National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for recycle vessel vent

  1. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  3. Gas venting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  4. Battery venting system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  5. Battery venting system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  6. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  7. Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Germer, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1987-01-01

    In a modular liquid-metal pool breeder reactor, a radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system is disclosed for removing the residual heat resulting from the shutdown of a reactor by a completely passive heat transfer system. A shell surrounds the reactor and containment vessel, separated from the containment vessel by an air passage. Natural circulation of air is provided by air vents at the lower and upper ends of the shell. Longitudinal, radial and inwardly extending fins extend from the shell into the air passage. The fins are heated by radiation from the containment vessel and convect the heat to the circulating air. Residual heat from the primary reactor vessel is transmitted from the reactor vessel through an inert gas plenum to a guard or containment vessel designed to contain any leaking coolant. The containment vessel is conventional and is surrounded by the shell.

  8. Extreme Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-01-14

    Broadcast Transcript: Singing the recycling blues because you have to separate your chipboard from your newspaper, your steel from your aluminum, your #1 from your #2 plastic? Pantywaists! The residents of Kamikatsu, Japan have no fewer than 34...

  9. ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·· Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling the recycle mix #12;Uses of Recycled ConcreteUses of Recycled Concrete 1.1. Aggregate BaseAggregate Base 2ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete

  10. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  11. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse...

  12. Filtered venting considerations in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R.J.; Hulman, L.G.; Kudrick, J.

    1988-01-01

    The capability to vent with or without attenuation of fission products exists at some US facilities. In addition, two utilities have proposed enhanced capabilities, and generic enhancements are being considered under a regulatory evaluation of severe accident vulnerabilities at all US commercial reactors. The paper 1) summarizes the history of filtered venting in the US including significant past and proposed related research; 2) summarizes an assessment of the positive and negative safety aspects of venting for a class of 24 US reactors (BWR Mark I), and 3) discusses the regulatory assessments being made of filtered venting as a severe accident management strategy, including potential attributes of both accident prevention and mitigation associated with venting. Lastly, based on a review of available literature on European initiatives, questions are raised; answers to which would significantly help US evaluations. 10 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  14. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  15. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  16. Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel: Initial Cooling Calculations V. Graves Target Studies Nov 15, 2012 vessel assumed to be cooled with Helium ­ Shielding vessel filled with tungsten beads ­ Mercury vessel;7 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cooling Calculations 15 Nov 2012 Mercury Vessel

  17. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  18. Scrap tire recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

    1997-03-01

    As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

  19. Oregon Subduction Zone: Venting, Fauna, and Carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    . The animals use meth- ane as an energy and food source in symbiosis with microorganisms. Oxidized methane, are associated with venting sites of cool fluids located on a fault-bend antidline at a water depth of2036 meters. The distribution of animals and carbonates suggests up-dip migration of fluids from both shallow and deep sources

  20. Hydrocracking. Upgrade recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazer, J.L.; Schott, M.E.; Stapf, L.A. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (US))

    1988-10-01

    Savings in make-up hydrogen of 6% or thruput increases of 10% are demonstrated for hydrocrackers by adding membrane hydrogen purifier units. These high-pressure units process slip streams taken form the hydrocracker recycle loop. Other advantages of these units include increased catalyst life, lengthened periods between catalyst regeneration cycles and less off-quality product.

  1. DOE H2 Program Annual Review, 5-20-2003 Insulated Pressure Vessels for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    range. J. We are generating tank performance data. K. Testing BOP components. L. Low venting losses) car, km 0 1 2 3 4 5 hydrogenlosses,kg low-pressure LH2 tank MLVSI insulated pressure vessel fueled with LH2 LH2 80 K CH2 1998: thermodynamic analysis 1999: cryogenic cycling 2001: DOT/ISO Tests 2003

  2. Recycled/Recyclable Printed with vegetable oil based inks on recycled paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    #12;Recycled/Recyclable Printed with vegetable oil based inks on recycled paper (minimum 50 renting, buying or renovating pre- 1978 housing. F ederal law requires that individuals receive certain information before renting, buying, or renovating pre-1978 housing: LANDLORDS have to disclose known infor

  3. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept V. Graves Target Studies EVO April 11, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 11 Apr 2012 Target Vessel;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 11 Apr 2012 Starting Point

  4. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Germantown Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Toner...

  5. Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One company is actually recycling energy that has already been used to power manufacturing plants, which is helping facilities cut their energy expenses by up to 20 percent.

  6. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  7. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2 Presented here is the...

  8. Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South Inyo Crater, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  9. Recycling of pavement materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Randy Jim

    1976-01-01

    roadway which was to be recycle 1 was a lightly reinforced Portland cement concrete pa remcnt an asphalt c&ncrete overlay. Thc mater ial was broken wjth ld a headache ball and the reinforcing steel cut with cutting torches. After hauling to a central... which was an 18 foot wide concrete pavement of cI-6-9 design. The reinforcing steel in the thickened edge pavement consisted of two 1/2-inch bars along each side with 1/2-inch by $- foot bars acting as tie bars between lanes. Dowels were placed...

  10. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  11. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept V. Graves Target Studies EVO May 1, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 1 May 2012 Review ­ Two Target Vessel Ideas · Solid-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 1 May 2012 #12;4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U

  12. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept Update V. Graves T. Lessard Target Studies EVO June 26, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Review - Mercury Module Extraction #12;4 Managed by UT

  13. Vacuum Vessel Remote Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRE Vacuum Vessel and Remote Handling Overview B. Nelson, T. Burgess, T. Brown, H-M Fan, G. Jones #12;13 July 2002 Snowmass Review: FIRE Vacuum Vessel and Remote Handling 2 Presentation Outline · Vacuum Vessel - Design requirements - Design concept and features - Analysis to date - Status and summary

  14. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept Update V. Graves Target Studies EVO June 12, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 12 June 2012 Review ­ IPAC #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 12 June 2012 Inner

  15. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concepts Updated 4/16/12 V. Graves Target Studies EVO April 11, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 16 Apr 2012 Target Vessel Requirements · Accurate jet placement · Jet/beam dump pool · Double containment of mercury

  16. NO FISHING REPORTING FORM Vessel ID. NO. Vessel Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NO FISHING REPORTING FORM Vessel ID. NO. Vessel Name: During the entire month of , year this vessel fishery if your vessel does not have a permit for it > Use Black Ink NMFS Use Only: Opened: Atlantic King Mackerel Spanish Mackerel Schedule # NO FISHING REPORTING FORM Vessel ID. NO. Vessel Name: During

  17. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Authors: Brady, Patrick V....

  18. Results from measurements on the PV-VENT systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Results from measurements on the PV-VENT systems at Lundebjerg Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish from measurements on the PV-VENT systems at Lundebjerg Søren Østergaard Jensen Solar Energy Centre with (Jensen, 2000a) Solar Energy Centre Denmark's (Danish Technological Institute) measuring work in the PV

  19. An Experimental Study and Analysis on Vent Cap Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escatel, Daniel Santiago

    2012-07-16

    and the ambient, there are vent caps that are used to allow air to flow out the building but not into it. These vent caps can significantly contribute to the pressure that the exhaust fan must overcome to remove air from the building, which means the exhaust fan...

  20. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols Dean G. Ellis, Richard W. Bizzoco Hydrothermal vents, known as `fumaroles', are ubiq- uitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats

  1. Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-09-14

    A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

  2. Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  4. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  5. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassbender, Alexander G. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  6. Cold bond agglomeration of waste oxides for recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Alessio, G.; Lu, W.K. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Recycling of waste oxides has been an on-going challenge for integrated steel plants. The majority of these waste oxides are collected from the cleaning systems of ironmaking and steelmaking processes, and are usually in the form of fine particulates and slurries. In most cases, these waste materials are contaminated by oils and heavy metals and often require treatment at a considerable expense prior to landfill disposal. This contamination also limits the re-use or recycling potential of these oxides as secondary resources of reliable quality. However, recycling of some selected wastes in blast furnaces or steelmaking vessels is possible, but first requires agglomeration of the fine particulate by such methods as cold bond briquetting. Cold bond briquetting technology provides both mechanical compacting and bonding (with appropriate binders) of the particulates. This method of recycling has the potential to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The nature of the present study is cold bond briquetting of iron ore pellet fines with a molasses-cement-H{sub 2}O binder for recycling in a blast furnace. The inclusion of molasses is for its contribution to the green strength of briquettes. During the curing stage, significant gains in strength may be credited to molasses in the presence of cement. The interactions of cement (and its substitutes), water and molasses and their effects on the properties of the agglomerates during and after various curing conditions were investigated. Tensile strengths of briquettes made in the laboratory and subjected to experimental conditions which simulated the top part of a blast furnace shaft were also examined.

  7. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  8. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation,...

  9. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Roger B. (Penn Twp., PA); Fero, Arnold H. (New Kensington, PA); Sejvar, James (Murrysville, PA)

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  10. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

    1997-12-16

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

  11. Reactor vessel support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  12. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  13. Automobile Recycling Policy: Findings and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Frank

    This report focuses on recycling. As an objective neutral party, MIT has compiled a knowledge base that examines the many complex issues relating to re-cycling. Although this report was prepared at the request of the ...

  14. Compositional evaluation of asphalt binder recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, Richard Charles

    1997-01-01

    new asphalt binder. The high temperature Superpave TM Performance Grade (PG) specifications for recycled asphalt binders were found to be highly dependent on the aged asphalt. In addition, as the amount of saturates in the aromatic recycling agent...

  15. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen (Middletown, DE); Grot, Walther (Chadds Ford, PA)

    2007-08-14

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory completes demolition, recycling...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    completes demolition, recycling of former Administration Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  17. Waste Management and Recycling in Lab Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Waste Management and Recycling in Lab · Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom · Electronic odors and collect the first rinse with its associated hazardous waste stream), remove or deface recycle it! · MIT recycled 2773 tons of waste in 2010 · Remember b onl hat o need!· Remember buy only what

  18. CATCHER VESSEL DFL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CATCHER VESSEL DFL GROUNDFISH TRAWL GEAR MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (Check if applicable and enter number) CDQ Exempted Research AIP No. VESSEL NAME OPERATOR NAME AND SIGNATURE Date (M - D - Y) ADF&G Vessel No Control No. 0648-0213 Expiration Date: 03/31/2018Revised: 05/12/2015 COPY DISTRIBUTION: WHITE Vessel Copy

  19. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  20. Recycled Materials Resource Jeffrey S. Melton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Using Lithium to Mitigate ASR in RCA Concrete Project 38: Recycled Concrete Aggregate Concrete Pavement.recycledmaterials.org/Research/past/P1&2/p2final.pdf #12;Transportation Applications of Recycled Concrete Aggregate #12;RCA as Aggregate IMCPCP (HIF-07-004) pg. 44 The recycled aggregate should be taken from a pavement that is known

  1. Energy and Environmental Considerations in Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    air pollution by 86%, water pollution by 76%, and CO2 emissions by 80% · 1 ton of recycled steel energy and releases 95% less air pollution · Recycled paper is usually not rebleached (or uses H2O2 materials from recyclables · Carbon emissions & water pollution from production of virgin materials vs

  2. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  3. Reactor vessel annealing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Katz, Leonoard R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Tatch, Michael D. (Randolph, NJ); Kordalski, Frank J. (White Oak, PA); Wykstra, Donald T. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kavalkovich, William M. (Monroeville, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

  4. An industry response to recycle 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motl, G.P.; Loiselle, V.

    1996-06-01

    The US DOE is expected to issue a policy early this year articulating DOE`s position on the recycle of DOE radioactive scrap metal. In anticipation of this `Recycle 2000` initiative, the nuclear industry has formed a new trade association called the Association of Radioactive Metal Recyclers (ARMR). This article describes the Recycle 2000 initiative, provides some background on the ARMR and its membership, and identifies industry views on the actions to be taken and issues to be resolved in Recycle 2000 is to become a reality.

  5. Blast venting through blanket material in the HYLIFE ICF reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.C.; Peterson, P.F.; Schrock, V.E. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-03-10

    This work presents a numerical study of blast venting through various blanket configurations in the HYLIFE ICF reactor design. The study uses TSUNAMI -- a multi-dimensional, high-resolution, shock capturing code -- to predict the momentum exchange and gas dynamics for blast venting in complex geometries. In addition, the study presents conservative predictions of wall loading by gas shock and impulse delivered to the protective liquid blanket. Configurations used in the study include both 2700 MJ and 350 MJ fusion yields per pulse for 5 meter and 3 meter radius reactor chambers. For the former, an annular jet array is used for the blanket geometry, while in the latter, both annular jet array as well as slab geometries are used. Results of the study indicate that blast venting and wall loading may be manageable in the HYLIFE-II design by a judicious choice of blanket configuration.

  6. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  7. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  8. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  9. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Outwater, John O. (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  10. Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ``hands-on`` refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided.

  11. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServicesRecovery Act » Recovery ActRecycling

  12. LQG Dynamic Positioning for a Supply Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Scott Ron

    8  2.1.   Vessel9  2.1.2.   3 DOF Marine Vessel Equations ofPositioning for a Supply Vessel A Thesis submitted in

  13. Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming Henrik Svensen a carbon cycle. The event lasted for approximately 200,000 years and was manifested by a global warming, and the Toarcian global warming. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: climate change; Toarcian

  14. Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog OUTLINE Microtephra horizons, found in soils across Scotland, contain fine ash produced by explosive eruptions in Iceland. They represent presented by the eruptions that produce them. ASHFALL IN SCOTLAND Ash from numerous volcanoes in Iceland can

  15. Fish Bulletin. Fishing Party Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of California, Department of Fish and Game

    1990-01-01

    FISH BULLETIN: Fishing Party Vessels In the Text and Excelby the passenger carrying fishing industry (party boat). The

  16. Recycling production designs : the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brommer, Tracey H. (Tracey Helenius)

    2013-01-01

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an ...

  17. Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Peer Review Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production 3252015 Algae Technology Area Review Todd W. Lane Sandia National Laboratories This presentation...

  18. Request for Information on Photovoltaic Module Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requests feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on issues related to photovoltaic (PV) module recycling technology. SunShot intends to understand the current state of recycling technology and the areas of research that could lead to impactful recycling technologies to support the developing PV industry. The intent of this request for information is to generate discussion related to planning for the end of life of photovoltaic modules and to create a list of high impact research topics in photovoltaics recycling.

  19. Ink and Toner Recycling Rewards Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    , earning both ISO 9001 for their quality processes, and 14001 certification for environmental management including the recycling and remanufacturing of consumable imaging supplies. · They are ISO certified

  20. High pressure storage vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-27

    Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

  1. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Upton, Hubert A. (Morgan Hill, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  3. Recycling Glass for Hawaii Reduce -Reuse -Recycle has never been so important. Developed countries around the world are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Nancy E.

