillets. Chunk cooked

  11. Project Reports for Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Weatherization improvement services will be provided to native people by native people in the Cook Inlet region.

  12. Effects of cooking on levels of PCBs in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; Durell, G.S.; Koczwara, G.; Spellacy, A.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Battelle Ocean Sciences performed a study to determine the effect of cooking on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the fillets of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Broiling, pan frying, and deep frying in oil were tested on fillets from 21 fish collected from New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, on February 21, 1991. The evaluation involved estimating the change in PCB concentrations using a mass-balance approach that factored the change in fillet weight resulting from cooking with the changes in PCB concentration expressed on a precooked wet-weight basis. Deep frying in oil resulted in a 47% reduction in total PCB levels in fillet tissue. Additionally, deep frying caused a 40% reduction in fillet mass. Pan frying and broiling resulted in statistically in insignificant increases in total PCB levels of 15% and 17%, respectively. Fillet mass reductions resulting from pan frying and broiling were 7% and 15%, respectively. The effects of cooking on 18 individual congeners generally paralleled the results observed for total PCB. All 18 congeners were significantly reduced by deep frying. Congener Cl{sub 2}(08) also was significantly reduced by either pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105) and Cl{sub 5}(118) showed apparent significant increases in concentrations following pan frying. Congeners Cl{sub 5}(105), Cl{sub 5}(118), and C1{sub 6}(138) showed significant increases in concentration following broiling.

  13. Solar cooking : the development of a thermal battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutting, Alexander Chatfield

    2007-01-01

    There are many rural area in the world where cooking fuel is very scarce. One solution to this problem is to use solar energy to cook food. However most people around the world like to cook large meals at night, when the ...

  14. If current capacity were to be expanded so that all of the non-recycled municipal solid waste that is currently sent to U.S. landfills each year could instead be converted to energy, we could generate enough electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    If current capacity were to be expanded so that all of the non-recycled municipal solid waste.S. could convert all its non-recycled plastics into oil each year, we could produce 5.7 billion gallons so that we could convert our non-recycled waste to alternative energy instead of landfilling it, we

  15. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  16. Inverse Gamma Distribution John D. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John D.

    Inverse Gamma Distribution John D. Cook October 3, 2008 Abstract These notes write up some basic facts regarding the inverse gamma distribution, also called the inverted gamma distribution. In a sense this distribution is unnecessary: it has the same distribution as the reciprocal of a gamma distribution. However

  17. Solid fuel cooking stoves: International directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    Optimal design and promotion of the use of fuel efficient cooking stoves demand continued interaction and exchange of information between researchers, extension workers, policy makers and others concerned with stove projects. The directory is aimed at listing all the known organisations in this area.

  18. Diet and Cancer Are Cooked Meats Involved

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01

    Diet has been associated with differences in cancer rates in human populations for many years. Mark Knize presents the latest research on cancer causes including work performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory investigating some interesting chemical products created when meat is cooked and how to reduce them. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 11542

  19. Workflow Patterns in Orc William Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William R.

    1 Workflow Patterns in Orc William Cook Sourabh Patwardhan Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Sciences University of Texas at Austin 2 Overview of Orc · Orchestration language ­Invoke services ­Manage(M, N) let(z) where z : if(x) | if(y) | or(x, y) where x : M where y : N 11 Orc Summary e, f, g ::= c

  20. Policy-Based Authorization William R. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William R.

    Page 1 Policy-Based Authorization William R. Cook Department of Computer Sciences University of Texas at Austin Abstract This paper discusses policy-based authorization, an effective intermediate point between MAC and DAC that promises to combine the best features of both models. Policy

  1. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Authors: Brady, Patrick V....

  2. System and technique for ultrasonic determination of degree of cooking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Leonard J. (Richland, WA); Diaz, Aaron A. (W. Richland, WA); Judd, Kayte M. (Richland, WA); Pappas, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Pfund, David M. (Richland, WA); Morgen, Gerald P. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-03-20

    A method and apparatus are described for determining the doneness of food during a cooking process. Ultrasonic signal are passed through the food during cooking. The change in transmission characteristics of the ultrasonic signal during the cooking process is measured to determine the point at which the food has been cooked to the proper level. In one aspect, a heated fluid cooks the food, and the transmission characteristics along a fluid-only ultrasonic path provides a reference for comparison with the transmission characteristics for a food-fluid ultrasonic path.

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  4. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  5. How to RECYCLE RIGHT at The University of Texas at Austin Material Acceptable Not Acceptable Where to Recycle Managed By Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    to Recycle Managed By Containers Paper & Cardboard Aluminum Cans Food Cans Plastics Glass office paper sticky notes clean drink cans clean food cans plastic drink bottles clean food containers hard plastics #1-7 unbroken glass carbon paper waxy paper food packaging anything stained with food or oil

  6. Cooking with Canned Tuna (packed in water) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    four servings. Tuna Macaroni Casserole (makes 4 to 6 servings) What you need 12-ounce can tuna, drained 2 10?-ounce cans cream of mushroom soup 1 cup frozen green peas (if you like) black pepper (to taste) 2 cups cooked...) What you need 7?-ounce box macaroni and cheese dinner *milk and margarine to make the macaroni and cheese ? cup milk 12 ounces canned tuna in water, drained 10?-ounce can cream of mushroom soup *Follow the directions on the package...

  7. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  10. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anderson-Cook received a doctorate in Statistics from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. She joined the Statistical Sciences Group at LANL in 2004. Currently, she...

  11. Anderson-Cook named American Society for Quality Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explained. Anderson-Cook holds a master's degree in statistics from the University of Toronto and a doctoral degree in statistics from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada...

  12. Cook Composites and Polymers Company Achieves Superior Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The case study highlights a Cook Composites and Polymers Co. (CCP) plant in Houston, Texas, as one of the first participants in the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) plant...

  13. Cooking with All-Purpose Flour 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    like) ? cup chopped nuts (if you like) How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Mix the butter or margarine with the sugar. 3. Add the egg and beat the mixture until it is creamy. Set... it aside. 4. In another bowl, mix the flour, baking powder and salt. 5. Add the flour mixture and milk to the sugar mixture. 6. Add the vanilla, raisins, and nuts. Mix well. 7. Spread the batter evenly into a greased 8-inch baking pan. 8. Mix the brown...

  14. Cook, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, EtInformation ControlGeorgia:Minnesota:Cook,

  15. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  16. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halsey, W; Simon, A J; Fratoni, M; Smith, C; Schwab, P; Murray, P

    2012-06-06

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  17. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobscheid, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    BC et al. (2009). Natural Gas Variability in California:to Pollutants  Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners  Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners Agnes B.

  18. Cold bond agglomeration of waste oxides for recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Alessio, G.; Lu, W.K. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Recycling of waste oxides has been an on-going challenge for integrated steel plants. The majority of these waste oxides are collected from the cleaning systems of ironmaking and steelmaking processes, and are usually in the form of fine particulates and slurries. In most cases, these waste materials are contaminated by oils and heavy metals and often require treatment at a considerable expense prior to landfill disposal. This contamination also limits the re-use or recycling potential of these oxides as secondary resources of reliable quality. However, recycling of some selected wastes in blast furnaces or steelmaking vessels is possible, but first requires agglomeration of the fine particulate by such methods as cold bond briquetting. Cold bond briquetting technology provides both mechanical compacting and bonding (with appropriate binders) of the particulates. This method of recycling has the potential to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The nature of the present study is cold bond briquetting of iron ore pellet fines with a molasses-cement-H{sub 2}O binder for recycling in a blast furnace. The inclusion of molasses is for its contribution to the green strength of briquettes. During the curing stage, significant gains in strength may be credited to molasses in the presence of cement. The interactions of cement (and its substitutes), water and molasses and their effects on the properties of the agglomerates during and after various curing conditions were investigated. Tensile strengths of briquettes made in the laboratory and subjected to experimental conditions which simulated the top part of a blast furnace shaft were also examined.

  19. A global clean cooking fuel initiative Jos Goldemberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initiative (GCCFI) to bring about a worldwide shift to clean fluid fuels for cooking and heating in 10 them by bringing about a shift to clean fluid fuels, and (2) an extensive and compelling literatureA global clean cooking fuel initiative José Goldemberg São Paulo State Environmental Secretariat

  20. Automobile Recycling Policy: Findings and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Frank

    This report focuses on recycling. As an objective neutral party, MIT has compiled a knowledge base that examines the many complex issues relating to re-cycling. Although this report was prepared at the request of the ...

  1. Compositional evaluation of asphalt binder recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, Richard Charles

    1997-01-01

    new asphalt binder. The high temperature Superpave TM Performance Grade (PG) specifications for recycled asphalt binders were found to be highly dependent on the aged asphalt. In addition, as the amount of saturates in the aromatic recycling agent...

  2. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen (Middletown, DE); Grot, Walther (Chadds Ford, PA)

    2007-08-14

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory completes demolition, recycling...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    completes demolition, recycling of former Administration Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  4. Waste Management and Recycling in Lab Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Waste Management and Recycling in Lab · Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom · Electronic odors and collect the first rinse with its associated hazardous waste stream), remove or deface recycle it! · MIT recycled 2773 tons of waste in 2010 · Remember b onl hat o need!· Remember buy only what

  5. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  6. Recycled Materials Resource Jeffrey S. Melton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Using Lithium to Mitigate ASR in RCA Concrete Project 38: Recycled Concrete Aggregate Concrete Pavement.recycledmaterials.org/Research/past/P1&2/p2final.pdf #12;Transportation Applications of Recycled Concrete Aggregate #12;RCA as Aggregate IMCPCP (HIF-07-004) pg. 44 The recycled aggregate should be taken from a pavement that is known

  7. Energy and Environmental Considerations in Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    air pollution by 86%, water pollution by 76%, and CO2 emissions by 80% · 1 ton of recycled steel energy and releases 95% less air pollution · Recycled paper is usually not rebleached (or uses H2O2 materials from recyclables · Carbon emissions & water pollution from production of virgin materials vs

  8. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  9. An industry response to recycle 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motl, G.P.; Loiselle, V.

    1996-06-01

    The US DOE is expected to issue a policy early this year articulating DOE`s position on the recycle of DOE radioactive scrap metal. In anticipation of this `Recycle 2000` initiative, the nuclear industry has formed a new trade association called the Association of Radioactive Metal Recyclers (ARMR). This article describes the Recycle 2000 initiative, provides some background on the ARMR and its membership, and identifies industry views on the actions to be taken and issues to be resolved in Recycle 2000 is to become a reality.

  10. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  11. In situ recycling of contaminated soil uses bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevlin, P.J.; Reel, D.A.

    1996-04-01

    OxyChem Pipeline Operations, primarily an ethylene and propylene products mover, has determined that substantial savings can be realized by adopting a bioremediation maintenance and recycling approach to hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. By this method, the soil can be recycled in situ, or in containers. To implement the soil-recycling program, OxyChem elected to use a soil remediator and natural absorbent product, Oil Snapper. This field maintenance material, based on an Enhanced Urea Technology, provides a diet to stimulate the growth of hydrocarbon-eating microbes. It works well either with indigenous soil microbes or with commercial microbes. The product is carried in field vehicles, which makes it immediately available when leaks or spills are discovered. Procedure for clean-up is to apply product and mix it into affected soil. Thus the contaminant is contained, preventing further migration; the contaminant is dispersed throughout the product, making it more accessible to the microbes; nutrients are immediately available to the microbes; and the material contributes aeration and moisture-retention properties.

  12. Business Feasibility Plan for an Onsite Mobile Oil Changing Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hecker, Jon W.

    2012-05-11

    recycling center in Olathe, KS that will accept up to 5 gallons of used motor oil per person, per day (Earth911.com 2012). Further information on how the process will work when applied to a company can be seen in Oil2U’s proposal to Company X, which can...

  13. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ``hands-on`` refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided.

  17. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServicesRecovery Act » Recovery ActRecycling

  18. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Matthew Cook, David Soloveichik, Erik Winfree,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks Matthew Cook, David Soloveichik, Erik Winfree cells we study Stochastic Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a for- mal model that considers a set SCRNs and Boolean Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive

  19. ROBERTA COOK Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ROBERTA COOK Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics University of California Davis, CA and Resource Economics, UC Davis. Applied research and extension program focusing on fresh produce marketing State University, East Lansing, Michigan Major: Agricultural Economics Areas of Concentration

  20. Project reports for Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc. (CITC) seeks to improve the energy efficiency of their Ernie Turner Center, which operates a therapeutic community "Village of Care" for its native members seeking residential substance abuse treatment.

  1. Recycling production designs : the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brommer, Tracey H. (Tracey Helenius)

    2013-01-01

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an ...

  2. Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Peer Review Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production 3252015 Algae Technology Area Review Todd W. Lane Sandia National Laboratories This presentation...

  3. Request for Information on Photovoltaic Module Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requests feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on issues related to photovoltaic (PV) module recycling technology. SunShot intends to understand the current state of recycling technology and the areas of research that could lead to impactful recycling technologies to support the developing PV industry. The intent of this request for information is to generate discussion related to planning for the end of life of photovoltaic modules and to create a list of high impact research topics in photovoltaics recycling.

  4. Ink and Toner Recycling Rewards Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    , earning both ISO 9001 for their quality processes, and 14001 certification for environmental management including the recycling and remanufacturing of consumable imaging supplies. · They are ISO certified

  5. Recycling Glass for Hawaii Reduce -Reuse -Recycle has never been so important. Developed countries around the world are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Nancy E.

    Recycling Glass for Hawaii Brief: Reduce - Reuse - Recycle has never been so important. Developed countries around the world are aiming at forming closed loop recycling systems - where all metal, plastic and glass are endlessly recycled. The US recycling rates are at 35% while some of EU countries are above 80

  6. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications The NRELRequirements

  7. recycling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp8/%2A4/%2A6/%2A en Y-12's

  8. LLNL oil shale project review: METC third annual oil shale contractors meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R.J.; Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combines laboratory and pilot-scale experimental measurements with mathematical modeling of fundamental chemistry and physics to provide a technical base for evaluating oil shale retorting alternatives. Presented herein are results of four research areas of interest in oil shale process development: Recent Progress in Solid-Recycle Retorting and Related Laboratory and Modeling Studies; Water Generation During Pyrolysis of Oil Shale; Improved Analytical Methods and Measurements of Rapid Pyrolysis Kinetics for Western and Eastern Oil Shale; and Rate of Cracking or Degradation of Oil Vapor In Contact with Oxidized Shale. We describe operating results of a 1 tonne-per-day, continuous-loop, solid-recycle, retort processing both Western And Eastern oil shale. Sulfur chemistry, solid mixing limits, shale cooling tests and catalyst addition are all discussed. Using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, we measure individual species evolution with greater sensitivity and selectivity. Herein we discuss our measurements of water evolution during ramped heating of Western and Eastern oil shale. Using improved analytical techniques, we determine isothermal pyrolysis kinetics for Western and Eastern oil shale, during rapid heating, which are faster than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the rate of cracking of oil vapor in contact with oxidized shale, qualitatively using a sand fluidized bed and quantitatively using a vapor cracking apparatus. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  10. Recycled Wash Water Crushed Returned Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Recycled Wash Water Crushed Returned Concrete National Concrete Consortium March 2012 Colin Lobo% increase by 2030 "Waste" to "Recycled" Returned Concrete - estimated 2 - 10% of production 8 to 12 million cubic yards Truck and Mixer Washout 50 to 200 gallons per truck WWW. NRMCA.ORG Need to manage

  11. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2009-01-01

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  12. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University waste through waste hierarchy and managing the waste in-house for final disposal. To explain the waste

  13. 8. Has recycled ber been used appropriately?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -making industry. The main raw material for paper used to be recycled clothes, until scarcity of clothes, rising to meet the demand and fiber collection can be a major bottleneck. In addition to the paper industry? Legality Have the products been legally produced? #12;#12;2.49 Recycling is common to the paper

  14. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2013-04-19

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  15. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  16. Solid waste recycling programs at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millette, R.L.; Blackman, T.E.; Shepard, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Flats (RFP) recycling programs for solid waste materials have been in place for over ten years. Within the last three years, the programs were centralized under the direction of the Rocky Flats Waste Minimization department, with the assistance of various plant organizations (e.g., Trucking, Building Services, Regulated Waste Operations, property Utilization and Disposal and Security). Waste Minimization designs collection and transportation systems for recyclable materials and evaluates recycling markets for opportunities to add new commodities to the existing programs. The Waste Minimization department also promotes employee participation in the Rocky Flats Recycling Programs, and collects all recycling data for publication. A description of the program status as of January 1994 is given.

  17. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    growth. For data on world oil consumption and long- term oilOil Production Domestic Oil Consumption a variety of

  18. Kids 4 Clean Air | Pollution | Climate | Recycling What can you do

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    to be produced and so less coal, oil and gas will have to be burnt in power stations, which means less airKids 4 Clean Air | Pollution | Climate | Recycling What can you do: There are many things we can do to encourage them to share http://www.clean-air-kids.org.uk/doingyourbit.html (1 of 3) [8/1/07 2:50:10 PM] #12

  19. Recycling of the Changing Automobile and Its Impact on Sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recycling of the Changing Automobile and Its Impact on Sustainability Title Recycling of the Changing Automobile and Its Impact on Sustainability Publication Type Conference Paper...

  20. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical EnergyRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyelectric energy generation and thermal energy conduction

  1. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  2. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 19, 2015 - 3:40pm Addthis Ryan Davis...

  3. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 5, 2015 - 12:16pm Addthis Ryan Davis...

  4. How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? Title How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2015 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  5. Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? Title Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2013...

  6. The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Title The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  7. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  8. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  9. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forget, Benoit; Pope, Michael; Piet, Steven J.; Driscoll, Michael

    2012-07-30

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  10. [DEMO PAPER] MIRURECIPE: A MOBILE COOKING RECIPE RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM WITH FOOD INGREDIENT RECOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    [DEMO PAPER] MIRURECIPE: A MOBILE COOKING RECIPE RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM WITH FOOD INGREDIENT-ta,maruya-t,yanai}@mm.inf.uec.ac.jp ABSTRACT In this demo, we demonstrate a cooking recipe recom- mendation system which runs on a consumer, and recommends cooking recipes related to the recognized food ingredients. By only pointing a built-in camera

  11. COOKING APPLIANCE USE IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A WEB-BASED SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klug, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    natural gas cooking burners generate pollutants that can have substantial impacts on residential indoor air quality.natural gas cooking burners generate pollutants that can have substantial impacts on residential indoor air quality.natural gas cooking burners. Proceedings of Indoor Air 2011, The 11th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality

  12. Mining the Home Environment Diane J. Cook and Narayanan Krishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    is a smart home. In a smart home, computer software plays the role of an intelligent agent that perceives mining smart home data and offer ideas for continued research. 2. Smart Home Data One reason whyMining the Home Environment Diane J. Cook and Narayanan Krishnan Washington State University

  13. Multi-agent smart environments Diane J. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Multi-agent smart environments Diane J. Cook School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and ambient intelligence has catapulted smart environments to the forefront of many research labs. While such issue is the role of multi-agent systems in smart environments. In this article we discuss the role

  14. Interpreting and Executing Recipes with a Cooking Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellex, Stefanie

    Interpreting and Executing Recipes with a Cooking Robot Mario Bollini, Stefanie Tellex, Tyler in the home, and a robotic chef capable of following arbitrary recipes would have many applications in both, and the ordered nature of recipes. We envision a robotic chef, the BakeBot, which can collect recipes online

  15. Mobility Management in Cellular Telephony Benjamin P. Cooke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobility Management in Cellular Telephony Benjamin P. Cooke , Darongsae Kwon , Dmitry Glotov. The left hand side of each inequality (5) is composed of the load resulting from hand-offs within a controller, from a controller, and to a controller. Here, q represents the load from handing over a call

  16. It Takes Two Neurons To Ride a Bicycle Matthew Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

    It Takes Two Neurons To Ride a Bicycle Matthew Cook Abstract Past attempts to get computers to ride bicycles have required an inor- dinate amount of learning time (1700 practice rides for a reinforcement an algebraic analysis of the exact equations of motion for the specific bicycle to be controlled [2, 3

  17. Automotive Powertrain Control: A Survey Jeffrey A. Cook, Jing Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    Automotive Powertrain Control: A Survey Jeffrey A. Cook, Jing Sun Julia H. Buckland, Ilya V recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Control- oriented models of gasoline, hybrid electric powertrains and automotive fuel cells. In each case, fundamental models are discussed

  18. Curbside recycling in the presence of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beatty, Timothy K.M.; Berck, Peter; Shimshack, Jay P

    2007-01-01

    Solid Waste. ” Journal of Environmental Economics and Management,solid waste and recycling with its Integrated Waste ManagementSolid Wastes: The Case of Portland, Oregon. ” Journal of Environmental Economics and Management,

  19. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    condenser operates above ambient temperature, the rejected heat also contains unused availability. By incorporating an absorption heat pump (AHP) into the distillation process, these sources of unused availability can be tapped so as to recycle (and hence...

  20. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  1. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  2. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed to sustainable waste management through reducing our consumption of materials, encouraging re-use where possible information in all future waste management contracts For further information see www

  3. printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER ENERGY EFFICIENCY, POLLUTION PREVENTION, AND PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT ASSISTANCE FOR INDUSTRY A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SPONSORED PROGRAM INDUSTRIAL STATE UNIVERSITY Industrial Assessment Center Department of Mechanical Engineering Fort Collins

  4. Loveland Water & Power- Refrigerator Recycling Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water & Power is providing an incentive for customers to recycle older, working refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old...

  5. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    Environmental Paradigm (NEP) scale, which has been widelyand Guagnano, 1995). The NEP was updated in 2000 and renamedand Poon (2001) use the NEP in a comparison of recycling

  6. Methods for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-06-30

    Methods for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. A method for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil comprising the steps of combining a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream with a heated low-oxygen-pyoil diluent recycle stream to form a heated diluted pyoil feed stream is provided. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream has a feed temperature of about 150.degree. C. or greater. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a first deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at first hydroprocessing conditions effective to form a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent.

  7. Mathematical Modeling for CostMathematical Modeling for Cost Optimization of PV RecyclingOptimization of PV Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    Mathematical Modeling for CostMathematical Modeling for Cost Optimization of PV Recycling of plants Capital costs to open up a recycling center 4 #12;Time Horizon for PV Recycling Infrastructure 5 cost $189K System optimal cost $1079K 11 #12;PV Recycling ­Cost Optimization 1. Where is the optimized

  8. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, James B. (Denville, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); McLean, Joseph B. (Somerville, NJ)

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  9. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  10. Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, and alkaline batteries. All batteries need to be sorted by battery type. Each battery type must be accumulated in a clearly labeled receptacle to identify the acceptable battery type. Batteries can be dropped off

  11. Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood estimated that about 5 million tons of spent preservative treated wood istons of spent preservative treated wood is disposed of annually into landfills in thedisposed of annually into landfills in the United

  12. Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Assessment of Using Recycled Materials for Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2003-01-01

    million metric tons of recycled aggregates are generated instate to state in the U.S. Recycled aggregates are, however,consumption of recycled aggregates from crushed concrete

  13. Near Miscible CO2 Application to Improve Oil Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bui, Ly H.

    2010-07-26

    control due to the reduction of oil viscosity. This suggested that application of carbon dioxide in the field would require injection and recycling of large volumes of carbon dioxide. Further study is needed to determine if such a process is economically...

  14. WASTE DESCRIPTION CONTACT PHONE RECYCLED OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eliminates potential environmental impact of storing waste bricks. Waste Oil Roland Baillargeon, ext.3261 Source Reduction 3,500 Hazardous Waste $6,000 $0 $20,000 350 gallons of waste oil contaminated contamination was identified and replaced with non-chlorinated substitute. Waste oil is now removed free

  15. BRSIC RECIPES COOKinG fiSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRSIC RECIPES fOR COOKinG fiSH Fishery Leaflet 106 Fish anel Wi Iellife Se r v;ce po-)ited States Department of the Interior Wa s.hi ngton, D.C. #12;United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Fish~9~4~9 Introduction .· ... BASTC R~CIP~~ FOR GOOK IN~ FISH By Rose G. Kerr, Home Economist Branch of Commercial

  16. Solar Cooking in the Sahel1 Beth Newton1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsham, John

    , E-mail: J.Marsham@leeds.ac.uk11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Capsule: The potential for use of low-cost solar and remotely sensed SEVIRI data.19 #12;ABSTRACT20 Solar cookers have the potential to help many of the worldSolar Cooking in the Sahel1 Beth Newton1 , Sophie Cowie1 , Derk Rijks2 Jamie Banks3 , Helen

  17. New developments in RTR fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelievre, F.; Brueziere, J.; Domingo, X.; Valery, J.F.; Leroy, J.F.; Tribout-Maurizi, A.

    2013-07-01

    As most utilities in the world, Research and Test Reactors (RTR) operators are currently facing two challenges regarding the fuel, in order to comply with local safety and waste management requirements as well as global non-proliferation obligation: - How to manage used fuel today, and - How fuel design changes that are currently under development will influence used fuel management. AREVA-La-Hague plant has a large experience in used fuel recycling, including traditional RTR fuel (UAl). Based on that experience and deep knowledge of RTR fuel manufacturing, AREVA is currently examining possible options to cope with both challenges. This paper describes the current experience of AREVA-La-Hague in UAl used fuels recycling and its plan to propose recycling for various types of fuels such as U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel or UMo fuel on an industrial scale. (authors)

  18. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  19. Prins recycling takes on a kingly presence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    Self-described as one of the industry`s fastest growing processors of post-consumer and post-commercial recyclables, Prins Recycling Corp. (Fort Lee, NJ) has certainly made a name for itself. Entrenched in a high-profile, aggressive acquisition mode, the company has expanded its operations and capacity by acquiring recyclables processing companies in Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania within the last year alone. In addition, since it began its acquisitions, the company has dramatically increased its annual sales from around $8 million in early 1994 to $20 million by the end of the same year. In 1995, through continued acquisitions and expansions, the company is expected to churn out sales of around $100 million.

  20. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  1. The value of recycling on water conservation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludi-Herrera, Katlyn D.

    2013-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is working to conserve water through recycling. This report will focus on the water conservation that has been accumulated through the recycling of paper, ceiling tiles, compost, and plastic. It will be discussed the use of water in the process of manufacturing these materials and the amount of water that is used. The way that water is conserved will be reviewed. From the stand point of SNL it will be discussed the amount of material that has been accumulated from 2010 to the first two quarters of 2013 and how much water this material has saved.

  2. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot...

  3. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot (gallons)","per Worker...

  4. Study of recycling impurity retention in Alcator C-mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Taekyun

    2004-01-01

    This work was aimed at reproducing experimental results in impurity compression of Ar, as well as the screening of recycling and non-recycling impurities from reaching the core plasma. As part of the study the code was ...

  5. Relationship between composition and performance of asphalt recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Gerald Dean

    1993-01-01

    This research was aimed at determining the effects of recycling agent composition on the performance of recycled asphalt with aging. To accomplish this, five experiments were performed, in which blends were produced with controlled compositions...

  6. Business plan for the Solar Recycle-o-Sort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalk, David O. (David Oliver)

    2008-01-01

    There exists much room for growth in recycling participation with almost 1 in every 4 Americans still not recycling at all. In many communities this fraction is significantly higher, with low awareness of the benefits of ...

  7. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01

    communication with Chuan-Hai Teh. Noranda Recycling, SanNokia), Stephane Burban and Chuan-Hai Teh (Noranda), Mike

  8. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S.

    2011-02-22

    Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

  9. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  10. WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were established for several of these laboratories. Initial cost estimates indicate that recycle may be preferable over burial if sufficient decontamination factors can be achieved during melt refining. Radiation levels of resulting ingots must be minimized in order to keep fabrication costs low. Industry has much of the expertise and capability to execute the recycling of radioactive scrap metal. While no single company can sort, melt, refine, roll and fabricate, a combination of two to three can complete this operation. The one process which requires development is in melt refining for removal of radionuclides other than uranium. WINCO is developing this capability in conjunction with academia and industry. This work will continue into FY-94.

  11. REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2001-01-29

    Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

  12. (Agricultural Need for Sustainable Willow Effluent Recycling)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the use of SRC willow for bioremediation. Alistair McCracken & Chris Johnston AFBI Environment!!! The challenges ! Energy Policy & The Environment Sustainable Water Mgmt Affordability (Fuel poverty SRC willow, for the management of waste water effluents. · To establish FIVE effluent recycling

  13. Printed on Recycled Paper United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Clean Air Act, further tightening emission standards. The NOx standard is set at 0.6 gpm for cars1 Emission Facts Printed on Recycled Paper United States Environmental Protection Agency Air and Radiation EPA420-F-99-017 May 1999 Office of Mobile Sources The History of Reducing Tailpipe Emissions 1970

  14. Ash Recycling: Just a Dream ? Heiner Zwahr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Ash Recycling: Just a Dream ? Heiner Zwahr MVR Müllverwertung Rugenberger Damm GmbH & Co. KG, which started operation in 1896, it was stated that "the fly ash" collected in the ash chambers was used methods for analysing the ingredients of fly ash have been improved, we no longer use fly ash from waste

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Volume 1 FRAP 1996-02 Prepared by: E1-RayesEnvironmental Corp. Vancouver, B.C. March 1996 #12;DISCLAIMER INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA (VOLUME I) BY EL-RAYES ENVIRONMENTAL CORP. 2601 East Mall Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z

  16. Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaic Modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium- Telluride Photovoltaic Modules Postdoctoral: Wenming Wang-Talk Program July 21, 2005 #12;Recycling Retired Photovoltaic Modules to Valuable Products, Where Are We.M., Feasibility of Recycling of Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaics, Presented at 134th TMS Annual Meeting &Exhibition

  17. PLACEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECYCLING CONTAINERS AROUND UBC CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equipment, and compostable waste such as food, animal and yard waste. This new outdoor recycling container Waste Management holds several recycling programs to promote waste and litter reduction. Its waste management fleets collect recycling items such as paper products, cans and bottles, e-waste such as computer

  18. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    lack of Waste-to-Energy capacity. #12;9 Austria As Germany, but Ban in force already in 2002. Landfill1 "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling" "A Sustainable Solution" Håkan in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse

  19. Barnett Katie O107 Cook Shelby O201 Crum Jade O207 Cui Yukun ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Boswell

    2013-11-14

    Barnett. Katie. O107. Cook. Shelby. O201. Crum. Jade. O207. Cui. Yukun. O213. Cybularz. Alexander O219. Duvall. Chelsea. O225. Gunthorp. Kara. P119.

  20. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    P. Sullivan (2009). Natural Gas Variability in California:Singer (2012). Impact of Natural Gas Appliances on PollutantPollutant Exposures in Natural Gas Cooking Burners, LBNL

  1. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobscheid, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    natural gas cooking burners without venting (kitchen exhaust systems) commonly leads to residential NO 2 concentrations that exceed ambient air quality

  2. LLNL oil shale project review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R.J. (ed.)

    1990-04-01

    Livermore's oil shale project is funded by two budget authorities, two thirds from base technology development and one third from environmental science. Our base technology development combines fundamental chemistry research with operation of pilot retorts and mathematical modeling. We've studied mechanisms for oil coking and cracking and have developed a detailed model of this chemistry. We combine the detailed chemistry and physics into oil shale process models (OSP) to study scale-up of generic second generation Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) retorting systems and compare with results from our 4 tonne-per-day continuous-loop HRS pilot retorting facility. Our environmental science program focuses on identification of gas, solid and liquid effluents from oil shale processes and development of abatement strategies where necessary. We've developed on-line instruments to quantitatively measure trace sulfur and nitrogen compounds released during shale pyrolysis and combustion. We've studied shale mineralogy, inorganic and organic reactions which generate and consume environmentally sensitive species. Figures, references, and tables are included with each discussion.