    Recycling Glass for Hawaii Brief: Reduce - Reuse - Recycle has never been so important. Developed countries around the world are aiming at forming closed loop recycling systems - where all metal, plastic and glass are endlessly recycled. The US recycling rates are at 35% while some of EU countries are above 80

  4. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications The NRELRequirements

  5. recycling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp8/%2A4/%2A6/%2A en Y-12's

  6. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  7. Recycled Wash Water Crushed Returned Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Recycled Wash Water Crushed Returned Concrete National Concrete Consortium March 2012 Colin Lobo% increase by 2030 "Waste" to "Recycled" Returned Concrete - estimated 2 - 10% of production 8 to 12 million cubic yards Truck and Mixer Washout 50 to 200 gallons per truck WWW. NRMCA.ORG Need to manage

  8. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2009-01-01

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  9. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University waste through waste hierarchy and managing the waste in-house for final disposal. To explain the waste

  10. 8. Has recycled ber been used appropriately?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -making industry. The main raw material for paper used to be recycled clothes, until scarcity of clothes, rising to meet the demand and fiber collection can be a major bottleneck. In addition to the paper industry? Legality Have the products been legally produced? #12;#12;2.49 Recycling is common to the paper

  11. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2013-04-19

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  12. Device and method for remotely venting a container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vodila, James M. (North Huntingdon, PA); Bergersen, Jeffrey A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A device for venting a container having a bung includes a saddle assembly curable to a container and having a support extending therefrom. A first arm is rotatably secured to the support, and the first arm extends in a first direction. A second arm has a first end portion drivingly engaged with the first arm, so that rotation of the first arm causes rotation of the second arm. A second end portion of the first arm is positionable proximate the bung of the container. A socket is operably associated and rotatable with the second end portion and is drivingly engageable with the bung, so that rotation of the socket causes corresponding rotation of the bung for thereby venting the container.

  13. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  14. TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qureshi, Z

    2007-02-21

    The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

  15. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  16. Solid waste recycling programs at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millette, R.L.; Blackman, T.E.; Shepard, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Flats (RFP) recycling programs for solid waste materials have been in place for over ten years. Within the last three years, the programs were centralized under the direction of the Rocky Flats Waste Minimization department, with the assistance of various plant organizations (e.g., Trucking, Building Services, Regulated Waste Operations, property Utilization and Disposal and Security). Waste Minimization designs collection and transportation systems for recyclable materials and evaluates recycling markets for opportunities to add new commodities to the existing programs. The Waste Minimization department also promotes employee participation in the Rocky Flats Recycling Programs, and collects all recycling data for publication. A description of the program status as of January 1994 is given.

  17. Recycling of the Changing Automobile and Its Impact on Sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recycling of the Changing Automobile and Its Impact on Sustainability Title Recycling of the Changing Automobile and Its Impact on Sustainability Publication Type Conference Paper...

  18. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical EnergyRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyelectric energy generation and thermal energy conduction

  19. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  20. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 19, 2015 - 3:40pm Addthis Ryan Davis...

  1. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 5, 2015 - 12:16pm Addthis Ryan Davis...

  2. How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? Title How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2015 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  3. Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? Title Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2013...

  4. The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Title The Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  5. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  6. Iranian Long Spouted Vessels of the Third and Second Millennium BCE: Contextualizing an Enigmatic Vessel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cromartie, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Long Spouted Vessels of the Third and SecondContextualizing an Enigmatic Vessel Reflective Essay By Amylong spouted Iranian bronze vessel from the third millennium

  7. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forget, Benoit; Pope, Michael; Piet, Steven J.; Driscoll, Michael

    2012-07-30

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  8. Coal gasification vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

  9. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, J. G.

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking ...

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure Escort for all Focus Vessels on Haro Routes Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-BOUNDARY ROUTES (GREEN

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base Case VTE 23-24 22-23 21-22 20-21 19-20 18-19 17-18 16

  12. Curbside recycling in the presence of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beatty, Timothy K.M.; Berck, Peter; Shimshack, Jay P

    2007-01-01

    Solid Waste. ” Journal of Environmental Economics and Management,solid waste and recycling with its Integrated Waste ManagementSolid Wastes: The Case of Portland, Oregon. ” Journal of Environmental Economics and Management,

  13. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    condenser operates above ambient temperature, the rejected heat also contains unused availability. By incorporating an absorption heat pump (AHP) into the distillation process, these sources of unused availability can be tapped so as to recycle (and hence...

  14. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  15. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  16. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed to sustainable waste management through reducing our consumption of materials, encouraging re-use where possible information in all future waste management contracts For further information see www

  17. printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER ENERGY EFFICIENCY, POLLUTION PREVENTION, AND PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT ASSISTANCE FOR INDUSTRY A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SPONSORED PROGRAM INDUSTRIAL STATE UNIVERSITY Industrial Assessment Center Department of Mechanical Engineering Fort Collins

  18. Loveland Water & Power- Refrigerator Recycling Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water & Power is providing an incentive for customers to recycle older, working refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old...

  19. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households’ Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    Environmental Paradigm (NEP) scale, which has been widelyand Guagnano, 1995). The NEP was updated in 2000 and renamedand Poon (2001) use the NEP in a comparison of recycling

  20. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Pressure Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/SmartMHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Pressure

  1. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Tide Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/SmartMHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented

  2. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Wave Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/SmartMHK ISDB/Sensors/VentedMHK

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm22-pmod-vent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, AugustgovInstrumentsap-surfgovInstrumentscitationpmod-vent Comments?

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayVented

  5. Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunYear Jan Feb MarVented

  6. Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear Jan Feb MarMay-15Vented and Flared

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014Thousand CubicYear Jan Feb MarVented and

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014Thousand CubicYear Jan Feb MarVented

  9. Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecade Year-0 Year-1Vented and Flared

  10. Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayVented and

  11. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million CubicDecade Year-0Vented and

  12. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million CubicDecade Year-0Vented

  13. Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060Year Jan Feb MarYearVented

  14. Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation (Million Cubic Feet)DecadeYearVented

  15. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  16. Mathematical Modeling for CostMathematical Modeling for Cost Optimization of PV RecyclingOptimization of PV Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    Mathematical Modeling for CostMathematical Modeling for Cost Optimization of PV Recycling of plants Capital costs to open up a recycling center 4 #12;Time Horizon for PV Recycling Infrastructure 5 cost $189K System optimal cost $1079K 11 #12;PV Recycling ­Cost Optimization 1. Where is the optimized

  17. Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

    1980-05-09

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  18. Spatial and temporal population genetics at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusaro, Abigail Jean

    2008-01-01

    Ecological processes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are punctuated by frequent physical disturbance. Larval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile ...

  19. ORNL/TM-2014/656 Condensing Furnace Venting Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2014/656 Condensing Furnace Venting Part 2: Evaluation of Same-Chimney Vent Systems Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/656 Energy and Transportation Science Division CONDENSING 2.2 ENTRAINVENT DEVELOPED AT ORNL

  20. CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Dizon, M.B.; Cheung, F.B. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rempe, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseoung, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean - United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Sub-scale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging. (authors)

  1. CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

  2. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  3. Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, and alkaline batteries. All batteries need to be sorted by battery type. Each battery type must be accumulated in a clearly labeled receptacle to identify the acceptable battery type. Batteries can be dropped off

  4. Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood estimated that about 5 million tons of spent preservative treated wood istons of spent preservative treated wood is disposed of annually into landfills in thedisposed of annually into landfills in the United

  5. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  6. Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Assessment of Using Recycled Materials for Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2003-01-01

    million metric tons of recycled aggregates are generated instate to state in the U.S. Recycled aggregates are, however,consumption of recycled aggregates from crushed concrete

  7. Tritium efflux from TFTR during a vacuum vessel vent1 D. Mueller, C.H. Skinner, W. Blanchard, A. Nagy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    on the 1987 measurements of the outgassing rate of the tritium produced by D-D reactions, 34 Ci/day with a 4 VALVES Flow rate up to 2 x

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure GW-VCU Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max. Speed of Container Vessels at 17 knots. RMM 2: Reduce Human Error incident on Oil Barges by 50% RMM 3: No Bunkering

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-BOUNDARY ROUTES (GREEN) AND FOR ROSARIO ROUTES (ORANGE

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max. Speed-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  12. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  13. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scobel, James H.; Conway, L.E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States); Theofanous, T.G. [Center for Risk Studies and Safety, University of California Santa Barbara (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris via external reactor vessel cooling is the hallmark of the severe accident management strategies in the AP600 passive PWR. The vessel is submerged in water to cool its external surface via nucleate boiling heat transfer. An engineered flow path through the reactor vessel insulation provides cooling water to the vessel surface and vents steam to promote IVR. For the 600 MWe passive plant, the predicted heat load from molten debris to the lower head wall has a large margin to the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel, which is the upper limit of the cooling capability. Up-rating the power of the passive plant from 600 to 1000 MWe (AP1000) significantly increases the heat loading from the molten debris to the reactor vessel lower head in the postulated bounding severe accident sequence. To maintain a large margin to the coolability limit for the AP1000, design features and severe accident management (SAM) strategies to increase the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel wall need to be implemented. A test program at the ULPU facility at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been initiated to investigate design features and SAM strategies that can enhance the critical heat flux. Results from ULPU Configuration IV demonstrate that with small changes to the ex-vessel design and SAM strategies, the peak critical heat flux in the AP1000 can be increased at least 30% over the peak critical heat flux predicted for the AP600 configuration. The design and SAM strategy changes investigated in ULPU Configuration IV can be implemented in the AP1000 design and will allow the passive plant to maintain the margin to critical heat flux for IVR, even at the higher power level. Continued testing for IVR phenomena is being performed at UCSB to optimize the AP1000 design and to ensure that vessel failure in a severe accident is physically unreasonable. (authors)

  14. New developments in RTR fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelievre, F.; Brueziere, J.; Domingo, X.; Valery, J.F.; Leroy, J.F.; Tribout-Maurizi, A.

    2013-07-01

    As most utilities in the world, Research and Test Reactors (RTR) operators are currently facing two challenges regarding the fuel, in order to comply with local safety and waste management requirements as well as global non-proliferation obligation: - How to manage used fuel today, and - How fuel design changes that are currently under development will influence used fuel management. AREVA-La-Hague plant has a large experience in used fuel recycling, including traditional RTR fuel (UAl). Based on that experience and deep knowledge of RTR fuel manufacturing, AREVA is currently examining possible options to cope with both challenges. This paper describes the current experience of AREVA-La-Hague in UAl used fuels recycling and its plan to propose recycling for various types of fuels such as U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel or UMo fuel on an industrial scale. (authors)

  15. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  16. Prins recycling takes on a kingly presence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    Self-described as one of the industry`s fastest growing processors of post-consumer and post-commercial recyclables, Prins Recycling Corp. (Fort Lee, NJ) has certainly made a name for itself. Entrenched in a high-profile, aggressive acquisition mode, the company has expanded its operations and capacity by acquiring recyclables processing companies in Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania within the last year alone. In addition, since it began its acquisitions, the company has dramatically increased its annual sales from around $8 million in early 1994 to $20 million by the end of the same year. In 1995, through continued acquisitions and expansions, the company is expected to churn out sales of around $100 million.

  17. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  18. print_grid() add_vessel()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharlin, Ehud

    grid.py print_grid() add_vessel() has_overlap() GRID_WIDTH GRID_HEIGHT NUM_VESSELS B VESSEL_NAMES[] VESSEL_SIZES[] human.py get_location() get_choice() grid_defend[] grid_attack[] import grid ai.py get, return false · add_vessel(grid, row, column, size, direction) ­ Check direction ­ Single for loop (size

  19. The value of recycling on water conservation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludi-Herrera, Katlyn D.

    2013-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is working to conserve water through recycling. This report will focus on the water conservation that has been accumulated through the recycling of paper, ceiling tiles, compost, and plastic. It will be discussed the use of water in the process of manufacturing these materials and the amount of water that is used. The way that water is conserved will be reviewed. From the stand point of SNL it will be discussed the amount of material that has been accumulated from 2010 to the first two quarters of 2013 and how much water this material has saved.

  20. Study of recycling impurity retention in Alcator C-mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Taekyun

    2004-01-01

    This work was aimed at reproducing experimental results in impurity compression of Ar, as well as the screening of recycling and non-recycling impurities from reaching the core plasma. As part of the study the code was ...

  1. Relationship between composition and performance of asphalt recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Gerald Dean

    1993-01-01

    This research was aimed at determining the effects of recycling agent composition on the performance of recycled asphalt with aging. To accomplish this, five experiments were performed, in which blends were produced with controlled compositions...

  2. Business plan for the Solar Recycle-o-Sort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalk, David O. (David Oliver)

    2008-01-01

    There exists much room for growth in recycling participation with almost 1 in every 4 Americans still not recycling at all. In many communities this fraction is significantly higher, with low awareness of the benefits of ...

  3. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01

    communication with Chuan-Hai Teh. Noranda Recycling, SanNokia), Stephane Burban and Chuan-Hai Teh (Noranda), Mike

  4. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  5. WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were established for several of these laboratories. Initial cost estimates indicate that recycle may be preferable over burial if sufficient decontamination factors can be achieved during melt refining. Radiation levels of resulting ingots must be minimized in order to keep fabrication costs low. Industry has much of the expertise and capability to execute the recycling of radioactive scrap metal. While no single company can sort, melt, refine, roll and fabricate, a combination of two to three can complete this operation. The one process which requires development is in melt refining for removal of radionuclides other than uranium. WINCO is developing this capability in conjunction with academia and industry. This work will continue into FY-94.