  3. FSC-Watch: FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global warming FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pile of collected paper, which can either be burned or landfilled, or shipped to more distant recycling recycled content. With the closure of this facility in early April 2008, there is no capacity

  4. Microwave Enhanced Separation of Water-In-Oil Emulsions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, C. S.; Lai, P.

    1992-01-01

    . INTRODUCTION Viscous and stable water-in-oil emulsions are generated in various industrial operations, such as petroleum refining, natural gas pipeline opera bon, and cutting or grinding in equiprent fabrica tion. Since itis no longer permitted by law... to dlscharge emulslons to a dump site, it is necessary to break the emulsion, and separate water fran oil to discharge water. The recovered oil can be recycled. If it must be disposed of, its VOlume is less than that of original emulsion, and conse quently...

  5. Methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-10-20

    Embodiments of methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. In one example, a method comprises the steps of separating a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent into a low-oxygen-pyoil organic phase stream and an aqueous phase stream. Phenolic compounds are removed from the aqueous phase stream to form a phenolic-rich diluent recycle stream. A biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is diluted and heated with the phenolic-rich diluent recycle stream to form a heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to deoxygenate the heated diluted pyoil feed stream.

  6. Prescriptive vs. performance based cook-off fire testing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakos, James Thomas; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Erikson, William Wilding; Gill, Walter; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-07-01

    In the fire safety community, the trend is toward implementing performance-based standards in place of existing prescriptive ones. Prescriptive standards can be difficult to adapt to changing design methods, materials, and application situations of systems that ultimately must perform well in unwanted fire situations. In general, this trend has produced positive results and is embraced by the fire protection community. The question arises as to whether this approach could be used to advantage in cook-off testing. Prescribed fuel fire cook-off tests have been instigated because of historical incidents that led to extensive damage to structures and loss of life. They are designed to evaluate the propensity for a violent response. The prescribed protocol has several advantages: it can be defined in terms of controllable parameters (wind speed, fuel type, pool size, etc.); and it may be conservative for a particular scenario. However, fires are inherently variable and prescribed tests are not necessarily representative of a particular accident scenario. Moreover, prescribed protocols are not necessarily adaptable and may not be conservative. We also consider performance-based testing. This requires more knowledge and thought regarding not only the fire environment, but the behavior of the munitions themselves. Sandia uses a performance based approach in assuring the safe behavior of systems of interest that contain energetic materials. Sandia also conducts prescriptive fire testing for the IAEA, NRC and the DOT. Here we comment on the strengths and weakness of both approaches and suggest a path forward should it be desirable to pursue a performance based cook-off standard.

  7. Model institutional infrastructures for recycling of photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.

    1996-01-01

    How will photovoltaic modules (PVMS) be recycled at the end of their service lives? This question has technological and institutional components (Reaven, 1994a). The technological aspect concerns the physical means of recycling: what advantages and disadvantages of the several existing and emerging mechanical, thermal, and chemical recycling processes and facilities merit consideration? The institutional dimension refers to the arrangements for recycling: what are the operational and financial roles of the parties with an interest in PVM recycling? These parties include PVM manufacturers, trade organizations; distributors, and retailers; residential, commercial, and utility PVM users; waste collectors, transporters, reclaimers, and reclaimers; and governments.

  8. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn3 TableAnderson-Cook wins William G.

  9. MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK Projects Jump to:BrilliantClarenceCook

  10. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWith PropaneNaturalTestAn Evolutionary Arms|Anderson-Cook Wins

  11. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01

    Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

  12. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01

    the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

  13. EECBG Success Story: How Chula Vista, California is Turning Cooking Oil

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of EnergyDepartment of EnergyDepartment of

  14. Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding, material microstructure and properties in friction stir welding welds of AA5083 (a non welding, Johnson-Cook material model 1. Introduction In this study, an attempt is made to modify

  15. Style Variation in Cooking Recipes Jing Lin1 and Chris Mellish2 and Ehud Reiter3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Ehud

    Style Variation in Cooking Recipes Jing Lin1 and Chris Mellish2 and Ehud Reiter3 Abstract. Human. For example, in food recipes there are style variations between authors even with describing the same cooking actions and foods. This paper summarises style variations in food recipes written by different people. 1

  16. HealthandSafetyOntario.ca The hazards of cooking and baking are mostly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    of water every 20 minutes (drinking fluids with electrolytes may also help you to acclimatize and provide At all times Follow the schedule below for cleaning: ­ Solid fuel cooking systems ­ once a month ­ High are cooking or baking Depending on the stove, adjustments to the burners may need to be made for clean

  17. Plant-Based Tannins as Antioxidants in Pre-Cooked Ground Beef Patties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruzen, Shannon Michelle

    2011-10-21

    .02percent), RM (0.2percent), or 0.25percent or 0.5percent powders of Chardonnay grapeseed (CG), Norton grapeseed (NG), CitruSmart (CS), or dried cherry (CP). Raw and cooked patties were aerobically stored for 0 to 5 days at 4 degrees C. Cooked patties were...

  18. Probe for contamination detection in recyclable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi

    2003-08-05

    A neutron detection system for detection of contaminants contained within a bulk material during recycling includes at least one neutron generator for neutron bombardment of the bulk material, and at least one gamma ray detector for detection of gamma rays emitted by contaminants within the bulk material. A structure for analyzing gamma ray data is communicably connected to the gamma ray detector, the structure for analyzing gamma ray data adapted. The identity and concentration of contaminants in a bulk material can also be determined. By scanning the neutron beam, discrete locations within the bulk material having contaminants can be identified. A method for recycling bulk material having unknown levels of contaminants includes the steps of providing at least one neutron generator, at least one gamma ray detector, and structure for analyzing gamma ray data, irradiating the bulk material with neutrons, and then determining the presence of at least one contaminant in the bulk material from gamma rays emitted from the bulk material.

  19. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  20. Recycling scheme for twin BWRs reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez-Sanchez, J. R.; Perry, R. T.; Gustavo Alonso, V.; Javier Palacios, H. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, La Marquesa s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750 (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    To asses the advantages of reprocess and recycle the spent fuel from nuclear power reactors, against a once through policy, a MOX fuel design is proposed to match a generic scenario for twin BWRs and establish a fuel management scheme. Calculations for the amount of fuel that the plants will use during 40 years of operation were done, and an evaluation of costs using constant money method for each option applying current prices for uranium and services were made. Finally a comparison between the options was made, resulting that even the current high prices of uranium, still the recycling option is more expensive that the once through alternative. But reprocessing could be an alternative to reduce the amount of spent fuel stored in the reactor pools. (authors)

  1. Recycling of Advanced Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.

    1999-10-06

    The pace of development and fielding of electric vehicles is briefly described and the principal advanced battery chemistries expected to be used in the EV application are identified as Ni/MH in the near term and Li-ion/Li-polymer in the intermediate to long term. The status of recycling process development is reviewed for each of the two chemistries and future research needs are discussed.

  2. Dresden 1 plutonium recycle program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresnick, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final report on the Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program. It covers the work performed from July 1, 1978 to completion, which includes in-pool inspection of two fuel assemblies, removal of two fuel rods, and post-irradiation examination (PIE) of six fuel rods. Appendix A describes the inspection and rod removal operations, and Appendix B describes the PIE work.

  3. Recycled Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycled Energy Development Jump

  4. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  5. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  6. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  7. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    From EIA, “World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Otherfrom EIA, “World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Otherfrom EIA, “World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other

  8. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  9. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  10. Automatic Concurrency in SequenceL Daniel E. Cooke a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    of parallel data processing, especially data processing of concern to the oil industry and to the U.S. Federal for New Language Abstractions Hardware improvements and the general spread of computing and computer

  11. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  12. EECBG Success Story: New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to build a state-of-the-art recycling center and improve stewardship of the land and environment. Learn more....

  13. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Brady, Patrick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Brady, Patrick V. Abstract Not Provided Sandia National Laboratories USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) United...

  14. Critical Materials Institute's rare-earth recycling tech goes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute's rare-earth recycling tech goes commercial OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 10, 2015-The Critical Materials Institute is celebrating its first commercial...

  15. Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Morris E. Fine Junior Professor, Northwestern University Sukhwant Raju Director of Recycling, First Solar Garvin Heath Senior Scientist, NREL Strategic Energy Analysis Center...

  16. Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs, The Cadmus Group, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recycling programs have become a staple of residential demand-side management portfolios. 1 Measure coincidence factor (demand savings), incremental cost, or measure life. #12;3 PART

  17. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01

    recycling. 3.1 Reverse logistics Reverse logistics costs canuse management are reverse logistics and reprocessing, whichbetween resale values and reverse logistics costs. The most

  18. Way to recycle, BES Technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has reached a major milestone by recycling 1 million gallons of radiological waste water through its laundry operations located at the East Tennessee Technology Park. This...

  19. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling Citation Details In-Document...

  20. Packing in a tradition of recycling: Manufacturer-turned-recycler Free-Flow Packaging Corp. , Redwood City, Calif

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Free-Flow Packaging Corp. recycles polystyrene. Loose-fill -- an industry name for expanded polystyrene (EPS) packaging modules, or what the public more commonly calls peanuts'' -- represents a material that can easily and economically be recycled over and over. The company manufactures a 100% recycled packaging peanut called FLO-PAK, as well as a variety of other EPS packaging products. Indeed, to date, Free-Flow Packaging has set up post-consumer EPS recycling operations at five of its 11 manufacturing facilities, both across the country and overseas. The corporation's original facility in Redwood City began this tradition when it first started processing industrial EPS scrap in 1978 and, later, pioneered the recycling of post-consumer EPS on site for use in its products in 1989. Now, only five years later, the result has produced a recycling operation that is truly successful, profitable, and closed-loop.

  1. A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel Travel ThePresidentialofSubsurfaceto Remote64EnergyA Ceramic Membrane to Recycle

  2. RecycleBank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎WindRecycleBank Jump to: navigation,

  3. Bayshore Recycling Solar Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSAEngineering LLCBarnerBayshore Recycling

  4. Analysis of the cost of recycling compliance for the automobile industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantec, Delphine

    2005-01-01

    Cars are one of the most recycled commercial products. Currently, approximately 75% of the total vehicle weight is recycled. The EU directives on End-of-life vehicles try to push the recycling process further: it fixed the ...

  5. Simulating consumer practices to evaluate the cooking and chemical characteristics of low fat ground beef patties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Jeanette Marie

    1993-01-01

    in a microwave oven was done only for broiled and pan-fried patties. Proximate composition, cholesterol, fat retention, energy content and cooking yield were determined. Frozen machine-made patties contained higher levels of fat (per patty) compared...

  6. Reading Cook-Lynn: Anti-Colonialism, Cultural Resistance, and Native Empowerment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afagla, Kodjo Ruben

    2010-12-17

    This work is an intellectual history and cultural study of Cook-Lynn's scholarship and other writings. Most scholars who discuss United States imperialism often prioritize its overseas activities and reduce the colonization ...

  7. Changes in quality of whole cooked sorghum {Sorghum bicolor (l) Moench} using precooking methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calderon de Zacatares, Vilma Ruth

    2009-05-15

    varieties compared to the control. This treatment produced grain with softer texture, increased dietary fiber and higher antioxidant activity retention (67.8%) for the tannin varieties than the control (22.7%). Evaluations of cooking quality of whole sorghum...

  8. Conjugated linoleic acid reduces lipid oxidation in irradiated, cooked ground beef patties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chae, Sung Hee

    2007-09-17

    This study was conducted to examine the antioxidative effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in irradiated, cooked ground beef patties. The hypothesis was that CLA would be retained during irradiation and would reduce lipid oxidation...

  9. Viability of waste-based cooking fuels for Developing countries : combustion emissions and field feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

    2013-01-01

    Biomass-derived cooking fuels are used by three billion people worldwide. The drawbacks of such fuels, typically wood or wood-derived charcoal, include health hazards, negative environmental effects, and perpetuation of ...

  10. Cook Composites and Polymers Company Achieves Superior Energy Performance Gold Certification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    The case study highlights a Cook Composites and Polymers Co. (CCP) plant in Houston, Texas as one of the first participants in the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) plant certification pilot program.

  11. 2014-02-06 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Conventional Cooking Products; Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information and notice of document availability regarding energy conservation standards for residential conventional cooking products, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 6, 2014.

  12. Linear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    (Glassey and Gupta, 1974) Paper Production Cycle ­ Production > Consumption > Recycling > Reuse in Production Waste Recovery Paper Production Paper Consumption Virgin Pulp Secondary Pulp Recovered Waste PaperLinear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse Tara Demeyer Management Science I #12

  13. Water Recycling Becomes Reality In the South Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Recycling Becomes Reality In the South Bay 12th Biennial State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference Friday September 18, 2015 #12;2 Presentation will cover: Santa Clara Valley Water District and Water Supply Picture Silicon Valley Advanced Water Purification Center Recycled Water Expansion- Potable

  14. Waste stream recycling: Its effect on water quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, D.A. (Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc., Newport Ness, VA (United States)); Lee, R.G. (Illinois-American Water Co., Belleville, IL (United States))

    1994-11-01

    Waste streams recycled to the influent of a water treatment plant typically contain contaminants at concentrations that are of concern. These contaminants may include giardia and Cryptosporidium, trihalomethanes, manganese, and assimilable organic carbon. This research shows that proper management--treatment, equalization, and monitoring--of the waste streams can render them suitable for recycling in many situations.

  15. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling and Its plasticity; however, the recycling of receptors has never been observed at peripheral synapses. Using a novel the regulation of receptor density, which could lead to rapid alterations in synaptic efficacy. Key words: toxin

  16. Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    with pavement recycling are (i) less user delay (ii) conservation of energy (iii) preservation of environment for recycling per year is about 0.84 million tons in Sweden, 7.3 million tons in Germany, 0.53 million tons mix was produced in Japan, which constituted 30% of the total hot mix production [4]. The RAP

  17. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASAT’s manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  18. Size distribution measurement of fine and ultrafine particle emission from cooking Evelyne Ghina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) for particle with diameter between d and (d+dd) including emission rate of the source, nucleation, re-suspension meat or fish lead to a total mean equivalent emission rate of (9±6)×1010 s-1 while cooking meat or fish in an oven lead to total mean equivalent emission rate of (9±4)×1010 s-1 . Cooking pasta or heat the stove

  19. Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

    2006-03-11

    While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

  20. Transport from the Recycler Ring to the Antiproton Source Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    In the post-NOvA era, the protons are directly transported from the Booster ring to the Recycler ring rather than the Main Injector. For Mu2e and g-2 project, the Debuncher ring will be modified into a Delivery ring to deliver the protons to both Mu2e and g-2 experiments. Therefore, it requires the transport of protons from the Recycler Ring to the Delivery ring. A new transfer line from the Recycler ring to the P1 beamline will be constructed to transport proton beam from the Recycler Ring to existing Antiproton Source beamlines. This new beamline provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. This paper presents the Conceptual Design of this new beamline.

  1. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

  2. 5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's share of world crude oil production has rebound5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil

  3. CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM BATTERIES All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead-acid and all other types. Uninterruptible Power Source (UPS) batteries must be removed from the UPS casing

  4. Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  5. Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  6. One-Pot Methamphetamine Cooks Pose New Danger Law enforcement in Southern Illinois are reporting that they are finding full blown methamphetamine cooks taking place in Coleman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    One-Pot Methamphetamine Cooks Pose New Danger Law enforcement in Southern Illinois are reporting. Inexperienced officers have picked these items up and moved them around without knowing the dangers involved. The idea is to reduce the amount of time needed for the overall process. The danger to subjects and to law

  7. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  8. Cooking with Cooked Ham 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of ham, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas.

  9. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    unfettered access to oil resources including the possibleChina’s search for oil resources around the world. However,a survey of China’s oil resources, while others focus

  10. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Figure 5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait,day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.and the peak in U.S. oil production account for the broad

  11. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq KuwaitEIA Table 1.2, “OPEC Crude Oil Production (Excluding Lease2008, from EIA, “Crude Oil Production. ” Figure 16. U.S.

  12. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),the Predictive Accuracy of Crude Oil Futures Prices,” EnergyFigure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December of

  13. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

  14. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),the faster its growth in oil demand over the last half ofthe income elasticity of oil demand to fall signi?cantly.

  15. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    current pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentthis point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supply inand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

  16. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

  17. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

  18. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    China made an Iranian oil investment valued at $70 billion.across Iran, China’s oil investment may exceed $100 billionthese involving investment in oil and gas, really undermine

  19. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    in U.S. real GDP and oil consumption, 1949-2006. slope =Historical Chinese oil consumption and projection of trend.1991-2006: Chinese oil consumption in millions of barrels

  20. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton Junedirectly. Understanding Crude Oil Prices* James D. Hamilton

  1. Initial Low Recycling Improving Confinement and Current Drive in Advanced Tokamak (AT) and Hybrid Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initial Low Recycling Improving Confinement and Current Drive in Advanced Tokamak (AT) and Hybrid Scenarios

  2. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    geological limits, global production of crude oil next yearGlobal production of crude petroleum. Notes: Bold line: From EIA, “World Production of Crude Oil,

  3. Oil Security Metrics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L.; Leiby, Paul N.

    2005-03-06

    A presentation to the IWG GPRA USDOE, March 6, 2005, Washington, DC. OSMM estimates oil security benefits of changes in the U.S. oil market.

  4. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

  5. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    historical data for claiming to be able to predict oil pricehistorical data. The second is to look at the predictions of economic theory as to how oil prices

  6. A Goldilocks Catalyst: Nanocluster 'just right' for Recycling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion are major contributors to global warming. Since CO2 comes from fuel, why can't we recycle it back into fuel rather...

  7. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  8. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Battery Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OnTo Technology LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced battery recycling.

  10. Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

    2007-01-01

    This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

  11. Fouling mechanisms of submerged ultrafiltration membranes in greywater recycling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oschmann, Nadine; Nghiem, L. D.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the influence of greywater constituents on the fouling behaviour of submerged hollow fibre UF membranes during greywater treatment for recycling purposes. Experiments were carried out on a bench-scale ...

  12. Ramsey County commercial, industrial, institutional waste reduction and recycling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman-Onkka, C.

    1995-09-01

    The Ramsey County Commercial, Industrial, Institutional Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was developed (1) to raise awareness of waste reduction and recycling opportunities for businesses, (2) to make information available to businesses, (3) to provide technical assistance to small and medium sized businesses on waste reduction and recycling, and (4) to raise awareness of Ramsey County as a technical resource. Ramsey County was founded in 1849 and is named for Alexander Ramsey, the first governor of the Minnesota Territory. Ramsey County is the smallest, most urban of all 87 counties in Minnesota. With 170 square miles and a 1990 population of 485,000, Ramsey has the most people per square mile of any county in Minnesota. There are 19 cities within the County, the largest is Saint Paul with a 1990 population of 272,000. There are no unincorporated areas in Ramsey County. This report describes the efforts directed towards raising the awareness of the county waste management, recycling program.

  13. Recycling Lingware in a Multilingual MT System Steffen Leo Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycling Lingware in a Multilingual MT System Steffen Leo Hansen Manny Rayner David Carter Ivan (Rayner and Carter, 1997). The first is the most obvious: we start with a function- ing grammar

  14. Strategies for aluminum recycling : insights from material system optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Preston Pui-Chuen

    2005-01-01

    The dramatic increase in aluminum consumption over the past decades necessitates a societal effort to recycle and reuse these materials to promote true sustainability and energy savings in aluminum production. However, the ...

  15. Recyclable organic solar cells on substrates comprising cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kippelen, Bernard; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Zhou, Yinhua; Moon, Robert; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.

    2015-12-01

    Recyclable organic solar cells are disclosed herein. Systems and methods are further disclosed for producing, improving performance, and for recycling the solar cells. In certain example embodiments, the recyclable organic solar cells disclosed herein include: a first electrode; a second electrode; a photoactive layer disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode; an interlayer comprising a Lewis basic oligomer or polymer disposed between the photoactive layer and at least a portion of the first electrode or the second electrode; and a substrate disposed adjacent to the first electrode or the second electrode. The interlayer reduces the work function associated with the first or second electrode. In certain example embodiments, the substrate comprises cellulose nanocrystals that can be recycled. In certain example embodiments, one or more of the first electrode, the photoactive layer, and the second electrode may be applied by a film transfer lamination method.

  16. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  17. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: An Approach to Building Large Internet Caches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabinovich, Michael "Misha"

    Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: An Approach to Building Large Internet Caches Syam Gadde Dept. of Computer, a distributed Internet object cache targeted to the needs of the organizations that aggregate the end users

  18. RECYCLING GALVANIZED STEEL: OPERATING EXPERIENCE AND BENEFrI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and enabling recycling of ferrous dusts to the sinter plant. In EAF operations, loss of control of the arc and zinc fuming on charging, tapping and casting is troublesome. In BOF...

  19. TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT POTENTIAL RECYCLING OF SCRAP METAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT POTENTIAL RECYCLING OF SCRAP METAL FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES PART I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 2 Overview of Scrap Metal Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.3 Principal Scrap Metal Operations Considered

  20. International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theurer, Jean E

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

  1. Neutronic analysis of a proposed plutonium recycle assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solan, George Michael

    1975-01-01

    A method for the neutronic analysis of plutonium recycle assemblies has been developed with emphasis on relative power distribution prediction in the boundary area of vastly different spectral regions. Such regions are ...

  2. Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, A.

    The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

  3. Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

  4. MultiWave™ Automated Sorting System for Efficient Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary challenge in recycling paper has been to obtain raw material with the highest purity. Ideally, creating a paper stream sorted by purity would facilitate a high-quality end product,...

  5. Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.

    1991-10-25

    As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

  6. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D. Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  7. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

  8. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1994-03-29

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

  9. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

  10. Binary and recycled pulsars: 30 years after observational discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G S Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2006-11-13

    Binary radio pulsars, first discovered by Hulse and Taylor in 1974 [1], are a unique tool for experimentally testing general relativity (GR), whose validity has been confirmed with a precision unavailable in laboratory experiments. In particular, indirect evidence of the existence of gravitational waves has been obtained. Radio pulsars in binary systems (which have come to be known as recycled) have completed the accretion stage, during which neutron star spins reach millisecond periods and their magnetic fields decay 2 to 4 orders of magnitude more weakly than ordinary radio pulsars. Among about a hundred known recycled pulsars, many have turned out to be single neutron stars. The high concentration of single recycled pulsars in globular clusters suggests that close stellar encounters are highly instrumental in the loss of the companion. A system of one recycled pulsar and one 'normal' one discovered in 2004 is the most compact among binaries containing recycled pulsars [2]. Together with the presence of two pulsars in one system, this suggests new prospects for further essential improvements in testing GR. This paper considers theoretical predictions of binary pulsars, their evolutionary formation, and mechanisms by which their companions may be lost. The use of recycled pulsars in testing GR is discussed and their possible relation to the most intriguing objects in the universe, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, is examined.

  11. Cooking a Cuban Ajiaco: The Columbian Exchange in a Stewpot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman, Gregory T.

    2006-01-01

    , heat 2 tablespoons of lard (manteca) or ¼ cup of olive oil (aceite de oliva). Peel and crush 3 cloves of garlic (ajo); chop 1 large onion (cebolla) and 1 large, seeded green bell pepper (ají pimiento verde); add to the fat at medium- low heat and sauté... in the Age of European Exploration and Exploitation. Columbus himself traveled to the coast of Panama during his fourth and final voyage, though the first European visi- tors had already sailed a few years earlier under Rodrigo de Bastidas. On that particu...

  12. L-sodium lactate in cooked beef top rounds: differing levels of incorporation and cookery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Lori Leigh

    1992-01-01

    L-SODIUM LACTATE IN COOKED BEEF TOP ROUNDS; DIFFERING LEVELS OF INCORPORATION AND COOKERY A Thesis by LORI LEIGH EVANS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Animal Science L-SODIUM LACTATE IN COOKED BEEF TOP ROUNDS; DIFFERING LEVELS OF INCORPORATION AND COOKERY A Thesis by LORI LEIGH EVANS Approved as to style and content by: R. K. Miller (Chair...

  13. Eco Oil 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

    2009-10-26

    This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

  14. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  15. > Facilities and Services > Recycling on the St. George Campus > NEW! Non-hazardous Laboratory Glass and Plastics Recycling NEW! Non-hazardous Laboratory Glass and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Glass and Plastics Recycling Program NEW! ­ Non-hazardous Laboratory Glass and Plastics Recycling Program NEW! NON-HAZARDOUS glass and plastic items used in laboratories can now be recycled! Facilities;© Copyright 2008, University of Toronto. Home Site Map Contact GLASS may be placed in the TEAL toters.PLASTIC

  16. Decreasing Variation in Cook Color of Ground Beef Patties Varying in Myoglobin and pH Using Acetic Acid and Hydrocolloid Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldredge, Teresa Lynn

    2011-02-22

    interactions for internal CIE a* and b* color space values ................................................................ 90 41 Least squares means for treatment and cooking method interaction for internal CIE a* color space values... no evidence of pink color post-cooking. Short-term holding after cooking has been shown to reduce the pink color (Berry and Bigner-George 2000; Ryan and others 2006). Holding for up to 90 min past cooking has been shown to decrease yield and increase...

  17. Formation of dl-limonene in used tire vacuum pyrolysis oils. [dipentene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakdel, H.; Roy, C.; Aubin, H.; Jean, G. ); Coulombe, S. )

    1991-09-01

    Tire recycling has become an important environmental issue recently due to the huge piles of tires that threaten the environment. Thermal decomposition of tire, a synthetic rubber material, enables the recovery of carbon black and liquid hydrocarbon oils. Both have potential economic values. Pyrolysis oils obtained under vacuum conditions contain a significant portion of a volatile, naptha-like fraction with an octane number similar to petroleum naphtha fraction, in addition, contains approximately 15% limonene. Potential applications of vacuum pyrolysis oil and carbon black have been investigated. However, the process economics is greatly influenced by the quality of the oil and carbon black products. This paper discusses limonene formation during used tire vacuum pyrolysis and its postulated reaction mechanism. The limonene separation method from pyrolysis oil, as well as its purification in laboratory scale, and structural characterization are discussed. Large-scale limonene separation and purification is under investigation.

  18. Saturday: Lasagna and potato wedges prep time: 30mins Cooking time: 1 hr Items: 1 ice-cream container and 1 yoghurt container of white sauce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    Saturday: Lasagna and potato wedges prep time: 30mins Cooking time: 1 hr Items: 1 ice-cream container and 1 yoghurt container of white sauce 2 ice-cream containers of meat mixture 1 yoghurt container! If you want it to cook in time, DON"T OPEN THE OVEN!) The potato wedges are already cooked, so spread

  19. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  20. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    of vegetable oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils, withof vegetable oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils.Fuel Wobbe Number Waste Vegetable Oil xxiv Chapter One:

  1. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  2. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  3. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1992-01-01

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  4. Global recycling services for short and long term risk reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arslan, M.; Grygiel, J.M.; Drevon, C.; Lelievre, F.; Lesage, M.; Vincent, O.

    2013-07-01

    New schemes are being developed by AREVA in order to provide global solutions for safe and non-proliferating management of used fuels, thereby significantly contributing to overall risks reduction and sustainable nuclear development. Utilities are thereby provided with a service through which they will be able to send their used fuels and only get returned vitrified and compacted waste, the only waste remaining after reprocessing. This waste is stable, standard and has demonstrated capability for very long term interim storage. They are provided as well with associated facilities and all necessary services for storage in a demonstrated safely manner. Recycled fuels, in particular MOX, would be used either in existing LWRs or in a very limited number of full MOX reactors (like the EPR reactor), located in selected countries, that will recycle MOX so as to downgrade the isotopic quality of the Pu inventories in a significant manner. Reprocessed uranium also can be recycled. These schemes, on top of offering demonstrated operational advantages and a responsible approach, result into optimized economics for all shareholders of the scheme, as part of reactor financing (under Opex or Capex form) will be secured thanks to the value of the recycled flows. It also increases fuel cost predictability as recycled fuel is not subject to market fluctuations as much and allows, in a limited span of time, for clear risk mitigation. (authors)

  5. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

  6. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

  7. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01

    is described below. Data Crude oil production data is fromproductivity measure is crude oil production per worker, andwhich is measured as crude oil production per worker, is

  8. The Politics of Oil Nationalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdavi, Paasha

    2015-01-01

    in the oil and gas sectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of regime change, using oil and gas income per capita as aregime change, using fitted oil and gas income per capita as

  9. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01

    Venezuelan Oil Industry Total Wells Drilled and InvestmentWells Drilled and Investment in the Venezuelan Oil Industryopenness of the oil sector to foreign investment contributes

  10. A Family-Centric Genealogy Visualization Paradigm Robert Ball and David Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Robert

    A Family-Centric Genealogy Visualization Paradigm Robert Ball and David Cook Stephen F. Austin State University Department of Computer Science {ballrg | cookda}@sfasu.edu ABSTRACT Genealogy is a way for future behavior. Genealogical visualizations are used to help understand and share the story of the past

  11. Energy Outlier Detection in Smart Environments Chao Chen and Diane Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Energy Outlier Detection in Smart Environments Chao Chen and Diane Cook School of Electrical and predicting energy usage. In this paper, we propose a framework to mine raw energy data by transforming time and automobiles. In fact, households are responsible for over 40% of energy usage in most countries (P

  12. Automating Process Discovery through EventData Analysis Jonathan E. Cook and Alexander L. Wolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Alexander L.

    Automating Process Discovery through Event­Data Analysis Jonathan E. Cook and Alexander L. Wolf methods and tools presuppose the existence of a formal model of a process. Unfortunately, developing a formal model for an on­going, complex process can be difficult, costly, and error prone. This presents

  13. Behaviometrics for Identifying Smart Home Aaron S. Crandall and Diane J. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Chapter 4 Behaviometrics for Identifying Smart Home Residents Aaron S. Crandall and Diane J. Cook Smart homes and ambient intelligence show great promise in the fields of medical monitoring, energy protecting and easy to use smart home technologies often lack any kind of unique tracking technologies

  14. Managing Adaptive Versatile Environments G. Michael Youngblood, Diane J. Cook, and Lawrence B. Holder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    research in smart home technologies from the aspect of treating an environment as an intelligent agent [10 or smart homes and buildings. Generally, these environments are defined by the way in which peo- ple, Arlington, Texas 76019-0015 {youngbld, holder, cook}@cse.uta.edu Abstract The goal of the MavHome project

  15. Workflow Patterns in Orc William R. Cook, Sourabh Patwardhan, and Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William R.

    Workflow Patterns in Orc William R. Cook, Sourabh Patwardhan, and Jayadev Misra Department systems and models. In this paper we provide implementations of the workflow patterns in Orc, a new process calculus for orchestrating wide-area computations. A key feature of the Orc implementations

  16. The Orc Programming Language David Kitchin, Adrian Quark, William Cook, Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William R.