  6. REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2001-01-29

    Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

  7. (Agricultural Need for Sustainable Willow Effluent Recycling)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the use of SRC willow for bioremediation. Alistair McCracken & Chris Johnston AFBI Environment!!! The challenges ! Energy Policy & The Environment Sustainable Water Mgmt Affordability (Fuel poverty SRC willow, for the management of waste water effluents. · To establish FIVE effluent recycling

  8. Printed on Recycled Paper United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Clean Air Act, further tightening emission standards. The NOx standard is set at 0.6 gpm for cars1 Emission Facts Printed on Recycled Paper United States Environmental Protection Agency Air and Radiation EPA420-F-99-017 May 1999 Office of Mobile Sources The History of Reducing Tailpipe Emissions 1970

  9. Ash Recycling: Just a Dream ? Heiner Zwahr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Ash Recycling: Just a Dream ? Heiner Zwahr MVR Müllverwertung Rugenberger Damm GmbH & Co. KG, which started operation in 1896, it was stated that "the fly ash" collected in the ash chambers was used methods for analysing the ingredients of fly ash have been improved, we no longer use fly ash from waste

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Volume 1 FRAP 1996-02 Prepared by: E1-RayesEnvironmental Corp. Vancouver, B.C. March 1996 #12;DISCLAIMER INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA (VOLUME I) BY EL-RAYES ENVIRONMENTAL CORP. 2601 East Mall Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z

  11. Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaic Modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium- Telluride Photovoltaic Modules Postdoctoral: Wenming Wang-Talk Program July 21, 2005 #12;Recycling Retired Photovoltaic Modules to Valuable Products, Where Are We.M., Feasibility of Recycling of Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaics, Presented at 134th TMS Annual Meeting &Exhibition

  12. PLACEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECYCLING CONTAINERS AROUND UBC CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equipment, and compostable waste such as food, animal and yard waste. This new outdoor recycling container Waste Management holds several recycling programs to promote waste and litter reduction. Its waste management fleets collect recycling items such as paper products, cans and bottles, e-waste such as computer

  13. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    lack of Waste-to-Energy capacity. #12;9 Austria As Germany, but Ban in force already in 2002. Landfill1 "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling" "A Sustainable Solution" Håkan in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse

  14. FSC-Watch: FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global warming FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pile of collected paper, which can either be burned or landfilled, or shipped to more distant recycling recycled content. With the closure of this facility in early April 2008, there is no capacity

  15. The Borobudur Vessels in Context 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglis, Douglas Andrew

    2014-07-28

    ). .................................................. 102 Fig. 39. Peterson’s reconstruction of I.b.86 (from Peterson 2006, 54, fig. 8.8). ............ 104 Fig. 40. Van Erp’s Photograph of I.b.86 (after Van Erp 1923, 18, afb. 6). .................... 104 Fig. 41: Sarimanok, built and sailed by Rob..., 28, afb. 10). ................................................... 113 Fig. 48. Vessel I.b.82 is a schematic view of a beached ship’s boat. The vessel is distinctly disproportionate to the figures (photograph after Anandajoti 2009d...

  16. Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

  17. Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy, Energy Tips...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy When the pressure of saturated condensate is reduced, a portion of the liquid "flashes" to low-pressure steam. Depending on the...

  18. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  19. Venting and Rapid Recompression Increase Survival and Improve Recovery for Red Snapper with Barotrauma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drumhiller, Karen L

    2012-12-01

    was to evaluate the efficacy of two techniques designed to minimize barotrauma-related mortality: venting and rapid recompression. In laboratory experiments using hyperbaric chambers, I assessed sublethal effects of barotrauma and subsequent survival rates of red...

  20. Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The taxpayer must provide proof of the taxpayer’s costs for installation of a solar powered roof vent or fan and a list of the persons or corporations that supplied labor or materials for the solar...

  1. ORNL/TM-2014/624 Condensing Furnace Venting Part 1: The Issue,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2014/624 Condensing Furnace Venting Part 1: The Issue, Prospective Solutions, and Facility or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/624 Energy

  2. System design description for the SY-101 vent header flow element enclosure upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    This document describes the design of the High and Low Range Vent Header Flow Element(s) Field Enclosure for the 241-SY-101 High Level Nuclear Waste Underground Storage Tank.

  3. Implementation of vented fuel assemblies in the supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Stephanie A

    2008-01-01

    Analysis has been undertaken to investigate the utilization of fuel assembly venting in the reference design of the gas-cooled fast reactor under study as part of the larger research effort at MIT under Gen-IV NERI Project ...

  4. CATCHER VESSEL INTERCOOPERATIVE FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001 CATCHER VESSEL INTERCOOPERATIVE FINAL REPORT TO THE NORTH PACIFIC FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL. The Race for Fish 8 Graph 2.2a 1999 & 2001 Mothership Pollock Harvest 9 Graph 2.2b 1999 & 2001 Inshore - Coop Sideboard Caps, Transfers, and Directed Fishing Appendix IX - BBRKC Management Plan #12;3 Section

  5. COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR I Mafine Biological Laboratory SEP 2 01957 WOODS HOLE, MASS. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE CIRCULAR 48 #12;CONTENTS Page Tuna Clipper 3 Tuna Bait Fishing 4 Two-Pole Tuna Fishing 4 Halibut Schooner 5 Halibut Long- Line 6 Steel Cable

  6. Seismic Vessel Problem Gregory Gutin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutin, Gregory

    Seismic Vessel Problem Gregory Gutin , Helmut Jakubowicz , Shuki Ronen and Alexei Zverovitch§ November 14, 2003 Abstract We introduce and study a new combinatorial optimization prob- lem, the Seismic computational experience with solving SVP instances drawn from industrial practice (geophysical seismic acquisi

  7. Model institutional infrastructures for recycling of photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.

    1996-01-01

    How will photovoltaic modules (PVMS) be recycled at the end of their service lives? This question has technological and institutional components (Reaven, 1994a). The technological aspect concerns the physical means of recycling: what advantages and disadvantages of the several existing and emerging mechanical, thermal, and chemical recycling processes and facilities merit consideration? The institutional dimension refers to the arrangements for recycling: what are the operational and financial roles of the parties with an interest in PVM recycling? These parties include PVM manufacturers, trade organizations; distributors, and retailers; residential, commercial, and utility PVM users; waste collectors, transporters, reclaimers, and reclaimers; and governments.

  8. Middle Bronze Age Ceramic Vessels from Kamid el-Loz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantazariti, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    and reconstruction of the ceramic vessel economic systemsmainly complete ceramic vessels and, more specifically,chemical composition of the vessel. This was particularly

  9. Vessel network detection using contour evolution and color components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ushizima, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    segmentation of retinal blood vessels and identification ofnormalization and local vessel detection. IEEE Trans MedLea. A review of 3d vessel lumen segmentation techniques:

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure & No Bunkering Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 113% of Base Case VTE 23-24 22-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Bunkering Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;S: DP 415 3

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure & No Bunkering & Only Haro Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 108% of Base-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure & Additional Variability of Case T What-If Focus Vessel Arrivals Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base Case VTE 23-24 22-23 21-22 20-21 19-20 18-19 17-18 16-17 15

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Bunkering Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;R: KM 348 3

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

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  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure GW-VCU Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Bunkering Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set Low December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure and Cargo FV set at High Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure Way ATB's Rosario #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base Case-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12;T: GW

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;S: DP 415 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM/21/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & LOW GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

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  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;T: GW) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 9 GW

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO #12;12/23/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/12/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;P-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/21/2013 6 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;T ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/21/2013 10 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL;12/13/2013 8 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;T-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  10. Nonlinear Tracking Control of Underactuated Surface Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    Nonlinear Tracking Control of Underactuated Surface Vessel Wenjie Dong and Yi Guo Abstract-- We consider in this paper the tracking control problem of an underactuated surface vessel. Based that the proposed control laws are effective. I. INTRODUCTION Control of underactuated surface vessels has attracted

  11. Vessel segmentation for angiographic enhancement and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Vessel segmentation for angiographic enhancement and analysis Alexandru Condurache1 , Til Aach1@isip.uni-luebeck.de Abstract. Angiography is a widely used method of vessel imaging for the diagnosis and treatment of pathological manifestations as well as for medical research. Vessel segmentation in angiograms is useful

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision;11/22/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision T ­ GW ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1) Draft #12;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION FREQUENCY - PCF Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & High Tan + CFV 3D Risk Profile All FV-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding T ­ GW ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1) Draft #12;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/21/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  4. Probe for contamination detection in recyclable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi

    2003-08-05

    A neutron detection system for detection of contaminants contained within a bulk material during recycling includes at least one neutron generator for neutron bombardment of the bulk material, and at least one gamma ray detector for detection of gamma rays emitted by contaminants within the bulk material. A structure for analyzing gamma ray data is communicably connected to the gamma ray detector, the structure for analyzing gamma ray data adapted. The identity and concentration of contaminants in a bulk material can also be determined. By scanning the neutron beam, discrete locations within the bulk material having contaminants can be identified. A method for recycling bulk material having unknown levels of contaminants includes the steps of providing at least one neutron generator, at least one gamma ray detector, and structure for analyzing gamma ray data, irradiating the bulk material with neutrons, and then determining the presence of at least one contaminant in the bulk material from gamma rays emitted from the bulk material.

  5. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  6. Recycling scheme for twin BWRs reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez-Sanchez, J. R.; Perry, R. T.; Gustavo Alonso, V.; Javier Palacios, H. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, La Marquesa s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750 (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    To asses the advantages of reprocess and recycle the spent fuel from nuclear power reactors, against a once through policy, a MOX fuel design is proposed to match a generic scenario for twin BWRs and establish a fuel management scheme. Calculations for the amount of fuel that the plants will use during 40 years of operation were done, and an evaluation of costs using constant money method for each option applying current prices for uranium and services were made. Finally a comparison between the options was made, resulting that even the current high prices of uranium, still the recycling option is more expensive that the once through alternative. But reprocessing could be an alternative to reduce the amount of spent fuel stored in the reactor pools. (authors)

  7. Recycling of Advanced Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.

    1999-10-06

    The pace of development and fielding of electric vehicles is briefly described and the principal advanced battery chemistries expected to be used in the EV application are identified as Ni/MH in the near term and Li-ion/Li-polymer in the intermediate to long term. The status of recycling process development is reviewed for each of the two chemistries and future research needs are discussed.

  8. Dresden 1 plutonium recycle program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresnick, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final report on the Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program. It covers the work performed from July 1, 1978 to completion, which includes in-pool inspection of two fuel assemblies, removal of two fuel rods, and post-irradiation examination (PIE) of six fuel rods. Appendix A describes the inspection and rod removal operations, and Appendix B describes the PIE work.

  9. Recycled Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycled Energy Development Jump

  10. Amendment 80 vessel replacement 1 Implementation and of Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Provisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendment 80 vessel replacement 1 Implementation and of Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Provisions identified and limited the vessels that could be used to fish for certain species of BSAI groundfish in a particular sector of the groundfish fishery. The final rule included this vessel restriction based on NMFS

  11. Containment venting as a mitigation technique for BWR Mark I plant ATWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Containment venting is studied as a mitigation strategy for preventing or delaying severe fuel damage following hypothetical BWR Anticipated Transient Without SCRAM (ATWS) accidents initiated by MSIV-closure, and compounded by failure of the Standby Liquid Control (SLC) system injection of sodium pentaborate solution and by the failure of manually initiated control rod insertion. The venting of primary containment after reaching 75 psia (0.52 MPa) is found to result in the release of the vented steam inside the reactor building, and to result in inadequate Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) for any system pumping from the pressure suppression pool. CONTAIN code calculations show that personnel access to large portions of the reactor building would be lost soon after the initiation of venting and that the temperatures reached would be likely to result in independent equipment failures. It is concluded that containment venting would be more likely to cause or to hasten the onset of severe fuel damage than to prevent or to delay it.

  12. Biodegradation of jet fuel in vented columns of water-unsaturated sandy soil. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coho, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of soil water content on the rate of jet fuel (JP-4) biodegradation in air-vented, water-unsaturated columns of sandy soil was investigated. The contaminated soil was obtained from a spill site located on Tyndall AFB, Fla. The initial soil loading was 4590 mg of JP-4/kg of dry soil. Three laboratory columns were packed with the contaminated soil, saturated and drained for periods of 81-89 days. Two columns were continuously vented with air, and the third, intended to provide an anaerobic control, was vented with nitrogen. The venting gas flows were maintained between 1 and 2.5 soil pore volume changeouts per day. The total JP-4 removal in the air-vented columns averaged 44% of the mass originally present. Biodegradation and volatilization accounted for 93% and 7% of the total removal, respectively. A maximum biodegradation rate of 14.3 mg of JP-4/kg of moist soil per day was observed at a soil water content of approximately 72% saturation. Soil drainage characteristics indicated that this water content may have corresponded to 100% of the in situ field capacity water content. Theses.

  13. EECBG Success Story: New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to build a state-of-the-art recycling center and improve stewardship of the land and environment. Learn more....

  14. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Brady, Patrick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Brady, Patrick V. Abstract Not Provided Sandia National Laboratories USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) United...

  15. Critical Materials Institute's rare-earth recycling tech goes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute's rare-earth recycling tech goes commercial OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 10, 2015-The Critical Materials Institute is celebrating its first commercial...

  16. Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Morris E. Fine Junior Professor, Northwestern University Sukhwant Raju Director of Recycling, First Solar Garvin Heath Senior Scientist, NREL Strategic Energy Analysis Center...

  17. Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs, The Cadmus Group, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recycling programs have become a staple of residential demand-side management portfolios. 1 Measure coincidence factor (demand savings), incremental cost, or measure life. #12;3 PART

  18. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01

    recycling. 3.1 Reverse logistics Reverse logistics costs canuse management are reverse logistics and reprocessing, whichbetween resale values and reverse logistics costs. The most

  19. Way to recycle, BES Technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has reached a major milestone by recycling 1 million gallons of radiological waste water through its laundry operations located at the East Tennessee Technology Park. This...

  20. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling Citation Details In-Document...

  1. Packing in a tradition of recycling: Manufacturer-turned-recycler Free-Flow Packaging Corp. , Redwood City, Calif

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Free-Flow Packaging Corp. recycles polystyrene. Loose-fill -- an industry name for expanded polystyrene (EPS) packaging modules, or what the public more commonly calls peanuts'' -- represents a material that can easily and economically be recycled over and over. The company manufactures a 100% recycled packaging peanut called FLO-PAK, as well as a variety of other EPS packaging products. Indeed, to date, Free-Flow Packaging has set up post-consumer EPS recycling operations at five of its 11 manufacturing facilities, both across the country and overseas. The corporation's original facility in Redwood City began this tradition when it first started processing industrial EPS scrap in 1978 and, later, pioneered the recycling of post-consumer EPS on site for use in its products in 1989. Now, only five years later, the result has produced a recycling operation that is truly successful, profitable, and closed-loop.

  2. A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel Travel ThePresidentialofSubsurfaceto Remote64EnergyA Ceramic Membrane to Recycle

  3. RecycleBank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎WindRecycleBank Jump to: navigation,

  4. Bayshore Recycling Solar Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSAEngineering LLCBarnerBayshore Recycling

  5. Tow Vessel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to:Tow Vessel Jump

  6. Potential Flammable Gas Explosion in the TRU Vent and Purge Machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, A

    2006-04-05

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the failure of the Vent and Purge (V&P) Machine due to potential explosion in the Transuranic (TRU) drum during its venting and/or subsequent explosion in the V&P machine from the flammable gases (e.g., hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds [VOCs]) vented into the V&P machine from the TRU drum. The analysis considers: (a) increase in the pressure in the V&P cabinet from the original deflagration in the TRU drum including lid ejection, (b) pressure wave impact from TRU drum failure, and (c) secondary burns or deflagrations resulting from excess, unburned gases in the cabinet area. A variety of cases were considered that maximized the pressure produced in the V&P cabinet. Also, cases were analyzed that maximized the shock wave pressure in the cabinet from TRU drum failure. The calculations were performed for various initial drum pressures (e.g., 1.5 and 6 psig) for 55 gallon TRU drum. The calculated peak cabinet pressures ranged from 16 psig to 50 psig for various flammable gas compositions. The blast on top of cabinet and in outlet duct ranged from 50 psig to 63 psig and 12 psig to 16 psig, respectively, for various flammable gas compositions. The failure pressures of the cabinet and the ducts calculated by structural analysis were higher than the pressure calculated from potential flammable gas deflagrations, thus, assuring that V&P cabinet would not fail during this event. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 68 calculations showed that for a failure pressure of 20 psig, the available vent area in the V&P cabinet is 1.7 to 2.6 times the required vent area depending on whether hydrogen or VOCs burn in the V&P cabinet. This analysis methodology could be used to design the process equipment needed for venting TRU waste containers at other sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex.

  7. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  8. Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break Kori R the edge of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf confirms that methane is actively venting at the site. Dissolved methane concentrations, which were measured with a commercially available methane sensor (METS

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/22/2013 6 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/22/2013 7 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 T: GW - KM;11/22/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING FREQUENCY

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING FREQUENCY

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Q: GW 487 & NB & OH

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision: GW ­ KM ­ DP & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P-2 0-1 12/19/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/19/2013 4 GW

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding ­ KM ­ DP & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  6. Analysis of the cost of recycling compliance for the automobile industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantec, Delphine

    2005-01-01

    Cars are one of the most recycled commercial products. Currently, approximately 75% of the total vehicle weight is recycled. The EU directives on End-of-life vehicles try to push the recycling process further: it fixed the ...

  7. Caustic Recycling Pilot Unit to Separate Sodium from LLW at Hanford Site - 12279

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendleton, Justin; Bhavaraju, Sai; Priday, George; Desai, Aditya; Duffey, Kean; Balagopal, Shekar [Ceramatec Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Remediation Technologies initiative, a scheme was developed to combine Continuous Sludge Leaching (CSL), Near-Tank Cesium Removal (NTCR), and Caustic Recycling Unit (CRU) using Ceramatec technology, into a single system known as the Pilot Near-Tank Treatment System (PNTTS). The Cesium (Cs) decontaminated effluent from the NTCR process will be sent to the caustic recycle process for recovery of the caustic which will be reused in another cycle of caustic leaching in the CSL process. Such an integrated mobile technology demonstration will give DOE the option to insert this process for sodium management at various sites in Hanford, and will minimize the addition of further sodium into the waste tanks. This allows for recycling of the caustic used to remove aluminum during sludge washing as a pretreatment step in the vitrification of radioactive waste which will decrease the Low Level Waste (LLW) volume by as much as 39%. The CRU pilot process was designed to recycle sodium in the form of pure sodium hydroxide. The basis for the design of the 1/4 scale pilot caustic recycling unit was to demonstrate the efficient operation of a larger scale system to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent stream from the Parsons process. The CRU was designed to process 0.28 liter/minute of NTCR effluent, and generate 10 M concentration of 'usable' sodium hydroxide. The proposed process operates at 40 deg. C to provide additional aluminum solubility and then recover the sodium hydroxide to the point where the aluminum is saturated at 40 deg. C. A system was developed to safely separate and vent the gases generated during operation of the CRU with the production of 10 M sodium hydroxide. Caustic was produced at a rate between 1.9 to 9.3 kg/hr. The CRU was located inside an ISO container to allow for moving of the unit close to tank locations to process the LLW stream. Actual tests were conducted with the NTCR effluent simulant from the Parsons process in the CRU. The modular CRU is easily scalable as a standalone system for caustic recycling, or for NTTS integration or for use as an In-Tank Treatment System to process sodium bearing waste to meet LLW processing needs at the Hanford site. The standalone pilot operation of the CRU to recycle sodium from NTCR effluent places the technology demonstration at TRL level 6. Multiple operations were performed with the CRU to process up to 500 gallons of the NTCR effluent and demonstrate an efficient separation of up to 70 % of the sodium without solids precipitation while producing 10 M caustic. Batch mode operation was conducted to study the effects of chemistry variation, establish the processing rate, and optimize the process operating conditions to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent. The performance of the CRU was monitored by tracking the density parameter to control the concentration of caustic produced. Different levels of sodium were separated in tests from the effluent at a fixed operating current density and temperature. The voltage of the modules remained stable during the unit operation which demonstrated steady operation to separate sodium from the NTCR effluent. The sodium transfer current efficiency was measured in testing based on the concentration of caustic produced. Measurements showed a current efficiency of 99.8% for sodium transfer from the NTCR effluent to make sodium hydroxide. The sodium and hydroxide contents of the anolyte (NTCR feed) and catholyte (caustic product) were measured before and after each batch test. In two separate batch tests, samples were taken at different levels of sodium separation and analyzed to determine the stability of the NTCR effluent after sodium separation. The stability characteristics and changes in physical and chemical properties of the NTCR effluent chemistry after separation of sodium hydroxide as a function of storage time were evaluated. Parameters such as level of precipitated alumina, total alkalinity, analysis of Al, Na, K, Cs, Fe, OH, nitrate, nitrite, total dissolved and

  8. Linear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    (Glassey and Gupta, 1974) Paper Production Cycle ­ Production > Consumption > Recycling > Reuse in Production Waste Recovery Paper Production Paper Consumption Virgin Pulp Secondary Pulp Recovered Waste PaperLinear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse Tara Demeyer Management Science I #12

  9. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  10. Water Recycling Becomes Reality In the South Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Recycling Becomes Reality In the South Bay 12th Biennial State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference Friday September 18, 2015 #12;2 Presentation will cover: Santa Clara Valley Water District and Water Supply Picture Silicon Valley Advanced Water Purification Center Recycled Water Expansion- Potable

  11. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-12-09

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

  12. Waste stream recycling: Its effect on water quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, D.A. (Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc., Newport Ness, VA (United States)); Lee, R.G. (Illinois-American Water Co., Belleville, IL (United States))

    1994-11-01

    Waste streams recycled to the influent of a water treatment plant typically contain contaminants at concentrations that are of concern. These contaminants may include giardia and Cryptosporidium, trihalomethanes, manganese, and assimilable organic carbon. This research shows that proper management--treatment, equalization, and monitoring--of the waste streams can render them suitable for recycling in many situations.

  13. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling and Its plasticity; however, the recycling of receptors has never been observed at peripheral synapses. Using a novel the regulation of receptor density, which could lead to rapid alterations in synaptic efficacy. Key words: toxin

  14. Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    with pavement recycling are (i) less user delay (ii) conservation of energy (iii) preservation of environment for recycling per year is about 0.84 million tons in Sweden, 7.3 million tons in Germany, 0.53 million tons mix was produced in Japan, which constituted 30% of the total hot mix production [4]. The RAP

  15. Transport from the Recycler Ring to the Antiproton Source Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    In the post-NOvA era, the protons are directly transported from the Booster ring to the Recycler ring rather than the Main Injector. For Mu2e and g-2 project, the Debuncher ring will be modified into a Delivery ring to deliver the protons to both Mu2e and g-2 experiments. Therefore, it requires the transport of protons from the Recycler Ring to the Delivery ring. A new transfer line from the Recycler ring to the P1 beamline will be constructed to transport proton beam from the Recycler Ring to existing Antiproton Source beamlines. This new beamline provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. This paper presents the Conceptual Design of this new beamline.

  16. Device for inspecting vessel surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appel, D. Keith (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A portable, remotely-controlled inspection crawler for use along the walls of tanks, vessels, piping and the like. The crawler can be configured to use a vacuum chamber for supporting itself on the inspected surface by suction or a plurality of magnetic wheels for moving the crawler along the inspected surface. The crawler is adapted to be equipped with an ultrasonic probe for mapping the structural integrity or other characteristics of the surface being inspected. Navigation of the crawler is achieved by triangulation techniques between a signal transmitter on the crawler and a pair of microphones attached to a fixed, remote location, such as the crawler's deployment unit. The necessary communications are established between the crawler and computers external to the inspection environment for position control and storage and/or monitoring of data acquisition.

  17. CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM BATTERIES All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead-acid and all other types. Uninterruptible Power Source (UPS) batteries must be removed from the UPS casing

  18. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  19. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brassell, Gilbert W. (13237 W. 8th Ave., Golden, CO 80401); Brugger, Ronald P. (Lafayette, CO)

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  20. Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

    1995-05-01

    Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction.

  1. Submarine venting of liquid carbon dioxide on a Mariana Arc volcano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadwick, Bill

    Submarine venting of liquid carbon dioxide on a Mariana Arc volcano John Lupton NOAA/Pacific Marine, Washington 98115-6349, USA Cornel de Ronde Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, 30 Gracefield Road, California, 92065, USA [1] Although CO2 is generally the most abundant dissolved gas found in submarine

  2. Development of a model for predicting transient hydrogen venting in 55-gallon drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apperson, Jason W; Clemmons, James S; Garcia, Michael D; Sur, John C; Zhang, Duan Z; Romero, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Remote drum venting was performed on a population of unvented high activity drums (HAD) in the range of 63 to 435 plutonium equivalent Curies (PEC). These 55-gallon Transuranic (TRU) drums will eventually be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this process, the development of a calculational model was required to predict the transient hydrogen concentration response of the head space and polyethylene liner (if present) within the 55-gallon drum. The drum and liner were vented using a Remote Drum Venting System (RDVS) that provided a vent sampling path for measuring flammable hydrogen vapor concentrations and allow hydrogen to diffuse below lower flammability limit (LFL) concentrations. One key application of the model was to determine the transient behavior of hydrogen in the head space, within the liner, and the sensitivity to the number of holes made in the liner or number of filters. First-order differential mass transport equations were solved using Laplace transformations and numerically to verify the results. the Mathematica 6.0 computing tool was also used as a validation tool and for examining larger than two chamber systems. Results will be shown for a variety of configurations, including 85-gallon and 110-gallon overpack drums. The model was also validated against hydrogen vapor concentration assay measurements.

  3. Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain venting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Dylan

    Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain- posphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument. Enhanced CO is observed over the Zagros mountains of Iran), Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain venting

  4. Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

    2007-01-01

    zone system all of the vent registers are open, distributing air into all areas of the house at once. Single zone control leads to wasted energy for two reasons - all rooms being conditioned when they are not occupied, and conditioning occupied rooms...

  5. Sound field near hydrothermal vents on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.A.; Stolzenbach, K.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    1990-08-10

    High-quality acoustic noise measurements were obtained by two hydrophones located 3 m and 40 m from an active hydrothermal vent on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an effort to determine the feasibility of monitoring hydrothermal vent activity through flow noise generation. Most of the measured noise field could be attributed to ambient ocean noise sources of microseisms, distant shipping, and weather, punctuated by local ships and biological sources. Long-period, low-velocity, water/rock interface waves were detected with high amplitudes which rapidly decayed with distance from the seafloor. Detection of vent signals was hampered by unexpected spatial nonstationarity due to the shadowing effects of the calders wall. No continuous vent signals were deemed significant based on a criterion of 90% probability of detection and 5% probability of false alarm. However, a small signal near 40 Hz, with a power level of 0.0001 Pa sq/Hz was noticed on two records taken within 3 m of the Inferno black smoker. The frequency of this signal is consistent with predictions, and the power level suggests the occurrence of jet noise amplification due to convected density inhomogeneities. Keywords: Seamounts; Flow noise; Underwater acoustics; Acoustic measurement; Geothermy/noise; Ocean ridges; Underwater sound signals; Reprints; North Pacific Ocean. (EDC).

  6. Discovery of new hydrothermal vent sites in Branseld Strait, G.P. Klinkhammer aY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Randall A

    ¨ Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France Received 24 January 2001; accepted 1 October 2001 Abstract We carried out a search for hydrothermal vents in the Central Basin of Bransfield Strait of dredges. Hydrothermal plumes over Hook Ridge at the eastern end of the basin are confined to the E ridge

  7. FIRE Vacuum Vessel Design and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality vacuum - outgassing and leak rate of waste disposal #12;6 June 2001 FIRE Review: Vacuum Vessel Design 8 Vessel shell dimensions #12;6 June - Shielding water + steel with 60% packing factor - Volume of torus interior 35 m^3 - Surface Area of torus

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & DH100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time Exposure: 100 Draft #12;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil Time

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3 RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;11/20/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil Time

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/21/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & OB HE100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time Exposure: 100% of Base;11/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/12/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;P TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  17. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision;11/22/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/22/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All FV

  19. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halsey, W; Simon, A J; Fratoni, M; Smith, C; Schwab, P; Murray, P

    2012-06-06

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  20. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  1. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred (1125 Canton Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550); Magnotta, Frank (1206 Bacon Way, Lafayette, CA 94549)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  2. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  3. International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Proceedings from the forum, which took place in...

  4. Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning Ryan Kiros, Karteek We introduce a representation learning approach to segmenting vessels in the lungs. Our algorithm

  5. Middle Bronze Age Ceramic Vessels from Kamid el-Loz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantazariti, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    and reconstruction of the ceramic vessel economic systemsis to investigate the ceramic economy of the site of Kamidstudied included mainly complete ceramic vessels and, more

  6. Thermal wake/vessel detection technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10

    A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

  7. Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Zeltner, Walter A. (Oregon, WI)

    1992-08-11

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU #12

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 2 GW-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU #12

  3. Initial Low Recycling Improving Confinement and Current Drive in Advanced Tokamak (AT) and Hybrid Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initial Low Recycling Improving Confinement and Current Drive in Advanced Tokamak (AT) and Hybrid Scenarios

  4. A Goldilocks Catalyst: Nanocluster 'just right' for Recycling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion are major contributors to global warming. Since CO2 comes from fuel, why can't we recycle it back into fuel rather...

  5. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  6. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Battery Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OnTo Technology LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced battery recycling.

  8. Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

    2007-01-01

    This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

  9. Fouling mechanisms of submerged ultrafiltration membranes in greywater recycling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oschmann, Nadine; Nghiem, L. D.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the influence of greywater constituents on the fouling behaviour of submerged hollow fibre UF membranes during greywater treatment for recycling purposes. Experiments were carried out on a bench-scale ...

  10. Ramsey County commercial, industrial, institutional waste reduction and recycling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman-Onkka, C.

    1995-09-01

    The Ramsey County Commercial, Industrial, Institutional Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was developed (1) to raise awareness of waste reduction and recycling opportunities for businesses, (2) to make information available to businesses, (3) to provide technical assistance to small and medium sized businesses on waste reduction and recycling, and (4) to raise awareness of Ramsey County as a technical resource. Ramsey County was founded in 1849 and is named for Alexander Ramsey, the first governor of the Minnesota Territory. Ramsey County is the smallest, most urban of all 87 counties in Minnesota. With 170 square miles and a 1990 population of 485,000, Ramsey has the most people per square mile of any county in Minnesota. There are 19 cities within the County, the largest is Saint Paul with a 1990 population of 272,000. There are no unincorporated areas in Ramsey County. This report describes the efforts directed towards raising the awareness of the county waste management, recycling program.