    The Orc Programming Language David Kitchin, Adrian Quark, William Cook, Jayadev Misra The University of Texas at Austin Abstract. Orc was originally presented as a process calculus. It has now practical concurrent programming problems are easily solved in Orc. 1 Introduction Concurrency has become

  17. A Timed Semantics of Orc Ian Wehrman, David Kitchin, William R. Cook, Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William R.

    A Timed Semantics of Orc Ian Wehrman, David Kitchin, William R. Cook, Jayadev Misra The University of Texas at Austin Abstract Orc is a kernel language for structured concurrent programming. Orc provides support sequential and concurrent execution, and concurrent execution with blocking and termination. Orc

  18. AUTOMOTIVE POWERTRAIN CONTROL A SURVEY Jeffrey A. Cook, Jing Sun, Julia H. Buckland, Ilya V. Kolmanovsky,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    AUTOMOTIVE POWERTRAIN CONTROL A SURVEY Jeffrey A. Cook, Jing Sun, Julia H. Buckland, Ilya V, Michigan, 48109, U.S.A. (e-mail: jingsun@umich.edu). AUTOMOTIVE POWERTRAIN CONTROL A SURVEY Jeffrey A This paper surveys recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Control

  19. Approximate Association Rule Mining Jyothsna R. Nayak and Diane J. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    1 Approximate Association Rule Mining Jyothsna R. Nayak and Diane J. Cook Department of Computer. In this paper, we describe an associate rule mining algorithm that searches for approximate association rules and Engineering Box 19015 University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 Office: (817) 272-3606 Fax: (817

  20. Systemic inflammatory changes and increased oxidative stress in rural Indian women cooking with biomass fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Anindita; Department of Experimental Hematology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata-700 026 ; Ray, Manas Ranjan; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-06-15

    The study was undertaken to investigate whether regular cooking with biomass aggravates systemic inflammation and oxidative stress that might result in increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rural Indian women compared to cooking with a cleaner fuel like liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). A total of 635 women (median age 36 years) who cooked with biomass and 452 age-matched control women who cooked with LPG were enrolled. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by ELISA. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry, and erythrocytic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was measured by spectrophotometry. Hypertension was diagnosed following the Seventh Report of the Joint Committee. Tachycardia was determined as pulse rate > 100 beats per minute. Particulate matter of diameter less than 10 and 2.5 ?m (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}, respectively) in cooking areas was measured using real-time aerosol monitor. Compared with control, biomass users had more particulate pollution in indoor air, their serum contained significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-? and CRP, and ROS generation was increased by 37% while SOD was depleted by 41.5%, greater prevalence of hypertension and tachycardia compared to their LPG-using neighbors. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} levels were positively associated with markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and hypertension. Inflammatory markers correlated with raised blood pressure. Cooking with biomass exacerbates systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, hypertension and tachycardia in poor women cooking with biomass fuel and hence, predisposes them to increased risk of CVD development compared to the controls. Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress may be the mechanistic factors involved in the development of CVD. -- Highlights: ? Effect of chronic biomass smoke exposure on cardiovascular health was investigated. ? Serum markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress were studied. ? Biomass using women had increased systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. ? Indoor air pollution and observed changes were positively associated.

  1. Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

    1984-02-14

    An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

  2. Spot-Oiling Johnsongrass. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Fred C.; Norris, M. J.; Rea, H. E.

    1955-01-01

    -treat Johnsongrass in cotton in 19 54. Power-driven sprayers normally used for in- tect control in row crops were modified for Yose. A spray pressure of 12 pounds re inch was used. Two systems of the grass were tried. In one system the crenr applying the oil... crown-oilings with naphtha, 83 percent in 7 tests by 3 oil- ings, 95 percent in 6 tests by 4 oilings and 98 percent in 4 tests by 5 to 7 oilings. The use of mixtures of 50 percent naphtha and 50 per- cent kerosene or diesel fuel oil reduced...

  3. Industrial recycling of glass, plastic and wood materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caccavo, F.N.; Posusney, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The intent of this paper is to discuss in detail the development and implementation of a recycling program encompassing these three residual waste streams at a major plant site of a large United States company. The paper will review the history of the program`s development, the vendor selection and recycling processes, the initial efforts to include failures and successes, and the cost recovery and profit that can be realized through a well-managed recycling program. The facility that is the subject of this paper is located approximately 20 lies north west of Philadelphia, Pa and supports a site population of over 6,200 employees working in three divisions of the parent company. The primary business of this firm is the manufacture, distribution, and sale of pharmaceutical drugs. This plant is the company`s largest facility engaging its employees in predominantly research and manufacturing operations. The manufacturing operations being the largest division encompassing the widest range of activities from the receipt of raw material through packaging and shipping operations. This site and the company it represents enjoy an excellent relationship within the community stemming in part to the commitment to environmental stewardship demonstrated by this successful program. The site retains its own internal waste management and disposal operations for the wide variety of refuse materials generated and it is this department which is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the site`s extensive recycling effort. The paper will review the ongoing development of these elements of this company`s growing recycling operations and attempt to demonstrate that extensive recycling can be both a productive and cost effective alternative to conventional disposal through incineration`s or landfill.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program: Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Seventh Quarterly Report April - June 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordan Fielding

    2004-08-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation quarterly report (April–June 2004) details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight INEEL four-cycle diesel engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes and six INEEL Chevrolet Tahoes with gasoline engines are equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. The bypass filters are reported to have engine oil filtering capability of <1 micron and a built-in additive package to facilitate extended oil-drain intervals. This quarter, the eight diesel engine buses traveled 85,632 miles. As of the end of June 2004, the eight buses have accumulated 498,814 miles since the beginning of the test and 473,192 miles without an oil change. This represents an avoidance of 39 oil changes, which equates to 1,374 quarts (343 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, furthermore, 1,374 quarts of waste oil not generated. One bus had its oil changed due to the degraded quality of the engine oil. Also this quarter, the six Tahoe test vehicles traveled 48,193 miles; to date, the six Tahoes have accumulated 109,708 total test miles. The oil for all six of the Tahoes was changed this quarter due to low Total Base Numbers (TBN). The oil used initially in the Tahoe testing was recycled oil; the recycled oil has been replaced with Castrol virgin oil, and the testing was restarted. However, the six Tahoe’s did travel a total of 98,266 miles on the initial engine oil. This represents an avoidance of 26 oil changes, which equates to 130 quarts (32.5 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, consequently, 130 quarts of waste oil not generated. Based on the number of oil changes avoided by the test buses and Tahoes to date, the potential engine oil savings if an oil bypass filter system were used was estimated for the INEEL, DOE complex and all Federal fleets of on-road vehicles. The estimated potential annual engine oil savings for the three fleets are: INEEL – 3,400 gallons, all DOE fleets – 32,000 gallons, and all Federal fleet – 1.7 million gallons.

  5. Laramie, Wyoming December, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    , President, University of Wyoming Don J. Likwartz, Oil and Gas Supervisor Lance Cook, State Geologist(800) 877-9975. Printed on 50% recycled fiber paper. 400 copies printed by Pony X-Press, Cheyenne, Wyoming - Geologic Hazards Rodney H. De Bruin, Staff Geologist - Oil and Gas Ray E. Harris, Staff Geologist

  6. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  7. Summary of Fermilab's Recycler Electron Cooler Operation and Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-15

    Fermilab's Recycler ring was used as a storage ring for accumulation and subsequent manipulations of 8 GeV antiprotons destined for the Tevatron collider. To satisfy these missions, a unique electron cooling system was designed, developed and successfully implemented. The most important features that distinguish the Recycler cooler from other existing electron coolers are its relativistic energy, 4.3 MV combined with 0.1-0.5 A DC beam current, a weak continuous longitudinal magnetic field in the cooling section, 100 G, and lumped focusing elsewhere. With the termination of the Tevatron collider operation, so did the cooler. In this article, we summarize the experience of running this unique machine.

  8. Ideal solar cell equation in the presence of photon recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Dongchen Green, Martin A.

    2014-11-07

    Previous derivations of the ideal solar cell equation based on Shockley's p-n junction diode theory implicitly assume negligible effects of photon recycling. This paper derives the equation in the presence of photon recycling that modifies the values of dark saturation and light-generated currents, using an approach applicable to arbitrary three-dimensional geometries with arbitrary doping profile and variable band gap. The work also corrects an error in previous work and proves the validity of the reciprocity theorem for charge collection in such a more general case with the previously neglected junction depletion region included.

  9. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-08-17

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  10. Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Water Distict Economic Evaluation for Water Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    -i- Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Water Distict Economic Evaluation for Water Recycling In Urban Areas: _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Committee in Charge 2008 #12;-ii- TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT........................................................................................................................................... 4 BENEFICIAL USES OF RECYCLED WATER

  11. Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    the largest Aluminium, Copper and Stainless Steel parts are separated, since the cost and the time into the cost of the recycling process, the financial demand to recycle cars or washing machines

  12. 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) AND NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) AND NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS) AND NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP) CURRENTLY LANDFILLED IN THE FIFTY STATES EXECUTIVE (EEC) Report to the Plastics Division of the American Chemistry Council

  13. ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide Updated June 2014 EH&S Green Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    &MS Loading Dock Engineering 2, 2nd Floor Thimann Loading Dock Styrofoam may be recycled. EH&S provides a detailed guide on recycling Styrofoam. Please return send or collect until: Collection Dates PSB Loading

  14. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01

    mining, lead smelting and battery recycling. Areas near Pbof soil with lead. A battery recycling site is a locationSome sites consist of battery-breaking/lead-recovery

  15. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

  16. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    an alternative investment strategy to buying oil today andinvestments necessary to catch up. This was the view o?ered by oilinvestment strategy. date t) in order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil

  17. Discrete Element Modeling Results of Proppant Rearrangement in the Cooke Conductivity Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl Mattson; Hai Huang; Michael Conway; Lisa O'Connell

    2014-02-01

    The study of propped fracture conductivity began in earnest with the development of the Cooke cell which later became part of the initial API standard. Subsequent developments included a patented multicell design to conduct 4 tests in a press at the same time. Other modifications have been used by various investigators. Recent studies by the Stim-Lab proppant consortium have indicated that the flow field across a Cooke proppant conductivity testing cell may not be uniform as initially believed which resulted is significantly different conductivity results. Post test analysis of low temperature metal alloy injections at the termination of proppant testing prior to the release of the applied stress suggest that higher flow is to be expected along the sides and top of the proppant pack than compared to the middle of the pack. To evaluate these experimental findings, a physics-based two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element model (DEM) was developed and applied to simulate proppant rearrangement during stress loading in the Cooke conductivity cell and the resulting porosity field. Analysis of these simulations are critical to understanding the impact of modification to the testing cell as well as understanding key proppant conductivity issues such as how these effects are manifested in proppant concentration testing results. The 2-D DEM model was constructed to represent a realistic cross section of the Cooke cell with a distribution of four material properties, three that represented the Cooke cell (steel, sandstone,square rings), and one representing the proppant. In principle, Cooke cell materials can be approximated as assemblies of independent discrete elements (particles) of various sizes and material properties that interact via cohesive interactions, repulsive forces, and frictional forces. The macroscopic behavior can then be modeled as the collective behavior of many interacting discrete elements. This DEM model is particularly suitable for modeling proppant mechanical interactions subjected to an applied stress, where the experimental cell is represented as a cohesive body composed of a large number of discrete elements, and proppants can be modeled as the individual discrete particles with various sizes (following the proppant size distribution-density function used in the test) that exhibit no cohesive strength between the particles. Initial 2-D DEM modeling results suggest that proppant rearrangement and non-uniform stress distribution across the proppant pack results in significant non-uniform porosity distribution across the Cooke cell. Larger porosities develop along the edge of the proppant pack beneath the square ring seal and would result in a disproportionate higher flow field along these edges as compared to the middle of the proppant pack. These results suggest that reported conductivity values determined by the Cooke cell may be biased to overestimate the actual conductivity of the proppant at high stresses and that modifications to the standard Cooke cell will affect the magnitude of this bias.

  18. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  19. Heat, 10B-Enriched Boric Acid, and Bromide as Recycled Groundwater Tracers for Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, J F

    2015-01-01

    using recycled municipal waste water in Los Angeles Countyet al. 1998). Boron in waste- water generally originateswarming mechanism: recycled waste- water arrives warm to the

  20. Vegetable oils for tractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroney, M.

    1981-11-14

    Preliminary tests by the Agricultural Institute, show that tractors can be run on a 50:50 rape oil-diesel mixture or on pure rape oil. In fact, engine power actually increased slightly with the 50:50 blend but decreased fractionally with pure rape oil. Research at the North Dakota State University on using sunflower oil as an alternative to diesel fuel is also noted.

  1. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  2. SRC residual fuel oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.; Foster, E.P.

    1985-10-15

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  3. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 2, Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This second volume contains detailed information on a number of specific topics relevant to the recovery/recycling of plastics.

  4. Enhanced Oil Recovery of Viscous Oil by Injection of Water-in-Oil Emulsion Made with Used Engine Oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xuebing

    2012-08-20

    Solids-stabilized water-in-oil emulsions have been suggested as a drive fluid to recover viscous oil through a piston-like displacement pattern. While crude heavy oil was initially suggested as the base oil, an alternative oil ? used engine oil...

  5. Oil Quantity : The histori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    120 140 160 19 Oil Quantity Con Wel N E A N N ng Results e Bay : The histori Bay over tim : Prudhoe Ba returns plan n in percent m 0% to 300% 968 1973 Oil Productio Productio 5000600 4000500 3000400 2000300 model for Prudhoe Bay. Figure 11: Historical Prudhoe Bay oil production data, modeled economically

  6. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  7. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  8. Oil spill response resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthukrishnan, Shankar

    1996-01-01

    source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill...

  9. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  10. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  11. Design and analysis of recycled content sign blanks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Ben Frank

    1996-01-01

    and Other Structures. A design example for a two-pole sign is performed for one of the recycled materials collected during the study. Adequacy of the preliminary design is checked using a finite element model of the structure in conjunction with a set...

  12. How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida, March 9-12, 2015. URL https:anl.box.comsk0v7g1kd6otk24ibjrvi7d9o01z8rsjr Related Projects Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Google Scholar...

  13. Packaging laws motivate industry to draw up global recycling pacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesche, E.S.

    1992-11-25

    Spurred by criticism that plastics contribute to the solid waste problem, some plastics industry associations are joining forces to find global solutions. For one, manufacturers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) protective foam packaging from the US, Germany, Austria, and Japan have entered an agreement to encourage the collection and recycling of postconsumer material. Meanwhile, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) makers from Japan, Europe, and North and South America met in September and agreed to develop systems and technology for PVC recycling as well as incineration. The EPS agreement was motivated by fears that packaging material made outside of Germany would not meet the country's new Packaging Ordinance, says a spokesman for the Association of Foam Packaging Recyclers (AFPR; Washington). AFPR chairman John O'Leary Jr., who is also president and CEO of Tuscarora Inc. (New Brighton, PA), says [open quotes]Some consumer product manufacturers in the US incorrectly believe that EPS protective foam packaging may not be acceptable in Germany.[close quotes] The agreement was signed by EPSY-Germany, EPSY-Austria, AFPR, and the Japan EPS Recycling Association. The AFPR is affiliated with the Society of the Plastics Industry (Washington).