  11. Recycling Lingware in a Multilingual MT System Steffen Leo Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycling Lingware in a Multilingual MT System Steffen Leo Hansen Manny Rayner David Carter Ivan (Rayner and Carter, 1997). The first is the most obvious: we start with a function- ing grammar

  12. Strategies for aluminum recycling : insights from material system optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Preston Pui-Chuen

    2005-01-01

    The dramatic increase in aluminum consumption over the past decades necessitates a societal effort to recycle and reuse these materials to promote true sustainability and energy savings in aluminum production. However, the ...

  13. Recyclable organic solar cells on substrates comprising cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kippelen, Bernard; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Zhou, Yinhua; Moon, Robert; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.

    2015-12-01

    Recyclable organic solar cells are disclosed herein. Systems and methods are further disclosed for producing, improving performance, and for recycling the solar cells. In certain example embodiments, the recyclable organic solar cells disclosed herein include: a first electrode; a second electrode; a photoactive layer disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode; an interlayer comprising a Lewis basic oligomer or polymer disposed between the photoactive layer and at least a portion of the first electrode or the second electrode; and a substrate disposed adjacent to the first electrode or the second electrode. The interlayer reduces the work function associated with the first or second electrode. In certain example embodiments, the substrate comprises cellulose nanocrystals that can be recycled. In certain example embodiments, one or more of the first electrode, the photoactive layer, and the second electrode may be applied by a film transfer lamination method.

  14. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  15. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: An Approach to Building Large Internet Caches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabinovich, Michael "Misha"

    Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: An Approach to Building Large Internet Caches Syam Gadde Dept. of Computer, a distributed Internet object cache targeted to the needs of the organizations that aggregate the end users

  16. RECYCLING GALVANIZED STEEL: OPERATING EXPERIENCE AND BENEFrI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and enabling recycling of ferrous dusts to the sinter plant. In EAF operations, loss of control of the arc and zinc fuming on charging, tapping and casting is troublesome. In BOF...

  17. TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT POTENTIAL RECYCLING OF SCRAP METAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT POTENTIAL RECYCLING OF SCRAP METAL FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES PART I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 2 Overview of Scrap Metal Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.3 Principal Scrap Metal Operations Considered

  18. International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theurer, Jean E

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

  19. Neutronic analysis of a proposed plutonium recycle assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solan, George Michael

    1975-01-01

    A method for the neutronic analysis of plutonium recycle assemblies has been developed with emphasis on relative power distribution prediction in the boundary area of vastly different spectral regions. Such regions are ...

  20. Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, A.

    The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

  1. Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

  2. MultiWave™ Automated Sorting System for Efficient Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary challenge in recycling paper has been to obtain raw material with the highest purity. Ideally, creating a paper stream sorted by purity would facilitate a high-quality end product,...

  3. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D. Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  4. Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckman, Kate Lynn

    2009-01-01

    A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

  5. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

  6. Future characteristics of Offshore Support Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Robin Sebastian Koske

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to examine trends in Offshore Support Vessel (OSV) design and determine the future characteristics of OSVs based on industry insight and supply chain models. Specifically, this thesis focuses ...

  7. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  8. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  9. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  10. Binary and recycled pulsars: 30 years after observational discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G S Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2006-11-13

    Binary radio pulsars, first discovered by Hulse and Taylor in 1974 [1], are a unique tool for experimentally testing general relativity (GR), whose validity has been confirmed with a precision unavailable in laboratory experiments. In particular, indirect evidence of the existence of gravitational waves has been obtained. Radio pulsars in binary systems (which have come to be known as recycled) have completed the accretion stage, during which neutron star spins reach millisecond periods and their magnetic fields decay 2 to 4 orders of magnitude more weakly than ordinary radio pulsars. Among about a hundred known recycled pulsars, many have turned out to be single neutron stars. The high concentration of single recycled pulsars in globular clusters suggests that close stellar encounters are highly instrumental in the loss of the companion. A system of one recycled pulsar and one 'normal' one discovered in 2004 is the most compact among binaries containing recycled pulsars [2]. Together with the presence of two pulsars in one system, this suggests new prospects for further essential improvements in testing GR. This paper considers theoretical predictions of binary pulsars, their evolutionary formation, and mechanisms by which their companions may be lost. The use of recycled pulsars in testing GR is discussed and their possible relation to the most intriguing objects in the universe, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, is examined.

  11. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-11-22

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  12. Annabella: a North American coasting vessel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claesson, Stefan Hans

    1998-01-01

    schooner in 1841. 53 26 Map of southern New Jersey. 60 27 28 Section lines of the preserved remains of Annabella. . . . . Lines of a Milford, Delaware vessel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 FIGURE Page 29 A billet head of a 19th... enrolment records. . 54 Measurements of Milford, Delaware-built sloops in comparison to Annabella, 69 Timber dimensions required for construction of 100 ton vessel by American Shipmaster's Association in 1882 compared to timber dimensions of Annabella...

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  15. A NOVEL APPROACH TO DRUM VENTING AND DRUM MONITORINGe/pj

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohl, P.C.; Farwick, C.C.; Douglas, D.G.; Cruz, E.J.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the details and specifications associated with drum venting and drum monitoring technologies, and discusses the maturity of in-place systems and current applications. Each year, unventilated drums pressurize and develop bulges and/or breaches that can result in potentially hazardous explosions, posing undesirable hazards to workers and the environment. Drum venting is accomplished by the safe and simple installation of ventilated lids at the time of packaging, or by the inherently risky in-situ ventilation (depressurization) of ''bulged'' drums. Drum monitoring employs either a Magnetically Coupled Pressure Gauge (MCPG) Patent Pending and/or a Magnetically Coupled Corrosion Gauge (MCCG) Patent Pending. Through patented magnetic sensor coupling, these devices enable the noninvasive and remote monitoring of the potentially hazardous materials and/or spent nuclear fuel that is contained in 55-gal drums and associated steel overpack containers.

  16. PURE NIOBIUM AS A PRESSURE VESSEL MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T. J.; Carter, H. F.; Foley, M. H.; Klebaner, A. L.; Nicol, T. H.; Page, T. M.; Theilacker, J. C.; Wands, R. H.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Wu, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Physics laboratories around the world are developing niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for use in particle accelerators. These SRF cavities are typically cooled to low temperatures by direct contact with a liquid helium bath, resulting in at least part of the helium container being made from pure niobium. In the U.S., the Code of Federal Regulations allows national laboratories to follow national consensus pressure vessel rules or use of alternative rules which provide a level of safety greater than or equal to that afforded by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Thus, while used for its superconducting properties, niobium ends up also being treated as a material for pressure vessels. This report summarizes what we have learned about the use of niobium as a pressure vessel material, with a focus on issues for compliance with pressure vessel codes. We present results of a literature search for mechanical properties and tests results, as well as a review of ASME pressure vessel code requirements and issues.

  17. Modeling Lithium Ion Battery Safety: Venting of Pouch Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram.; Yang, Chuanbo.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the successful completion of the NREL July milestone entitled “Modeling Lithium-Ion Battery Safety - Complete Case-Studies on Pouch Cell Venting,” as part of the 2013 Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This work aims to bridge the gap between materials modeling, usually carried out at the sub-continuum scale, and the

  18. IDS120h GEOMETRY SHIELDING VESSELS: STAINLESS STEEL vs. TUNGSTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY SHIELDING VESSELS: STAINLESS STEEL vs. TUNGSTEN SHIELDING MATERIAL: 60%WC+40%H2 O shielding vessels (STST OR W) Different cases of shielding material. >mars1510/MCNP >10-11 MeV NEUTRON ENERGY CUTOFF >SHIELDING:60%WC+40%H2 O (STST or W VESSELS), 80%WC+20%He, 80%W+20%He (W VESSELS) >4 MW

  19. Augmented Vessels for Pre-operative Preparation in Endovascular Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Albert C. S.

    Augmented Vessels for Pre-operative Preparation in Endovascular Treatments Wilbur C.K. Wong1 to construct imaginary disease-free vessel lumens, namely augmented vessels, and demarcate the abnormalities;Augmented Vessels for Pre-operative Preparation 603 Several researchers have suggested to detach a saccular

  20. > Facilities and Services > Recycling on the St. George Campus > NEW! Non-hazardous Laboratory Glass and Plastics Recycling NEW! Non-hazardous Laboratory Glass and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Glass and Plastics Recycling Program NEW! ­ Non-hazardous Laboratory Glass and Plastics Recycling Program NEW! NON-HAZARDOUS glass and plastic items used in laboratories can now be recycled! Facilities;© Copyright 2008, University of Toronto. Home Site Map Contact GLASS may be placed in the TEAL toters.PLASTIC

  1. Probabilistic vessel axis tracing and its application to vessel segmentation with stream surfaces and minimum cost paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Albert C. S.

    Probabilistic vessel axis tracing and its application to vessel segmentation with stream surfaces May 2007 Available online 2 June 2007 Abstract We propose a novel framework to segment vessels on their cross-sections. It starts with a probabilistic vessel axis tracing in a gray-scale three

  2. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM), the NRC/Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) raised numerous safety-related issues regarding elevated-temperature structural integrity criteria. Most of these issues remained unresolved today. These critical licensing reviews provide a basis for the evaluation of underlying technical issues for future advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Major materials performance issues and high temperature design methodology issues pertinent to the ARR are addressed in the report. The report is organized as follows: the ARR reference design concepts proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory and four industrial consortia were reviewed first, followed by a summary of the major code qualification and licensing issues for the ARR structural materials. The available database is presented for the ASME Code-qualified structural alloys (e.g. 304, 316 stainless steels, 2.25Cr-1Mo, and mod.9Cr-1Mo), including physical properties, tensile properties, impact properties and fracture toughness, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, microstructural stability during long-term thermal aging, material degradation in sodium environments and effects of neutron irradiation for both base metals and weld metals. An assessment of modified versions of Type 316 SS, i.e. Type 316LN and its Japanese version, 316FR, was conducted to provide a perspective for codification of 316LN or 316FR in Subsection NH. Current status and data availability of four new advanced alloys, i.e. NF616, NF616+TMT, NF709, and HT-UPS, are also addressed to identify the R&D needs for their code qualification for ARR applications. For both conventional and new alloys, issues related to high temperature design methodology are described to address the needs for improvements for the ARR design and licensing. Assessments have shown that there are significant data gaps for the full qualification and licensing of the ARR structural materials. Development and evaluation of structural materials require a variety of experimental facilities that have been seriously degraded

  3. Removal of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor - 13031

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzog, C. Brad [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States)] [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States); Guercia, Rudolph [US-DOE (United States)] [US-DOE (United States); LaCome, Matt [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)] [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The 309 Facility housed the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), an operating test reactor in the 300 Area at Hanford, Washington. The reactor first went critical in 1960 and was originally used for experiments under the Hanford Site Plutonium Fuels Utilization Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned in 1988-1989, and the facility was deactivated in 1994. The 309 facility was added to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response actions as established in an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) and Action Memorandum (AM). The IROD directs a remedial action for the 309 facility, associated waste sites, associated underground piping and contaminated soils resulting from past unplanned releases. The AM directs a removal action through physical demolition of the facility, including removal of the reactor. Both CERCLA actions are implemented in accordance with U.S. EPA approved Remedial Action Work Plan, and the Remedial Design Report / Remedial Action Report associated with the Hanford 300-FF-2 Operable Unit. The selected method for remedy was to conventionally demolish above grade structures including the easily distinguished containment vessel dome, remove the PRTR and a minimum of 300 mm (12 in) of shielding as a single 560 Ton unit, and conventionally demolish the below grade structure. Initial sample core drilling in the Bio-Shield for radiological surveys showed evidence that the Bio-Shield was of sound structure. Core drills for the separation process of the PRTR from the 309 structure began at the deck level and revealed substantial thermal degradation of at least the top 1.2 m (4LF) of Bio-Shield structure. The degraded structure combined with the original materials used in the Bio-Shield would not allow for a stable structure to be extracted. The water used in the core drilling process proved to erode the sand mixture of the Bio-Shield leaving the steel aggregate to act as ball bearings against the core drill bit. A redesign is being completed to extract the 309 PRTR and entire Bio-Shield structure together as one monolith weighing 1100 Ton by cutting structural concrete supports. In addition, the PRTR has hundreds of contaminated process tubes and pipes that have to be severed to allow for a uniformly flush fit with a lower lifting frame. Thirty-two 50 mm (2 in) core drills must be connected with thirty-two wire saw cuts to allow for lifting columns to be inserted. Then eight primary saw cuts must be completed to severe the PRTR from the 309 Facility. Once the weight of the PRTR is transferred to the lifting frame, then the PRTR may be lifted out of the facility. The critical lift will be executed using four 450 Ton strand jacks mounted on a 9 m (30 LF) tall mobile lifting frame that will allow the PRTR to be transported by eight 600 mm (24 in) Slide Shoes. The PRTR will then be placed on a twenty-four line, double wide, self powered Goldhofer for transfer to the onsite CERCLA Disposal Cell (ERDF Facility), approximately 33 km (20 miles) away. (authors)

  4. Global recycling services for short and long term risk reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arslan, M.; Grygiel, J.M.; Drevon, C.; Lelievre, F.; Lesage, M.; Vincent, O.

    2013-07-01

    New schemes are being developed by AREVA in order to provide global solutions for safe and non-proliferating management of used fuels, thereby significantly contributing to overall risks reduction and sustainable nuclear development. Utilities are thereby provided with a service through which they will be able to send their used fuels and only get returned vitrified and compacted waste, the only waste remaining after reprocessing. This waste is stable, standard and has demonstrated capability for very long term interim storage. They are provided as well with associated facilities and all necessary services for storage in a demonstrated safely manner. Recycled fuels, in particular MOX, would be used either in existing LWRs or in a very limited number of full MOX reactors (like the EPR reactor), located in selected countries, that will recycle MOX so as to downgrade the isotopic quality of the Pu inventories in a significant manner. Reprocessed uranium also can be recycled. These schemes, on top of offering demonstrated operational advantages and a responsible approach, result into optimized economics for all shareholders of the scheme, as part of reactor financing (under Opex or Capex form) will be secured thanks to the value of the recycled flows. It also increases fuel cost predictability as recycled fuel is not subject to market fluctuations as much and allows, in a limited span of time, for clear risk mitigation. (authors)

  5. Cavity closure arrangement for high pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amtmann, Hans H. (San Diego, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A closure arrangement for a pressure vessel such as the pressure vessel of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor wherein a liner is disposed within a cavity penetration in the reactor vessel and defines an access opening therein. A closure is adapted for sealing relation with an annular mounting flange formed on the penetration liner and has a plurality of radially movable locking blocks thereon having outer serrations adapted for releasable interlocking engagement with serrations formed internally of the upper end of the penetration liner so as to effect high strength closure hold-down. In one embodiment, ramping surfaces are formed on the locking block serrations to bias the closure into sealed relation with the mounting flange when the locking blocks are actuated to locking positions.

  6. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  7. Vessel with filter and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Jonathan S.; Ripley, Edward B.; Cecala, David M.

    2008-01-29

    Chemical processing apparatuses which incorporate a process vessel, such as a crucible or retort, and which include a gas separation or filtration system. Various embodiments incorporate such features as loose filtration material, semi-rigid filtration material, and structured filtration material. The vessel may include material that is a microwave susceptor. Filtration media may be selected so that if it inadvertently mixes with the chemical process or the reaction products of such process, it would not adversely affect the results of the chemical process.

  8. Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, Alessandro; Passarini, Fabrizio; Vassura, Ivano; Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

  9. Industrial recycling of glass, plastic and wood materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caccavo, F.N.; Posusney, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The intent of this paper is to discuss in detail the development and implementation of a recycling program encompassing these three residual waste streams at a major plant site of a large United States company. The paper will review the history of the program`s development, the vendor selection and recycling processes, the initial efforts to include failures and successes, and the cost recovery and profit that can be realized through a well-managed recycling program. The facility that is the subject of this paper is located approximately 20 lies north west of Philadelphia, Pa and supports a site population of over 6,200 employees working in three divisions of the parent company. The primary business of this firm is the manufacture, distribution, and sale of pharmaceutical drugs. This plant is the company`s largest facility engaging its employees in predominantly research and manufacturing operations. The manufacturing operations being the largest division encompassing the widest range of activities from the receipt of raw material through packaging and shipping operations. This site and the company it represents enjoy an excellent relationship within the community stemming in part to the commitment to environmental stewardship demonstrated by this successful program. The site retains its own internal waste management and disposal operations for the wide variety of refuse materials generated and it is this department which is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the site`s extensive recycling effort. The paper will review the ongoing development of these elements of this company`s growing recycling operations and attempt to demonstrate that extensive recycling can be both a productive and cost effective alternative to conventional disposal through incineration`s or landfill.

  10. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  11. Summary of Fermilab's Recycler Electron Cooler Operation and Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-15

    Fermilab's Recycler ring was used as a storage ring for accumulation and subsequent manipulations of 8 GeV antiprotons destined for the Tevatron collider. To satisfy these missions, a unique electron cooling system was designed, developed and successfully implemented. The most important features that distinguish the Recycler cooler from other existing electron coolers are its relativistic energy, 4.3 MV combined with 0.1-0.5 A DC beam current, a weak continuous longitudinal magnetic field in the cooling section, 100 G, and lumped focusing elsewhere. With the termination of the Tevatron collider operation, so did the cooler. In this article, we summarize the experience of running this unique machine.

  12. Ideal solar cell equation in the presence of photon recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Dongchen Green, Martin A.

    2014-11-07

    Previous derivations of the ideal solar cell equation based on Shockley's p-n junction diode theory implicitly assume negligible effects of photon recycling. This paper derives the equation in the presence of photon recycling that modifies the values of dark saturation and light-generated currents, using an approach applicable to arbitrary three-dimensional geometries with arbitrary doping profile and variable band gap. The work also corrects an error in previous work and proves the validity of the reciprocity theorem for charge collection in such a more general case with the previously neglected junction depletion region included.

  13. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-08-17

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  14. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study microbial and geochemical phenomena.

  15. Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Water Distict Economic Evaluation for Water Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    -i- Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Water Distict Economic Evaluation for Water Recycling In Urban Areas: _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Committee in Charge 2008 #12;-ii- TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT........................................................................................................................................... 4 BENEFICIAL USES OF RECYCLED WATER

  16. Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    the largest Aluminium, Copper and Stainless Steel parts are separated, since the cost and the time into the cost of the recycling process, the financial demand to recycle cars or washing machines

  17. 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) AND NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) AND NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS) AND NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP) CURRENTLY LANDFILLED IN THE FIFTY STATES EXECUTIVE (EEC) Report to the Plastics Division of the American Chemistry Council

  18. ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide Updated June 2014 EH&S Green Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    &MS Loading Dock Engineering 2, 2nd Floor Thimann Loading Dock Styrofoam may be recycled. EH&S provides a detailed guide on recycling Styrofoam. Please return send or collect until: Collection Dates PSB Loading

  19. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01

    mining, lead smelting and battery recycling. Areas near Pbof soil with lead. A battery recycling site is a locationSome sites consist of battery-breaking/lead-recovery

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/18/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12;P: BC & DH100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Pot. Ground. Oil OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/18/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ) 2010 Draft #12;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OILVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/18/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/19/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/19/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  5. Final Vitrification Melter And Vessels Evaluation Documentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has prepared final evaluations and made waste incidental to reprocessing determinations for the vitrification melter and feed vessels (the concentrator feed makeup tank and the melter feed hold tank), used by DOE’s West Valley Demonstration Project as part of the process to vitrify waste from prior commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

  6. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, John B. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  7. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desai, Dilip R. (Fremont, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  8. Investigation of Cracked Lithium Hydride Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    bird, e.l.; mustaleski, t.m.

    1999-06-01

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds, most of which were circumferentially located in the bottom portion of the vessels. Sections were cut from the vessels containing these cracks and examined by use of the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. Most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the base material and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depths of those examined sections ranged from {approximately}300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 1/8 in. The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue, whereby crack propagation may have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which indicates a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  9. Original Investigation Vessel Specific Coronary Artery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Original Investigation Vessel Specific Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring: An Automatic System Rahil heart as well as per coronary artery on non-contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomographic images and tested on 157 data sets. Statistical testing included determining Pearson's correlation coefficients

  10. Original Investigations Vessel Specific Coronary Artery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Original Investigations Vessel Specific Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring: An Automatic System Rahil heart as well as per coronary artery on non-contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomographic images and tested on 157 data sets. Statistical testing included determining Pearson's correlation coefficients

  11. THE WEST GERMAN RESEARCH VESSEL WALTHER HERWIG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....... .·. ... .. .........··...... 1 Lower deck aft........... ............... ............. ....... 1 Fish processing machinery and launched in 1963. The vessel was primarily designed as a stern trawler for use in high sea fisheries investigations with emphasis on mid- water and bottom trawling. Pertinent features of design, equipment

  12. Exploratory Dijkstra forest based automatic vessel segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasi, Carlo

    , and follows vessel branching naturally and efficiently. To test our method, we constructed a retinal video code freely available online. © 2012 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (100.0100) Image processing, "Automatic segmentation of seven retinal layers in SDOCT images congruent with expert manual segmentation

  13. Heat, 10B-Enriched Boric Acid, and Bromide as Recycled Groundwater Tracers for Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, J F

    2015-01-01

    using recycled municipal waste water in Los Angeles Countyet al. 1998). Boron in waste- water generally originateswarming mechanism: recycled waste- water arrives warm to the

  14. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 2, Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This second volume contains detailed information on a number of specific topics relevant to the recovery/recycling of plastics.

  15. Mast cells present protrusions into blood vessels upon tracheal allergen challenge in mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    probe cutaneous blood vessels to capture immunoglobulin E.Protrusions into Blood Vessels upon Tracheal AllergenProtrusions into Blood Vessels upon Tracheal Allergen

  16. Extending vaterite microviscometry to ex vivo blood vessels by serial calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shreim, Samir G.; Steward, Earl; Botvinick, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    stresses doing in our blood vessels? ” Ann. Biomed. Eng. 19(to ex vivo blood vessels by serial calibration Samir G.implications in vessel mechanics and mechanotransduction.

  17. The "Empty Vessel" Physician: Physicians' Instrumentality Makes Them Seem Personally Empty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, J; Fishbach, A

    2015-01-01

    Article The ‘‘Empty Vessel’’ Physician: Physicians’emotionless ‘‘empty vessels’’: The higher is individuals’physicians as empty vessels for health care. Keywords

  18. Arborizing vessels under dermoscopy: A case of cellular neurothekeoma instead of basal cell carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydingoz, Ikbal Esen; Mansur, Ayse Tulin; Dikicioglu-Cetin, Emel

    2013-01-01

    inspection disclosed prominent vessels. The background skinonly thick and arborizing vessels on the surface of theshowing arborizing vessels (Heine x10) Histopathology

  19. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  20. Design and analysis of recycled content sign blanks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Ben Frank

    1996-01-01

    and Other Structures. A design example for a two-pole sign is performed for one of the recycled materials collected during the study. Adequacy of the preliminary design is checked using a finite element model of the structure in conjunction with a set...

  1. How Can We Enable EV Battery Recycling? | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida, March 9-12, 2015. URL https:anl.box.comsk0v7g1kd6otk24ibjrvi7d9o01z8rsjr Related Projects Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Google Scholar...

  2. Packaging laws motivate industry to draw up global recycling pacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesche, E.S.

    1992-11-25

    Spurred by criticism that plastics contribute to the solid waste problem, some plastics industry associations are joining forces to find global solutions. For one, manufacturers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) protective foam packaging from the US, Germany, Austria, and Japan have entered an agreement to encourage the collection and recycling of postconsumer material. Meanwhile, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) makers from Japan, Europe, and North and South America met in September and agreed to develop systems and technology for PVC recycling as well as incineration. The EPS agreement was motivated by fears that packaging material made outside of Germany would not meet the country's new Packaging Ordinance, says a spokesman for the Association of Foam Packaging Recyclers (AFPR; Washington). AFPR chairman John O'Leary Jr., who is also president and CEO of Tuscarora Inc. (New Brighton, PA), says [open quotes]Some consumer product manufacturers in the US incorrectly believe that EPS protective foam packaging may not be acceptable in Germany.[close quotes] The agreement was signed by EPSY-Germany, EPSY-Austria, AFPR, and the Japan EPS Recycling Association. The AFPR is affiliated with the Society of the Plastics Industry (Washington).

  3. Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality Manuel Vasquez, Juan Sandoval acquisition of solar power, nuclear power, and biofuels to diversify the country's domestic energy profile, the chemical make-up of biofuels allows them to be readily converted into their petroleum counterparts making

  4. Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

  5. FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE L. EL-GUEBALY,* P. WILSON for Publication February 3, 2004 The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management

  6. The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A.

    2006-09-15

    The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

  7. HKUST Environmental Report 2003 Update Waste Recycling and Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    paper. 9:CSO, EMO and SEPO together with the LG1 caterer launched the food waste collection and composting scheme at LG1 catering outlet. The program aims to reduce the amount of food waste being sentHKUST Environmental Report 2003 Update #12;Waste Recycling and Minimization Enhanced efforts

  8. REVIEW OF STRATEGY FOR RECYCLING AND REUSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary

    concrete waste ­ as part of the construction and demolition waste stream ­ has received considerable ­ Waste hierarchy READY-MIXED CONCRETE Concrete is the world's most important construction materialREVIEW OF STRATEGY FOR RECYCLING AND REUSE OF WASTE MATERIALS B J Sealey G J Hill Dr P S Phillips

  9. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

  10. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 242249 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Recycling education Municipal solid waste Waste management a b s t r a c t This study analyzes the effects of various recycling and waste management policy variables on recycling rate by utilizing county-level panel municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in the United States has increased from 88 million tons in 1960

  11. NREL Materials Recycling Procedure Purpose To promote environmental sustainability and stewardship, NREL provides the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    collection locations for recyclable materials, excluding batteries and hazardous materials, from home. This procedure identifies appropriate materials, collection locations, and rules and processes for recycling. To recycle or dispose of hazardous materials from home, contact your county or city or go to the Colorado

  12. Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a, *, J.C. Poggiale b , P rights reserved. Keywords: Aggregation methods; Batch reactor; Chemostat; Food chains; Nutrient recycling recycling is taken into account. The food chain is formed by a nutrient and two populations, prey

  13. Cover Heated, Open Vessels, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Cover Heated, Open Vessels Open vessels that contain heated liquids often have high heat loss due to surface evaporation. Both energy and liquid losses are reduced by covering...

  14. Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind October 1, 2013...

  15. aftercastle masted vessel with aftercastle is found on a Spanish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    masted vessel with aftercastle is found on a Spanish ations it would have any idea of crusader ships aces for the new tack as large as the crusader vessels (

  16. X-Ray Ablation and Debris Venting for the HIF Point Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debonnel, C.S. [University of California (United States); Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Peterson, P.F. [University of California (United States)

    2003-09-15

    This paper presents detailed design and analysis for x-ray ablation and venting in the 120-beam, 7-MJ heavy-ion fusion (HIF) 'robust' point design. The HI Robust Point Design ('RPD-2002') is a self-consistent, non-optimized system design that has been generated as a point of reference for ongoing research in the HIF program. The point design uses a thick-liquid protected chamber, derived from HYLIFE-II - no structural surfaces face the target. A ternary salt mixture called flinabe (LiNaBeF{sub 4}) has been selected for the liquid structures. Detailed two-dimensional, axially symmetric TSUNAMI calculations have been performed to determine the mass of ablation debris generated by the target x-rays following ignition and to predict the venting of the debris from the inside of the pocket into the main chamber and beam lines. These calculations provide predictions of the impulse loading to the surfaces of the liquid pocket - The closest liquid structures will experience a somewhat strong impulse, but further optimization of the design will easily decrease this impulse. The integrated mass and energy fluxes of ablation and target debris reaching the beam-line magnetic shutters are given as well: A small and acceptable magnetic dipole will prevent any debris ingression up in the final focus magnet region.

  17. Tailoring Topology Optimization to Composite Pressure Vessel Design with Simultaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    $160/ship Comparison of CNG and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) Introduction ­ CNG Pressure Vessels MM;Introduction ­ CNG Pressure Vessels Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Pressure Vessels CNG Cargo Containment System upon the number of ships used for the transport of the gas. MMscf/d - million standard cubic feet per

  18. Large Blood Vessels 1.1 Introduction --The Cardiovascular System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaoyu

    Chapter 1 Large Blood Vessels 1.1 Introduction -- The Cardiovascular System The heart is a pump vessels, the capillaries, in which the main ex- change processes between the blood and tissues take place- sue, collagen, with a few muscle cells. 3 #12;4 CHAPTER 1. LARGE BLOOD VESSELS Figure 1.1: Structure

  19. FEDERAL PERMIT APPLICATION FOR VESSELS FISHING FOR WRECKFISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FEDERAL PERMIT APPLICATION FOR VESSELS FISHING FOR WRECKFISH OFF THE SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES OMB can you bring to the dock when full? USCG DOCUMENTED VESSELS ONLY Gross Tons Net Tons Hull Material) United States Coast Guard (USCG) Certificate of Documentation or a copy of the State Vessel Registration

  20. Image Segmentation Methods for Detecting Blood Vessels in Angiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Albert C. S.