  14. Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality Manuel Vasquez, Juan Sandoval acquisition of solar power, nuclear power, and biofuels to diversify the country's domestic energy profile, the chemical make-up of biofuels allows them to be readily converted into their petroleum counterparts making

  15. Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

  16. FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE L. EL-GUEBALY,* P. WILSON for Publication February 3, 2004 The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management

  17. The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A.

    2006-09-15

    The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

  18. HKUST Environmental Report 2003 Update Waste Recycling and Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    paper. 9:CSO, EMO and SEPO together with the LG1 caterer launched the food waste collection and composting scheme at LG1 catering outlet. The program aims to reduce the amount of food waste being sentHKUST Environmental Report 2003 Update #12;Waste Recycling and Minimization Enhanced efforts

  19. REVIEW OF STRATEGY FOR RECYCLING AND REUSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary

    concrete waste ­ as part of the construction and demolition waste stream ­ has received considerable ­ Waste hierarchy READY-MIXED CONCRETE Concrete is the world's most important construction materialREVIEW OF STRATEGY FOR RECYCLING AND REUSE OF WASTE MATERIALS B J Sealey G J Hill Dr P S Phillips

  20. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

  1. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 242249 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Recycling education Municipal solid waste Waste management a b s t r a c t This study analyzes the effects of various recycling and waste management policy variables on recycling rate by utilizing county-level panel municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in the United States has increased from 88 million tons in 1960

  2. NREL Materials Recycling Procedure Purpose To promote environmental sustainability and stewardship, NREL provides the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    collection locations for recyclable materials, excluding batteries and hazardous materials, from home. This procedure identifies appropriate materials, collection locations, and rules and processes for recycling. To recycle or dispose of hazardous materials from home, contact your county or city or go to the Colorado

  3. Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a, *, J.C. Poggiale b , P rights reserved. Keywords: Aggregation methods; Batch reactor; Chemostat; Food chains; Nutrient recycling recycling is taken into account. The food chain is formed by a nutrient and two populations, prey

  4. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  5. The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blessington, Tyann

    2005-11-01

    on these levels. Therefore, the changes in carotenoid content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic content were investigated using combinations of cultivars, cooking methods, storage treatments, and low-dose ionizing irradiation. Carotenoid content was measured via...

  6. UNLOCKING ANCIENT DIET: USING STARCH GRANULES IN FOOD RESIDUE FROM COOKING CERAMICS TO ANALYZE PRE-COLUMBIAN ERA CADDO DIET 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skrla, Amy

    2011-04-28

    This thesis examines the nature of food residues on sherds of ancient Caddoan ceramic cooking vessels from East Texas, which was the homeland of Caddoan peoples for more than 2,000 years. Interior surfaces of some ceramic ...

  7. Methods for minimizing plastic flow of oil shale during in situ retorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

    1978-01-01

    In an in situ oil shale retorting process, plastic flow of hot rubblized oil shale is minimized by injecting carbon dioxide and water into spent shale above the retorting zone. These gases react chemically with the mineral constituents of the spent shale to form a cement-like material which binds the individual shale particles together and bonds the consolidated mass to the wall of the retort. This relieves the weight burden borne by the hot shale below the retorting zone and thereby minimizes plastic flow in the hot shale. At least a portion of the required carbon dioxide and water can be supplied by recycled product gases.

  8. Western states enhanced oil shale recovery program: Shale oil production facilities conceptual design studies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This report analyzes the economics of producing syncrude from oil shale combining underground and surface processing using Occidental's Modified-In-Situ (MIS) technology and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Hot Recycled Solids (HRS) retort. These retorts form the basic technology employed for oil extraction from oil shale in this study. Results are presented for both Commercial and Pre-commercial programs. Also analyzed are Pre-commercialization cost of Demonstration and Pilot programs which will confirm the HRS and MIS concepts and their mechanical designs. These programs will provide experience with the circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC), the MIS retort, the HRS retort and establish environmental control parameters. Four cases are considered: commercial size plant, demonstration size plant, demonstration size plant minimum CFBC, and a pilot size plant. Budget cost estimates and schedules are determined. Process flow schemes and basic heat and material balances are determined for the HRS system. Results consist of summaries of major equipment sizes, capital cost estimates, operating cost estimates and economic analyses. 35 figs., 35 tabs.

  9. Facile residue analysis of recent and prehistoric cook-stones using handheld Raman spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Laura; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Joshi, Amitabh; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    We performed food residue analysis of cook-stones from experimental and prehistoric earth ovens using a handheld Raman spectrometry. Progress in modern optical technology provides a facile means of rapid non-destructive identification of residue artifacts from archaeological sites. For this study spectral signatures were obtained on sotol (Dasylirion spp.) experimentally baked in an earth oven as well as sotol residue on an experimentally used processing tool. Inulin was the major residue component. The portable handheld Raman spectrometer also detected traces of inulin on boiling stones used to boil commercially obtained inulin. The Raman spectra of inulin and sotol may be useful as signatures of wild plant residues in archaeology. Spectroscopic analysis of millennia-old cook-stones from prehistoric archaeological sites in Fort Hood, TX revealed the presence of residues whose further identification requires improvement of current optical methods.

  10. Used oil and its regulation in the United States. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledbetter, G.H.

    1988-09-30

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took the first significant steps toward the federal regulation of waste and used oil by: (1) promulgating the final rule for the Burning of Waste Fuel and Used Oil Fuel in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces; (2) proposing a rule to establish standards for used oil which is recycled; and (3) proposing a rule to amend the regulations for hazardous waste management under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (hereafter referred to as RCRA) by listing used oil as a hazardous waste. These efforts by EPA are particularly interesting because of both the nature of the prodding from Congress it took to obtain EPA action and the unprecedented volume, degree, and breadth of public opposition these actions generated once taken.

  11. North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development grant, funded by EERE, to demonstrate the commercial viability of its Flare Gas Micro-turbine. The microturbine pilot project places generators at oil production well...

  12. 2014-11-24 Issuance: Test Procedures for Conventional Cooking Products; Supplementary Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register Supplementary Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding test procedures for conventional cooking products, as issued by the Deputy Asisstant Secretary for Energy Efficiency. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  13. MuSIC status report 2011 Sam Cook (University College London)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    04/08/2011 MuSIC status report 2011 1 Sam Cook (University College London) On behalf of the MuSIC Collaboration NuFACT11 at UniGe 4th August, 2011 #12;04/08/2011 Contents What is MuSIC and what do we do with it.2MW(1) proton beam MuSIC aims to reach or beat that using a 400W proton beam (1)Psi website: http

  14. Factors affecting the cooking and extrusion properties of sorghum for noodle production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekalake, Rosemary Ikalafeng

    1993-01-01

    on Texture and Dry Matter Loss of Dorado Noodles . . . . . . . Stickiness of Freshly Extruded, Surface Gelatinized Noodles, and Cooked Noodles . 34 35 35 39 39 VIII Effect of Salt and Surface Gelatinization on the Texture of Flat Noodles, and Dry... Matter Losses of Vermicelli, Spaghetti, and Flat Noodles. IX XI XII Effect of Different Drying Methods on Texture and Dry Matter Loss of Dorado Noodles . . . . . . . . . Different Drying Methods and Acceptability of Noodles by an Untrained Panel...

  15. Economic Feasibility of Electrochemical Caustic Recycling at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Kurath, Dean E.; Holton, Langdon K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2009-03-01

    This report contains a review of potential cost benefits of NaSICON Ceramic membranes for the separation of sodium from Hanford tank waste. The primary application is for caustic recycle to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreatment leaching operation. The report includes a description of the waste, the benefits and costs for a caustic-recycle facility, and Monte Carlo results obtained from a model of these costs and benefits. The use of existing cost information has been limited to publicly available sources. This study is intended to be an initial evaluation of the economic feasibility of a caustic recycle facility based on NaSICON technology. The current pretreatment flowsheet indicates that approximately 6,500 metric tons (MT) of Na will be added to the tank waste, primarily for removing Al from the high-level waste (HLW) sludge (Kirkbride et al. 2007). An assessment (Alexander et al. 2004) of the pretreatment flowsheet, equilibrium chemistry, and laboratory results indicates that the quantity of Na required for sludge leaching will increase by 6,000 to 12,000 MT in order to dissolve sufficient Al from the tank-waste sludge material to maintain the number of HLW canisters produced at 9,400 canisters as defined in the Office of River Protection (ORP) System Plan (Certa 2003). This additional Na will significantly increase the volume of LAW glass and extend the processing time of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Future estimates on sodium requirements for caustic leaching are expected to significantly exceed the 12,000-MT value and approach 40,000-MT of total sodium addition for leaching (Gilbert, 2007). The cost benefit for caustic recycling is assumed to consist of four major contributions: 1) the cost savings realized by not producing additional immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, 2) caustic recycle capital investment, 3) caustic recycle operating and maintenance costs, and 4) research and technology costs needed to deploy the technology. In estimating costs for each of these components, several parameters are used as inputs. Due to uncertainty in assuming a singular value for each of these parameters, a range of possible values is assumed. A Monte Carlo simulation is then performed where the range of these parameters is exercised, and the resulting range of cost benefits is determined.

  16. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  17. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  18. REVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appanna, Vasu

    REVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived products: a review Natalia A. Yemashova January 2007 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Abstract Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil of operational problems. Nowadays various test-systems are utilized for microbial monitoring in crude oils

  19. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  20. Process for refractory compound conversion in a hydrocracker recycle liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruia, A.J.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a catalytic hydrocracking process. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock; partially condensing the hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone; introducing at least a portion of the unconverted hydrocarbon stream boiling above about 400{degrees} F and comprising trace quantities of 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds into a 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compound conversion zone; admixing at least a portion of the effluent from the conversion zone with the lower boiling hydrocarbon stream and partially condensing the resulting admixture; separating the partially condensed admixture to provide a hydrogen-rich gaseous stream and a liquid stream; separating the liquid stream comprising unconverted hydrocarbons boiling above about 400{degrees} F and lower boiling hydrocarbon products; and recycling at least a portion of the unconverted hydrocarbon stream boiling above about 400{degrees} F to the hydrocracking zone as at least a portion of the liquid recycle stream.

  1. World Oil: Market or Mayhem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

  2. Recycling of nuclear spent fuel with AIROX processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, D.; Jahshan, S.N.; Allison, C.M.; Kuan, P.; Thomas, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report examines the concept of recycling light water reactor (LWR) fuel through use of a dry-processing technique known as the AIROX (Atomics International Reduction Oxidation) process. In this concept, the volatiles and the cladding from spent LWR fuel are separated from the fuel by the AIROX process. The fuel is then reenriched and made into new fuel pins with new cladding. The feasibility of the concept is studied from a technical and high level waste minimization perspective.

  3. Symbiotically integrated organic recycling/renewable energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamburg, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Two operating systems designed for the integrated recycling of organic materials and production of renewable energy are described. Both systems include the Chinese design, water-pressure biogas digesters, a solar greenhouse and algae/aquatic plant ponds, all in passive symbiotic relationships with a minimum of high technology sophistication. A discussion of fish ponds and fuel alcohol production is also included since they offer many possibilities for expanded integration.

  4. Regional or global WEEE recycling. Where to go?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lopez N, Brenda N.; Liu, Lili; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Keli; Zheng, Lixia [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Source and Destination countries involved in the movement of WEEE have been studied. ? Legislation, facilities and EPR are presented in Source and Destination countries. ? Mostly Destination countries do not have EPR established and have informal facilities. ? Source countries: good technology, EPR established and mostly WEEE regulation enacted. ? Regional WEEE recycling should be under global standards for Sources and Destinations. - Abstract: If we consider Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) management, we can see the development of different positions in developed and developing countries. This development started with the movement of WEEE from developed countries to the developing countries. However, when the consequences for health and the environment were observed, some developing countries introduced a ban on the import of this kind of waste under the umbrella of the Basel Convention, while some developed countries have been considering a regional or global WEEE recycling approach. This paper explores the current movements between Source and Destination countries, or the importers and exporters, and examines whether it is legal and why illegal traffic is still rife; how global initiatives could support a global WEEE management scheme; the recycling characteristics of the source an destination countries and also to ascertain whether the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) has been established between the different stakeholders involved in WEEE management. Ultimately, the Full Extended Producer Responsibility is presented as a possible solution because the compensation of the environmental capacity for WEEE recycling or treatment could be made by the contribution of extra responsibility; and also generating an uniform standard for processing WEEE in an environmentally sound manner could support the regional or international solution of WEEE and also improve the performance of the informal sector.

  5. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  6. Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Past OpportunitiesRecycling

  7. AISI waste oxide recycling program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E.; Downing, K.B.; Sarma, B.

    1995-08-01

    In March 1995 AISI completed a five-year, $60 million collaborative development program on Direct Steelmaking cost-shared by DOE under the Metals Initiative. This program defined an energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly technology to produce hot metal for steelmaking directly from coal and iron ore pellets without incurring the high capital costs and environmental problems associated with traditional coke oven and blast furnace technology. As it becomes necessary to replace present capacity, this new technology will be favored because of reduced capital costs, higher energy efficiency, and lower operating costs. In April 1994, having failed to move forward with a demonstration plant for direct ironmaking, despite substantial efforts by both Stelco and Geneva Steel, an alternative opportunity was sought to commercialize this new technology without waiting until existing ironmaking capacity needed to be replaced. Recycling and resource recovery of steel plant waste oxides was considered an attractive possibility. This led to approval of a ten-month, $8.3 million joint program with DOE on recycling steel plant waste oxides utilizing this new smelting technology. This highly successful trial program was completed in December 1994. The results of the pilot plant work and a feasibility study for a recycling demonstration plant are presented in this final technical report.

  8. EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, Robert P.; Morrison, Dennis J.

    1999-08-11

    Recycling of the spent rinse water discharged from the wet benches commonly used in semiconductor processing is one tactic for responding to the targets for water usage published in the 1997 National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS). Not only does the NTRS list a target that dramatically reduces total water usage/unit area of silicon manufactured by the industry in the future but for the years 2003 and beyond, the NTRS actually touts goals which would have semiconductor manufacturers drawing less water from a regional water supply per unit area of silicon manufactured than the quantity of ultrapure water (UPW) used in the production of that same silicon. Achieving this latter NTRS target strongly implies more widespread recycling of spent rinse waters at semiconductor manufacturing sites. In spite of the fact that, by most metrics, spent rinse waters are of much higher purity than incoming municipal waters, recycling of these spent rinse waters back into the UPW production plant is not a simple, straightforward task. The rub is that certain of the chemicals used in semiconductor manufacturing, and thus potentially present in trace concentrations (or more) in spent rinse waters, are not found in municipal water supplies and are not necessarily removed by the conventional UPW production sequence used by semiconductor manufacturers. Some of these contaminants, unique to spent rinse waters, may actually foul the resins and membranes of the UPW system, posing a threat to UPW production and potentially even causing a shutdown.

  9. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

  10. Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II (Continued) PAD District...

  11. Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II (Continued) PAD District...

  12. Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II (Continued) PAD District...

  13. Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II (Continued) PAD District...

  14. Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 2002 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II (Continued) PAD District...

  15. PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified...

  16. Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Robert Keiter; John Ruple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Robert Keiter; John Ruple; Heather Tanana; Rebecca Holt 29 ENERGY...

  17. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most impressive finding was the impact of the clay on the elongation at break; a nearly 400% increase was observed for a clay concentration of 0.5 wt.%. These coatings also demonstrate a number of other property enhancements, which make them a good candidate for continued research. Another approach explored in this research was the use of structured and self-cleaning surfaces. If the amount of coating utilized can be significantly reduced, the environmental impact is diminished.

  18. The Politics of Oil Nationalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdavi, Paasha

    2015-01-01

    model specifications Oil production in the 1930-1950 period,NOCs by type, 1947-2005 . . Oil production, before and afterThe Political Economy of Oil Production in Latin America. ”

  19. The Politics of Oil Nationalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdavi, Paasha

    2015-01-01

    revenues (adjusted for real oil price) before and after es-to the volatility of oil prices – and thus the volatility ofSonin (2011) shows that oil prices and executive constraints

  20. The Politics of Oil Nationalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdavi, Paasha

    2015-01-01

    assessment of political and economic factors of oilAssessment of PEMEX’s Performance and Strategy. In Oil andOil Company resembled more of a regulator NOC). I will combine this assessment

  1. The Politics of Oil Nationalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdavi, Paasha

    2015-01-01

    Markus Br¨ uckner. 2012. “Oil Rents, Corruption, and Statewithin-country variance in oil rents and their effects onshift in the capture of oil rents – but I show why more work

  2. The Legacy of Oil Spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

  3. Microsoft Word - FST15-119_OpticsRecycleLoop_Final_Paper.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NGUYEN, D. COOKE, S. ELHADJ, AND S. YANG, "Laser smoothing of sub-micron grooves in hydroxyl-rich fused silica," Appl. Surf. Sci. 256, 4031-4037 (2010). 86. S. ELHADJ, M....