    Image Segmentation Methods for Detecting Blood Vessels in Angiography Albert C. S. Chung Lo Kwee-assisted detection and segmentation of blood vessels in angiography are crucial for endovascular treat- ments--Segmentation of Blood Vessels, Feature Detection, Statistical Segmentation, Active Contour Model, Angiography I

  1. Modeling Torsion of Blood Vessels in Surgical Simulation and Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Wee Kheng

    Modeling Torsion of Blood Vessels in Surgical Simulation and Planning Hao LI a,1 , Wee Kheng LEOW a hybrid approach for modeling torsion of blood vessels that undergo deformation and joining. The proposed model takes 3D mesh of the blood vessel as input. It first fits a generalized cylinder to extract

  2. Cross Section of Coils & Shielding Vessels; Stresses & Deformations Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Cross Section of Coils & Shielding Vessels; Stresses & Deformations Preliminary Results Bob Weggel 7/5--7/26/2011 The inner radius of the bore tube of the inner shielding vessel (longitudinal axis compressed) of inner and outer shielding vessels of design "Shields50mm.mph", including

  3. IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH SHIELDING VESSELS ENERGY FLOW ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH SHIELDING VESSELS ENERGY FLOW ANALYSIS SHIELDING MATERIAL: 60% W + 40% He vs SHIELDING Nicholas Souchlas, PBL (10/18/2011) 1 #12;IDS120h with shielding vessels. # Different cases ENERGY CUTOFF >SHIELDING: 60% W + 40% He , 80% W + 20% He, 88% W + 12% He ( WITH W VESSELS) >4 MW proton

  4. Vessel tractography using an intensity based tensor model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Vessel tractography using an intensity based tensor model Suheyla Cetin1 , Gozde Unal1 , Ali Demir1 method, which is based on an intensity-based tensor that fits to a vessel. Our model is initialized with a single seed point and it is ca- pable of capturing whole vessel tree by an automatic branch detection

  5. Hydrocracking of heavy oils using an ebullated bed technology with recycle of unconverted bottom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galiasso, R.; Gutierrez, M.; Caprioli, L.

    1986-01-01

    An hydrocracking process was studied to convert Cerro Negro heavy oil using an ebullated bed technology with recycle of uncoverted bottoms. Three levels of recycle were used to demonstrate its effect on the economy of the process. An apparent kinetics was developed for the properties studied and a CSTR model was used to simulate the hydrocracking reactor. The reactivity of the recycled decreases as a function of the number of pass and the level of conversion; the higher the recycle is the higher the catalyst consumption for constant level of conversion. There is an economic optimum level of recycle which depends on catalyst deactivation and the economic parameters, and properties of the feed.

  6. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

  7. (Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1990-09-24

    The traveler served as a member of the two-man US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored team who visited the Prometey Complex in Leningrad to assess the potential for expanded cooperative research concerning integrity of the primary pressure boundary in commercial light-water reactors. The emphasis was on irradiation embrittlement, structural analysis, and fracture mechanics research for reactor pressure vessels. At the irradiation seminar in Cologne, presentations were made by German, French, Finnish, Russian, and US delegations concerning many aspects of irradiation of pressure vessel steels. The traveler made presentations on mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and on important aspects of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program results of irradiated fracture mechanics tests.

  8. Economic Feasibility of Electrochemical Caustic Recycling at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Kurath, Dean E.; Holton, Langdon K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2009-03-01

    This report contains a review of potential cost benefits of NaSICON Ceramic membranes for the separation of sodium from Hanford tank waste. The primary application is for caustic recycle to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreatment leaching operation. The report includes a description of the waste, the benefits and costs for a caustic-recycle facility, and Monte Carlo results obtained from a model of these costs and benefits. The use of existing cost information has been limited to publicly available sources. This study is intended to be an initial evaluation of the economic feasibility of a caustic recycle facility based on NaSICON technology. The current pretreatment flowsheet indicates that approximately 6,500 metric tons (MT) of Na will be added to the tank waste, primarily for removing Al from the high-level waste (HLW) sludge (Kirkbride et al. 2007). An assessment (Alexander et al. 2004) of the pretreatment flowsheet, equilibrium chemistry, and laboratory results indicates that the quantity of Na required for sludge leaching will increase by 6,000 to 12,000 MT in order to dissolve sufficient Al from the tank-waste sludge material to maintain the number of HLW canisters produced at 9,400 canisters as defined in the Office of River Protection (ORP) System Plan (Certa 2003). This additional Na will significantly increase the volume of LAW glass and extend the processing time of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Future estimates on sodium requirements for caustic leaching are expected to significantly exceed the 12,000-MT value and approach 40,000-MT of total sodium addition for leaching (Gilbert, 2007). The cost benefit for caustic recycling is assumed to consist of four major contributions: 1) the cost savings realized by not producing additional immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, 2) caustic recycle capital investment, 3) caustic recycle operating and maintenance costs, and 4) research and technology costs needed to deploy the technology. In estimating costs for each of these components, several parameters are used as inputs. Due to uncertainty in assuming a singular value for each of these parameters, a range of possible values is assumed. A Monte Carlo simulation is then performed where the range of these parameters is exercised, and the resulting range of cost benefits is determined.

  9. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  10. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Calibration and Certification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-17

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of SNM in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le} 100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The system was calibrated in three different mass regions (low, medium, and high) to cover the entire plutonium mass range that will be assayed. The low mass calibration and medium mass calibration were verified for material positioned in the center of an empty vessel. The systematic uncertainty due to position bias was estimated using an MCNPX model to simulate the response of the system to material localized at various points along the inner surface of the vessel. The background component due to cosmic ray spallation was determined by performing measurements of an empty vessel and comparing to measurements in the same location with no vessel present. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements of CVs before and after cleanout.

  11. Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messenger, S. J.; Forsberg, C.; Massie, M.

    2012-07-01

    Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options for disposal of fission gas wastes. In each option, lithostatic pressure, a kilometer or more underground, eliminates the pressure driving force for noble gas release and dissolves any untrapped gas in deep groundwater or into incorporated solid waste forms. The options, challenges, and potential for these methods to dispose of gaseous fission products are described. With this research, we hope to help both MSRs and other advanced reactors come one step closer to commercialization. (authors)

  12. Whitey Swagelok SCHe Ball Valves Provide Isolation between SCHe Purge Lines C and D and the Process Vent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-15

    These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They provide an isolation function betwen SCHe Purge Line C, (PV-V-*079), and Purge Line D, (PV-V-*080), and the Process Vent.

  13. Whitey Swagelok SCHe Ball Valves Provide Isolation between SCHe Purge Lines C and D and the Process Vent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-06-21

    These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They provide an isolation function between SCHe Purge Line C, (PV-V-*079), and Purge Line D, (PV-V-*080), and the Process Vent.

  14. Whitey Swagelok SCHe ball valves Provide Isolation between SCHe Purge Lines C and D and the Process Vent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They provide an isolation function betwen SCHe Purge Line C, (PV-V-*079), and Purge Line D, (PV-V-*080), and the Process Vent.

  15. Process for refractory compound conversion in a hydrocracker recycle liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruia, A.J.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a catalytic hydrocracking process. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock; partially condensing the hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone; introducing at least a portion of the unconverted hydrocarbon stream boiling above about 400{degrees} F and comprising trace quantities of 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds into a 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compound conversion zone; admixing at least a portion of the effluent from the conversion zone with the lower boiling hydrocarbon stream and partially condensing the resulting admixture; separating the partially condensed admixture to provide a hydrogen-rich gaseous stream and a liquid stream; separating the liquid stream comprising unconverted hydrocarbons boiling above about 400{degrees} F and lower boiling hydrocarbon products; and recycling at least a portion of the unconverted hydrocarbon stream boiling above about 400{degrees} F to the hydrocracking zone as at least a portion of the liquid recycle stream.

  16. Recycling of nuclear spent fuel with AIROX processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, D.; Jahshan, S.N.; Allison, C.M.; Kuan, P.; Thomas, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report examines the concept of recycling light water reactor (LWR) fuel through use of a dry-processing technique known as the AIROX (Atomics International Reduction Oxidation) process. In this concept, the volatiles and the cladding from spent LWR fuel are separated from the fuel by the AIROX process. The fuel is then reenriched and made into new fuel pins with new cladding. The feasibility of the concept is studied from a technical and high level waste minimization perspective.

  17. Symbiotically integrated organic recycling/renewable energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamburg, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Two operating systems designed for the integrated recycling of organic materials and production of renewable energy are described. Both systems include the Chinese design, water-pressure biogas digesters, a solar greenhouse and algae/aquatic plant ponds, all in passive symbiotic relationships with a minimum of high technology sophistication. A discussion of fish ponds and fuel alcohol production is also included since they offer many possibilities for expanded integration.

  18. Regional or global WEEE recycling. Where to go?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lopez N, Brenda N.; Liu, Lili; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Keli; Zheng, Lixia [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Source and Destination countries involved in the movement of WEEE have been studied. ? Legislation, facilities and EPR are presented in Source and Destination countries. ? Mostly Destination countries do not have EPR established and have informal facilities. ? Source countries: good technology, EPR established and mostly WEEE regulation enacted. ? Regional WEEE recycling should be under global standards for Sources and Destinations. - Abstract: If we consider Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) management, we can see the development of different positions in developed and developing countries. This development started with the movement of WEEE from developed countries to the developing countries. However, when the consequences for health and the environment were observed, some developing countries introduced a ban on the import of this kind of waste under the umbrella of the Basel Convention, while some developed countries have been considering a regional or global WEEE recycling approach. This paper explores the current movements between Source and Destination countries, or the importers and exporters, and examines whether it is legal and why illegal traffic is still rife; how global initiatives could support a global WEEE management scheme; the recycling characteristics of the source an destination countries and also to ascertain whether the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) has been established between the different stakeholders involved in WEEE management. Ultimately, the Full Extended Producer Responsibility is presented as a possible solution because the compensation of the environmental capacity for WEEE recycling or treatment could be made by the contribution of extra responsibility; and also generating an uniform standard for processing WEEE in an environmentally sound manner could support the regional or international solution of WEEE and also improve the performance of the informal sector.

  19. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  20. Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Past OpportunitiesRecycling

  1. Potential for AP600 in-vessel retention through ex-vessel flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Allison, C.M.; Thinnes, G.L.; Atwood, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) is a new severe accident management strategy that involves flooding the reactor cavity to submerge the reactor vessel in an attempt to cool core debris that has relocated to the vessel lower head. Advanced and existing light water reactors (LWRs) are considering ERVC as an accident management strategy for in-vessel retention (IVR) of relocated debris. In the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for the AP600 design, Westinghouse credits ERVC for preventing vessel failure during postulated severe accidents with successful reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization and reactor cavity flooding. To support the Westinghouse position on IVR, DOE contracted the University of California--Santa Barbara (UCSB) to produce the peer-reviewed report. To assist in the NRC`s evaluation of IVR of core melt by ex-vessel flooding of the AP6OO, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was tasked to perform: An in-depth critical review of the UCSB study and the model that UCSB used to assess ERVC effectiveness; An in-depth review of the UCSB study peer review comments and of UCSB`s resolution method to identify areas where technical concerns weren`t addressed; and An independent analysis effort to investigate the impact of residual concerns on the margins to failure and conclusions presented in the UCSB study. This report summarizes results from these tasks. As discussed in Sections 1.1 and 1.2, INEEL`s review of the UCSB study and peer reviewer comments suggested that additional analysis was needed to assess: (1) the integral impact of peer reviewer-suggested changes to input assumptions and uncertainties and (2) the challenge present by other credible debris configurations. Section 1.3 summarized the corresponding analysis approach developed by INEEL. The remainder of this report provides more detailed descriptions of analysis methodology, input assumptions, and results.

  2. AISI waste oxide recycling program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E.; Downing, K.B.; Sarma, B.

    1995-08-01

    In March 1995 AISI completed a five-year, $60 million collaborative development program on Direct Steelmaking cost-shared by DOE under the Metals Initiative. This program defined an energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly technology to produce hot metal for steelmaking directly from coal and iron ore pellets without incurring the high capital costs and environmental problems associated with traditional coke oven and blast furnace technology. As it becomes necessary to replace present capacity, this new technology will be favored because of reduced capital costs, higher energy efficiency, and lower operating costs. In April 1994, having failed to move forward with a demonstration plant for direct ironmaking, despite substantial efforts by both Stelco and Geneva Steel, an alternative opportunity was sought to commercialize this new technology without waiting until existing ironmaking capacity needed to be replaced. Recycling and resource recovery of steel plant waste oxides was considered an attractive possibility. This led to approval of a ten-month, $8.3 million joint program with DOE on recycling steel plant waste oxides utilizing this new smelting technology. This highly successful trial program was completed in December 1994. The results of the pilot plant work and a feasibility study for a recycling demonstration plant are presented in this final technical report.

  3. In situ recycling of contaminated soil uses bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevlin, P.J.; Reel, D.A.

    1996-04-01

    OxyChem Pipeline Operations, primarily an ethylene and propylene products mover, has determined that substantial savings can be realized by adopting a bioremediation maintenance and recycling approach to hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. By this method, the soil can be recycled in situ, or in containers. To implement the soil-recycling program, OxyChem elected to use a soil remediator and natural absorbent product, Oil Snapper. This field maintenance material, based on an Enhanced Urea Technology, provides a diet to stimulate the growth of hydrocarbon-eating microbes. It works well either with indigenous soil microbes or with commercial microbes. The product is carried in field vehicles, which makes it immediately available when leaks or spills are discovered. Procedure for clean-up is to apply product and mix it into affected soil. Thus the contaminant is contained, preventing further migration; the contaminant is dispersed throughout the product, making it more accessible to the microbes; nutrients are immediately available to the microbes; and the material contributes aeration and moisture-retention properties.

  4. EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, Robert P.; Morrison, Dennis J.

    1999-08-11

    Recycling of the spent rinse water discharged from the wet benches commonly used in semiconductor processing is one tactic for responding to the targets for water usage published in the 1997 National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS). Not only does the NTRS list a target that dramatically reduces total water usage/unit area of silicon manufactured by the industry in the future but for the years 2003 and beyond, the NTRS actually touts goals which would have semiconductor manufacturers drawing less water from a regional water supply per unit area of silicon manufactured than the quantity of ultrapure water (UPW) used in the production of that same silicon. Achieving this latter NTRS target strongly implies more widespread recycling of spent rinse waters at semiconductor manufacturing sites. In spite of the fact that, by most metrics, spent rinse waters are of much higher purity than incoming municipal waters, recycling of these spent rinse waters back into the UPW production plant is not a simple, straightforward task. The rub is that certain of the chemicals used in semiconductor manufacturing, and thus potentially present in trace concentrations (or more) in spent rinse waters, are not found in municipal water supplies and are not necessarily removed by the conventional UPW production sequence used by semiconductor manufacturers. Some of these contaminants, unique to spent rinse waters, may actually foul the resins and membranes of the UPW system, posing a threat to UPW production and potentially even causing a shutdown.

  5. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most impressive finding was the impact of the clay on the elongation at break; a nearly 400% increase was observed for a clay concentration of 0.5 wt.%. These coatings also demonstrate a number of other property enhancements, which make them a good candidate for continued research. Another approach explored in this research was the use of structured and self-cleaning surfaces. If the amount of coating utilized can be significantly reduced, the environmental impact is diminished.

  6. Cryogenic Pressure Vessel workshop, LLNL, February 15, 2011, p. 1 Cryogenic Pressure Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , February 15, 2011, p. 8 In both industrial and laboratory environments, low heat transfer requires : demonstration 2007-2009: compact vessels 2010: para-ortho H2 conversion 2011: LH2 pump #12;Cryogenic Pressure, February 15, 2011, p. 4 H2 Temperature H2 Pressure H2 massHeat input Drop in apparent heat flux due to para

  7. Water soluble/dispersible and easy removable cationic adhesives and coating for paper recycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Yulin; Yan, Zegui

    2005-11-29

    The present invention is an adhesive or coating composition that is dispersible or dissolvable in water, making it useful in as a coating or adhesive in paper intended for recycling. The composition of the present invention is cationically charged thereby binding with the fibers of the paper slurry and thus, resulting in reduced deposition of adhesives on equipment during the recycling process. The presence of the composition of the present invention results in stronger interfiber bonding in products produced from the recycled fibers.

  8. A Xenon Condenser with a Remote Liquid Storage Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Slutsky; Y. -R. Yen; H. Breuer; A. Dobi; C. Hall; T. Langford; D. S. Leonard; L. J. Kaufman; V. Strickland; N. Voskanian

    2009-07-25

    We describe the design and operation of a system for xenon liquefaction in which the condenser is separated from the liquid storage vessel. The condenser is cooled by a pulse tube cryocooler, while the vessel is cooled only by the liquid xenon itself. This arrangement facilitates liquid particle detector research by allowing easy access to the upper and lower flanges of the vessel. We find that an external xenon gas pump is useful for increasing the rate at which cooling power is delivered to the vessel, and we present measurements of the power and efficiency of the apparatus.

  9. Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles R&D of Large Stationary HydrogenCNGHCNG Storage Vessels...

  10. Webinar: Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar titled, Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts, originally presented on August 14, 2012.

  11. Stress analysis and evaluation of a rectangular pressure vessel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States)) 42 ENGINEERING; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; PRESSURE VESSELS; STRESS ANALYSIS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE;...

  12. Method and device for supporting blood vessels during anastomosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    A device and method for preventing first and second severed blood vessels from collapsing during attachment to each other. The device comprises a dissolvable non-toxic stent that is sufficiently rigid to prevent the blood vessels from collapsing during anastomosis. The stent can be hollow or have passages to permit blood flow before it dissolves. A single stent can be inserted with an end in each of the two blood vessels or separate stents can be inserted into each blood vessel. The stent may include a therapeutically effective amount of a drug which is slowly released into the blood stream as the stent dissolves. 12 figs.

  13. Expansion and user study of CoolVent : inclusion of thermal comfort models in an early-design natural ventilation tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Rebecca E. (Rebecca Eileen)

    2011-01-01

    CoolVent, a software design tool for architects, has been improved. The work of Maria- Alejandra Menchaca-B. and colleagues has been improved to include a more robust and intuitive building and window dimensioning scheme, ...

  14. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  15. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lead ranks second among the most hazardousof the potentially Pb most contaminating activities are leadmining, lead smelting and battery recycling. Areas near Pb

  16. 2009-08 " Establish an Effective Policy and Funding for Recycling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 " Establish an Effective Policy and Funding for Recycling of Valuable Materials from Environmental Restoration Work at DOE Sites" 2009-08 " Establish an Effective Policy and...

  17. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksAlgae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and...

  18. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01

    Official Gazette of Republic Macedonia No. 140/2010 “Law onYugoslav republic of Macedonia” Environmental PerformanceRecycling Regulation in Macedonia The Challenges of Policy

  19. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-08-31

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to significantly reduce the cost to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of treating the tank wastes by hundreds of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass. An electrochemical salt-splitting process, based on sodium-ion selective ceramic membranes, is being developed to recover and recycle sodium hydroxide from high-salt radioactive tank wastes in DOE’s complex. The ceramic membranes are from a family of materials known as sodium (Na)—super-ionic conductors (NaSICON)—and the diffusion of sodium ions (Na+) is allowed, while blocking other positively charged ions. A cost/benefit evaluation was based on a strategy that involves a separate caustic-recycle facility based on the NaSICON technology, which would be located adjacent to the WTP facility. A Monte Carlo approach was taken, and several thousand scenarios were analyzed to determine likely economic results. The cost/benefit evaluation indicates that 10,000–50,000 metric tons (MT) of sodium could be recycled, and would allow for the reduction of glass production by 60,000–300,000 MT. The cost of the facility construction and operation was scaled to the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification facility, showing cost would be roughly $150 million to $400 million for construction and $10 million to $40 million per year for operations. Depending on the level of aluminate supersaturation allowed in the storage tanks in the LAW Pretreatment Facility, these values indicate a return on investment of up to 25% to 60%.

  20. Process for refractory compound conversion in a hydrocracker recycle liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruia, A.J.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a catalytic hydrocracking process. It includes contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock having a propensity to form 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds and a liquid recycle stream in a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a metal promoted hydrocracking catalyst at elevated temperature and pressure sufficient to gain a substantial conversion to lower boiling products; partially condensing the hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone and separating the same into a hydrocarbonaceous stream comprising lower boiling hydrocarbons, unconverted hydrocarbons boiling above about 400{degrees} F (204{degrees} C) and trace quantities of 11{sup +} ring heavy polynuclear aromatic compounds, and a vaporous hydrocarbonaceous stream comprising the lower boiling hydrocarbons.

  1. Recycling and composting demonstration projects for the Memphis region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the development and implementation of the project entitled ``Recycling and Composting Demonstration Projects for the Memphis Region.`` The project was funded by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives. This Project was implemented by the staff of the Special Programs Section of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. The project began November 1, 1990, and was completed December 31, 1991. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of a variety of solid waste disposal alternatives.

  2. Recycling and composting demonstration projects for the Memphis region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the development and implementation of the project entitled Recycling and Composting Demonstration Projects for the Memphis Region.'' The project was funded by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives. This Project was implemented by the staff of the Special Programs Section of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. The project began November 1, 1990, and was completed December 31, 1991. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of a variety of solid waste disposal alternatives.

  3. Recycling Magnets from the Factory Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications The NRELRequirementsRecycling

  4. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  5. Vessel Segmentation in Angiograms using Hysteresis Thresholding Alexandru-Paul Condurache

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Vessel Segmentation in Angiograms using Hysteresis Thresholding Alexandru-Paul Condurache.e. vessel imaging after the injection of a radiopaque substance) is a widely used procedure for vessel- lature it is needed to measure the angiogram area covered by vessels and/or the vessel length

  6. Fluid-solid contact vessel having fluid distributors therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., John B. (Rifle, CO)

    1980-09-09

    Rectangularly-shaped fluid distributors for large diameter, vertical vessels include reinforcers for high heat operation, vertical sides with gas distributing orifices and overhanging, sloped roofs. Devices are provided for cleaning the orifices from a buildup of solid deposits resulting from the reactions in the vessel.

  7. Equilibrium and Stability of Rectangular Liquid-filled Vessels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahan, Russell E

    2012-07-11

    Here we focus on the stability characteristics of a rectangular liquid-filled vessel. The position vector of the center of gravity of the liquid volume is derived and used to express the equilibrium angles of the vessel. Analysis of the potential...

  8. Handling Whiting Aboard Fishing Vessels JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handling Whiting Aboard Fishing Vessels JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO Introduction The same fundamental principles for handling fresh fish in general aboard fishing vessels apply to whiting. There- fore, this article will review the factors which influence the quality of fish aboard fishing boats and will offer re

  9. 2004 Saltwater Charter Vessel Logbook State of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 Saltwater Charter Vessel Logbook State of Alaska Department of Fish & Game Division of Sport copy. 2004 Saltwater CharterVessel Logbook Sign-Out For ADF&G Use Only State of Alaska Department for 2004 or register simultaneously when picking up a logbook). Business Mailing Address: Business Phone

  10. Thrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Thrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels Aleksander Veksler,1 Tor Arne Johansen,1 Roger Skjetne2 Abstract--A thrust allocation method with capabilities are fairly straightforward. Index Terms--Thrust Allocation, Surface Vessels, Power Man- agement I

  11. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  12. Contribution of cooperative sector recycling to greenhouse gas emissions reduction: A case study of Ribeirão Pires, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Megan F.; Gutberlet, Jutta

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Cooperative recycling achieves environmental, economic and social objectives. • We calculate GHG emissions reduction for a recycling cooperative in São Paulo, Brazil. • The cooperative merits consideration as a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project. • A CDM project would enhance the achievements of the recycling cooperative. • National and local waste management policies support the recycling cooperative. - Abstract: Solid waste, including municipal waste and its management, is a major challenge for most cities and among the key contributors to climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced through recovery and recycling of resources from the municipal solid waste stream. In São Paulo, Brazil, recycling cooperatives play a crucial role in providing recycling services including collection, separation, cleaning, stocking, and sale of recyclable resources. The present research attempts to measure the greenhouse gas emission reductions achieved by the recycling cooperative Cooperpires, as well as highlight its socioeconomic benefits. Methods include participant observation, structured interviews, questionnaire application, and greenhouse gas accounting of recycling using a Clean Development Mechanism methodology. The results show that recycling cooperatives can achieve important energy savings and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and suggest there is an opportunity for Cooperpires and other similar recycling groups to participate in the carbon credit market. Based on these findings, the authors created a simple greenhouse gas accounting calculator for recyclers to estimate their emissions reductions.

  13. On a theory of vessels and the inverse scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melnikov

    2011-08-23

    In this paper we present a theory of vessels and its application to the classical inverse scattering of the Sturm-Liouville differential equation. The classical inverse scattering theory, including all its ingredients: Jost solutions, the Gelfand-Levitan equation, the tau function, corresponds to regular vessels, defined by bounded operators. A contribution of this work is the construction of models of vessels corresponding to unbounded operators, which is a first step for the inverse scattering for a wider class of potentials. A detailed research of Jost solutions and the corresponding vessel is presented for the unbounded Sturm-Liouville case. Models of vessels on curves, corresponding to unbounded operators are presented as a tool to study Linear Differential equations of finite order with a spectral parameter and as examples, we show how the family of Non Linear Schrodinger equations and Canonical Systems arise.

  14. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

  15. Packaging, Transportation and Recycling of NPP Condenser Modules - 12262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polley, G.M. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, 575 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Perma-Fix was awarded contract from Energy Northwest for the packaging, transportation and disposition of the condenser modules, water boxes and miscellaneous metal, combustibles and water generated during the 2011 condenser replacement outage at the Columbia Generating Station. The work scope was to package the water boxes and condenser modules as they were removed from the facility and transfer them to the Perma-Fix Northwest facility for processing, recycle of metals and disposition. The condenser components were oversized and overweight (the condenser modules weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lb]) which required special equipment for loading and transport. Additional debris waste was packaged in inter-modals and IP-1 boxes for transport. A waste management plan was developed to minimize the generation of virtually any waste requiring landfill disposal. The Perma-Fix Northwest facility was modified to accommodate the ?15 m [50-ft] long condenser modules and equipment was designed and manufactured to complete the disassembly, decontamination and release survey. The condenser modules are currently undergoing processing for free release to a local metal recycler. Over three millions pounds of metal will be recycled and over 95% of the waste generated during this outage will not require land disposal. There were several elements of this project that needed to be addressed during the preparation for this outage and the subsequent packaging, transportation and processing. - Staffing the project to support 24/7 generation of large components and other wastes. - The design and manufacture of the soft-sided shipping containers for the condenser modules that measured ?15 m X 4 m X 3 m [50 ft X 13 ft X 10 ft] and weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lbs] - Developing a methodology for loading the modules into the shipping containers. - Obtaining a transport vehicle for the modules. - Designing and modifying the processing facility. - Movement of the modules at the processing facility. If any of these issues were not adequately resolved prior to the start of the outage, costly delays would result and the re-start of the power plant could be impacted. The main focus of this project was to find successful methods for keeping this material out of the landfills and preserving the natural resources. In addition, this operation provided a significant cost savings to the public utility by minimizing landfill disposal. The onsite portion of the project has been completed without impact to the overall outage schedule. By the date of presentation, the majority of the waste from the condenser replacement project will have been processed and recycled. The goals for this project included helping Energy Northwest maintain the outage schedule, package and characterize waste compliantly, perform transportation activities in compliance with 49CFR (Ref-1), and minimize the waste disposal volume. During this condenser replacement project, over three millions pounds of waste was generated, packaged, characterized and transported without injury or incident. It is anticipated that 95% of the waste generated during this project will not require landfill disposal. All of the waste is scheduled to be processed, decontaminated and recycled by June of 2012. (authors)

  16. Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) Power Down Exemption Request Regulations implementing the requirements for the vessel monitoring system (VMS) within the NMFS Northeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) Power Down Exemption Request Regulations implementing the requirements for the vessel monitoring system (VMS) within the NMFS Northeast Region allow for vessels to be exempt from the requirement to transmit the vessel's location at all times if one or more

  17. Additional or Lost Gillnet Tag Order Form All NE multispecies Category A, E, and F Day gillnet vessels fishing for NE multispecies and/or vessels fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vessels fishing for NE multispecies and/or vessels fishing under a monkfish DAS using gillnet gear must tag their gillnets with BLUE gillnet tags. Vessel owners are required to account for the total number of tags issued. Should tags be lost, missing, or destroyed, vessel owners/operators must report

  18. Fundamental Study on the Effects of Irreversible Electroporation Pulses on Blood Vessels with Application to Medical Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maor, Elad

    2009-01-01

    Remodeling of Blood Vessels,” Biomechanics: MechanicalDifferences in compensatory vessel enlargement, not intimalLuminal Narrowing After Deep Vessel Wall Injury : Insights

  19. PAGE 2 October 17, 2007 MIT Tech TalkPEOPLE Printed on recycled paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

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    Dual Phase, Co-Continuous Morphology from Mixtures of Recycled Polystyrene/Curbside Tailings Recycling Research K.E. Van Ness, Ph.D. Washington and Lee University Department of Physics and Engineering L.W. Suttner Rheometrics, Inc. Paper No.292 Introduction Virtually all studies of polymer mixtures