  4. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  5. Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

    2007-01-25

    Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

  6. Oil & Gas Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. DAÏM

    2002-11-12

    update of the mechanical displacement and porosity field. In ... water and oil pressures are equal. ... o or w, denote the cell values of the oil and water phase.

  7. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01

    Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . OilEllner, ”Organized Labor in Venezuela 1958-1991: Behavior

  8. Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Today, the United States spends about $400 billion each year on imported oil. To realize a secure energy future, America must break its dependence on imported oil and its volatile costs. The transportation sector accounts for about 70% of U.S. oil demand and holds tremendous opportunity to increase America's energy security by reducing oil consumption. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R and D) on vehicle technologies which can stem America's dependence on oil, strengthen the economy, and protect the environment. Hybrid-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles can significantly improve fuel economy, displacing petroleum. Researchers are making batteries more affordable and recyclable, while enhancing battery range, performance, and life. This research supports President Obama's goal of putting 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The program is also working with businesses to develop domestic battery and electric-drive component plants to improve America's economic competitiveness globally. The program facilitates deployment of alternative fuels (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, propane, and natural gas) and fuel infrastructures by partnering with state and local governments, universities, and industry. Reducing vehicle weight directly improves vehicle efficiency and fuel economy, and can potentially reduce vehicle operating costs. Cost-effective, lightweight, high-strength materials can significantly reduce vehicle weight without compromising safety. Improved combustion technologies and optimized fuel systems can improve near-and mid-term fuel economy by 25% for passenger vehicles and 20% for commercial vehicles by 2015, compared to 2009 vehicles. Reducing the use of oil-based fuels and lubricants in vehicles has more potential to improve the nation's energy security than any other action; even a 1% improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency would save consumers more than $4 billion annually.

  9. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  10. Heavy oil hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.E.; Nongbri, G.; Clausen, G.A. [Texaco R& D, Port Arthur, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Many of the crude oils available worldwide are classified as heavy oils (API gravity less than 20). In addition, many of the heavier crude oils are also high in sulfur content. Both the low gravity and high sulfur content make these crude oils difficult to process in many refineries and additional processing equipment is required. Often, deasphalting of the vacuum residuum is one of the processing routes chosen. However, the deasphalted oil (DAO) is often of poor quality and presents problems in processing in existing refinery units. Fixed bed hydrotreater and hydrocracker catalysts are quickly fouled and fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) reach regenerator temperature limits with only small amounts of DAO in the feed. Use of the T-STAR ebullated bed process to hydrocrack and upgrade the DAO is an excellent route for making the DAO more palatable to refinery units.

  11. North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of its Flare Gas Micro-turbine. The microturbine pilot project places generators at oil production well sites to transform wellhead flare gas into high-quality, three-phase...

  12. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentratingPortal ControllingConvectionConvertingCooking Up

  13. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  14. Water soluble/dispersible and easy removable cationic adhesives and coating for paper recycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Yulin; Yan, Zegui

    2005-11-29

    The present invention is an adhesive or coating composition that is dispersible or dissolvable in water, making it useful in as a coating or adhesive in paper intended for recycling. The composition of the present invention is cationically charged thereby binding with the fibers of the paper slurry and thus, resulting in reduced deposition of adhesives on equipment during the recycling process. The presence of the composition of the present invention results in stronger interfiber bonding in products produced from the recycled fibers.

  15. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lead ranks second among the most hazardousof the potentially Pb most contaminating activities are leadmining, lead smelting and battery recycling. Areas near Pb

  16. 2009-08 " Establish an Effective Policy and Funding for Recycling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 " Establish an Effective Policy and Funding for Recycling of Valuable Materials from Environmental Restoration Work at DOE Sites" 2009-08 " Establish an Effective Policy and...

  17. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksAlgae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and...

  18. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01

    Official Gazette of Republic Macedonia No. 140/2010 “Law onYugoslav republic of Macedonia” Environmental PerformanceRecycling Regulation in Macedonia The Challenges of Policy

  19. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01

    htm ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF OIL Dutch Shell andAnalysis ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF OIL Briefs:ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF OIL Oil obviously

  20. An informal description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Andrzej

    An informal description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL 28 November 2000 Sean Bechhofer (1) Jeen to be specified in some language. This paper introduces the newest version of OIL ­ the ontology inference layer of the DAML language, with working name DAML-OIL, was proposed in a message to the rdf-logic mailing list

  1. European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil) Dec 15, 2006 Doug Bradley President Climate Change of Contents Scope Executive Summary 1. Background 2. Pyrolysis Oil-Char Supply and Export Potential 2 Competitiveness 3.1. Substitute Fuels 3.2. Price of Fossil Fuels 3.3. Delivered Costs of Pyrolysis Oil/Char 4

  2. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-08-31

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to significantly reduce the cost to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of treating the tank wastes by hundreds of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass. An electrochemical salt-splitting process, based on sodium-ion selective ceramic membranes, is being developed to recover and recycle sodium hydroxide from high-salt radioactive tank wastes in DOE’s complex. The ceramic membranes are from a family of materials known as sodium (Na)—super-ionic conductors (NaSICON)—and the diffusion of sodium ions (Na+) is allowed, while blocking other positively charged ions. A cost/benefit evaluation was based on a strategy that involves a separate caustic-recycle facility based on the NaSICON technology, which would be located adjacent to the WTP facility. A Monte Carlo approach was taken, and several thousand scenarios were analyzed to determine likely economic results. The cost/benefit evaluation indicates that 10,000–50,000 metric tons (MT) of sodium could be recycled, and would allow for the reduction of glass production by 60,000–300,000 MT. The cost of the facility construction and operation was scaled to the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification facility, showing cost would be roughly $150 million to $400 million for construction and $10 million to $40 million per year for operations. Depending on the level of aluminate supersaturation allowed in the storage tanks in the LAW Pretreatment Facility, these values indicate a return on investment of up to 25% to 60%.

  3. Process for refractory compound conversion in a hydrocracker recycle liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruia, A.J.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a catalytic hydrocracking process. It includes contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock having a propensity to form 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds and a liquid recycle stream in a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a metal promoted hydrocracking catalyst at elevated temperature and pressure sufficient to gain a substantial conversion to lower boiling products; partially condensing the hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone and separating the same into a hydrocarbonaceous stream comprising lower boiling hydrocarbons, unconverted hydrocarbons boiling above about 400{degrees} F (204{degrees} C) and trace quantities of 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds, and a vaporous hydrocarbonaceous stream comprising the lower boiling hydrocarbons.

  4. Recycling and composting demonstration projects for the Memphis region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the development and implementation of the project entitled ``Recycling and Composting Demonstration Projects for the Memphis Region.`` The project was funded by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives. This Project was implemented by the staff of the Special Programs Section of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. The project began November 1, 1990, and was completed December 31, 1991. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of a variety of solid waste disposal alternatives.

  5. Recycling and composting demonstration projects for the Memphis region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the development and implementation of the project entitled Recycling and Composting Demonstration Projects for the Memphis Region.'' The project was funded by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives. This Project was implemented by the staff of the Special Programs Section of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. The project began November 1, 1990, and was completed December 31, 1991. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of a variety of solid waste disposal alternatives.

  6. Recycling Magnets from the Factory Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications The NRELRequirementsRecycling

  7. Grilling Outdoors Safely Outdoor grilling is a fun way to cook food for family and friends. Although we often think about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    grilling to ensure a clean workspace and safe food preparation. BBeeffoorree yyoouu bbeeggiinn Choose meat away. If the trip home takes more than 30 minutes, use a cooler. Cook or freezing fresh poultry, fish, seafood, or ground beef within 1 to 2 days; other meat like steak and pork chops should be cooked

  8. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett C.; Klepeis, Neil E.

    2011-06-01

    We developed a physics-based data-supported model to investigate indoor pollutant exposure distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model was applied to calculate time-resolved indoor concentrations of CO, NO2 and formaldehyde resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air. Exposure metrics include 1-week average concentrations and frequency of exceeding ambient air quality standards. We present model results for Southern California (SoCal) using two air-exchange scenarios in winter: (1) infiltration-only, and (2) air exchange rate (AER) sampled from lognormal distributions derived from measurements. In roughly 40percent of homes in the SoCal cohort (N=6634) the 1-hour USEPA NO2 standard (190 ?g/m3) was exceeded at least once. The frequency of exceeding this standard was largely independent of AER assumption, and related primarily to building volume, emission rate and amount of burner use. As expected, AER had a more substantial impact on one-week average concentrations.

  9. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M; Singer, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Range hood use during residential cooking is essential to maintaining good indoor air quality. However, widespread use will impact the energy demand of the U.S. housing stock. This paper describes a modeling study to determine site energy, source energy, and consumer costs for comprehensive range hood use. To estimate the energy impacts for all 113 million homes in the U.S., we extrapolated from the simulation of a representative weighted sample of 50,000 virtual homes developed from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey database. A physics-based simulation model that considered fan energy, energy to condition additional incoming air, and the effect on home heating and cooling due to exhausting the heat from cooking was applied to each home. Hoods performing at a level common to hoods currently in U.S. homes would require 19?33 TWh [69?120 PJ] of site energy, 31?53 TWh [110-190 PJ] of source energy; and would cost consumers $1.2?2.1 billion (U.S.$2010) annually in the U.S. housing stock. The average household would spend less than $15 annually. Reducing required airflow, e.g. with designs that promote better pollutant capture has more energy saving potential, on average, than improving fan efficiency.

  10. New Products TACKLING OIL SPILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    New Products TACKLING OIL SPILLS Low-grade nonwoven cotton Texas Tech University researchers its own weight in oil. The results strengthen the use of cotton as a natural sorbent for oil, said Mr Engineering and Environmental Toxicology. "With the 2010 crude oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. which resulted

  11. Outdoor Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Jenoyce; Reasonover, Frances

    1967-01-01

    can "breathe." If the fire box has a rounded bottom, use enough base to make a level bad to the edge of the box. After four or six uses, wash the base to remove drip- pings and ash. Be sure it is thoroughly dry before using, because gravel can... or wash and dry it to kp it bm. Poisonous bacteria require moisture, food and tern- peratures 50 to 110 degrees F. Heat destroys harmful bacteria, and cold rgards production of toxins. MEAT Equipment, number of guests to be served and time avail...

  12. Brandon Cook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum - Science onBranding & Logos

  13. Contribution of cooperative sector recycling to greenhouse gas emissions reduction: A case study of Ribeirão Pires, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Megan F.; Gutberlet, Jutta

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Cooperative recycling achieves environmental, economic and social objectives. • We calculate GHG emissions reduction for a recycling cooperative in São Paulo, Brazil. • The cooperative merits consideration as a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project. • A CDM project would enhance the achievements of the recycling cooperative. • National and local waste management policies support the recycling cooperative. - Abstract: Solid waste, including municipal waste and its management, is a major challenge for most cities and among the key contributors to climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced through recovery and recycling of resources from the municipal solid waste stream. In São Paulo, Brazil, recycling cooperatives play a crucial role in providing recycling services including collection, separation, cleaning, stocking, and sale of recyclable resources. The present research attempts to measure the greenhouse gas emission reductions achieved by the recycling cooperative Cooperpires, as well as highlight its socioeconomic benefits. Methods include participant observation, structured interviews, questionnaire application, and greenhouse gas accounting of recycling using a Clean Development Mechanism methodology. The results show that recycling cooperatives can achieve important energy savings and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and suggest there is an opportunity for Cooperpires and other similar recycling groups to participate in the carbon credit market. Based on these findings, the authors created a simple greenhouse gas accounting calculator for recyclers to estimate their emissions reductions.

  14. Oil shale research in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

    1989-01-01

    There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

  15. Oil Mill Operators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Natural gas and petroleum are non-renewable and scarce energy sources. Although, it is well known that hydrocarbon reserves are depleting through the years, oil and gas remain the principal source of energy upon which our ...

  16. Crude Oil Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    19.11 18.73 18.63 17.97 18.75 18.10 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  17. Crude Oil Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20.86 20.67 20.47 20.24 20.32 19.57 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  18. Using Oils As Pesticides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

    2006-10-30

    Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. ...

  19. Oil Market Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

  20. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01

    that the income elasticity of U.S. petroleum demand hasincome growth over the period and 1.11 for 11 oil-exporting countries.. And it is the latter countries where petroleum

  1. Imbibition assisted oil recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashayev, Orkhan H.

    2004-11-15

    analyzed in detail to investigate oil recovery during spontaneous imbibition with different types of boundary conditions. The results of these studies have been upscaled to the field dimensions. The validity of the new definition of characteristic length...

  2. Packaging, Transportation and Recycling of NPP Condenser Modules - 12262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polley, G.M. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, 575 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Perma-Fix was awarded contract from Energy Northwest for the packaging, transportation and disposition of the condenser modules, water boxes and miscellaneous metal, combustibles and water generated during the 2011 condenser replacement outage at the Columbia Generating Station. The work scope was to package the water boxes and condenser modules as they were removed from the facility and transfer them to the Perma-Fix Northwest facility for processing, recycle of metals and disposition. The condenser components were oversized and overweight (the condenser modules weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lb]) which required special equipment for loading and transport. Additional debris waste was packaged in inter-modals and IP-1 boxes for transport. A waste management plan was developed to minimize the generation of virtually any waste requiring landfill disposal. The Perma-Fix Northwest facility was modified to accommodate the ?15 m [50-ft] long condenser modules and equipment was designed and manufactured to complete the disassembly, decontamination and release survey. The condenser modules are currently undergoing processing for free release to a local metal recycler. Over three millions pounds of metal will be recycled and over 95% of the waste generated during this outage will not require land disposal. There were several elements of this project that needed to be addressed during the preparation for this outage and the subsequent packaging, transportation and processing. - Staffing the project to support 24/7 generation of large components and other wastes. - The design and manufacture of the soft-sided shipping containers for the condenser modules that measured ?15 m X 4 m X 3 m [50 ft X 13 ft X 10 ft] and weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lbs] - Developing a methodology for loading the modules into the shipping containers. - Obtaining a transport vehicle for the modules. - Designing and modifying the processing facility. - Movement of the modules at the processing facility. If any of these issues were not adequately resolved prior to the start of the outage, costly delays would result and the re-start of the power plant could be impacted. The main focus of this project was to find successful methods for keeping this material out of the landfills and preserving the natural resources. In addition, this operation provided a significant cost savings to the public utility by minimizing landfill disposal. The onsite portion of the project has been completed without impact to the overall outage schedule. By the date of presentation, the majority of the waste from the condenser replacement project will have been processed and recycled. The goals for this project included helping Energy Northwest maintain the outage schedule, package and characterize waste compliantly, perform transportation activities in compliance with 49CFR (Ref-1), and minimize the waste disposal volume. During this condenser replacement project, over three millions pounds of waste was generated, packaged, characterized and transported without injury or incident. It is anticipated that 95% of the waste generated during this project will not require landfill disposal. All of the waste is scheduled to be processed, decontaminated and recycled by June of 2012. (authors)

  3. Cooking with Cooked Ham (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est?n disponibles para todas las personas, sin distinci?n de raza, color, sexo, discapacidad, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Emitido para el desarrollo del Trabajo de la Extensi?n Cooperativa en Agricultura y... cocido El jam?n es una fuente excelente de prote?na. El tipo de jam?n que se incluye en los Programas del Hogar no tiene hueso y est? cocido. El exterior del jam?n est? cubierto y esta protecci?n debe quitarse antes de comerse. Cada pieza de jam?n pesa...

  4. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  5. PAGE 2 October 17, 2007 MIT Tech TalkPEOPLE Printed on recycled paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    PAGE 2 October 17, 2007 MIT Tech TalkPEOPLE Printed on recycled paper Editor Greg Frost- ics, polymers, and semicon- ductors. Con- troversial at the time, this change created a department and engineering, particularly in the areas of conservation, recycling, environmen- tal concerns, public policy

  6. Dual Phase, Co-Continuous Morphology from Mixtures of Recycled Polystyrene/Curbside Tailings Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dual Phase, Co-Continuous Morphology from Mixtures of Recycled Polystyrene/Curbside Tailings Recycling Research K.E. Van Ness, Ph.D. Washington and Lee University Department of Physics and Engineering L.W. Suttner Rheometrics, Inc. Paper No.292 Introduction Virtually all studies of polymer mixtures

  7. Physical Characteristics of the Dual Phase Region in Mixtures of Recycled Polystyrene/Curbside Tailings Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical Characteristics of the Dual Phase Region in Mixtures of Recycled Polystyrene/Curbside Tailings Materials R.W. Renfree, T.J. Nosker, and D.R. Morrow The Center for Plastics Recycling Research and Lee University Introduction Virtually all studies of polymer mixtures made by the processing of virgin

  8. RECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    phases of new wind turbines. There are plans about offshore wind farms in many countries e.g. in northernRECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES ­ AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE and an analysis of future removal and recycling processes of offshore wind turbines. The method is process

  9. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 878892 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    stabilization Lime kiln dust Base course a b s t r a c t Fly ashes produced by power plants in the United StatesResources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 878­892 Contents lists available at Science with another recycled material, lime kiln dust (LKD). California bearing ratio (CBR) and resilient modulus

  10. MapReuse and MapRecycle : Two More Frameworks for Eco-Friendly Data Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MapReuse and MapRecycle : Two More Frameworks for Eco-Friendly Data Processing Mary Mc presents an additional two frameworks for eco-friendly data processing: MapReuse and MapRecycle. In both: · Share your sensitive data with the general public of researchers. Being eco-friendly is more imporant

  11. Environmental Health & Safety will help you properly dispose of and recycle your batteries & CFLs regardless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Environmental Health & Safety will help you properly dispose of and recycle your batteries & CFLs regardless of type. All batteries (rechargeable or single use) have a finite life span and will eventually need to be properly disposed of and recycled. Many batteries are considered "Hazardous Waste

  12. Explicit Representation of Main-Chamber Recycling in the OEDGE Boundary Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stangeby, P. C.

    Explicit Representation of Main-Chamber Recycling in the OEDGE Boundary Code S. LISGO, P contact occurs with the main chamber walls, additional to the divertor target. In order to investigate the role of main chamber recycling on core fuelling and impurity behavior, the OSM-EIRENE- DIVIMP (OEDGE

  13. Battery resource assessment. Subtask II. 5. Battery manufacturing capability recycling of battery materials. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemsler, P.

    1981-02-01

    Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials. Each recycle process has been designed to produce a product material which can be used directly as a raw material by the battery manufacturer. Metal recoverabilities are in the range of 93 to 95% for all processes. In each case, capital and operating costs have been developed for a recycling plant which processes 100,000 electric vehicle batteries per year. These costs have been developed based on material and energy balances, equipment lists, factored installation costs, and manpower estimates. In general, there are no technological barriers for recycling in the Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine and Zinc/Bromine battery systems. The recycling processes are based on essentially conventional, demonstrate technology. The lead times required to build battery recycling plants based on these processes is comparable to that of any other new plant. The total elapsed time required from inception to plant operation is approximately 3 to 5 y. The recycling process for the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/sulfide battery systems are not based on conventional technology. In particular, mechanical systems for dismantling these batteries must be developed.

  14. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 163170 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    2010-01-01

    , Malaysia b Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University, Agriculture: Recycling Drop-off programs Drop-off sites Curbside programs Waste management Recycling behavior a b s t r a c t To reduce the amount of waste entering landfills, policymakers and governments have implemented

  15. Engineering a Recyclable Elastin-like Polypeptide Capturing Scaffold for Non-Chromatographic Protein Purification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Engineering a Recyclable Elastin-like Polypeptide Capturing Scaffold for Non- Chromatographic and the reversible aggregation property of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) to pro- vide fast and cost reduce the purifica- tion cost by recycling the ELP capturing scaffold, a truncated dockerin domain

  16. PPPL3194 Preprint: July 1996, UC420, 421, 426 Tritium Recycling and Transport in TFTR Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their fusion power. Especially if the plasma radii are large, it could prove challenging to fuel reactors performance TFTR supershots, which are produced by reducing the limiter recycling, the hydrogenic recycling measurements, so it is desirable to have independent checks of the results. #12; This paper uses a new

  17. Solid Waste Reuse & Recycling, Professor Vasil Diyamandoglu Spring 2014 (subject to refinement/updating)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    -of-the-art technologies for processing of solid wastes for recycling, including their implementation in selected of materials reuse on CO2 emissions, urban sustainability, and energy consumption with specific examples from standing. Textbook: The McGrawHill Recycling Handbook ­ 2nd Edition. Author: Herbert F. Lund, ISBN 0

  18. Volume-Based Waste Fee (VBWF): Effect on Recycling and Applicability to New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Volume-Based Waste Fee (VBWF): Effect on Recycling and Applicability to New York City by John sponsored by #12;2 Volume-Based Waste Fee (VBWF): Effect on Recycling and Applicability to New York City a challenge for cities such as New York, where a municipal fleet of collection vehicles services dense urban

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cheryl Gomes, Danielle Salvatore, David Chan, Fraser Howatson, Jan Laesecke, Jesse Hudkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , recycled cooking oils. It is renewable, energy-efficient and can displaceUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cheryl Gomes, Danielle that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind

  20. Reverse Supply Chain Management and Electronic Waste Recycling: A Multitiered Network Equilibrium Framework for E-Cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Reverse Supply Chain Management and Electronic Waste Recycling: A Multitiered Network Equilibrium for the modeling of reverse supply chain management of electronic waste, which includes recycling. We describe networks; Environment; Waste management; Reverse logistics; Variational inequali- ties; Network equilibrium

  1. Copyright 1998 by the Genetics Society of America Genetics of Adaptive Radiation in Hawaiian and Cook Islands Species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitkus, Richard

    Copyright © 1998 by the Genetics Society of America Genetics of Adaptive Radiation in Hawaiian and Cook Islands Species of Tetramolopium (Asteraceae). II. Genetic Linkage Map and Its Implications, 1998 ABSTRACT In a study of the genetic mechanisms associated with adaptive radiation in Hawaiian

  2. MavHome: An AgentBased Smart Home Diane J. Cook, Michael Youngblood, Edwin O. Heierman, III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    MavHome: An Agent­Based Smart Home Diane J. Cook, Michael Youngblood, Edwin O. Heierman, III­ habitant action prediction. We demonstrate the effective­ ness of these algorithms on smart home data. 1. Introduction The MavHome smart home project focuses on the cre­ ation of an environment that acts

  3. Detection of Social Interaction in Smart Spaces Diane J. Cook, Aaron Crandall, Geetika Singla, and Brian Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    applications, smart environments can also be employed for valuable functions such as at-home health monitoring an increasingly important component of our everyday lives. The emphasis of smart home assistance for individuals1 Detection of Social Interaction in Smart Spaces Diane J. Cook, Aaron Crandall, Geetika Singla

  4. The future of automotive lithium-ion battery recycling: Charting a sustainable course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, Linda

    2014-12-01

    This paper looks ahead, beyond the projected large-scale market penetration of vehicles containing advanced batteries, to the time when the spent batteries will be ready for final disposition. It describes a working system for recycling, using lead–acid battery recycling as a model. Recycling of automotive lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is more complicated and not yet established because few end-of-life batteries will need recycling for another decade. There is thus the opportunity now to obviate some of the technical, economic, and institutional roadblocks that might arise. The paper considers what actions can be started now to avoid the impediments to recycling and ensure that economical and sustainable options are available at the end of the batteries' useful life.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  6. The future of automotive lithium-ion battery recycling: Charting a sustainable course

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaines, Linda

    2014-12-01

    This paper looks ahead, beyond the projected large-scale market penetration of vehicles containing advanced batteries, to the time when the spent batteries will be ready for final disposition. It describes a working system for recycling, using lead–acid battery recycling as a model. Recycling of automotive lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is more complicated and not yet established because few end-of-life batteries will need recycling for another decade. There is thus the opportunity now to obviate some of the technical, economic, and institutional roadblocks that might arise. The paper considers what actions can be started now to avoid the impediments to recycling andmore »ensure that economical and sustainable options are available at the end of the batteries' useful life.« less

  7. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

  8. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by Evaporation,treatment of oil shale waste products. Consequently, bothmost difficult and costly oil shale waste stream requiring

  9. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  10. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    during oil shale retorting: retort water and gas condensate.commercial oil shale plant, retort water and gas condensateunique to an oil shale retort water, gas condensate, and

  11. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold promises as a replacement for AHA. FHA undergoes hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. Unfortunately, FHA powder was not stable in the experiments we ran in our laboratory. In addition, AHA and FHA also decompose to hydroxylamine which may undergo an autocatalytic reaction. Other reductants are available and could be extremely useful for actinides separation. The review presents the current plutonium reductants used in used nuclear fuel reprocessing and will introduce innovative and novel reductants that could become reducers for future research on UNF separation.

  12. Advanced Fuel Cycle Treatment, Recycling, and Disposal of Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo D [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear waste, in the form of used and spent nuclear fuel, is currently being stored in the U.S., mostly at reactor sites to await future direct disposal or treatment to permit recycle of re-usable components and minimization of wastes requiring geologic disposal. The used fuel is currently accumulating at a rate of over 2,000 tons per year and a total of over 60,000 tons is in storage. New dry storage capacity is estimated to cost {approx} $0.6 B per year. Technologies have been developed and deployed worldwide to treat only a portion of the nuclear waste that is generated. Recent research, development, and systems analysis studies have shown that nuclear waste treatment could be done at the rate of generation in a safe, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective manner. These studies continue to show that major benefits can be obtained by allowing the used fuel assemblies to remain in safe storage for 30 years or longer before treatment. During this time, the radioactivity and decay heat generation decrease substantially, such that the separations process can be simplified and made less costly, waste gases containing {sup 85}Kr can be released below regulatory limits, and the solid fission product wastes containing {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr require decay storage for a much shorter time-period before geologic disposal. In addition, the need for separating curium from americium and for extra purification cycles for the uranium and uranium-plutonium-neptunium products is greatly diminished. Moreover, during the 30+ years of storage prior to treatment, the quality of the recyclable fuel is only degraded by less than 5 percent. The 30+ year storage period also enables recycle of long-lived transuranic actinides to be accomplished in existing light water reactors without waiting on and incurring the cost of the development, licensing, and deployment of future Gen IV reactors. Overall, the safety, environmental, and cost benefits of treating the longer aged used nuclear wastes are substantial.

  13. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    given that restaurant waste oil capacity is limited to twoand biodiesel derived from waste cooking oil, soybeans andConventional diesel Waste cooking oil-derived biodiesel

  15. Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A Simulation-based Assessment for Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants, and they are typically used without venting range hoods. In this study, LBNL researchers quantified pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes.The simulation model estimated that—in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods -- 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO2, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3,000, and 20 ppb for NO2, CO, and HCHO, respectively. The study recommends that reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

  16. Distribution, Natural History, and Parasites of Mammals of Cook County, Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.

    1975-12-30

    labels of some specimens from Cook County provide only a legal de- scription of the locality where the specimen originated. These were converted to a form 10 with mileage from some point of reference as follows: NW X Sec. 8, T. 64 N; R. 1 W ( = 20... mi. N, 6 mi. W Grand Marais) Sec. 33, T. 63 N, R. 1 E ( = 10 mi. N Grand Marais) NE M Sec. 8, T. 64 N, R. 3 E ( = 14 mi. N, 5 mi. W Hovland) NE J£ Sec. 22, T. 64 N, R. 3 E ( = 12 mi. N, 3 mi. W Hovland) NE }i Sec. 32, T. 63 N, R. 4 E ( = 4X mi...

  17. Flavor Pairing in Medieval European Cuisine: A Study in Cooking with Dirty Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Kush R; Wang, Jun; Myers, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    An important part of cooking with computers is using statistical methods to create new, flavorful ingredient combinations. The flavor pairing hypothesis states that culinary ingredients with common chemical flavor components combine well to produce pleasant dishes. It has been recently shown that this design principle is a basis for modern Western cuisine and is reversed for Asian cuisine. Such data-driven analysis compares the chemistry of ingredients to ingredient sets found in recipes. However, analytics-based generation of novel flavor profiles can only be as good as the underlying chemical and recipe data. Incomplete, inaccurate, and irrelevant data may degrade flavor pairing inferences. Chemical data on flavor compounds is incomplete due to the nature of the experiments that must be conducted to obtain it. Recipe data may have issues due to text parsing errors, imprecision in textual descriptions of ingredients, and the fact that the same ingredient may be known by different names in different recipes. ...

  18. Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX); Anderson, George H. (Houston, TX); Trachte, Ken L. (Baytown, TX); Hsia, Steve J. (Friendswood, TX)

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

  19. Process for refractory compound rejection from a hydrocracker recycle liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnes, T.N.

    1990-06-05

    This patent describes a catalytic hydrocracking process. It comprises: contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock having a propensity to form heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds and a liquid recycle stream in a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a metal promoted hydrocracking catalyst at elevated temperature and pressure sufficient to convert a substantial portion of the hydrocarbonaceous components in the feedstock to lower boiling products; and recovering a hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone and partially condensing the hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone and separating the same into a lower boiling hydrocarbon product stream and an unconverted hydrocarbon stream having at least a portion boiling above about 400{degrees} F. and comprising trace quantities of heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds.

  20. FUEL CYCLE ISOTOPE EVOLUTION BY TRANSMUTATION DYNAMICS OVER MULTIPLE RECYCLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel Bays; Steven Piet; Amaury Dumontier

    2010-06-01

    Because all actinides have the ability to fission appreciably in a fast neutron spectrum, these types of reactor systems are usually not associated with the buildup of higher mass actinides: curium, berkelium and californium. These higher actinides have high specific decay heat power, gamma and neutron source strengths, and are usually considered as a complication to the fuel manufacturing and transportation of fresh recycled transuranic fuel. This buildup issue has been studied widely for thermal reactor fuels. However, recent studies have shown that the transmutation physics associated with "gateway isotopes" dictates Cm-Bk-Cf buildup, even in fast burner reactors. Assuming a symbiotic fuel relationship with light water reactors (LWR), Pu-242 and Am-243 are formed in the LWRs and then are externally fed to the fast reactor as part of its overall transuranic fuel supply. These isotopes are created much more readily in a thermal than in fast spectrum systems due to the differences in the fast fission (i.e., above the fission threshold for non-fissile actinides) contribution. In a strictly breeding fast reactor this dependency on LWR transuranics would not exist, and thus avoids the introduction of LWR derived gateway isotopes into the fast reactor system. However in a transuranic burning fast reactor, the external supply of these gateway isotopes behaves as an external driving force towards the creation and build-up of Cm-Bk-Cf in the fuel cycle. It was found that though the Cm-Bk-Cf concentration in the equilibrium fuel cycle is dictated by the fast neutron spectrum, the time required to reach that equilibrium concentration is dictated by recycle, transmutation and decay storage dynamics.